Island Grandparent

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island

GRAND parent Summer/Fall 2019

Treats to Eat!

Things to

Do and See with Your

Grandkids


Everything you need for back to school!

Making Meaningful Memories

CLOTHING • SHOES • STROLLERS • CAR SEATS • TOYS • BOOKS SLEEP AIDS • FURNITURE • SKINCARE • DIAPER BAGS

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Ballet, Lyrical, Tap. Musical Theatre, Acrobatics & Hip Hop, in a non-competitive atmosphere.

• Not sure which class to take? Try a Drop-In: No hassle, No Obligation.

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Call 250-384-3267 Email us at: stagesdance@shaw.ca Or visit our website: www.stagesdance.com


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3873 Swan Lake Road, Victoria, B.C. Canada, V8X 3W1 | www.swanlake.bc.ca | 250-479-0211

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Summer/Fall 2019  3


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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Digital Grandparenting

The value of video chatting. SUE FAST

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7 Things to Do with Your Grandkids

Summer fun and a fall fair.

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14

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Hopscotch in the Dark

Wet Feet Wet Hands

Keeping Cool in Regional Parks

JACQUI GRAHAM

TINA KELLY

RACHAEL TANCOCK

An antidote to boredom.

Intertidal exploration.

Outdoor fun with your grandkids.

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24

Can Praise Be Detrimental

Summer at Swan Lake

KELLY CLEEVE

RENEE CENERINI

The power of words.

A sanctuary in the city.

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My, What Big Expectations You Have Grandma! The little things matter. ELIZABETH OLSON

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Summer Treats

Helping your grandchildren develop a healthy relationship with food. STÉPHANE LAHAYE

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Adventures in Learning Together

Unicorns, Fairies & Mermaids, Oh My!

Make the library part of your family story.

Fantastical summer reads. CHRISTINA VAN STARKENBURG

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Kids Kits to Go

Let’s Rock…Hunt

Special book kits for kids and family.

The Sooke to Sidney Rock Hunt. SERENA BECK

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Sometimes the Sky is Green The importance of grandparents as allies. TIM COLLINS

On the Cover Noah (21⁄2), Logan (5), Cara Stephens & Ken Stephens Photo by Lorraine Stephens

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Family Matters

Grandparents in Canada: the stats.

Jim Schneider  Publisher  publisher@islandparent.ca Sue Fast  Editor  editor@islandparent.ca Linda Frear  Account Manager/Office Manager  linda@islandparent.ca Kristine Wickheim  Account Manager  kristine@islandparent.ca

island

GRAND parent Summer/Fall 2019

Treats to Eat!

Things to

Do and See with Your

Grandkids

4  Island Grandparent

Island Grandparent, published by Island Parent Group Enterprises Ltd., is a bi-annual publication that honours and supports grandparents by providing information on resources and businesses for families, and a forum for the exchange of ideas and opinions. Views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher. No material herein may be reproduced without the permission of the Editor. Island Grandparent is distributed free in selected areas. ISSN 0838-5505.

Island Parent Magazine 830–A Pembroke St Victoria, BC V8T 1H9 250-388-6905 islandparent.ca

IslandParent.ca


Digital Grandparenting

S

kype. FaceTime. Facebook Messenger. Zoom. When it comes to video chatting, most grandparents, I would argue, fall into two camps: those who love it and those who don’t. Those who love it, I’d bet, are the ones who use it to help bridge the distance between themselves and far-flung family. Those who don’t are likely the ones who live close to their grandchildren and who can maintain a close relationship the oldfashioned way, face-to-face. If you are like 38 per cent of grandparents surveyed for a new study by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), you use video chat to communicate and stay in touch with your grandkids. “Forty-five per cent of us sometimes or often stay in touch by text,” writes Paula Span in The New York Times. “A third use email and 27 per cent use Facebook. We are becoming digital grandparents.” And that’s a good thing, she maintains. Video chatting serves a purpose, according to Dr. Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Hospital. “I’m bullish on video chatting,” Christakis said in The New York Times. “It can enhance bonding and recognition.”

Unlike watching TV and using other screens, Christakis says video chatting “is inherently interactive and doesn’t involve the same sped-up pace, overstimulation or passivity as, say, watching cartoons.” And unlike a phone call, it enriches conversation when our grandchildren are able to see our facial expressions—and us, theirs. “Facial expressions are incredibly important,” he adds. “It’s why we use emojis.” It goes without saying that video chatting is no substitution for seeing our grandchildren face-to-face, and being able to reach out and give them a hug or a kiss. But it’ll do in a pinch. And a squeeze. No matter how you stay connected, we hope this issue of Island Grandparent helps you enjoy your time with your grandchildren. You’ll find articles on everything from the importance of being your grandchild’s ally, whether or not praise can be detrimental, and beach exploration, to a grandparent’s expectations, summer treats, and 7 things to do on the Island with the grandkids. Just like the time you spend with your grandchildren, we hope you enjoy every minute—and every page—of Island Grandparent.

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Summer/Fall 2019  5


7

Things to Do With Your Grandkids

Kids’ Guide

For more ideas and a fun map of the Island, pick up a copy of the Kids Guide to Vancouver Island at Tourist Info Centres or at your local recreation centre.

Spit Sidney spo t to see t for a summer day trip if you wan

…is a beautiful shes, rolling meadows, forsandy beaches, tidal flats, salt mar a picnic, your sunscreen, est paths and various wildlife. Pack the foot-passenger ferry bathing suits and towels, and take Ave) to Sidney Island. con Bea from Sidney (at the bottom of egroup.ca. alpin visit s, rate For a ferry schedule and

Shaw Centre for the Salish Sea

…is a state-of-the-art aquarium and marine learning centre in Sidney that focuses on the ecosyst em of the Salish Sea. Visit the touch pools and learn about esse ntial life forms such as algae, plankton and amazing jellies. Take part in guided tours, scavenger hunts, Tot Tuesdays, and Sea Shirt Sundays, along with other kids’ activities. salishseacentre.org.

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Attraction s Activities Family Fun

VE R ISL AN D

Butchart Gardens

…awes visitors every Sa turday evening (until Au gust 31) with a spectacular fireworks display that’ll knock yo ur socks, er, sandals off. Then the re are gardens galore along with a Children’s Pavillion and Rose Carousel. There’s a Living Fossils Walk, a Family Walk, a boat tour and Night Illu minations. You’ll also find 55 acres worth of garden paths , perfect for exploring and expendin g some of your grandkid s’ endless energy. butchartgarde ns.com.

Chemainus Theatre

…presents its 2019 Kidzplay, The Magician’s Nephew, for the young and young-at-heart. This prequel to The Chronicles of Narnia series, the literary classic by C.S. Lewis, is set in Victorian London, 100 years before The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Running Tues–Sun until August 11. chemainustheatrefestival.ca.

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Saanich Fair

…is the place to “Bee” Happy on August 31, Sept 1 and 2. Drop by the Saanich Fairgrounds, where fun, food and fantastic meet. There’s a variety of things to see and do including 5,000 exhibits, dog and horse shows, concessions, carnival games, live entertainment and a midway. The Fair features numerous free attractions (with entrance). Admission is $13 for adults, $8 for seniors and youth, kids 6 and under are free. saanichfair.ca.

Parksville ival Beach Fesst master sand sculp-

…draws world clas of art. tors who create incredible works days to four r ove rs hou 30 have Sculptors sand just create their masterpieces from ths “My e them and water based on the and & Legends.” This year’s competition until daily m –9p 9am from runs n exhibitio a. August 16. parksvillebeachfest.c

IslandParent.ca

North Island Wildlife Recovery & Discovery Centre …invites you to take a walk on the wild side. See owls, bears, eagles, hawks, falcons, turkey vultures, ravens, a wildlife garden and mor e. Stroll the 8-acre park-like setting and see Vancouver Island wildlife in pea ceful and rustic surroundings. Open daily for public viewing from 9am–4:30pm . niwra.org.

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p o H scotch

in the Dark An antidote to boredom

I

recently read an article presenting the theory that grandparents who are raising grandchildren tend to live longer. I would dispute this. In the two and a half years since my husband and I moved to the Comox Valley to be near our grandkids, we have aged noticeably. While we are not responsible for the day-to-day care of these delightful descendants we are frequently summoned for duty—for instance, when our daughter texts at 2:25 p.m. to inform us that she is unavoidably detained and could we please pick the kids up from school at 3:00 p.m., feed them a snack, and amuse them until she can collect them at 4:30 p.m.? The responsible and dedicated grandparents immediately abandon their plans for the afternoon—napping, say, or scrubbing out the recycling bin, or picking aphids off the rose bushes—to rush to the school and collect the little darlings. This is not as easy as it sounds. The first challenge is to survive the drive home. The two youngsters in the backseat are fighting over whose turn it is to play games on Grandma’s laptop. The young teen in the front seat is complaining loudly about the “old person” music on the radio, as she changes it to her favourite pop station. The backseat argument is settled by Grandma’s decree that today is a “no screens day” and NEITHER of them gets to use her laptop. The kid riding shotgun is informed that she has 30 seconds to return the radio to Grandma’s classic rock station. Furthermore, everybody better pipe down or they can all get out and walk! This subdues them briefly. The seven-year-old recovers first, and regales Grandma with a blow-by-blow description of her school day. Her memory is prodigious. In the five-minute drive home I learn more than I ever wanted to know about the habits and social interactions of second graders. Meanwhile, the other two quietly squabble about who gets to play with the cat. Snack time is complicated by the fact that the oldest is on a grain-free and dairyfree diet, the youngest will only eat rice crackers and goat cheese, and we have run out of Honey Nut Chex for the middle kid. Once they have been fed and watered, however, peace reigns. The two oldest hun-

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ker down with the cat and our collection of Calvin and Hobbes cartoon anthologies. I sigh and head for the coffee pot. Then the youngest says those three little words all grandparents dread: “Grandma, I’m bored.” I offer suggestions: we could draw pictures, or do a jigsaw puzzle, or read another chapter of Winnie the Pooh, or pick aphids off the rose bushes…? She sighs. None of those things are INTERESTING. Then her face lights up. “I know, Grandma! Let’s play Hopscotch in the Dark.” ??? I fear the worst. “Hopscotch In the Dark,” I remark calmly. “I’m not familiar with that game.” “That’s because I just made it up,” she says. In case you ever want to play Hopscotch in the Dark, here is how it goes. First, you need: • One child (hereafter referred to as Player One) • One Grandma (hereafter referred to as Player Two) • Nine hula hoops from Grandma’s Magic Closet (a story for another day!) • One flashlight • Three small projectiles: buttons, bottle caps, or (ideally) the beanbags Grandpa uses for juggling • A large family room

Game play:

1. Arrange hula hoops on the floor in a random pattern. 2. Turn out the light. 3. Turn on the light. The flashlight doesn’t work, and it’s scary in the dark. 4. Find batteries for the flashlight. 5. Turn out the light. 6. Turn on the light. There are strange noises in the room. 7. Eject cat from room. 8. Turn out the light. 9. Player One shines the flashlight on the hoops, while Player Two tosses the three objects into the hoops of her choice. 10. Player Two now hops from hoop to hoop on one foot, collecting the objects, while Player One helpfully shines the flashlight into her eyes. 11. Players switch roles. 12. When this gets boring, move on to a variation called “Follow The Light,” in which the hopper navigates a series of long jumps, sudden turns, and switchbacks devised by the fiendish flashlight wielder. 13. Continue playing until someone gets bored, or someone passes out, or Mommy arrives. 14. Say goodbye to Player One and her siblings. 15. Lie down. I would like to propose a new theory. Grandparents raising their grandchildren don’t live longer. It just seems longer.

The Chronicles of Narnia

by C.S. Lewis adapted by Melissa Young

JUL 13 - AUG 11

1.800.565.7738 chemainustheatre.ca

From alpacas to miniature goats, tropical birds and miniature pigs, we have all kinds of fuzzy, furry, feathered creatures, including a goat petting area and the famous goat stampedes. The farm is open seasonally. Please call us for dates and hours. Don’t forget your camera! Circle Drive, Beacon Hill Park  250-381-2532 beaconhillchildrensfarm.ca bhcfvictoria@gmail.com

Jacqui Graham has six grown kids and eight delightful grandkids age 6 months to 11 years. If she had known how much fun grandkids would be, she would have had them first! IslandParent.ca

Summer/Fall 2019  9


Adventures in Learning Together Make the library part of your family story

The Greater Victoria Public Library has put together activities you can undertake with your grandchild to develop your special bond and help set up the little one in your life for early-learning success. Choose from interactive activities and prompts for interesting conversations, inspired by favourite storybook characters, library resources and a thirst for knowledge. Take time to enjoy the magic of learning together.

Around Town and on the Road

Make Connections

Explore new neighbourhoods and visit Little Free Library boxes dotted around town (littlefreelibrary.org and victoriaplacemaking.ca/little-free-libraries). Count the books inside and talk about what you see including the design of the box and the reading material.

Set up one of GVPL’s StoryWalk® kits in the backyard. Pages from a picture book are placed around the yard in a circuit. Kids and adults go from page to page in sequence, reading the book and discussing characters, illustrations, themes and vocabulary.

Pop into a library branch to pick up some great books, then head to a local park. Find a bench in a beautiful spot and read together in the great outdoors.

Share books you remember from your childhood. Tell your grandchild why you loved each book, what you remember about it and why you wanted to share it with them.

Attend a Baby Time, Storytime or other free program at your public library. Learn songs to sing, rhymes to perform and stories to enact together.

Get Creative Borrow a cookbook from the library, and let your grandchild select one of the desserts. Make the delicacy together; sit; enjoy; and repeat! Put on your bookface! Find a book with a face on the cover, take turns holding it in front of your faces, and take silly photos.

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Create a new set of illustrations for a beloved picture book.

Go Digital Borrow a movie or TV show using Hoopla, a streaming service for library users. Get settled with snacks, and enjoy the show. Explore Tumblebooks or Biblioenfants: watch picture books come to life with animation, sound effects and narration.

Make Believe Dress up as characters from your grandchild’s favourite story, then read the book together in costume. Have a conversation about which book characters your grandchild would like to spend the day with. What would they do? Where would they go? What would the characters say?

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Kids Kits to Go GVPL staff put together special kits of books so kids and families can explore a topic in depth. • Books to Go • Readers to Go • Stories to Go • Family Picks to Go

Home Sweet Home PROFESSIONAL SOCCER LIVES HERE

Books to Go

Is there a Lego lover in your family? How about a fairy fanatic? An adventurous astronaut? The Kids Books to Go Bags contain 10 books on one topic to immerse your child in an engaging learning experience. From dragons and dinosaurs to princesses and pirates, the mix of non-fiction and fiction titles will appeal to kids ages five to 10 years old.

Readers to Go

Readers to Go provide kids learning to read in English or French with a variety of books suited to their reading development. Each bag contains an assortment of short books with controlled vocabulary and related illustrations, plus information on how you can support children learning to read.

Stories to Go

It’s storytime in a box. GVPL’s Stories to Go boxes are a resource for families, caregivers and early childhood educators to use with young children. These theme boxes have been designed to meet a variety of interests while helping to develop early literacy skills. Kits include books, music CDs, a rhyme booklet and puppets.

Family Picks to Go

With a Family Picks to Go kit, you can dig deeper into a topic with your grandchild. Choose a light-hearted kit like camping, coding or gardening; or one for more serious times, such as coping with the death of a family member or learning about truth and reconciliation. Or, choose something in between like getting ready for kindergarten or learning about puberty. These kits are based on requests from library patrons about what they’d like to see. Each kit contains seven books, making it easy for a parent or caregiver to thoroughly explore a topic with their grandchildren. For Greater Victoria Public Library’s complete list of 100 exceptional picture books for babies, toddlers and preschoolers, visit gvpl.ca/100books.

IslandParent.ca

Join us and experience the new Family Zone at Westhills Stadium Aug 24 - Saturday 3:00 pm vs. Valour FC

Sep 14 - Saturday 12:00 pm vs. FC Edmonton

Sep 4 - Wednesday 7:00 pm vs. Forge FC

Oct 2 - Wednesday 7:00 pm vs. HFX Wanderers

Sep 11 - Wednesday 7:00 pm vs. York9 FC

Oct 19 - Saturday 3:30 pm vs. Valour FC

*grand opening

Get tickets at PacificFC.ca #ForTheIsle

Summer/Fall 2019  11


Send Us Your Stories! Island Grandparent is looking for articles for upcoming issues. Some of our best content comes from people just like you—Vancouver Island grandparents who are passionate about their families and are dealing with the day-to-day issues of raising grandchildren in our community. Share your experiences, your thoughts on a particular issue, your ideas on places to see or projects to do— anything related to grandparenting.

Sometimes the Sky is Green

I

’ve never really thought about my role as a grandfather. It’s been a sort of organic growth in approach and attitude without a whole lot of planning. So, the other day when my now precocious granddaughter came upstairs and asked if she could sing a song for me, I didn’t give it much thought. I could hear my daughter calling up the stairs telling Randi that Grampa had better things to do and to stop being a pest. Pest? I wondered how anyone could consider the request to be an imposition and, turning away from my computer, I told her to go ahead. She belted out a song with the enthusiasm of Ethel Merman and the confidence of Beyoncé. When she finished she looked at me with a smile and I applauded. Oh sure, there had been a few pitchy moments in the performance, but she was happy, gave me a hug, and left. It left me thinking about what had just happened.

Check our Writer’s Guidelines at islandparent.ca for specific information on submissions. We’d love to hear from you.

Please email submissions to editor@islandparent.ca

Randi knew that the performance hadn’t been perfect, but she also knew that there was no way on earth that I was going to be critical of her efforts. Now, make no mistake, I don’t hesitate to call my granddaughter on negative behaviours. If she sulks at her mother or rolls her eyes at the suggestion that she needs to take her school work more seriously, I will let her know, in no uncertain terms, that it’s time to shape up. I make sure she cleans up after herself and I’d have no patience for mean or unkind acts on her part, although those are few and far between. And I don’t think she should get trophies for just showing up or that she should always win. Life’s not like that and I let her know that, too. But when it comes to that other stuff, the sort of things where you’d expect your friend to be in your corner, I’m going to be there for her. Always. My approach has sometimes left my daughter frustrated and critical. “If Randi said the sky was green, you’d agree with her,” she observed one day. Randi was listening to this exchange and laughed. 12  Island Grandparent


“You probably would Grampa. You’re on my side!” Maybe I’d agree that there was probably some green in the sky at times, I countered, and that it really is a matter of perception. I noted that I’d seen the sky all kinds of colours and that those colours always shifted. Sometimes it’s nice to have someone who’ll appreciate your imagination and not be judgmental of what you think, I added. None of that is a criticism of my daughter’s parenting. I know that she does the heavy lifting of raising Randi and has to deal with everything from the vagaries of wardrobe and peer pressure of what the little twerp thinks she should be wearing, to registering her for extra-curricular activities and helping her with schoolwork.

2 01 9

Jul 12 - A Parksvilug 18 le BC This year’s theme

Competition Jul 12―14 (doors open to public Jul 12 @ 2 pm) Exhibition Jul 15―Aug 18 Tim Hortons Summer Concert Series Jul 19―Aug 17 Fri & Sat 6:30―8:30 pm Art in the Park Jul 27 & 28 Coast Capital Savings Sculpture Light Up! Aug 16 & 17 Quality Foods Festival of Lights Aug 17 KidFest Aug 18

My role is far easier. I’m the one person that Randi will always be able to count on to listen to her songs and applaud. Sometimes, I’ll sing along. I’m the person with whom she can share stories without fear that I’ll be critical of what I’ve heard and who, sometimes, will share stories in return. And I’m the guy who’ll agree that, sometimes, the sky is a little green. Tim Collins is a writer and freelance journalist living and working in Victoria. Summer/Fall 2019  13


Wet Feet, Wet Hands Intertidal exploring

L

ettuce, cucumber, lemons, peaches, pork, fried egg, and bread—this may resemble a picnic ingredients shopping list, but they are in fact local marine species. The Salish Sea is rich with biodiversity and sea lettuce, sea cucumber, sea lemon, sea peach, sea pork, fried-egg jelly, and bread crumb sponge are all out there waiting to be spotted. As residents of this island paradise we are spoiled for choice of locations to explore. Along with some pre-planning—proper

clothing, sunscreen, tide checks, and picking a location, there are things to consider upon arrival at the beach. A colleague in marine education asks students if they’d head over to a friend’s house and proceed to overturn cushions, knock over lamps, tear up stuffed animals, and throw food wrappers on the floor; their answer is always no. The point of course is to make a parallel with visiting a beach countless animals call home. These tips will help you explore while minimizing your impact on the intertidal environment. Be prepared. Along with the pre-planning tips noted above, one essential piece of preparedness is footwear. Sand can suck off flip flops, exposed toes will lose in a battle against barnacles, and rocks are often more slippery than they appear. Take a book, a guide book. Even experts come across surprises and species they’re not familiar with; a good field guide will help you identify animals and algae on the spot. Stay low. How far down are you willing to jump or fall? Dropping an animal from your standing position is a monumental distance for most creatures. A quick scuttling shore crab held in non-confident hands can result a long and dangerous drop for the animal. Stay squatting near the ground.

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Stay where you are. Staying where you are with feet firmly planted in place reduces the risk you’ll slip and fall but also prevents an animal from tumbling out of your hands. It also avoids the question, “where did I find it?”, when it’s time to put the animal back. Find something cool? Call others over to you instead of moving the animal. Hands clean and wet. Rinse the palms of your hands clean of sunscreen and keep them wet for touching or holding animals. Intertidal creatures without shells or other hard protective coverings need to remain wet. Some fish have a protective coating that can be damaged by holding them with dry hands. Return it. Animals living under a rock are adapted differently than animals adhering to the top of that same rock; it’s important to pay notice to where the animal was found and place it back in the habitat you found it in. When turning rocks over, choose rocks small and light enough you can roll it gently towards you and after a good look, carefully roll it back into its original position while watching out for the creatures and your fingers. Be gentle. To withstand wave action and protect themselves from predators, many rocky shore animals adhere tightly to the shoreline. If an organism is attached after a gentle touch, leave them be and simply observe. When holding an animal, the 10 second rule is best; count one thousand one, one thousand two, and so on until reaching 10 which is your cue to return it. Patience. Camouflage is one of the best ways to survive in nature so at first glance you may see little to nothing at all; re-

main still and let your eyes adjust to the location. Your incoming movement and shadow may have sent species scurrying but as you stay still, a tidepool can start to come alive. Look up and out. Fascinating beach finds aren’t only at your feet. Survey the landscape by looking up and out; there is the chance to see seals, sea lions, whales, birds and more. Pack it in, pack it out. Remember to take all of your belongings with you when you leave, including garbage and recycling. Take 3 for the sea. You’ve learned a few things, snapped some pictures, returned everything as you found it, and left no trace, but before you turn on your heals and head home, take three for the sea. Take three for the sea is a new spin on the old adage, “leave a place better than you found it.” If we all picked up three pieces of trash from the sidewalk, park, beach, or anywhere, we’d make a huge difference on the health of our environment. Write a shopping list, make a picnic and head to the beach to explore. Perhaps you’ll find a sea lemon while sipping lemon water or spot a sea cucumber after munching a cucumber sandwich. Tina Kelly is the Director of Learning at the Shaw Centre for the Salish Sea. IslandParent.ca

Summer/Fall 2019  15


Can Praise Be Detrimental?

H

ow can praise possibly be a bad thing? I asked myself this question as I began my research into the nature of praise. As a teacher and a mother, I am constantly aware of the power of my words and their impact upon young minds and self-esteem. I do believe that praise needs to be earned (kids can tell when it is unwarranted). And I am quick to provide positive feedback when a child puts forth great effort or has a creative idea. However, what I am learning is that the praise we offer our children can affect how they feel about their ability to learn. In my classroom, I would often offer praise such as, “What a beautiful drawing!” or “You did a fantastic job on your writing assignment!” With my own children, I may have said, “What a great goal that you scored!” or “You are so smart!” The most common phrase in both my classroom and in my home was, “I am proud of you.” This all sounds wonderfully encouraging, doesn’t it? However, I was making a mistake. Perhaps it is a mistake that many of you are unwittingly making too. The praise that I offered was based on a final product, on a mastered talent or skill. It reinforced the idea that chil-

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dren are “good” at something, and when you are good at one thing, inevitably, you must be “bad” at something else. When adults praise this way, it gives the impression that talents are fixed. If a child struggles with something or experiences a failure, the implication is that they must be bad at it. For example, if a child receives a poor score on an assignment at school, they may not attribute this failure to lack of effort or preparation, but may believe it is because they are “bad” at that subject. This leaves no room for motivation to improve or try again. What I have learned is that we should be praising effort and progress. We can praise a child’s critical thinking or problem solving strategies. Imagine the impact of your words if you praised a child’s persistence and determination in a moment of struggle. “I admire how you keep trying different strategies to solve that issue.” “I notice that you never give up!” If we praised acts of kindness and empathy, how would this affect the behaviour of our children? Perhaps we should shift our focus to highlighting our children’s character, rather than their accomplishments. I no longer offer the statement, “I am proud of you.” to my students or my children. This implies that children should strive to make me proud. It is a source of external motivation, when what we are truly seeking is for our grandchildren to be intrinsically motivated to learn and improve. Now, I offer the thought, “You should be proud of yourself.” What a powerful shift. Children know that they have the ability to work hard and to succeed. They are not in comparison to other children, only to their own progress and growth. They should not strive to earn the approval of the adults around them, but to be the best version of themselves. So, keep praising your grandchildren, but perhaps take a moment to be mindful of what it is you are choosing to reward. Accomplishments may come and go, but the character of who our grandchildren are becoming and their values for effort and determination will carry them far in life. Kelly Cleeve is a passionate educator with 14 years experience. She is a graduate student at the University of British Columbia, a wife and a mother of two beautiful boys. IslandParent.ca

Island Catholic Schools

Committed to educating the “whole” child in a Christcentered community of learning. Island Catholic Schools: with schools located in Victoria, Duncan and Port Alberni. For more information call 250-727-6893 or visit www.cisdv.bc.ca

Pick up your copy of the Island Parent

Kids’ Guide Attractions, Kids’ Guide Activities & Family Fun on Vancouver Island

Attractions Activities Family Fun VA NC OU VE R ISL AN D

Summer/Fall 2019  17


My, What Big Expectations You Have, Grandma!

A

nother grandchild birthday approaching. I deliberate, flip-flop, buy the gift, experience buyer’s remorse, wrap tenderly, write the card (sealed with a lick ’cause a kiss won’t stick!), close eyes while paying the exorbitant parcel postage, pocket the tracking information for future reference and wait with baited breath for an acknowledgement. Silence. “Say ta,” I can still hear my own grandmother admonishing over six decades ago. In my day, we were sat down, given a blue Air Letter aerogramme, a pen, and expected to come up with a thank you letter for Grandma. (Or rather a “merci beaucoup” letter since I spent my childhood in France!) No wait, I’m missing a step or two. First we were given a piece of lined paper and a pencil and pink eraser to practise, using cursory writing. Sometimes it could take me hours and many attempts to get the wording right and a standard of neatness with which both of my parents would be satisfied. Sometimes meals would be missed and harsh words would fly across the kitchen table. Once or twice, I even recall a friendly rap on the knuckles with the 6-inch wooden ruler. Which is probably the reason I am

18  Island Grandparent

able to write a better-than-average letter and email to this day. No word from them just yet. I count the business days on the calendar. I check for messages on my iPhone. Soon I give up waiting and begin pontificating. Why is acknowledging with grace seemingly such a lost art these days? Do parents even teach the importance of saying or writing a simple: “thank you”? Why is saying thank you a stretch when it should be a strength? After all, “thanks” doesn’t need to be embellished with adjectives or superlatives when falling on grateful grandmother ears or eyes. I remember my dad buying my first grandson an ice cream cone on the waterfront in Nanaimo. My grandson is 19 now and I recall the scene like it was yesterday. “He didn’t thank me!” my dad reprimanded me incredulously. “Sorry Greatgrandpa!,” my grandson said, having overheard. “I was enjoying the blackberry flavour so much that I forgot!” I remember not having the words to express my own appreciation when the gift was handmade with hundred of hours of love. Like when my own mother made me a Raggedy Andy or when both my parents constructed a puppet theatre with handsewn curtains and paper mache Punch and Judy puppets. To bring clarity to this quibble of mine, I determined to

IslandParent.ca


research the threshold for having the grandchildren utter a simple thanks. It could even be under their breath. Maybe I could even imagine it. I certainly wasn’t holding my breath for anything stamped and in writing to pop through the mail slot.

is saying thank “youWhy a stretch when it should be a strength? After all, “thanks” doesn’t need to be embellished with adjectives or superlatives when falling on grateful grandmother ears or eyes.

If I got my grandsons a 3D printer would it impress them sufficiently to hear those two words? They have every electronic device imaginable. They already fly drones around the neighbourhood. I can’t afford to send them on a space trip. You know what I’ve realized? I’m through fussing about any of this! It doesn’t matter. Just as they don’t owe it to me to care what I did for a living, where their great-great-great grandparents lived or even where I went for my last cruise, it is not their job to thank me for knitting them a cardigan with sleeves way too long or getting them a hardcover they read last year. But hold on, I spot a lovely thick envelope in today’s mail. Why, it’s chock full of darling handwritten printing, crayoned drawings and inked letters from the entire family. They’ve all chimed in! A veritable feast of delicious recognition of gifts received. What on earth was I thinking. They love me! We have the best of relationships! My world is still spinning on its axis! It’s a bluebird day! I shall brew a latté and have a healthy biscuit and settle in for a delicious read. After which I’ll give them a telephone call to thank them. Ta for reading!

OUR HOSPITALS ARE VITAL. OUR CAREGIVERS ARE VITAL. OUR FAMILIES ARE VITAL. OUR DONORS ARE VITAL. THIS EQUIPMENT IS VITAL.

Our Vancouver Island kids are vital.

Thanks to specialized caregivers and technology, 98% of pediatric cases on Vancouver Island can be treated at Victoria General Hospital. Right now, its NICU and PICU are in critical need of new monitors for life-saving care.

Let’s join together so that our children can continue to receive exceptional critical care here on the Island.

WWW.VICTORIAHF.CA/VITALKIDS

Elizabeth Olson recently retired from Galiano Island Books and spends a lot of time these days in bookstores in Sidney. Her own grandfather was a pirate who spent his retirement searching for Inca gold on Cocos Island. IslandParent.ca

Summer/Fall 2019  19


Summer Treats

The secret ingredient of grandparent superpower Healthy Families, Happy Families

Child, Youth & Family Public Health South Island Health Units Esquimalt Gulf Islands

250-519-5311 250-539-3099

(toll-free number for office in Saanichton)

A

little story I’ll always remember the first time I tried dark chocolate. Until that day, I always thought that the only chocolate worth eating was milk chocolate and that dark chocolate was only a pale imitation that grown-ups were force-fed for health reasons. This all changed during a summer vacation at my grandmother’s house in my native French Alps. On a sunny afternoon my grandmother, forgetting that kids don’t usually like dark chocolate, handed me my first-ever piece of dark chocolate. I would normally have rejected the offer without thinking twice

preconceptions and limitations around food. My grandmother succeeded where my parents often struggled; grandparents have a superpower that parents don’t always have. How about using that superpower to teach your grandchildren lifelong skills and help them develop a healthy relationship with food! And when it comes to a healthy relationship with food, small actions can go a long way. For instance, the simple act of eating together around a table, removing distraction like TV, slowing down when eating and offering small portions could have tremendous and long-lasting health

about it, but since I could so vividly feel the love and joy my grandmother had by sharing this treat with me, I had no other choice than giving it a try. To my biggest surprise, it was delightful, the intensity of the earthy, woodsy, and nutty notes took me by surprise, why did I ever eat milk chocolate before? This was over 30 years ago and I have almost never touched milk chocolate since. Thanks to my grandmother’s love, which I could so clearly feel that day, I learned to go beyond some of my

promoting impacts on your grandkids. They will cherish and aim to replicate those memories once adults. The new Canada’s Food Guide reinforces those timeless values by encouraging us “to cook more often, enjoy food, be mindful of eating habits, and eat meals with others.” A healthy relationship with food starts now.

Peninsula 250-544-2400 Saanich 250-519-5100 Saltspring Island 250-538-4880 Sooke 250-519-3487 Victoria 250-388-2200 West Shore 250-519-3490

Central Island Health Units Duncan Ladysmith Lake Cowichan Nanaimo Nanaimo Princess Royal Parksville/ Qualicum

250-709-3050 250-755-3342 250-749-6878 250-755-3342 250-739-5845

Port Alberni Tofino

250-731-1315 250-725-4020

250-947-8242

North Island Health Units Campbell River 250-850-2110 Courtenay 250-331-8520 Kyuquot Health Ctr 250-332-5289 ‘Namgis Health Ctr 250-974-5522 Port Hardy 250-902-6071

islandhealth.ca/our-locations/ health-unit-locations 20  Island Grandparent

Food bonds us

We forget that our best food memories are often related to a feeling, such as IslandParent.ca


ing recipe is taken from kristenyarker.com, a local dietitian’s website. This recipe is nut-free, dairy-free, vegan, gluten-free, no-sugar-added and protein-packed with lentils and pumpkin seeds. Ingredients: 1⁄2 cup cooked green lentils (or lentils from a can) 1⁄2 cup of puréed pumpkin seeds 1⁄3 cup of dry oats 1⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon 1⁄2 tsp vanilla extract 4 dates 1⁄4 cup of chocolate chips (optional) 1⁄4 cup of coconut flakes, unsweetened (to roll in)

a sense of peace, safety or love, more than a taste per se. This may be part of what makes our memories so magical. This idea that spoiling grandkids has more to do with undivided attention rather than a given food is very elegantly described by the ageless Proust’s madeleine, a sponge cake made of flour, butter, sugar, and eggs. Marcel Proust was a French writer who became one of the most influential authors of the 20th century. In his novel In Search of Lost Time, Proust shared this iconic memory that has since become known in psychology as a Proustian Memory. As an adult Proust described how biting into a madeleine, a simple sponge cake, could bring him back, decades earlier, to his auntie’s kitchen and how all of the sweet memories flood back in. What this story tells us is that beyond a sweet treat to spoil our beloved grandkids, we can also offer our undivided attention. Great ways to achieve such a goal is to listen louder, focus on the sharing rather than giving by baking together, for instance. Food is a fantastic tool to create sweet memories with grandparents, which is why we want to bond around food, not with food. This will help your grandkids develop a healthy relationship with food. Just like a simple reusable food container may become a grandchild’s favorite toy over some very fancy, expensive store-bought substitutes, a simple homemade dish can become a time-traveling machine that can connect grandchildren to their beloved grandparents. Who knew?! This simple act of sharing (making) instead of giving (buying) can have such a positive and long-lasting effect on your grandchildren. Cooking and baking together will not only give you an unprecedented opportunity to bond with your grandchildren, but as a bonus, you will also teach your grandchildren lifelong, transferable skills. In a food environment where take-out and convenience foods have made their way to the dinner table, learning some basic cooking skills could be one of the best long-lasting gifts a child can receive from their grandparents.

Lentil Coconut Energy Bites

The best way to avoid giving treats with a lot of added sugar and additives, and a great way to create memories with your grandkids, is to make the treat yourself. The followIslandParent.ca

Instructions: Cook the lentils in a pot with water for 25–30 minutes on medium heat. In the meantime, puree ½ cup of pumpkin seeds in a food processor until smooth. Add in fresh dates and continue to purée. Once you reach a paste-like consistency, add in dry oats, cinnamon, vanilla extract and cooked lentils. Transfer into a bowl and add chocolate chips. Roll into small balls (should make about 9–10). On some parchment paper, sprinkle 1⁄4 cup coconut flakes and roll in the lentil coconut bites. Enjoy!

Take home message:

The best way to spoil your grandchildren, beyond the comforting, holiday or celebration food, is offering them your undivided attention. This is the secret ingredient that turns a regular treat into a magical homemade dish worthy of a lifelong sweet memory. So how about making treats that are a celebration of health and create bonding with your grandchildren around food, instead of with food. Stéphane Lahaye is a Dietetic Intern with Island Health. Born and raised in France’s countryside, he enjoys sharing his passion for whole and local food. Summer/Fall 2019  21


Keeping Cool in Regional Parks

L

ooking for some outdoor fun with your grandchildren? With warm weather and longer daylight, summer is an excellent time to get outside with the family and enjoy nature. Spending time with your grandchildren in natural areas enhances the whole family’s connection to nature and improves physical and mental health while creating lifelong memories. From beaches to forests, and swimming to hiking, there are many wonderful places to stay cool on sunny and warm days in the Capital Region. Plan a day with the grandkids in these spectacular regional parks!

tide—to peek under the rocks. Look for marine critters, including shore crabs, hermit crabs, chitons, snails, fish and many more. Hop in the ocean for a dip to cool off, but watch out for rocks. Or you can explore the circle route trail. Head north down the user-friendly beach trail and return by way of the inland trail through the old salt marsh and backdunes, and end at the picnic area for a snack.

Francis/King Regional Park

Dense forest shade can also keep you cool on a hot day. Francis/King Regional

Island View Beach Regional Park Park offers various trail options through Nothing keeps you cool like the ocean does. Island View Beach Regional Park offers visitors a beautiful, sandy and rocky beach overlooking Haro Strait, the San Juan Islands and Mount Baker. Spend time playing in soft sand and at low tide, explore in the intertidal zone— the area between the high tide and low 22  Island Grandparent

dense forest ecosystems with towering trees. Enjoy the accessible Elsie/King trail with its maple trees, ferns and wildflowers. Head over to Heritage Grove to find some of the largest and oldest Douglas-fir trees in the area. Keep your eyes and ears open for red squirrels, eagles and woodpeckers. Visit this park on a Saturday,

Sunday or holiday Mondays from noon4pm to check out the Nature Centre.

Sooke Potholes Regional Park

Sooke Potholes Regional Park is a popular freshwater swimming destination for its clear, cool waters and deep “pothole” pools. Looking for a shallow beach wading area? There are many beaches along the Sooke River, including Sand Pebble Beach, which is a short walk through the forest from parking Lot 2. This beach is a wonderful spot for a picnic and dip into the river to cool off. Feeling active? Ride the Galloping Goose Regional Trail with the family directly to the park. Don’t forget to pack drinking water.

Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park

Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park is a popular recreational destination area with opportunities for swimming, picnicking, walking, hiking, fishing, boating and, of course, playing! Pack a picnic and head to Beaver Beach at Beaver Lake to find a shady spot in the grass under a tree and play in the shallow water or playground. You can also check out the Nature Centre on Saturdays, Sundays and holiday Mondays from noon-4pm. Walk along the forest trails looking for butterflies, dragonflies and other insects. Hamsterly beach at Elk Lake also offers shaded areas, a sandy beach and playground. Both of these beaches are great spots to launch canoes if you’re looking to spend time on the water. When spending time outside in warm and sunny weather, remember to prepare for sun and water safety. Pack sunscreen, hats, sunglasses, snacks and plenty of water for everyone. If you’re spending time on the water, remember to bring your beach shoes and water safety equipment, such as lifejackets and a bailer. It’s always a good idea to check park conditions and alerts prior to your visit at www.crd. bc.ca. Looking for an activity to join outdoors with the grandkids? CRD Regional Parks offers free nature outings and events for all ages. If you’re looking to explore and learn about the parks with a park naturalist, check out the nature outings and events calendar on the website at crd.bc.ca/parks-events. Rachael Tancock is a park naturalist at CRD Regional Parks. IslandParent.ca


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ummer time, and the living is easy! It’s summer, the favorite season of ice cream vendors and pool salespeople. It’s a time for BBQs, wearing flip flops and sitting on patios. It’s also a time of easy, or at least easier living, for a lot of our local wildlife. Gone are the days of winter hardship and of spring scrounging for suitable locations to have babies! It’s summertime and now is the time of thriving and growth. For our smaller wildlife, such as insects, food is often plentiful at this time of year. The ever popular Ladybird beetle (or just plain Ladybug as it is better known) is busy feeding on juicy aphids that tend to pop up uninvited on my rose bushes and plum trees. Their bright yellow eggs show up as harbingers of the tiny aggressive predatory larva that will emerge and tackle my aphid problem. Many beautiful native butterflies such as Western Swallowtails, Lorquin’s Admirals and Red Admirals are flitting about, having their last hoorahs. Many species do not survive as adults past fall, having their larva (aka caterpillars) or pupa (aka cocoons) go through the tough times of fall and winter. Wasps, with their tough reputation, are busy drinking nectar and hunting down other insects while the going is good. As their queen winds down her egg laying, they have more and more free time on their hands, hence the partying at our outdoor parties! None will survive past late fall other than a new queen who will find a safe hiding place for winter and emerge in spring, ready to start a new colony. By summer, the ducks of Swan Lake are done with child rearing, most ducklings have hatched anywhere from February to June, and are happily dabbling or diving in search of food. Juvenile ducks are looking more like their parents, having lost their downy feathers and developed proper flight feathers that are not shed until the following summer.

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Swan Lake The small and mighty hummingbirds are also done having babies with the tiny Rufus hummingbird already preparing for its amazing migration back to Mexico for the winter. Peak sightings of this little jewel are from June to August. Anna’s hummingbirds have decided that the living in Victoria is tolerable given the sheer number of feeders put out by the kind hearted citizens of our city. They too would migrate back to California but we save them the trip! Many mammals of Swan Lake are at their most visible during the long summer evenings. Muskrat, beaver and especially bats love the dusk as temperatures are cooler and in the case of bats, bugs (their food supply) are out at their fullest! Evening programs at Swan Lake showcase some of the amazing nocturnal adaptations of these and many other nighttime visitors to the Sanctuary. And as for us humans, summer is a fabulous time to go outside and enjoy nature, at any age. I like to follow the animals lead and enjoy walks early in the morning when it is still cool and the birds are singing, or later evening when the sun is setting and the heat of the day is finally dissipating. Mid-day is for sitting on the patio with a cool drink and snacks or naps! There is no shortage of nature locations in our fair city from ocean beaches like Gyro Park, Island View beach and Esquimalt Lagoon, cool forests like at Francis King Park and Mt. Douglas Park, and of course soothing wetlands such as Elk/Beaver Lake and Swan Lake Nature Sanctuary. Many Parks and Sanctuaries offer guided walks and programs but simply showing up and enjoying the location on your own is a great option too. Be sure to come prepared with sun protection, water for hydration and lots of snacks if coming with little ones, whether for a guided program or not. Remember that summer, like all seasons, will come to an end and the easy living shall pass all too soon. Fortunately though, nature has a rhythm of decay and renewal that will begin again and those of us who seek time out in nature are renewed as well. Enjoy. Renee Cenerini is the Program Manager at Swan Lake Christmas Hill Nature Sanctuary. For a full listing of all the great summer programs at Swan Lake please visit swanlake.bc.ca. IslandParent.ca

Summer/Fall 2019  25


Unicorns, Fairies & Mermaids, Oh My!

T

here’s something about unicorns, mermaids and fairies that captures our collective imagination. I was at a party recently, and there was a lady there who was painting the children’s faces. Soon there were unicorns galloping around everywhere you looked. So it’s no real surprise that they turn up all the time in our stories. But what do we really know about unicorns? Children’s authors Cale Atkinson and Bethanie Deeney Murguia strive to answer some of our burning questions about these illusive creatures. Kate Pugsley and Liz Kessler focus on mermaids and what we can learn from these mysterious sea creatures about confidence and self-acceptance. Finally, Sophie Kinsella helps us learn more about the training fairies go through before they are allowed to use their magic in our high-tech world. Regardless of whether your grandchildren are interested in mermaids, fairies or unicorns, here are a few stories about finding the fantastical in the mundane that will help add some magic to their lives this summer.

are looking at a horse in a red hat or a unicorn in disguise. The narrator is adamant it is in fact a horse. That is, they are convinced it is a horse until the takes off its hat and things become much more confusing. The fun and creative pictures will cause you to second guess what you see—on every single page. And, like the story’s narrator, you and your grandkids will wonder if you are looking at a unicorn or a horse in disguise. For ages 3 to 7.

Do You Believe in Unicorns? by Bethanie Deeney Murguia (Candlewick, 2018) is a conversation between the narrator and an unseen and unheard companion about whether or not they

Unicorns are more than just masters of disguise, and many children will have questions about these gorgeous creatures. For these questions, look no further that Cale Atkinson’s book Unicorns 101 (Tundra, 2019). Atkinson assures his readers that unicorns are not only “magical,” “majestic,” and “better than horses,” they are also fantastically fun on camping trips and “30 to 67 hamsters tall.” Filled with bold, bright, and glittery images, this scientific book on unicorns will tell your grandchild everything they could possibly want to know about these magnificent creatures. For example, while you will never see one buying something from a bake sale, you will find out what activities they use their horns for, how they decorate their houses, and who was the first unicorn to visit Pluto. For ages 3 to 7.

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Half-mermaid, half-girl Emily Windsnap is back in her eighth novel: Emily Windsnap and the Pirate Prince by Liz Kessler (Candlewick, 2019). In her latest adventure Emily is heading home via cruise ship with her mother and boyfriend Aaron, while her father and best friend Shona took Neptune’s chariot. The trip has barely begun when they’re boarded by pirates and Aaron is kidnapped by the pirate king’s oldest son. To save him, Emily lets herself get kidnapped by the younger son, and they set off to find Neptune’s treasure. Along the way Emily learns the importance of being true to herself and not letting others define her. For ages 8 to 12.

Kate Pugsley’s Mermaid Dreams (Tundra, 2019) is a new take on the eternal theme of making friends. Maya and her family head to the beach for some summer fun, but when they arrive her mother and father tell her they want to relax instead of play. After settling into their lounge chairs they tell Maya to go and play with the other kids. But, Maya doesn’t know what to say. She watches the kids from the safety of her turtle floaty as she considers how to approach them. While she ponders this, she ends up falling asleep and waking up in the middle of the ocean. Mermaid Maya and her turtle dive down to the coral reef below. There among the sea weed and coral, she plays hide-and-seek with another mermaid. For ages 3 to 7.

Of course, magic isn’t always the best way to solve problems as Ella discovers in Fairy in Waiting by Sophie Kinsella and illustrated by Marta Kissi (Puffin, 2019). Ella’s mother, aunt and grandmother are fairies. One day Ella will be one too. Right now, she’s just a fairy in waiting, but that doesn’t stop her from helping her mother when her mom’s spells go wrong, or from attempting to do magic herself. These hilarious stories are interspersed with some delightful pictures that help you see just how wrong the spells can go sometimes. For ages 7 to 10. So the next time your grandchildren tell you they are bored, feel free to send them on an adventure to try and spot unicorns, make magic, or play with mermaids. No beach or party required. Christina Van Starkenburg is a freelance writer and mother of two young boys. You can read about their adventures at thebookandbaby. com. IslandParent.ca

Summer/Fall 2019  27


A

grandma and her four-year-old granddaughter are strolling along a trail when the girls bends to pick something up. She squeals and holds out her find. She has found her first painted rock. It’s an amazing work of art, labeled to indicate that it’s part of the Sooke to Sidney Rock Hunt on Facebook (SSRH FB). As part of SSRH FB, participants paint, label, and seal rocks and then hide them wherever they choose. It can make discovering a new trail or beach extra fun. These rocks have also been hidden outside of hospitals to cheer people up. Some keep the rocks as good luck charms and then paint and hide more rocks to replace the rocks they kept. Others may choose to hang onto a particular rock for a little while and then re-hide it. We have a few rocks in our fairy garden in our front yard and my son has his favourite in a little treasure chest. You don’t have to be a professional artist to paint and hide a rock. The skill levels vary and people of all ages paint and hide rocks. Some people even sell their work or use it as gifts. The SSRH Facebook group provides product recommendations, tips for sealing rocks and many photos of painted rocks. For example, the type of paint pens or sealants that work best and tips for using them. There are dotting tools that you can purchase to paint mandala rocks and there is even a class offered to learn how to paint these types of rocks.

Let’s Rock…Hunt!

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Over 6700 members belong to the SSRH FB group, so it’s a great way to connect with other people in your community and meet other members. In July 2016, Kristi Nelson started the group. Erin Devine teaches the mandala class and has helped keep the group going. They both do admin work for the group and Susan Nelson is the group moderator. It’s a fun treasure hunt and you learn to always be on the lookout for rocks. It’s neat to see rocks that might be in a certain shape, which can influence the drawing chosen for it. For example, I’ve seen a kitty cat face shaped rock, a hot dog, a chocolate coated candy that has a bite looking chip missing off the rock. There are a few etiquette rules to follow such as take only one rock per person per hunt (so there are lots of rocks for other to enjoy), and post a picture of your find on the SSRH FB group. Rocks need to be sealed, so the paint doesn’t chip. The rocks that are hidden need to be accessible and can’t be hidden in cemeteries. Recently, monthly rock challenges were introduced. Each day of the month you paint a new rock that fits the daily theme and then post a picture. There are even prizes. It’s also fun to paint your own rocks and then post pictures to the group to reveal where you hid them. It’s thrilling to see someone post a picture of a rock that you painted and hid. We have even found rocks from other nearby rock hunting groups such as Tacoma Rocks in Washington. We have a Kindness Rocks garden in our neighbourhood too. Our kids were excited when they found rocks at their school that were specially hidden by an artist who said the kids could keep them. Rock painting and hunting is a great way to feel part of the community and it’s a great activity to introduce your grandkids to this summer. Once you get started, you’ll never look at rocks the same way again. You’ll be visualizing your painting upon each rock. You’ll be collecting buckets of rocks with your grandkids to paint and hide yourselves. Happy rock hunting. Serena Beck works full-time as a technical writer. She loves to write, travel, and swim at the beach with family and friends. IslandParent.ca

Summer Fun!

Night Illuminations Firework Saturdays Rose Carousel Boat Tours Family Discovery Walk

butchartgardens.com 250.652.5256

LEARN THE JOYS OF CREATION

AGES 5 & UP

Classes in Theatre, Film, Improv, and More! Professional Teaching Artists Small Class Sizes

skam.ca 250-386-7526 Building future leaders

We are accepting applications for September 2019 for grades K thru 9. Limited space in some grades.

Please check our website: queenofangels.ca for an application form and/or call our school at 250-746-5919 to arrange a tour. Queen of Angels – where students learn to love, and love to learn. 2085 Maple Bay Rd, Duncan, BC V9L 5L9  email:qa@cisdv.bc.ca Summer/Fall 2019  29


Fam�y Ma��

Grandparents in Canada

7.5 million (47%) Canadians aged 45 and over are grandparents

21%

47%

of grandparents were born outside of Canada The average age of grandparents has risen

Grandmothers outnumber grandfathers

64 years in 1995

The average age for first-time grandparents was 52 in 2017

3.3 million

4.2 million

68 years in 2017

44%

56%

The proportion of grandparents aged 85 and over has more than doubled between 1995 and 2017

Percentage of Grandparents

35

31.97

30

33.72 29.92

1995

31.07

5% of grandparents live with at least one grandchild

2017

25 20

19.44

19.14 14.66

15 10

9.28

7.64

5 0

Grandparents in Canada have an average of 4 grandchildren

3.16 45-54

55-64

65-74 Age Cohorts

75-84

85+ Catalogue number: 11-627-M ISBN: 978-0-660-28845-1

Note: Population includes Canadians 45 and over. Source: General Social Survey (Families) 1995 and 2017.

Statistics Canada

Statistique Canada

30  Island Grandparent

At 63 years old, Indigenous grandparents are younger than the average grandparent in Canada

www.statcan.gc.ca

IslandParent.ca


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