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VO L U M E 17 N U M B E R 3 2 010

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M A G A Z I N E

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C O U N T R Y

L I V I N G

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H E A D W A T E R S

R E G I O N

Life in the council seat Then and now

Archery lessons The cougar’s return? Ontario Gothic The story of a farm

Festival Art Show & Sale


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the Colourful Season Autumn is about colour: the trees on the hillsides, the art on the canvas and, once every four years, the election signs on the roadsides. In anticipation of the municipal election on October 25, Jeff Rollings asked four former councillors about their lives in the municipal hot seat. Their comments are frank and personal, not only about what they feel they accomplished, but about where they feel they failed, and some of the frustrations that go with the job. In counterpoint, Julie Pollock talked to neophyte candidate Heather Hayes. Fuelled by her long record of community and volunteer service, she has entered the race with untainted optimism. And finally, Ken Weber takes a look at councils of the past – when, for example, a seventy-dollar bridge repair could cause a local tizzy. Read. Enjoy. Vote. —

PUBLISHER | EDITOR

Signe Ball O P E R AT I O N S M A N A G E R

Kirsten Ball EDITORIAL

Roberto Fracchioni | Michele Green Alison Hird | James Jackson Bethany Lee | Douglas G. Pearce Julie Suzanne Pollock | Jeff Rollings Nicola Ross | Don Scallen | Ken Weber PHOTOGRAPHY

Bryan Davies | Rosemary Hasner Robert McCaw | Pete Paterson I L L U S T R AT I O N

Shelagh Armstrong Linda McLaren | Jim Stewart DESIGN | ART DIRECTION

Kim van Oosterom Wallflower Design ADVERTISING SALES

Roberta Fracassi | Julie Lockyer ADVERTISING PRODUCTION

Marion Hodgson Type & Images PROOFREADING

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

With this issue we say a very fond farewell to Alison Hird. For the past ten years, Alison has supplied our calendar of events, collected through her website, WhatsOn.ca. Alison was a pioneer in the use of the Internet for community service. With the help of her husband Chris, a software engineer, she originally developed the site when she was a stay-athome mum. She had recently immigrated to the Caledon countryside from England where she had worked for IBM. “Situated at the top end of Caledon, I discovered we were in an area of conflicting borders,” she says. “Schools, health units, postal service, towns Alison Hird and counties all had different boundaries. I found it difficult to work out what was happening where.” Her creative solution was to launch her own free, community-based events site. At first, much of her time was spent just teaching people how to use the Internet. In recent years, more than a thousand event managers from near and far have regularly submitted events to her site. Now, after a decade of what she calls “a labour of love,” Alison is retiring her site, though she will continue to stay in touch with the community through her work as collections manager at Dufferin County Museum & Archives. In The Hills is deeply grateful to Alison for her long and valuable service. We look forward to carrying on her work through inthehills.ca, where we will continue to provide the region’s most comprehensive listings of community, arts and entertainment events.

Susan Robb ONLINE IN THE HILLS

Tony Maxwell, Headwaters Media Inc. Bethany Lee, Focus on Media COVER

“Pearallel” by Jean Junkala (pastel 25" x 2o") — In the Hills is published four times a year by MonoLog Communications Inc. It is distributed through controlled circulation to households in the towns of Caledon, Erin, Orangeville, Shelburne and Creemore, and Dufferin County. Subscriptions outside the distribution area are $22.6o per year (including hst). Letters to the editor are welcome. For information regarding editorial, advertising, or subscriptions: PHONE E-MAIL

519-942-84o1

info@inthehills.ca

FA X

519-942-1118

MonoLog Communications Inc. R.R.1 Orangeville ON L9W 2Y8

www.inthehills.ca — The advertising deadline for the Winter (November) issue is October 15, 2o1o.


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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010


I N

T H I S

I S S U E D E P A R T M E N T S

F E A T U R E S 16

A PERSUASIVE MAN

An interview with Terry O’Reilly by James Jackson

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10

32 62 38

STRAIGHT ARROW

Lessons in archery by Nicola Ross 53

STARS OF DUFFERIN COUNTY

A quirky local history by Signe Ball 58

13

Heatherlea Farm Market by Nicola Ross

THE DIGEST

69 HEADWATERS SKETCHBOOK

Snail shells by Linda McLaren

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Hugh Russel

WHAT MAKES HEATHER RUN?

First-time candidate Heather Hayes by Julie Suzanne Pollock

62 HOMEGROWN IN THE HILLS

Countryside news by Douglas G. Pearce

22 HOME AFTER SUPPER

Reflections by former councillors by Jeff Rollings

LETTERS

Our readers write

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70 HEADWATERS NEST

Goodbye commuting by Bethany Lee

MUST DO

Our favourite picks for fall

86 WHAT’S ON IN THE HILLS

36 HISTORIC HILLS

A calendar of autumn happenings by Alison Hird

When local government ruled by Ken Weber 61

EDIBLE HILLS

Beauty and the beet by Roberto Fracchioni

94 A PUZZLING CONCLUSION

by Ken Weber

AUTUMN CANVAS

Preview of the Festival show 64

64 HAS THE CAT COME BACK?

Cougars among us by Don Scallen 72

ONTARIO GOTHIC

A heritage farm restoration by Michele Green

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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PAT U L L O WA L L B Y J I M S T E WA R T

L E T T E R S

Dance kudos

Accolades for a master

craftsman

Further to the piece on the Patullo stone wall on Mississauga Road (A Fine Old Wall Restored, summer ’10): I had the pleasure of meeting Andrew Loudon, chief certifier of Britain’s Dry Stone Walling Association, at a workshop at Credit Valley Quarries on behalf of the fledgling Dry Stone Guild of Canada. I was observing rather than participating and I was amazed to watch a group of neophytes throw up a twenty-five-foot stretch of a five-foot high wall over a mere two days! Gorgeous piece of work! Andrew and I got to talking and he told me his opinion of Mike Schenk’s work on the Patullo wall: It’s brilliant! Mike is brilliant! It doesn’t follow some of the rules used in building new dry stone walls (many of the stones appear to have been placed on the vertical rather than horizontal, the latter orientation providing greater stability and strength), but as a restoration Andrew felt it is wonderfully true to the original and matches the best work he’s seen in Britain. He was also fascinated by the use of cedar shims, a technique he’d never seen before, either in the UK or Europe. Whereas Mike seemed to think the cedar had been used for levelling, Andrew thought it was more likely for stability, instead of through-stones. Regardless, he was mightily impressed with Mike’s craftsmanship, and photos of Caledon’s heritage-designated wall will now become part of his various presentations on dry stone walls. So, accolades from the very top of the profession! The wall not only looks great, it is great. Sally Drummond Heritage Officer, Town of Caledon 8

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

My sincere gratitude to Michele Green for her article on our dance group (Dancing on the Edge, summer ’10). She is an amazing writer. The piece is full of sincerity and authenticity (a reflection of the author). Thanks so much for being interested in what our little collective is trying to do. I especially loved Michele’s note at the end – that she “applauds” us. That means a lot coming coming from Michele, a professional dancer and choreographer. Michelle Grierson, No 6 Collective, Orangeville

Citizens’ Brigade Once again, In the Hills has set me thinking, as I sense that the rural lifestyle of Caledon, which I love, is still under attack. Here are some observations on topics which I have not yet seen subject to rational debate. In Imagining the Future (summer ’10), Jeff Rollings raises the issue of low voter turnout at elections, which have traditionally been the means by which the population can express its approval (or otherwise) of the government. The failure of this democratic process is the reason for the emergence of concerned citizens groups, largely unco-ordinated, which does not help much. I would like to attempt an explanation for this state of affairs. The voting process has become so unfriendly that I am no longer prepared to have anything to do with it. When I moved into this area twenty years ago, voting was a pleasurable occasion. I knew some of the registering staff, caught up with the local gossip, they checked me off in their big book, and that was that. Last time, I was asked for two pieces of photo i.d., so I walked out, and will never, ever return. On the provincial and federal levels, there is absolutely no point in voting at all. With a few shining exceptions, I find them all selfserving liars, and I’m surprised that anyone turns out! Finally, I don’t see why anything should change. People come to live here because they like it. I cannot imagine any other reason. There’s no public transport, the postal service is totally dysfunctional, and so on. But that’s all a small price to pay for the beauty and tranquility of the countryside. John Tysoe, Cheltenham

ONLINE IN THE HILLS We welcome your comments! For more commentary from our readers, or to add your own thoughts on any of the stories in this issue, please visit www. inthehills.ca. You can also send your letters to the editor by e-mail to sball@ inthehills.ca. Please include your name, address and contact information. In the Hills reserves the right to edit letters for publication.


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C O U N T R Y S I D E

D I G E S T

by Douglas G. Pearce

It is never too early

Spotty apples, sleepy bees and mad economists

to discuss retirement options for healthy living.

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“It’s always amazed me that Canada exports massive amounts of grains and beans to places such as South America, the Middle East, Africa, China and India, where they are cooked whole in many delicious ways. However, we don’t eat much whole grain in Canada, nor lentils, dried peas, chickpeas, fava beans, regular beans or soybeans. For example, we consume only one per cent of the dried peas grown in Canada. Maybe it’s time we had pea soup once a week instead of once a year. “The bottom line, to my mind is that we don’t have to figure what to grow for Canada to be self-sufficient in food. We just have to learn to eat what we’re already growing!” Dan Jason in Canadian Organic Grower, Summer/10.

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Ordinary People “There was a time, long ago now, when history was dominated by the accounts of the political, military, and economic elites. In recent years especially, historians have turned their attention to rescuing the history of ‘ordinary people,’ the likes of whom are central to Hiemstra’s work. Gully Farm serves as a valuable resource, allowing us a window into the lives of people who at one time did not surface on the pages of history. “Remarkably consistent in maintaining a childhood perspective, deeply evocative and tellingly written, Gully Farm rises above the cardboard reminiscences that so often characterize ‘pioneer writing.’ Those who lived her era are gone, with little left behind but unlabelled, tinted photographs of sober-faced people beside nondescript buildings, or rusted farm machinery in what is generously called a museum.” From Franklin Foster’s foreword to Gully Farm, by Mary Hiemstra, Fifth House Ltd., 1997 (first published 1955).

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

“Grandpa Snedd … was the saving kind. When he sent a youngster downstairs for a bowl of apples for the evening snack, he’d order, ‘Look through for any that have spots, and bring those. One bad apple can spoil the whole crate.’ “Aunt Carrie was his daughter, but she never agreed. ‘Bring the best apples you can find,’ she’d say. ‘That way, even when they’re all spotted, we’ll still be getting the best of the batch.’” Eupha Shanly, quoted in Root

Cellaring, by Mike and Nancy Bubel, Storey Publishing, 1991.

Dutch East India Company, quoted in Merchant Kings, by Stephen R. Brown, Douglas and McIntyre, 2009.

Resveratrol Reservations “Clinical trials of a red wine ingredient thought to slow the human aging process have been halted. GlaxoSmithKline stopped the trial of a potent form of resveratrol. The aim was to test its ability to treat multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, but five of the trial’s 24 participants developed potentially dangerous kidney damage.” From New Scientist, May 15/10.

Check Before Cutting “Medicine, construction, and flying a jet have one thing in common. They’ve all become complex endeavours in which simple mistakes can cost lives. “‘When we look closely, we recognize the same balls being dropped over and over, even by those of great ability and determination... It’s time to try something else. Try a checklist.’ “… Gawande makes it abundantly clear that checklists can make being a patient in surgery much safer and can do so just about anywhere in the world. Surgical complications in eight study hospitals fell 36 per cent, deaths by 47 per cent, with 4,000 patients experiencing 277 complications instead of the expected 435. It is not surprising that, as Gawande points out, even though 20 per cent of medical professionals using checklists don’t like doing so and didn’t think they were useful, 93 per cent would want one used if they were on the operating table.” From Michael A. Goldman’s review of The Checklist Manifesto, by Atul Gawande, Metropolitan Books, 2010, in Science, June 11/10.

World Domination “Whosoever commands the trade of the world, commands the riches of the world and consequently the world itself.” Sir Walter Raleigh, c. 1600.

Trade War “Your Honours should know by experience that trade in Asia must be driven and maintained under the protection and favour of your Honours’ own weapons, and that the weapons must be paid for by the profits from the trade; so that we cannot carry on trade without war, nor war without trade.” From Jan Pieterszoon Coen’s 1614 letter to the Council of Seventeen,

Grebe No More “And then there were none. The Alaotra grebe, unique to a lake in Madagascar, has been driven to extinction by a combination of fishing nets and carnivorous fish that were introduced to the lake by humans.” From New Scientist, May 29/10.

Arctic Bees “Even under the midnight sun, bees like their beauty sleep. Researchers have found that both native (Bombus pascuorum) and imported (B. terrestris) bumblebees in northern Finland, 270 miles north of the Arctic Circle, stuck to a regular workday, foraging local flowers from morning until evening and retiring to their nests at ‘night’ despite the sun’s 24-hour brightness. Working the graveyard shift would maximize their nest’s food supply and boost their chances for survival. The results, published in the journal BMC Biology, suggest that, unlike reindeer and other Arctic creatures that lose their 24-hour biological rhythms in summer and winter, bees internal clocks sync to cues other than light and darkness – perhaps variations in temperature or light quality – and that their nighttime rest confers an advantage even greater than extra food.” From Science, July 9/10.

Mad Old Ideas “The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed, the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist. “Madmen in authority, who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy from some academic scribbler of a few years back.” John Maynard Keynes, quoted in CCPA Monitor, June/10.

Roots of Power “Roots: the prime decision-makers for life on this planet.” Fra Tomas de Berlanga (1487-1551), quoted in Root Cellaring, by Mike and Nancy Bubel, Storey Publishing, 1991. ≈


Most fairs consider candy apples a delicacy. We aren’t most fairs. Especially when it comes to our wide selection of culinary experiences. So come enjoy local gourmet food at both the Vintners’ Terrace and the Hitching Ring, test your wine tasting skills at the Wine Bar, discover a new craft beer or attend a world-class celebrity chef event. It’s all right here at the largest – and tastiest – combined indoor agricultural and equestrian event in the world.

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Indulge Yourself An Evening of Electrifying Authors! Savour the best in Canadian literary talent

ARMCHAIRS, AUTHORS & ART Presented by BookLore & The Headwaters Arts Festival

S.G.I. Centre, Alton • Friday, October 1, 6:30pm CATHY MARIE BUCHANAN

Fishing guide. Forest ranger. Backwoodsman. Axe handle carver. (When did Tom Thomson ever find time to paint?)

The Day the Falls Stood Still Powerful and elegant – she pulls us into the maelstrom of Niagara Falls when rivermen drew daredevils from the brink, the promise of hydroelectric power wooed the nation and only a few dared question our relationship with the mighty river.

TERRY FALLIS The High Road Back by popular demand, with his brilliant follow-up to the Stephen Leacock award-winner The Best Laid Plains. This hilarious satire continues the story of Honest Angus McLintock, an irreverent Scotsman and amateur politician who dares to do the impossible: tell the truth!

TERRY O’REILLY The Age of Persuasion Host of the award-winning CBC Radio Show, “The Age of Persuasion�,Terry & co-author Mike Tennant combine years of industry insider information to show how marketing shapes our culture.The biggest moments, legendary anecdotes, and behindthe-ads stories pepper this “persuasive� read.

KATE TAYLOR A Man in Uniform A combination of history and mystery in a pageturning jaunt through 19th century Parisian society: the attempt to prove the innocence of convicted spy Alfred Dreyfus. From the Globe & Mail’s cultural affairs columnist and the 2009 “Atkinson Fellow�.

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NICOLA ROSS Moderator Headwaters author & editor-in-chief of Alternatives Journal, Canada’s national environmental magazine.

Defiant Spirits: The Modernist Revolution of the Group of Seven 2FWREHUWR-DQXDU\

Stay after for a catered “meet and greet� and enjoy the Festival Art Show and Sale Tickets ($25) Available at:

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

10365 Islington Ave., Kleinburg, ON • 905.893.1121 • www.mcmichael.com


A R T I S T

I N

R E S I D E N C E

counter-clockwise from top right : Avanti, bronze, edition of 12, height 3o"; Training Session, bronze, of 12, height 9"; Rooster, Baltic Birch plywood, clear lacquer ďŹ nish, height 18"; Story Time Puzzle, bronze, of 1o, height 10.5"; Old Sister, bronze, of 1o, height 12".

Hugh Russel Mulmur sculptor Hugh Russel’s work combines a keen knowledge of anatomy and movement, an emotional empathy with his subject, an often sly sense of humour, and a penchant above all for storytelling. His renowned bronzes of people and animals range from miniature to larger-than-life and are featured in collections around the world. To view more of his work, visit hughrussel.com. This month, he is participating in a two-weekend group show at Silver Creek Arts (silvercreekcaledon.com) IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

13


must do

trio d’argento

A highly selective guide to the picks of the season.

must

must

give thanks

’Tis the season when it’s tough to be a turkey. About the best they can hope for is to have led relatively happy lives before they hit the roasting pan. We’ve scouted out several local markets where it’s possible to purchase just such birds: free-range, naturally raised, grain-fed, hormone- and steroid-free. All those adjectives mean they’ve been raised pretty much outdoors and their feed contained no additives. And all of them come directly from farms well within a 100-mile radius. Because they’re fresh, not frozen you have to order ahead – and size requests will be filled on a firstcome, first-served basis. (Ask when they were slaughtered, fresh birds will keep up to a week in a very cold fridge.) Broadway Farms Market 905-843-9225 12506 Heart Lake Rd, Caledon Heatherlea Farm Market 519-927-5902 17049 Winston Churchill Blvd, Caledon Howard the Butcher 905-584-2934 Caledon East Carver’s Block 519-833-9677 102 Main St, Erin Dave’s Butcher Shop 519-415-6328 Alder Street Mews, Orangeville Harmony Whole Foods 519-941-8961 163 First St, Orangeville 100-Mile Store 705-466-3514 Creemore In addition to the free-range turkeys it gets from a farm in Hockley Valley, Harmony also takes orders for “certified organic” turkeys, but be prepared to pay $7/lb, more than double the going rate for uncertified birds. 14

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

A long time ago, it happened every two years, now it’s every four: your chance to have a say about who is running your town or township.

must

vote

Not so long ago, exercising your franchise was a community affair. A trip to the polling station, a chat with the clerk who happened to be your neighbour, a nod to the folks from the next sideroad. That’s the way it still happens in Caledon, Orangeville and Shelburne, but most other towns and townships in the hills have switched to a mail-in vote – a procedure that just doesn’t come with the same pleasant frisson of democratic virtue. Election day is Monday, October 25. If you’re in mail-in country, the ballot you’ll receive by post around the end of September needs to be returned and post-marked by election day. Keen to vote, but confused? Most local municipalities have outlined the procedure on their websites. Or, call your town office with your questions.

mellow

For 35 years, Orangeville Concert Association has been bringing superb classical and jazz musicians to play in Orangeville and the coming four-concert series is no exception to the quality of talent we’ve come to expect. oct 1 Trio D’Argento nov 5 Robi Botos Trio oct 1 Trio D’Argento: Chamber music from Bach to Carmen to Chamber music from Bach The acclaimed jazz pianist European jazz. to Carmen to European jazz. plays with his brothers on nov 5 Robi Botos Trio: The acclaimed jazz pianist plays with his drum and bass. brothers on drum and bass. of Canada’s premier classical jan 30 Henderson-Kolk Duo: Duo Onemar 18 The Blazing Fiddles guitarofduos. One Canada’s premier Show tunes, jazz standards classical guitar duos.Fiddles: Showand classical music on two mar 18 The Blazing tunes, jazz standards and fiddles classical music on two fiddles with pianowith and piano bass. and bass. All shows are 8 pm, except the Henderson-Kolk matinée at 2 pm, at the Orangeville Town Hall Opera House. A series subscription is $95 (students $45); individual concerts $30 (students $15).

must

piece together

The Dufferin Piecemakers Quilting Guild is celebrating its sixteenth birthday with an extravaganza of a quilting show. “The Magic of Cloth” on October 23 and 24 at Orangeville Fairgrounds features more than 300 hand-made quilts. You’ll also be able to purchase quilting supplies and bring your heirloom quilts to have them expertly appraised. The Piecemakers’ aim is to preserve quilting as an art form. And, in line with the social nature of the tradition, to contribute to the community while they do it. Last year the active group donated 17 large quilts and more than two dozen smaller ones to a host of local organizations, including Choices Youth Shelter, Family Transition Place, Headwaters Health Care Centre and Dufferin Meals on Wheels. The Magic of Cloth runs from 10 am to 5 pm on Saturday and 10 am to 4 pm on Sunday. Admission is $5. http://library. grandvalley.org/actiononline/grandvalley/piecemakers/


must

attend

The Orangeville Town Hall Opera House is the place to be on the evening of Sunday, September 19, when a group of gifted musicians assemble their collective talents in support of Matthew Shawn Fleming. A songwriter and percussionist, Matthew has been a pivotal force in the local music scene, with a particular interest in developing the skills of young people through drumming circles and workshops in high schools and with youth groups. Matthew is now suffering impaired vision and kidney failure due to Type One diabetes. The Concert has been put together to celebrate his extraordinary contribution to the arts and to aid him financially. Musical director and pianist Bruce Ley has gathered a stellar group of professional musicians, all of whom have played with Matthew at some time. They include drummer Al Cross, bassist Bob Hewus, saxophonist Steve Kennedy, and guitarists Kim Ratcliffe and Don Ross. They’ll be joined by vocalists Beth Hamilton and Connie Rossitter of Beckon, tenor Mark DuBois, bluesman Larry Kurtz, Juno-award nominee Jani Lauzon, country singer Leisa Way, Theatre Orangeville’s David Nairn, The Friday Soul Singers, and Matthew’s own improv band, The Evil Orange Consort. The show starts at 7:30 pm. Tickets are $35, available from the theatre, BookLore and local music stores.

must

hike

Because if ever you are going to, fall is the time to take to the trails and enjoy all the seasonal splendour the hills have to offer. You can explore the Niagara Escarpment, get plenty of exercise, and make a social event of it on the hikes that Caledon Hills Bruce Trail Club leads every weekend through October – some for seasoned hikers, some for newcomers. To celebrate Bruce Trail Day, on Sunday, October 3, the club is also hosting a barbecue and offering a series of free introductory hikes from 10 am to 4 pm at Forks of the Credit Provincial Park (parking is free). The day is held to promote public awareness of the Bruce Trail and the benefits of outdoor activity on land conserved for future generations. The Caledon Club, one of nine member clubs that form the Bruce Trail Conservancy, maintains seventy kilometres of main trail and about the same length of side trails in Caledon and the south end of Dufferin County. For hike details, see caledonbrucetrail.org. IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

15


A Persuasive Man

Ad man, radio host and author Terry O’Reilly discusses growing up in Sudbury, what it means to live in the Age of Persuasion, and why advertising really is an art. BY J A ME S J AC K S O N

The books in Terry O’Reilly’s extensive library at his Mulmur home are not all about advertising and marketing – most of those are in his Toronto studio – but they do tend to non-fiction, including business, biographies and science. 16


So often, the choice of guerrilla marketing over conventional ad media revolves around budget.

P H O T O B R YA N D AV I E S

How else can a smallish brand be heard against

T

he patio roof shades the sun from our eyes, but the air is still heavy on this midsummer day. On-the-go ad man Terry O’Reilly is relaxed. He is sitting in a wicker chair opposite me at his home overlooking the Mulmur hills, the top two buttons of his shirt are undone and his bare feet stretch out in front of him. In the humidity, beads of condensation drip down the side of Terry’s water glass – and I can’t help thinking that in every beverage commercial, condensation beads just so on the sides of glasses. I can’t help thinking it because it’s the kind of detail that Terry has taught me to notice. Sound familiar? If so, like me, you are probably among the legions of Canadians who tune in addictively to Terry O’Reilly’s CBC radio program, The Age of Persuasion, the show that takes a behind-the-scenes look at the world of marketing and advertising. Terry is also the author of a book by the same name, co-authored by the show’s producer, Mike Tennant. The radio program attracts some 600,000 listeners each week, and has made him as much a household name in Canada as many of the brands he discusses. So it’s surprising when he describes it as a sideline, created in “stolen moments.” For nearly thirty years, his day job has been writing and directing radio and television commercials. Among his clients are some of the world’s largest companies, including Bud Light, Goodyear and Bell. In fact, his radio show is not even recorded at CBC. “It’s a funny thing, when I go to CBC to do an interview or to be on another show, I always have to get directions where to go, because I don’t exist inside the CBC building – we record the show at my offices and studio.” His office is at Pirate Toronto, the company he co-founded back in 1990. Originally called Pirate Radio, the advertising

Even for the best in the business, great ideas are elusive. [David] Ogilvy confessed: “I am supposed to be one the more fertile inventors of big ideas, but in my long career as a copy writer, I have not had more than 20, if that.” So very true. In a business where one person may create thousands of ads over a career, a top creative mind may generate fewer than twenty big ideas.

deep-pocketed, better-established rivals? “Don’t outspend them,” I tell clients of modest means. “Outsmart them.”

company began exclusively in radio production, but soon branched into sound production for television advertising. In a nice twist to the usual corporate flow, Pirate also has a subsidiary studio in New York City. It employs more than forty people across the two locations. Terry has won hundreds of national and international awards for writing and directing, he conducts speaking tours across the country, and in 2005, was named the sole Canadian judge for the inaugural year of radio at the Cannes Advertising Festival – the largest advertising awards ceremony in the world. Yet with all of this success, he continues to be best known as the host of The Age of Persuasion – a show that wasn’t even his idea. It was born over lunch with friends. Four times a year, Terry and Mike Tennant meet for lunch with two of the creative directors at CHUM Radio, Larry MacInnis and Mike Occomore. They call themselves The Radio Boys. Terry also gives a radio seminar every year to young advertising copywriters whom he takes through the steps of developing effective and creative radio commercials. At lunch one day, Larry MacInnis told Terry, “You know what, if you broke your radio seminar into pieces, that would make a really interesting radio series.” Terry responded, “Really? Who would run that?” And Larry replied, “The CBC.” “You mean the advertising-free CBC would run a show about advertising?” Terry asked. They shared a laugh and Terry never expected the idea to go past that lunch table. The next day, however, Terry received a phone call from Mike, who had done marketing shows for the CBC in the past. Mike believed Larry was onto something with his radio idea. The two of them assembled a three-page pitch, and Mike sent it in to the CBC. “I expected the folks at CBC to say ‘thanks but no thanks.’ I truly thought that,” admits Terry. Much to his surprise though, CBC liked the idea. “Our pitch was that we wanted to create an interesting, insightful and fun show on the business of adver tising. We wanted to take people along a kind of wild and crazy ride through the hallways and boardrooms of advertising.” The show began as a ten-part summer replacement series, called O’Reilly on Advertising. It dealt with broad topics such as humour in advertising and commercials gone too far. Terry was the host and Mike was the producer. continued on next page

THINGS TERRY O’REILLY WOULD CHANGE ABOUT ADVERTISING AND MARKETING

Ban advertising from boards at NHL hockey games. Leave the playing area pristine.

Let people drink beer in beer ads. Who are we fooling?

No more junk mail. Just think of the chiropractic bills our letter carriers are racking up.

No more bodily functions in ads. ’Nuff said.

No more telemarketing. 1-800 has become a toxic readout on my home phone.

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

17


persuasive continued from page 17

Correspondence Program in Creative Writing

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creativeandperformingarts.humber.ca/writers Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Much to Terry’s surprise, the show was a hit. In fact, it was so popular that CBC expanded the program from its original ten episodes to twenty-five, and when the season ended, CBC wanted another one. “Mike and I regrouped and said ‘okay, if this is going to be an ongoing series, let’s change the skew of it.’” The show became much more specific – which Terry preferred – and they renamed it The Age of Persuasion. “Instead of taking a 30,000-foot view of the subject matter, we were zooming right in on it.” In one recent episode, Terry explained how creative strategies vary by product category. By taking listeners on a tour of different industries – from automotive and confectionary, to fast food and banking – he uncovered the personalities, rules and language used within each category.

MORE THINGS TERRY O’REILLY WOULD CHANGE ABOUT ADVERTISING AND MARKETING

Stop turning great songs into jingles. When the Beatles’ song “Hello Goodbye” gets turned into “Hello Good Buy” for a retail store, it’s time for a spanking.

So the key to great advertising is to make that interruption as welcome as possible. “To me, humour is a great way of doing that. If you make them smile, two things happen. They might like the brand a little more, and it won’t feel like such an interruption.” It’s no surprise that two of his favourite ads right now are Dos Equis: The Most Interesting Man in the World, and Old Spice: The Man Your Man Could Smell Like – ads that rely heavily

Advertising is an enormous (and growing) worldwide industry. Like any community, it’s driven by geniuses, visionaries, and savants, just as its dark, damp cracks are infested with crackpots, and the good ones are invited into your imagination as familiar friends and given an honoured place in that cozy chair by the fire; the bad ones are dismissed as “advertisers” and are shown the door.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

Terry’s show wrapped up its fourth season in June. When it resumes again in January, loyal listeners will again be able to tune in every Saturday to hear Terry’s smooth, familiar voice as he delves deeper into the mysterious world from whence emerges the ads we love – and loathe. “I definitely am a storyteller, there’s no doubt about that,” he says. “I try to tell great stories, and search for great stories to tell.” The show is not just aimed at the general public, either. “A lot of people ask me if ad agencies are angry [about the show’s frank approach to their business], and they’re not. They’re fans of the show too, because there aren’t any secrets to advertising. It’s an art. It’s an applied art.” One of the keys to his creative success, both in advertising work and on his radio show, is humour. He understands that advertising is an interruption, an intrusion into your enjoyment as you watch your favourite program. With the exception of the Super Bowl, people do not sit down in front of their TVs for the ads.

on humour. (If you’ve missed them, find them on YouTube – they’re a treat!) He says that much of advertising comes down to understanding human nature. For marketers, every new ad is like solving a puzzle to find a solution that audiences will enjoy, instead of changing the station or hitting the mute button. He brings the same goal to his radio show: “I want it to be great radio. Really listenable, rewarding, I-wantto-hear-it-every-week radio.” To say he has been successful would be an understatement. Terry’s program is the hallmark of great radio – it grabs you by the ear and doesn’t let go. Listeners sit in their cars in their driveways or supermarket parking lots waiting for the show to end before going inside. All of this success, however, grew from seemingly modest roots. Terry O’Reilly was born in Sudbury in 1959 – not a place you might first associate with creative virtuosity, but he credits his upbringing there for his fascination with radio, television, and all things pop culture. His first experience in media came

Banish commercials from movie theatres. Sorry, this breaks the contact. All ads should give you something in return. These don’t.

early in life, thanks to the popular children’s television show, Romper Room. “I watched it like crazy, and bugged my mother to take me to see if I could get on the show – which she did.” One day, on the Sudbury set of Romper Room, his mother was asked if four-year-old Terry could appear in an ad for a local bakery. She agreed, and Terry’s life in advertising was set in motion. Throughout his years at Sudbury Secondary School, Terry was fortunate to have access to a television and film class with a full studio. “Cameras, lights, switchers, everything – which is extraordinary in a small town like Sudbury,” he says. From the moment he stepped into the studio, he knew it was where he wanted to be for the rest of his life. “It was just one of those moments,” he says as he snaps his fingers together. Terry went on to study radio and television arts at Ryerson. Although there were no classes devoted to advertising, it was there that he settled on his future career. Every Wednesday morning, his class would hear a lecture from someone in the media industry, from Lloyd Robertson to Bob Homme – better known as The Friendly Giant on CBC television. “But when the ad guys came in, I loved it,” Terry says smiling. “The pressure of the business, the deadlines, working in studios with actors, going to wonderful exotic location shoots. Everything about it.” He left Ryerson in 1981, one credit short of graduating – “I was too impatient to get on with life” – and set about writing sixty elaborate resumés. He sent them to sixty advertising agencies across Canada – and promptly received sixty rejection letters. Still, he persevered. “The great thing about life is serendipity kicks in,” he says. Terry’s girlfriend (and future wife) lived in Hamilton while he was jobhunting in Toronto. He took the GO bus on weekends to visit her, and as he passed through Burlington, he could see the radio station FM 108 through the bus window. He had never considered radio as a career path. It was television that had


No more hard-sell ads that yell at you. Advertising is intrusive enough without this going on. Gives all advertising a black eye.

No more perfume samplers in magazines. Gesundheit.

No more odious overrepetition in advertising. We get it. We get it. We get it.

hear an audio excerpt of james jackson’s interview with terry o’reilly at inthehills.ca

captured his imagination. But one day he decided to get off the bus and put in a resumé for a copywriting job at the station. He was hired. “Don’t you know it, I fell completely head over heels in love with radio and it affected the absolute direction of my life.” Now, after three decades in the advertising business, he says that not once has he caught himself watching the clock at work. He enjoys trying to connect the dots to get the picture that explains why certain ads work, and others fail miserably. But his fascination with advertising hasn’t blinded him to the downside of the business. He laments the fact that advertising has infiltrated virtually every aspect of our lives, something he calls “ad clutter.” In fact, the subtitle of his book is How Marketing Ate Our Culture. As he explains it, advertisers are in the business of creating ads that grab our attention, but the more ads they create the more cluttered the advertising world becomes, which makes it harder for them to get our attention and forces them to create more ads – a Catch-22. Nowadays, ads are everywhere from NASA rockets to golf holes and urinals, and he calls the trend worrisome. “We live in the age of persuasion, meaning that everything – every brand, every show, anything that’s marketable – is trying to persuade you or divert your attention. Everything is some form of persuasion.” As he and Mike describe it in their book, “On a given day, at least three hundred, and as many as six thousand, marketing messages are lobbed your way... The age of persuasion reveals itself in us each time we flirt, date, apply for a job, buy a car, sell a home, fight a speeding ticket, heckle a

No more being put on hold for forty-five minutes by companies we pay. “Your call is important to us. Sort of. Actually, not really. Please go away.”

referee, write to Santa Claus, pop a breath mint, or simply dress for effect.” Terry’s ultimate goal with the radio show and the book is to help create a better-informed consumer and advertiser. He says that the more informed consumers are, the more products they will buy from advertisers who truly care about them. And the more that advertisers care about their audience, the better the ads will be. With his thrice weekly, two hours each way commute to his office on King Street in Toronto (where he maintains a condo), a weekly half-hour radio show, countless book tours, and his consuming work writing and directing commercials at Pirate, how does Terry maintain his sanity? “Living here is my mental health,” he says, gazing over the hills that surround his log home. The house was built in 2003 and after a couple of years of weekending, Terry, his wife Debbie and their three teenaged daughters moved up permanently in 2005. “My work life is a five-alarm blaze where every minute is accounted for. I get to work in the morning and my assistant says, ‘Okay, from 9:00 to 9:15 you have this phone call, from 9:15 to 9:20 you’re doing this,’ and that’s my day.” He pauses, and smiles when he says, “When I get to Hockley valley driving home, I just kind of breathe out, and love the journey home.” Terry is one of the four authors who will take the stage to discuss their books at the sixth annual Armchair, Authors & Art, part of the Headwaters Arts Festival this fall. “The greatest part about a book tour is meeting fans of the radio show,” he says. “They’re so warm and so wonderful, and just to make contact and hear their feedback on the show, I love it.” ≈ Caledon native James Jackson recently graduated with a journalism degree from the University of Western Ontario.

Armchair, Authors & Art takes place on Friday, October 1, at 7 pm, at SGI Canada Caledon Centre for Culture and Education, north of Alton. Along with Terry O’Reilly, featured authors are Terry Fallis, Kate Taylor and Cathy Marie Buchanan. Tickets $50, from Headwaters Arts Festival office, 519-943-1149. Highlighted text is excerpted from The Age of Persuasion: How Marketing Ate Our Culture, published by Alfred A. Knopf Canada, 2009.

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DISCOVER

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evening meetings are just one of the demands that come with the job for local councillors, and there are plenty of others, but for most who take the plunge into public service, there are also rewards

home after supper four former councillors reflect on the highs and lows of life in the council chambers – and after BY JEFF R O L L IN GS

L

ike a rare cactus that blooms only once every four years, municipal elections are upon us. Unlike the cactus, the politician’s intention to flower is announced months before, with press reports that candidate X or Y has filed nomination papers. You know the buds are forming when suddenly politicians are everywhere – the farmers’ market, the community meeting, the town festival. When petals begin to appear in September, they are smooth and silky – some even a little slippery. Sport-

ing a variety of colours, they all exude the sweet scent of success. By October, every flower has opened and there’s a come-hither display of empathetic smiles, let’s-do-lunch handshakes and baby-kissing photo ops, while promises fill the air like clouds of pollen. It all culminates in a crescendo on the fourth Monday of October, the day some flowers are chosen, but many are left to wilt on the vine. Then it’s over. Scattered at the feet of the victors, the losers’ blooms are swept up for the compost. Forgotten,

Seats of power? The Town of Caledon has nine council positions, four area and four regional councillors, plus the mayor. Whoever fills seats after the election on October 25, however, will have their decisions constrained by a host of financial and land-use planning regulations, some of them established by previous councils, some by the provincial government.

F

ormer councillor Beverly Kumprey is taking on new challenges too, though after twenty-seven years things must seem pretty strange in Melancthon without her. Kumprey spent twelve years working at the township hall before trading her office chair for a council seat. Now, five terms and fifteen years later, it’s fair to say she knows how to get a thing or two done. Kumprey’s feelings are far more positive feelings than negative about her tenure. “I really enjoyed it. Each election I would get a respectable count, so I always felt the residents thought I was doing a decent job.” She acknowledges that when dealing with electors, “Sure, you get the odd rude one, but it’s not personal. You just have to be tough and let stuff wash off your back.” Kumprey is particularly pleased with her contribution to the township’s tax policy. “I guess I feel it’s an accomplishment that I was part of 22

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

decisions that resulted in Melancthon having the lowest tax rate in Dufferin. I think we also have the lowest administration costs. And we maintain 167 miles of road.” Still, that same property tax bill was an ongoing irritant. “I’d have to check the exact numbers, but as I recall, it was about 28 per cent that went to education, and another 36 per cent went to the county. We have no say in either of those amounts. And what’s left? How are we supposed to run the township?” And to Kumprey, monitoring taxes is more than simply an exercise in frugality: “High taxes often mean families must have two incomes.” Councillors’ incomes are one of the things those taxes finance. It isn’t uncommon for councils to defer giving themselves a raise for years, simply because it’s politically unpopular. Eventually, though, it’s catchup time, and then the percentage increases can seem huge. In 2008, Orangeville studied how much coun-

cillors were paid in other municipalities and attempted to bring their own council remuneration in line, but that meant the mayor would receive a whopping 61-per-cent increase, councillors 36 per cent. The result was a public revolt that drew more than a hundred residents to protest at council meetings. Council eventually reversed the pay increases and appointed a committee to study the matter further. It found that Orangeville councillors were paid an average of 35 per cent less than those in eight similar-sized municipalities. Significant increases, though less than first proposed, will be in effect for Orangeville’s incoming council. There’s also quite a wide range in pay rates across the region. The base rate for a local councillor in Melancthon, for example, is a little over $8,000, while a Caledon councillor who also sits on upper-tier Peel regional council, receives a base rate of a little over $78,000. All councillors

are paid extra for things like mileage, benefits and committee work. Although Melancthon’s part-time, five-person council has been facing some tough issues lately, including industrial wind farming and a rumoured mega-quarry, Kumprey feels she was adequately paid for her work. Pointing out that “the position was volunteer when municipal councils first started,” she stresses community over compensation: “There’s a different atmosphere in rural politics. You know everyone. I’ve received more than a hundred nice letters since my retirement. I know, young people demand to be paid. It’s no longer the pleasure it once was.” It’s not unusual to hear local politicians complain that their hands are tied by upper levels of government, and to a jaded electorate that can seem like little more than a handy excuse to dodge responsibility. However, Kumprey argues that there’s truth to the claim. “You’re dictated to about everything. You always have to


like so many lawn signs in the back corner of a garage. But even for the victors, sprouting roots in a council seat can be a precarious business. Some cacti resume their thorny hide, but many tender plants fall victim along the way. Survival requires the determination of a June dandelion, a lot of growth, the pruning of some ideas and, just maybe, the occasional application of a well-known organic fertilizer. Some politicians will thrive and branch out. For some, local politics is a hothouse of growth that leads to a

continued on next page

Beverly Kumprey

P H O T O S P E T E PAT ER S O N

be aware that you’re at the bottom, and then ask how many decisions can we make? We know what’s best, but often have no say. Yet we’re the caretakers of the land.” Kumprey retired a few months before the end of the current term. With health problems that affected her mobility, she found some aspects of the job too demanding. “I couldn’t get out and inspect a gravel pit or property any more, and I just felt you need to be able to do things like that to do the job properly.” Kumprey says she would have run again if her health had permitted. On the other hand, she now has the time to indulge another interest. “Once in a while I take a trip to the casino. I could never have admitted that when I was a politician, because I’d be afraid someone would claim ‘She’s taking our tax dollars and blowing them at the casino!’ Even if they didn’t, I’d feel guilty anyway.” A moment later, she adds “Actually, I still do.”

lifelong career in public service. Former Mono mayor John Creelman and former Caledon mayor Carol Seglins, for example, have both gone on to become provincial Justices of the Peace. Ironically, as Justices, the two former politicians are restrained from commenting on details of their municipal experience. Still, both are quick to encourage anyone who is considering running to take the plunge. “I’ll always miss it,” says Seglins. “I loved every minute of it. But I also love my new challenge.”

Five terms, Melancthon

high “I feel it’s an accomplishment that I was part of decisions that resulted in Melancthon having the lowest tax rate in Dufferin. I think we also have the lowest administration costs.”

low At the municipal level, “you’re dictated to about everything. You always have to be aware that you’re at the bottom ... We know what’s best, but often have no say. Yet we’re the caretakers of the land.” IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

23


F

or former Amaranth councillor Ron Pincoe, who served one term in the 1990s, just getting elected was an extended crap shoot. On election night there was a tie. Only two spoiled ballots separated him from his nearest opponent. It took an official recount and two court cases before Pincoe was finally declared the victor. Pincoe began as what is known as a “one-issue candidate.” He ran specifically to try to prevent Orangeville from annexing parts of Amaranth during the municipal amalgamation craze of the Harris government. Oneissue candidates are susceptible to criticism that they lack of understanding the big picture, but Pincoe sees it differently: “So what if a particular concern gets someone involved? They’re still getting involved.” Furthermore, he says, candidates are bound to gain more knowledge of voters’ concerns as they make their way on the campaign trail. Once his seat was confirmed, Pincoe became one of three neophyte politicians on a council of five. “A steep learning curve went on,” he says, emphasizing the importance of having some more experienced council members on board. “And the clerk was a great help.” Pincoe was sensitive to the very personal nature of some issues that come up for councillors. He recalls one occasion when a couple with a young child came looking for help. They were renting a farmhouse, and the landlord refused to properly

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

For every new municipal politician, there must be a moment of white-knuckled, sweaty-palmed self-doubt. At least we should hope there is. It arrives after the victory celebration is over, around the same time they sit down to read The Municipal Councillor’s Guide. Produced by the ministry of municipal affairs and housing, this seventy-three page tour of life as a municipal councillor is enough to make anyone gulp about what they’ve gotten themselves into.

who’s your daddy? One thing the province wants new councillors to understand concerns who the boss is. The document points out that there is no provision for the existence of local municipalities in the Canadian constitution. Instead, municipalities are a creation of the provinces and, as such, “may only do what they have been authorized to do by the provincial government.” Legalese for “Get too big for your britches, and we’ll squish you like a bug.”

three roles representative role

In theory, municipal councillors are elected to represent the views of their constituents as closely as possible. In practice, though, it’s impossible to represent all constituents’ views all the time, so complete agreement on any issue is very rare. As a result, councillors are directed to make decisions based on the long-term health and welfare of the community, and to represent constituents by “providing the services and programs that they need, not everything they want.” But distinguishing between “needs” and “wants” can be the trickiest part of the job. policy-making role

As policy-makers, councillors have their greatest opportunity to shape what the


Ron Pincoe One term, Amaranth

high “A great feeling comes from helping somebody, letting them know someone cares. My three years were a great growing experience.”

low “I tended to take issues to heart and wanted to help everybody. I’d get frustrated when I couldn’t do it, either because I was handcuffed by the rest of council, or by the province ... People don’t understand what council can really do. They think they can do everything, not realizing how limited their power is.”

seal an open well located nearby. Fearing for their child’s safety, they approached the township. “At the time,” Pincoe remembers, a note of regret in his voice, “the township didn’t have a property standards bylaw, so we couldn’t go after the owner. All I could do was tell these people,

‘I can’t do any more.’” In his experience, “People don’t understand what council can really do. They think they can do everything, not realizing how limited their power is.” And he echoes Kumprey’s frustrations with the province. Take provincial road standards as an example. “The township has to build to meet the standards, and pay for it. So let’s say we have a narrow little country road that needs a new bridge. We end up spending $300,000 for some great big bridge that’s wider than the road that leads up to it.” On the positive side, Pincoe is proud of his work to advance recycling in Amaranth, and of his time spent working with fellow Amaranthonians. “A great feeling comes from helping somebody, letting them know someone cares,” he says, encouraging people to get involved. “My three years were a great growing experience.” So then why did he quit after only one term? “I wasn’t cut out to be a politician. I tended to take issues to heart and wanted to help everybody. I’d get frustrated when I couldn’t do it, either because I was handcuffed by the rest of council, or by the province.” Also, he adds, “Some people have a thick skin, but for me, we’d get a bunch of residents turn up as a delegation to council for some issue, and afterward I’d find it bothersome.” At the south end of the hills, former Caledon councillor Al Frost won’t tell you how much he loved being on council, nor wax nostalgic about the glory days.

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municipality looks like. Policy extends beyond the four-year term of office and may guide decision-making well into the future. Policy may be specific, such as “no skateboarding downtown,” or broad, such as approval of an official plan. An established process guides development of policy. Usually, council directs staff to look into an issue and report back. Council then debates and refines the policy and directs staff to implement it. Often, a policy may also be sent to committee for study. It all sounds fairly straightforward, but in practice things get messy. Issues can change rapidly, or simply be too complex to analyze thoroughly in the time available. There are rigid limits on what municipalities can do, both legally and financially. Sometimes the idea may be good, but the machinery needed to implement or monitor it is too cumbersome to maintain. stewardship role

In a way, election as a municipal councillor is a bit like being elected mom. As stewards of the municipality, they are responsible for making sure the bills are paid, there’s some cash in the bank, no one is leaving the lights turned on, and that everyone is generally behaving themselves. It’s a tricky job, because there’s a fine line between council’s duty and the day-to-day management responsibilities of staff. Without necessarily kowtowing, a councillor who works well with staff is likely to find life a lot easier than one who doesn’t. continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

25


another day at the office continued from page 25

upper-tier and lower-tier Upper-tier government is the regional or county council. It typically provides services of broader scope, such as regional planning, or where greater efficiencies can be achieved collectively, such as for waste management or the operation of a seniors’ home. In Ontario, upper-tier councillors are usually elected indirectly, meaning membership is automatic for the heads of lower-tier councils and certain other councillors, such as deputy mayors. This is the case in Dufferin. However, in some municipalities, including Peel and Wellington, upper-tier councillors are directly elected by voters. Lower-tier government is the town or township office that most people think of as “town hall.” There are those who feel lower-tier government should more rightly be called “local” government, because the tier reference suggests regional government is somehow more important or powerful.

committees, local boards and special purpose bodies Municipal councils have a wide-ranging workload. One way they get it all done is through the creation of committees. These can be either “standing” committees, 26

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010


Al Frost Three terms, Caledon

high He counts holding to a zero tax increase throughout his nine years on council as his most significant accomplishment in office.

low Working as a cog in the machinery of government wore him down. “I have very little tolerance for unending process.”

L

ike Pincoe, Al Frost got involved as a one-issue candidate. In the late 1980s, a coalition of taxpayers ran a slate of anti-tax candidates. Frost was one of them, and he was elected as an area councillor for Ward Two. He subsequently served three terms, but he’s a harsh critic of his own tenure. “My first term was the most productive. I did okay in the second term, but by the third term I shouldn’t have been there.” He says working as a cog in the machinery of government gradually wore him down, and he admits, “I’m a bit bitter. I have very little tolerance for unending process.” By way of example, he points to a provincial search for a new landfi ll site that went on for years in the 1990s

and identified numerous potential locations in Caledon. “That process cost the province $63 million, got everybody up-in-arms, and ended up with no dump ... the whole thing was a complete waste of time.” Then there were the lawyers. Frost was in management at Eaton’s department store, responsible for product testing and safety. Even in such a potentially litigious situation, he says, “we maybe consulted a lawyer once or twice a year. But at council, it was numerous times every meeting.” Frost was also frustrated by the power of senior municipal staff. “On Thursday I’d get the package of material for the council meeting on Monday night, typically supplemented with staff reports and recommendations covering whatever was inside. Nine times out of ten that would be the vote of council.” He feels that’s especially true of financial matters. “Council bends too easily to staff on taxes.” He thinks municipal government should run more like a business. “They don’t look at it from the revenue side. For them, if there’s a shortfall, it’s called a tax increase.” Litt le wonder t hen t hat Frost counts holding to a zero tax increase throughout his nine years on council as his most significant accomplishment in office. Though he’s been asked, it’s unlikely you’ll find Al Frost’s name on the ballot again any time soon. “No, I won’t run again. I’d come home from some meeting, and my wife would say ‘You’re going to have a heart attack.’” Echoing Ron Pincoe, he says, “I’m not cut out for politics.” continued on next page

made up of only councillors, or “advisory” committees, made up of a mix of councillors and public appointees. These committees do a lot of the heavy lifting, studying issues and reporting back to council with recommendations. Examples include parks and recreation, heritage, finance and planning. A huge assortment of other boards and special purpose bodies are engaged in the delivery of public services. They have varying degrees of independence from municipal council control. Some, like the police services board and library board, are mandatory. Others are created at council’s discretion, and council has the power to shut them down if conflicts arise. A trail committee might be an example of that. Still other public bodies exist entirely outside council’s control. Hospital boards, boards of health and conservation authorities operate independently, though in some cases the municipality may have an opportunity to appoint a member. School boards operate entirely separately from council. Curiously, while school boards usually command a majority of the property tax bill, public representation there is dramatically lower. For example, where Orangeville has seven municipal councillors, it has only one elected representative on the Upper Grand District School Board. continued on next page

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lawmakers The Municipal Act gives each municipality a variety of powers falling into several categories: Natural Person Powers, which permit it to do anything a person or corporation could do, such as hiring people or buying land; Broad Permissive Powers, which allow the community to decide its own form of governance and make decisions about how it will operate; and Spheres of Jurisdiction, which may be shared or divided between upper- and lower-tier governments and provide the power to pass bylaws concerning: • Highways, including parking and traffic • Transportation systems, other than highways • Waste management • Public utilities • Culture, parks, recreation and heritage • Drainage and flood control, except storm sewers • Structures, including fences and signs • Parking, other than on highways • Animals • Economic development services • Business licensing At the same time, there are a multitude of limitations on what councillors can do with their wizard-like powers. Short advice here: As a councillor, you’re going to get to know your friendly municipal solicitor. Really well.

money The Municipal Councillor’s Guide warns, “The learning curve may be steep as you 28

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010


Jeff Duncan Two terms, Erin

high “I loved being on council. I found it very rewarding, and the number of people you get to meet is incredible.” Being elected is “really humbling. It’s the reason why you give the job your best effort.”

low “The province has so many different policy initiatives going at the same time, it’s hard for municipalities to keep up… There’s so much timeconsuming red tape. You only have limited staff and if they’re focussed on that, they’re not doing other local things.”

F

ormer Erin councillor Jeff Duncan also says “no, I don’t think so” when asked if he’ll run again, but the wistful tone of his voice says “maybe someday.” Duncan’s introduction to politics occurred when he appeared before council as part of a community delegation about a local issue, the municipal purchase of a millpond in Hillsburgh.

That experience “made me think I wanted to take part, to help facilitate good ideas. Some guys volunteer for the fire department. I thought it would be a way to help pay back. So when I got on, it wasn’t about change, but about fi nding the best ways to consult and foster co-operation.” Of course, that’s not as easy as it sounds, as Duncan notes, on council “you don’t get to pick your team. You have to make the best of it and play the cards you’re dealt.” As a result, he says, “to get things done can be difficult. I found the best way to achieve something was to take the bull by the horns and run with it yourself.” In that respect, Duncan says he was lucky, “because the mayor always gave me enough rope to either pull it off or hang myself.” Still, success in politics is rarely a one-person show. Says Duncan, “Whatever you bring forward, you only have one vote. Even the mayor only has one vote. You have to get buy-in at the committee level, from the staff, and then from council.” Daunting as it seems, achievements are possible, and Duncan points to several examples from his own experience. Erin was the only near-urban municipality that did not have a full-time planner. “We’re right next door to Caledon, who I think has a planning staff of more than twenty.” Duncan, whose own day job is with a professional planning firm, says, “I had an idea of the limitations that created for the town, so I count Erin getting its own planner as an accomplishment.” However, he is probably best known for the creation of Erin’s heritage committee. When he began his term,

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investigate how your municipality’s financial processes operate.” The accompanying brief review of where the money comes from, how it’s spent, and how to keep track of it all must make new councillors think that some other part-time job – say spaceship navigation – might have been an easier choice. First there’s preparation of the municipal budget. Sort of like an annual birthing process where, line by line, revenues and expenses are tallied up. There is perhaps a misconception that town hall operates solely on property taxes. In fact, municipalities have a variety of income streams, including grants from other levels of government, user fees for facilities like the arena and services like garbage, licensing, fines, investment income and development charges. On the expense side, there are capital expenditures and operating expenditures. The capital budget includes tangible assets, including anything from new traffic signals to upgrading the sewage treatment plant. On the operating side, there are things like repairing traffic signals and fixing the leaky roof at town hall, as well as ongoing costs like fire and police protection. In many cases, rapid growth and/or aging infrastructure place tremendous pressure on municipal finances. Councillors are responsible for not only effective financial management, but also ensuring that taxpayers are receiving good value for their tax dollars. continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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jeff duncan continued from page 29

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he says, “if someone wanted to tear an old building down, there was nothing to prevent it happening.” Duncan oversaw the creation of the committee and chaired it for five years. In that time, the committee developed an inventory of heritage buildings and worked with a developer to preserve a stone building, thought to be the first dwelling in Erin, at Crewson’s Corners. The project subsequently won an Ontario Heritage Award. He says the most personally meaningful experience during his public service took place in April 2007, when he travelled to Vimy Ridge in France to lay a wreath on behalf of Wellington County’s WWI veterans and their families. Duncan even took lessons from the election process itself. “I’ve learned that ideas come from all the people who run. The people who bring them forward may not win, but the ideas still come forward.” It wasn’t all clear sailing though. Duncan found the variable pace of activity a particular challenge. He feels some things, such as provincial adjustments to municipal council terms and the Greenbelt legislation, happened too quickly or without local consultation, while others, such as dealing with municipal infrastructure deficits, happen glacially or not at all. And he has other quibbles: “The province has so many different policy initiatives going at the same time, it’s hard for municipalities to keep up. Another beef I have with the province is about reporting requirements, which are a big drain for local municipalities. There’s so much time-consuming red tape. You only have limited staff and if they’re focussed on that, they’re not doing other local things.” But there is one area where Duncan

would like to see more provincial control, not less: “The province has a thousand and one rules around the environment, but it’s still up to the local municipality to manage infrastructure. You would think the province would be more directly involved, particularly with funding.” Despite the frustrations, it’s clear Duncan means it when he says, “I loved being on council. I found it very rewarding, and the number of people you get to meet is incredible.” Although he topped the polls in the two terms he served, rather than seeing it as a licence to coast, Duncan says, “It was really humbling. It’s the reason you give the job your best effort.” Still, he decided not to run in 2006. At the time, four people close to him had been diagnosed with cancer. “That factored in the decision more than I realized at the time,” he says, “but the main issue was the time commitment.” Duncan says he attended about sixty to seventy meetings a year. For councillors who actually read the mountains of material they receive, preparation time for that kind of meeting load is huge. “You’ve got family, a full-time job, and then council. You can’t do all three, so something suffers,” he says. Worse yet, some committees meet during the day, so he would take vacation days from work to attend. With only three weeks annual vacation from his job, not much time was left. “Plus I commute an hour a day. It was becoming too much of a struggle.” Perhaps Duncan sums up the reality of life in municipal politics most eloquently when he says, “You forget what it’s like to be home after supper, and have to deal with the dirty dishes.” ≈ Freelance writer Jeff Rollings will be choosing his favourite bouquet at a polling station in Orangeville.

another day at the office continued from page 29

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- Chinese Proverb

A large part of life as a municipal councillor is taken up with planning matters, and it’s where they are likely to bump into the most voters. As the elected local representatives, councillors are at the centre of decisions regarding land and resources. It’s a complicated dance with proponents of development projects, the public, the province, and the Ontario Municipal Board. In theory, the steps are called by the municipality’s official plan and zoning bylaws; however, the content of those documents must conform to the Provincial Policy Statement, so the province ultimately calls the tune. Councillors are also likely to confront the subdivision development process, and require an understanding of land severance. Public participation is a mandatory element of land-use planning. When considering a development plan, councillors are required to take a balanced view, factoring in public input along with environmental, social and financial costs and benefits. While land-use planning decisions are often controversial, the process provides the best opportunity for shaping the future of the community – the most enduring legacy of an individual’s time in the council seat. ≈


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eet Heather Hayes. Resident of Mulmur Township. Wife to Mike. Mother to Connor and Liam. Volunteer, fundraiser, home-schooler. Professional cook, with a flair for old-fashioned cinnamon buns. Here she is at the cusp of mid-life, her first son fledged out of the nest and into high school, the second on his way. So what now? Kick back? Redecorate? Heck no. Heather wants to jump into local politics. Over the seventeen years she’s lived in Honeywood, Heather has had a busy life – foster parenting, running a daycare, driving a school bus, selling her glorious baking at the Creemore Farmers’ Market – always tied to people and community. She now works in the kitchen at Pine River Institute, a residential treatment centre for young people. “It has always been in the back of my mind,” she says. “For a long time, people have been asking me: Why don’t you run? And the reason I’m doing it now, well, I just feel like this is a great time of change around here. We need to figure out what we are to people. So we have farmers, right? Country people. And then we have city people. It’s a unique blend. In the city, you get city. You don’t have farmers in the middle of downtown. “Here, we have such diverse groups

of people. How do you meet their needs? How do you blend what’s going on in the farm community right now with these big houses and developments? ” It’s a big commitment. If Heather wins, she will serve the township for the next four years. Each month, there will be a daytime council meeting and an evening meeting followed by an open citizens’ forum. She will learn the workings of governance and absorb pages and pages of complex reports. There will be committee meetings for planning, fi nance and services such as water, cemeteries, roads and landfills. Tempers may flare when talk turns to gravel mines or water management. She will answer calls and field requests from businesses, social groups and media. She’ll be invited to public functions and accosted at the grocery store. All of this after running a vigorous election campaign to win the job. The campaign began for Heather back in June, when she fi led her nomination papers with the township clerk Terry Horner. Mulmur’s five-person council includes a mayor, deputy mayor and three councillors. Heather is running for one of the council slots. Candidates have until September 10 to throw their hat into the ring. At press time, Heather was one of four candidates competing for three


P H O T O S B R YA N D AV I E S

After seventeen years as a resident of Honeywood, Heather Hayes is making a bid for a seat on Mulmur council.

councillor seats. Municipal elections attract relatively fewer votes than provincial or federal elections. In 2006, 41 per cent voters came out on average across Ontario, according to data gathered by the Association of Municipal Managers, Clerks and Treasurers. In general, municipalities with smaller populations had better turnout rates than larger ones. In Mulmur, 47 per cent of voters came out, quite different from neighbouring Melancthon where only 25 per cent showed up. Each vote can really count in a small township. In 2006, Mulmur’s race for the position of mayor ended dramatically. Paul Mills won the position by one vote. When the other candidate, Gordon Montgomery, requested a recount, it came out a tie. Finally, a rejected ballot was included in the count and Gordon Montgomery became mayor. Both men are running again. Candidates across Ontario pay $100 for the opportunity to run for council ($200 for mayor or reeve, depending on the municipality). To be eligible, candidates or their spouses must be residents, owners or tenants of land within the municipality – in short, people who live or who own property there. Heather’s approach to campaigning is straightforward: “My plan is to go to as many houses as I possibly can, introduce myself and listen to what people tell me. Certain things bug me that I think need to be looked at, but I firmly believe, if I was voted in, my job would be to communicate with people: This is what we’re thinking of doing, but what is your opinion, what do you want to see happen?”

Campaigns can raise up to $5,000 ($7,500 for head of council), plus 85 cents for each elector in the district. All candidates are required to open a campaign account and, in the year following the election, fi le a financial statement. Candidates whose campaign contributions exceed $10,000 must also fi le an auditor’s report. One of the first people that Heather recruited was a campaign accountant. She felt that, in the heat of the race, she would need someone else to track the money. Given Mulmur’s small population, she will not need an audit. However, rules for campaign contributions are somewhat complex, particularly around gifts of goods and services – say for a fundraiser – where fair market value needs to be established. As another example, loans for a campaign are not considered contributions, but interest paid on the loan must be included in the campaign expenses. Heather can accept up to $750 from each supporter, but may not accept anonymous contributions. Expenses can include standard items such as pamphlets and signs, but candidates need to ensure that enough money is left in the coffers to pay expenses that might crop up at the end of the campaign, such as an election after-party or recount expenses. If a candidate asks for a recount, she pays for it. Any campaign surplus or anonymous contributions become the property of the municipality. There does not appear to be any profit in campaigning for office. After all this, Heather may find the effort exceeds the reward. “The powers that have been taken away from municipal government are huge, with the new Municipal Act and things like the Green Energy Act,” Heather acknowledges. “There are fewer things municipal governments can do anymore. Community we can; but some of the greater decisions, not so much.” So why do it? Why would Heather run for council? “People should have a voice,” she says. “Maybe people should start standing up and saying to the province, ‘No, that’s not okay. You can’t take all of this away from us. This is our community and we need to speak up for that.’” She adds, “There are so many great things that could be done. Every day a new idea pops into my head about how council could make more of a difference in people’s lives.”

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continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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MUL MUR TOWNSHIP : A RUR AL SNAP SHOT There are 1.4 million rural and small-town inhabitants in Ontario, according to Statistics Canada. Although just a small fraction of Ontario’s total population, they make up 24 per cent of Canada’s total rural and small-town population. This population grew slowly at 1 per cent from 2001 to 2006; whereas urban populations grew by 6.4 per cent over the same time span. Mulmur Township is growing slightly faster than Ontario overall. P O P UL AT I O N ............................................................................................ 3, 30 0 TOTA L P R I VAT E DW EL L IN GS .................................................................. 1, 479 DW ELLINGS O CC UPIED BY PERMANEN T RE SIDENT S ........................ 1,19 5 MED I A N AGE ............................................................................................... 42 . 3 MED I A N H O USEH O L D IN CO ME ........................................................ $76 , 45 4 NUMBER W H O WO R K O U T SIDE THE CO U NT Y ..................... 8 0 0 O F 1,775 source : statistics canada, 2006 census of population

hayes continued from page 33

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In Ontario’s last municipal elections, 5,724 people must have agreed with Heather – that’s how many decided it was a good idea to run for office. Of those elected, 24 per cent were women and 36 per cent were new to the position. Municipal government is a good place to start in politics. The candidates run against each other without the added tension of party loyalties. As councillors, they have a shot at directly influencing change in their own backyards – often in counterpoint to actions by provincial or federal governments. Heather is especially concerned about what she considers the arbitrary nature of the provincial-local power split. “We have to be able to plan for ourselves. One of the biggest things that bothers me is the cut to social services, specifically to the Children’s Aid Societies. The provincial government decided, well after the budget was set, to come in and cut $1.4 million from Dufferin County’s services. How is that supposed to work? CAS is specifically mandated to provide a certain level of service and, if they don’t follow through, they’ll be held accountable. And yet, all that money is pulled away from them.” Heather had first-hand experience

Heather tries out her pitch with fellow resident Stan Cowling. She says her campaign strategy is “to go to as many houses as I possibly can, introduce myself and listen to what people tell me.”

with the result of the cutbacks. With her experience in youth services, she had been hired by CAS to provide post-care liaison with at-risk youth, but the position fell victim to budget cuts a week before she was to start. Like many people raised in rural and small-town environments, Heather has been steeped in the notion that we belong to our community. Raised in Port Elgin and educated in youth services, she has volunteered widely, from running a toy-lending library to heading up the Simcoe County AIDS committee to, most recently, leading a fundraiser for the Dufferin Children’s Fund. She believes in connection. “Family is about connection. Community is about connection. If people just had access to the resources of municipal government – or provincial and federal – you’d see how all of those connections could come together and great things could happen.” ≈ Julie Suzanne Pollock lives in Honeywood and works outside the county for the federal government.


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H I S T O R I C

H I L L S

by Ken Weber

WHEN LOCAL GOVERNMENT RULED

D

eputy-Reeve Crawford was in a spot of trouble at the June, 1883 meeting of the Albion Township council in Lockton. In late May, a sudden flood on the Albion-King Town Line had torn out the bridge over a creek. The situation, in Crawford’s opinion, created a clear and present danger, so he had ordered a new bridge built. In head-spinning time by today’s standards, a contractor was hired, support beams laid and planks nailed down. In just two days, the danger was eliminated and normal traffic restored. It was a speedy and practical response to an urgent need, but there was a political flaw. Deputy-Reeve Crawford had acted on his own.

“It needed doing and I did it!”

On the books in Albion Township was a requirement that no member of council could authorize expenditures over ten dollars without first consulting other councillors. “Crawford’s Bridge,” as his critics called it, had cost nearly seventy dollars. Exactly what was said at the June council meeting will never be known. If mud was tossed, clerk James Donaghy did not record it. Still, there 36

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

are hints. A bill for five dollars from William Clark was summarily rejected and Councillor Brown was appointed to inspect the bridge before any other bills were approved. Evidence of heat comes too from letters to the editor arguing that by acting outside the ten-dollar limit Crawford was personally responsible for the difference. The deputy-reeve’s reply was that it was more urgent to deal rapidly with the washed out bridge than to travel around the township looking for consensus among other councillors. “It needed doing and I did it,” he is alleged to have said. Judging by the tone of subsequent letters to the editor, his argument prevailed, not just with council but with the citizens of Albion too. Action, it seems, was preferred over consultation.

Dour men in beards: At its November session in 1888, Dufferin County council adjourned briefly to gather outside the court house to be photographed. It was the first time since the new county’s council was established in 1881 that anyone had thought to capture the “County Fathers” on film. Of that first council, the Orangeville Sun enthused, “They are, perhaps, the ablest-bodied Council in Ontario. There are 13 members, and their united weight is 2,704 lbs, or an average of 208 lbs each! The Deputy-Reeve of Melancthon takes the lead, he weighing 268 pounds… Verily, the race of giants is not passed away.”

No End to the Responsibilities

Despite the common contemporary feeling that government had little involvement in people’s daily lives during the nineteenth century, the fact is, here in the hills and elsewhere, citizens relied heavily on their local councils. Predictably, much of that reliance related to infrastructure. After Albion’s council dealt with the deputy-reeve’s transgression at the June meeting, it went on to authorize improvements to five different roads, repairs to three

Also in the Minutes …

Almost hidden in the flurry of disbursements during Albion council’s minutes for June, 1883 is approval to pay the account of Dr. Allison of Caledon East. The bill was $16 for his medical care of A. Jamison, an “indigent.” There are no details but the amount is significant and suggests that the highly regarded physician put in a great deal of time and effort not to mention expertise on the case. Sadly, further along in the minutes another account is approved for payment, this time to Henry Brown: $7.50 to build a coffin for A Jamison.

bridges and construction of a new one. At the July meeting (held at Perdue’s Hotel in Caledon East), council voted to repair seven more bridges and, with an apparent change of heart, reversed itself on William Clark’s five-dollar account for the work on Crawford’s Bridge. In the June and July meetings of every other council around these hills, the minutes suggest precisely the same thing was going on: fi xing, building and getting things done. It was not all roads and bridges, however. Promotion of commerce also came under local government’s vast umbrella. In the summer of 1883, for example, Reeve Henderson of East Garafraxa organized yet another (unsuccessful) petition to the Credit Valley Railway for a station on its line through the township. In Erin Township, Reeve Burt (who had two deputy-reeves) worked to get more council support for local fairs. In Melancthon, after seven years without a single store in

P H O T O CO U R T E S Y D U F F E R I N CO U N T Y M U S E U M & A R C H I V E S

Before there were boards and commissions and tribunals and official plans, and before there were consultants and mission statements and surveys and regulations and codes, the local municipal council handled almost everything. And fast.


NO DETAIL TOO SMALL

Among a council’s many duties, animal control was considered crucial because unfenced livestock often caused significant damage. In Amaranth Township, bylaw 33 was very specific on the issue. It permitted free roaming of “cows, heifers, steers and oxen that are not breachy [prone to break fences], pigs over forty pounds except boars, and all sheep except rams.” Owners of roaming livestock not covered by the list were subject to fines of fifty cents for the first offence, one dollar for the second, then two dollars, “and so on for each and every subsequent offence with costs.” The by-law was enacted in 1861 and stood for decades except for an amendment passed in 1882. As of May 7 that year, a roaming pig had to be “rung” (have a ring in its nose to keep it from rooting).

the entire township, council got its wish and celebrated the opening of a general store in Melancthon Corners. But commerce also had a downside for municipal politicians. For example, at its May, 1883 meeting, Caledon Township council, received delegations from Alton and Caledon East pleading for the removal of community slaughterhouses to sites where the offensive smells would be less invasive. Both enterprises were run by influential employers, but by the end of the meeting council had appointed two of its members to become health officers pro tem, empowered not to consult but to “have the same removed.” Occasionally, councillors had to respond to unusual, even bizarre situations – such as the one that confronted Colwell Graham in 1883. Then in his fourteenth year as reeve, and having been treasurer for eight years and a councillor for nine, he thought he’d heard it all, until a local citizen told him that otherworldly creatures were haunting a culvert on 15 Sideroad and council had better do something. (It turned out to be a still.) Less edgy but still unusual was Albion council’s order to S. Beamish to remove his furniture from the middle of the intersection of the Fourth Line and 35 Sideroad. More common, but indicative of the all-encompassing role of municipal politicians, was the number of disbursements at council meetings on behalf of “indigents,” what today would be similar to social assistance payments. Caledon Township’s elected body made eight such payments in May, 1883, including one “to Mrs. Brown, $5 for care of a foundling,” a baby abandoned in a woodshed near Mono Road. A strange matter for a municipal council, but there was no other official body to take charge.

Being a Councillor: Worth All the Work?

For the most part, the people who undertook council responsibilities – and made the effort to get elected – were citizens with a keen appreciation of the benefits that come with local control. Prior to the incorporation of

Orangeville in 1863, for example, the municipal power of the town’s 1,200 citizens was fragmented across three townships, Mono, Caledon and Garafraxa, and three counties, Wellington, Grey and Simcoe. Getting its own local government meant Orangeville could do things on its own and for itself. In urban settlements like Orangeville, local politicians were often businessmen who realized local control was crucial because rural township councils tended to govern instinctively in favour of a rural lifestyle, a point which may explain why Bolton’s first council made no effort to hide its relief at the village’s separation from Albion Township in 1872 (yet Shelburne, whose boundaries sit astride Melancthon and Amaranth Townships did not incorporate as a town until 1977). Certainly it was not the level of remuneration that encouraged citizens to run for council in the nineteenth century. One dollar per meeting was a typical compensation, although ad hoc appointments to such positions as health officer, fence inspector, and various committees could sweeten the pot a little. Perhaps the strongest indication of the inherent rewards of municipal work is the number of reeves who returned repeatedly to serve their constituencies. Examples abound: Thomas Swinarton, twelve terms for Albion Township; Colwell Graham, fourteen in Mulmur: John Gillespie, eleven in Amaranth, to name just three. Numbers like these suggest the rewards of serving on council must have been worth all the work. DeputyReeve Crawford would surely say so. Not long after the quick construction of “his” bridge, news wires carried the story of an American family who met disaster at a bridge washout. They were travelling in the dark and the bridge where they fell had gone unrepaired for weeks. ≈ Caledon writer Ken Weber’s bestselling Five-Minute Mysteries series is now published in 22 languages.

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37


Writer Nicola Ross takes aim on the outdoor range at The Archers of Caledon. 38

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010


STRAIGHT ARROW lessons in a steady hand and a sharp eye

BY NI CO L A R OSS

 “F

irst, we have to determine whether you are right-eye or left-eye dominant,” says Bruce Savage, my accomplished archery instructor. Bruce’s successful wish list

in the sport he loves can only be topped if his daughter, Racheal, makes it to competition in the 2012 Olympics. She was the team’s alternate

P H O T O S P E T E PAT ER S O N

for the games in Athens and Beijing. A long-time Caledon resident, Bruce explains that about 25 per cent of the time, a right-handed person is lefteye dominant (or vice versa). When that happens the eye overrules the hand. Your dominant eye determines depth, and it’s easier to learn the mechanics than depend on the wrong eye. I’m right-eye dominant, so Bruce pulls a right-handed recurve bow out of a cabinet fi lled with dozens of these elegant double-bent bows. There are some compound bows too, but for lessons, the recurve is the “weapon” of choice; it is also what Racheal, will use in London if she makes the cut. The Archers of Caledon on Shaw’s Creek Road, south of Belfountain, is one of two archery clubs in the hills. The other is the Dufferin-Northern Peel Hunters’ & Anglers’ Association on Mono’s Five Sideroad, north of Orangeville. Only the Caledon facility has an indoor range and, in fact, the Archers of Caledon’s ten heated indoor lanes compose one of only two such facilities in the Greater Toronto Area. For this reason, it attracts some top-notch archers. The day I’m there, I speak with Torontonian Crispin Duenas. He competed at the Beijing Olympics, hopes to make the London team and is a role model for 16-year-old Sean Delaporte. A tall, good-looking kid who recently graduated from Erin District High School, Sean competed in his first national competition this year. I ask Sean what he likes about archery and he tells me it’s the combination of the friendly, laid-back camaraderie at the Caledon club and the discipline. “My background is in the cadets, so I like the discipline.” A young Scandinavian couple are the only other people shooting indoors as I make my way onto a lane. Fortunately, Bruce sets me up on the other side of the shooting range, hidden from the view of these experts, and half again as close to the targets. I may have a dominant right eye, but

from where these seasoned archers shoot, I would hardly be able to see, much less hope to hit, the target. I attended Mayfield Secondary School which had an archery program at the time. I recall loving it. As Sean pointed out, there is something highly disciplined and precise about the sport, but it’s also simple – just you, a bow, three arrows and a target. These days, few high schools offer archery. Sometimes it’s because they don’t have the equipment; sometimes it’s because there is no qualified instructor; but as often as not, it’s because some schools discourage teaching a sport related to hunting. Bruce puts a rubber tube in my hand and shows me how to hold it as if it were a bow. I pull back on the rubber and let it go. It’s something he does with all of the students who flock to the Archers of Caledon’s popular instructional program. Bruce wants me to let my right shoulder recoil after releasing the rubber. He also gets me to cock my left elbow in a way that will prevent the string from burning the inside of my arm. After a few tugs on the rubber tube, I’m ready for a real bow. Bruce gives me a leather strip that protects my inside elbow – I guess people don’t always remember to cock their arm, helps me fit a leather protector on to my right, stringpulling hand, and has me straddle a line ten metres from the target. He puts the bow in my left hand, helps me fit the bowstring into the slot in the feathered end of the arrow and then rest the arrow’s shaft on a small ledge built into my bow. He shows me how to wrap three fingers on my right hand around the string – the arrow fits between two of my leather-clad fingers – and pull the string back until it touches my nose. Then he reminds me to cock my left elbow and raise my right, string-pulling elbow high into the air. Finally, he repeats his earlier direction about allowing my right arm to recoil. Given everything there is to remember, I forget about the target. In fact, I don’t even notice that there is no bull’s eye on the wall ahead of me – only a white rectangular piece of spongy material. Feeling amazingly comfortable given the raft of last-minute instructions, I let the arrow go, aiming vaguely toward the front of the room. continued on page 41 IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

39


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ith the timing and language of a gifted storyteller, Brian Oates is relating to me his most fulfilling hunting experience – one when he didn’t shoot anything. Brian can’t remember a time when he wasn’t interested in archery, and over the years that I’ve known this Erin native, we’ve often had heated discussions about hunting. Why not just use a camera if it’s all about the experience and intimacy with your prey? Why do you need to kill the poor beast, I want to know? But in truth, I’m playing devil’s advocate. There is something primordial about hunting and though I have never shot an animal and hope I never will, I would if I had to. Besides, I can’t help thinking that eating what you kill is about as pure a relationship between humans and their sustenance as it gets. I also recognize that there is something about a real-life chase, the cunning of the animal, wanting to understand, to outsmart, to outwit. For Brian and for ethical hunters like him, the chase needs to end in more than a photograph – either the prey wins or the hunter does. Or sometimes, maybe both come out victors. The sun was past its zenith when Brian headed out to hills behind his house that November day. The fi elds he travelled were as much a part of him as the crow’s feet that appeared at his temples each time he checked the horizon for white-tailed deer. A snowfall earlier in the week had turned the fields virgin white. Then a warm spell brought rain. That day, the temperature had plummeted, crystallizing the snow. It was frigid. “Every time I brushed past a tree, ice would fall from it on to the icy surface,” Brian says. “It sounded as if someone was throwing glass bottles in an empty gymnasium.” He traversed a low spot and was climbing up a hill through a thicket of dogwoods when he put up three does and a nice buck. “I followed them, one step, two steps, just like a deer would move.” He remembers that the clouds had cleared and light was good. Then he spotted a little six-pointer checking out the does. It was rutting season, after all. “I played cat and mouse with him through the dogwoods and cedars for about forty-five minutes, maybe longer,” he says. Brian followed the buck to an old

A younger Brian Oates on a wilderness hunting expedition.

cornfield at the top of a hill and then paused to gaze over the open landscape below. The taffeta surface of crusted snow sparkled in the afternoon sun’s oblique rays. Minutes later, the fiery ball dipped below the horizon, and Brian unstrung his long bow. Bow hunting is only legal when the sun is up. An “instinctive shooter” in that he uses no sights, Brian’s preferred weapon is what is referred to as a “stick” bow, since it is little more than a piece of wood and a string. Popular in ancient Britain because of how quickly they could be loaded with arrows, long bows require a bit more strength than the more elegant recurve bows, which are used in Olympic competition. But they are far simpler than the highly technical compound bows with their hooks and pulleys, or lethal crossbows, which are more Schwarzenegger than Robin Hood. Brian has made at least a dozen bows himself, has a basement filled with partially made ones, and pieces of wood that may someday become bows. Nonetheless, he hunts with bows that are custom-made, individually named and autographed by Dick Robertson of Stykbow in Montana. That day he was using “Sun Dog,” his winter bow. Made of flexible bamboo with walrus tusk ivory tips, it is lighter than its fair-weather cousins, which are made from red elm or ironwood or osage – or even yew, if you have the money.

Brian left the cornfield and headed down into the open land where he stopped to gaze back through his binoculars. Although he had unstrung his bow, he hoped to spy his prey one more time. With a full moon rising, Brian got his wish. The young buck left the cornfield, hopped a fence and was heading his way. “I had a white top on and white camouflage pants,” he recalls, “so the buck couldn’t see me.” Then Brian used his grunt horn to pull the deer in closer. “I bet if I’d reached out like this with my bow, I could have touched him,” he tells me, his eyes doe-like with the memory. “He’s sort of looking right through me. I’m just standing there, not moving, and I see his nose working, but the wind is coming to me and now, because of the freezing rain, everything is jewels in the moonlight. Everything is sparkling, it’s unbelievable and if I had to feed my family, I could have shot him right there, but I didn’t have to feed my family, I didn’t have to eat that night, and so I’m looking at him and smiling to myself and that is how close I got.” In the breathless silence that followed, I asked: “Were you tempted to shoot him?” “I knew I could and that was the reward. To get that close, to get that intimate with the animal…So I spoke to him. I said, ‘Look buck, it’s your lucky day.’ “And his eyes went bang because I moved my hands and he saw me. It was like he was thinking: ‘Holy! Holy! Holy! Holy!’ “He didn’t know where to go and he’s moving from side to side and all of a sudden – you know that blow, that grunt – and he’s stomping his feet and then he jumps straight up into the air and he lands and he’s bounding away from me, and he’s crashing and the crusted snow is exploding each time he lands. He goes in a long arc and he goes back up into the cornfield and I could still hear him going “hoosh, hoosh, hoosh” as he disappeared into the night. So I turned around and just walked home. “And that’s my most fulfilling hunting experience.” “But you practically scared him to death,” I offer. “No,” says Brian after a long pause during which I can tell he really is pondering my suggestion. “No,” he repeats. “He probably got a pretty good education out of the deal.” ≈


archery continued from page 39

My shoulder doesn’t exactly recoil as Bruce had hoped, but my arrow hits the square rectangle, which makes me smile. When I remark on it, Bruce replies with a line he must have repeated hundreds of times to beginners: “Our goal at this point is to keep the arrow in the building.” Bruce’s daughter Racheal, 29, repeats the phrase when I talk to her. A Mayfield grad as well, she learned the sport from her dad, spending countless hours at the archery club along with her older brother Eric. Racheal got off to an early start, competing in Ontario’s Summer Games before reaching her teens. Then she gave archery up for a few years before deciding to get serious. In 1997, Racheal competed in the Canada Summer Games in Brandon, Manitoba. She tells me that so far, that was the best experience of her archery career. Not only did she win gold in both the individual and team events, but her dad was her coach and her brother Eric competed too. “I remember hearing Eric cheering me on from the bleachers,” she says. At a competition in Colombia in 2003, she raised the eyebrows of archery’s élite. With an unexpected top-three placing, Racheal won Canada its first Olympic spot for a female archer in sixteen long years. Problem was, she earned a spot for Canada, not for herself. To determine who would get to use the berth, organizers set out a number of standards that archers had to meet. Only Racheal and one other woman made the grade. The next step was a head-to-head competition between the two. When the final arrow flew, it was Racheal’s opponent who captured the Olympic dream and made the trip to Athens. Back at the archery range where Racheal spends so much time, I try my luck with two more arrows. You shoot three before retrieving them from the target. My second misses the rectangle and clatters to the f loor. With my third attempt, I make sure to recoil my shoulder as Bruce has instructed. It works. The arrow zings off my string and whizzes cleanly through

string nock

recurve

upper limb

bow sight

sight window nocking point locator

arrow rest pivot point

centre serving

bow grip

lower limb

bowstring

recurve string nock

the air, embedding itself in the spongy material. It feels pretty neat. I’m the only one using this half of the range, so Bruce and I amble down to pick up my arrows. Normally, everyone shoots, everyone puts down their bows, and then everyone goes to retrieve their arrows at the same time. “It’s not a dangerous sport,” Bruce assures me, and it’s rules like these that make it that way. Bruce attaches a large bull’s eye to the white rectangle and when I set up to shoot again, he adjusts a small pin that is attached to the bow. He has me align the pin with the centre of the target. I get a clean shot off, but it hits continued on next page

Arrowheads: metal tip crafted by Brian Oates; stone tips by Don Gilson.

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archery continued from page 41

just above the coloured rings. Not your fault, Bruce assures me as he raises the pin to compensate. My next shot is worse, not better, but once again I’d forgotten to recoil my right shoulder. With my third set of three arrows, I manage to hit the bull’s eye. I can’t resist cheering, and Bruce smiles too. Despite the huge number of lessons he’s given, and even though he instructs some of Canada’s finest archers, he shares my joy. With a bull’s eye under my belt, we move outdoors. I’m advancing ahead of my actual skill level, but I’d asked Bruce for the entire experience, and what really intrigues me are the outdoor field and 3-D courses that marry archery with a little bit of golf. Both the Archers of Caledon and the Dufferin-Northern Peel facilities

have outdoor archery courses. The latter is a busy place on Saturday mornings, according to long-time member and executive Bob Clarence. That’s when twenty or more people show up, split into threesomes or foursomes, and spend an hour or more walking through forest and field from target to target. While the Caledon club has two field courses where you shoot at traditional bull’s eye targets, both clubs have 3-D courses. Somewhat reallooking deer, elk, moose, bears and even rabbits are set out, and each member of the foursome shoots at them from different distances, before moving on to the next target. Personally, the idea of shooting at animal targets, even if they are made of sponge, makes me uncomfortable. I’m not against hunting, especially bow hunting, when it’s ethical and

people eat what they take, but I can’t bring myself to aim at these animals. I am content to try my hand at the bull’s eyes. Whereas members of the Caledon club are mostly target shooters, the Dufferin-Northern Peel facility caters to hunters. There are always exceptions, however. And when I spoke to one of them, I came across a target shooter with a story. Charlotte and Ivan Lathwell moved from Toronto to a small acreage near Erin almost forty years ago. Ivan, now 74, explains that he’s from “Robin Hood country.” He grew up in Nottingham with a bow in his hand. He hunts, but these days you can find him at the Dufferin-Northern Peel club most Saturday mornings. You can identify him by his signature red, blue, yellow and green arrows that he assembles himself and adorns continued on next page


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Avid archers Charlotte and Ivan Lathwell have an archery range on their Erin property.

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

with his school colours. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a matter of cost really. Commercial arrows cost about $200 for a dozen,â&#x20AC;? he explains. When Bob suggested I call Ivan to learn about his arrows, he told me to talk to Charlotte also, because â&#x20AC;&#x153;she can outshoot anyone at the club.â&#x20AC;? And indeed, her fifty or more archery trophies almost double those of her husband. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Scotland,â&#x20AC;? Charlotte tells me proudly, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I held the British award for ballroom dancing.â&#x20AC;? It seems a long way from crystal chandeliers and stiletto heels to bows and arrows, but sometime after she arrived in Canada and under Ivanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tutelage, Charlotte turned into an avid kayaker, learned to shoot a rifle, and eventually became an accomplished archer. Now 79 and limited to a walker by two replacement knees, Charlotte continues to shoot the targets set up behind the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house, and as recently as four years ago was still competing. Charlotte explains how she managed to get to most but not all of the targets at a tournament in Galt, Ontario, by slowly moving with her walker over the rough ground on the course. In the end, she placed second,

losing to a thirty-year-old who had to shoot at every single target in order to outscore Charlotte. Kicking herself even today, she tells me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All I had to do was shoot at one more target and I would have won. I could have slowly taken my walker to another target, but the ground was rough and I was nervous.â&#x20AC;? Maybe there is inspiration for Racheal Savage in Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dogged determination. It turns out that Racheal was once again the alternate to the Olympic team in Beijing. This time it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Racheal who won Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spot, but she, along with two others, made the standard and had to compete in a shootout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always the bridesmaid, never the bride,â&#x20AC;? she quips. But Racheal is back into serious training because next year she will be vying for that Olympic berth again. Perhaps if she imagines Charlotte in her walker making her slow determined progress to one more target, it will help her capture that spot in London and fi ll her Dadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quiver of archery dreams. â&#x2030;&#x2C6; Nicola Ross is the executive editor of Alternatives Journal, a national environmental magazine.


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ARTS EVENTS September

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September & October

September & October

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P H O T O R O S EM A R Y H A S N ER

a new, illustrated book tells the history of Dufferin County like you’ve never heard – or seen – it before

Tt

here’s the official history of Dufferin County – documented in such serious tomes as Into the High County by Adelaide Leitch. And now there is the unofficial history, or, more aptly, the “picture book.” Stars of Dufferin County by Mulmur artist Mary Lazier, co-illustrated by Shelburne artist Ursula Crosbie, is a quirky, highly selective, pictorial collection of historic tales, some perhaps a tad tall, from the county’s history. The book begins and ends with stories that even Adelaide Leitch would deem worthy of classic historical treatment: the Petun longhouse settlement in the north end of the county and the presentday development of the Melancthon wind farms. But between those opening and closing pages, Mary Lazier takes readers on a wild ride, not so much through the history of Dufferin, but through the psyche of its people. This is a not a book about historic personages, but about everyday personalities. It’s a people’s history, but there is nothing ordinary about Dufferin’s people. As author and actor Mag Ruffman writes in her foreword to the book: “Almost anyone would be underprepared for the depth of character one can encounter in Dufferin County’s established resi-

BY SI GNE B A L L

dents. If I’d had this wonderful book when I moved here about a decade ago, I would have known what an individualistic bunch we all are. And I would have relaxed.” That individualist bunch includes Miss Phyllis Maltby, “The Hello Girl,” who operated the switchboard in Laurel in the early 1900s; Mary Ireland who won the “Husband Calling” contest in Shelburne in 1951; the Williams Hillhouse and Jelly, who famously discovered a mastodon skeleton in an Amaranth farm field, then toured it across North America; and Bruce Beach who maintains an extensive underground nuclear bomb shelter near Hornings Mills, constructed from forty-seven school buses. The book also recounts some incidents of visiting “stars,” such as how the outlaws Jesse and Frank James hid out on a Mulmur sideroad, and the day The Rolling Stones cleared the shelves at the Shelburne LCBO, and the time Willie Nelson arrived by helicopter for a concert at Rock Hill Park. And there is a good selection of the county’s memorable moments, such as the séance to raise ghosts at Orangeville’s Town Hall Opera House and the annual Wiccan harvest-moon celebration near Mulmur. These are interspersed with idiosyn-

Mary Lazier at work in her Mulmur studio, framing the original art for sale at the launch of Stars of Dufferin County.

cratic accounts from the illustrators’ personal experiences, such as the day they were shifting the sliding shelving at the museum and heard the plaintive cry, “You’re squishing my husband!” Mary Lazier, 69, is a county star in her own right. Born and raised in Toronto, she always had an artistic bent. But her mother, herself an accomplished artist, wouldn’t let her go to art school, “because she didn’t feel that you could make a living as an artist. Maybe she was right. I don’t know.” So Mary began her working life as a lab technician – “which meant I could illustrate things, and look at things, and it was really quite fun because it appealed to my scientific side.” But she continued to have itchy fingers, and in 1972 she took her first potting class. Mary went on to study at Sheridan College and by the late seventies she had launched an artistic co-op. For the next decade, Spiral Pottery provided continued on page 55 IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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dufferin continued from page 53

classes, studio space and week ly teaching oppor tunities to potters. Her work has now been widely exhibited, including two solo shows at the Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art in Toronto. In her own distinctive style, Mary creates a combination of thrown and hand-built tableware, using techniques that relate to pastry-making, cake-decorating and dressmaking. She also constructs engaging clay garden characters. The consciously primitive style of those sculptures is reflected in the “naïve” collages and other mixed media illustrations in Stars of Dufferin County. Many of her garden sculptures are mermaids, who, as Mary says, “are sybarites. They don’t do housework, change diapers or tires on the cars. You never see them standing in line at the grocery store because all they do is lie around looking gorgeous all day.” Mary’s enchantment with the “mermaid lifestyle” was the inspiration for the title of the autobiography she self-published in 2008: I’d Rather Be a Mermaid. Drawn largely from the journals she wrote as a youth and on her extensive travels, it recounts with wry humour the travails of growing up with a brilliant, alcoholic father and an artistic, distracted mother. After her mother’s death, Mary and her third, “keeper” husband, potter Mark Tichenor, moved to the family property in Mulmur in 1999. She and Mark built a spacious potting workshop and gallery, which they dubbed Little Red Hen’s Kitchen Garden. In Mulmur, with her three daughters grown, Mary once more threw herself into the local artistic community, with active involvement in the local studio tours, the artists-inschools program of the Dufferin Arts Council, the Headwaters Arts Festival Show and Sale, and, over the past six

The book cover illustrates one of Mary Lazier’s favourite stories: In the mid-1800s, Dufferin Protestants feared an invasion by the Americaninspired Fenians (their flag was a green version of the stars and stripes). Four hundred men mustered in Rosemont to repel a rumoured assault by Adjala’s Catholics, but in the end the only casualty was a cow.

years as co-organizer with weaver Pat Burns-Wendland of the Holiday Treasures Show at Dufferin County Museum. Mary hatched the idea for the book after seeing a similar one by Susan Baker on trip to Provincetown, Maryland. “I came back here and I thought [Mulmur sculptor] Hugh Russel had sold a sculpture to some Arab sheiks, and I had a picture in my mind of the sheiks arriving in helicopter to pick it up. But that never happened. Too bad.” With one good story eliminated, Mary and Ursula went about researching others. “I talked to my farmer, I talked to my neighbours, I talked to the folks at the museum,” Mary says, adding that museum curator Wayne Townsend “had more stories than anyone I’ve met in my life.” From there they followed up, phoning, e-mailing and visiting to get the details. “There is only a small amount of text, but we needed lots of background to create the pictures,” Mary says. In all, Mary and Ursula spent two years researching and creating the fifty-eight illustrations. Mary financed the publishing venture through the sale of a painting by well-known Winnipeg artist Walter Phillips, which she’d inherited from her mother. Adelaide Leitch’s Into the High County is now out of print, but all continued on page 57 IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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true lovers of local history will have it on their bookshelf. From time to time, they may even take it down and blow off the dust to resolve an erudite dinner-table debate about the date the county was founded (1881), or Lord Dufferin’s given name (Frederick Temple Blackwood). Stars of Duf ferin County might nestle comfortably next to Leitch’s history, but more likely it will dwell

well-thumbed on the coffee table, at the ready for those less erudite debates about the county’s UFO sightings and nude weddings. “If I’d had this book to refer to when I first arrived,” says Mag Ruffman, “I would have understood that creativity runs unchecked in this part of the world. If you’re unusual enough, you’re not ignored or made fun of, you’re respected and even admired. And certainly discussed.” ≈

Stars of Dufferin County will be officially launched on Saturday, September 18 at the Mono Community Centre in Mono Centre. The launch will include a show and sale of Mary Lazier’s and Ursula Crosbie’s original 11" x 14" illustrations for the book (mixed media on canvas), as well as a pottery show featuring work by six local potters, from top: Arlene Peters, Rosemary Molesworth, Mary Lazier, Kim Harcourt, Mark Tichenor and Janet Helps (not shown).

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The book launch takes place in conjunction with Mono’s Big Day Out, a community festival in “downtown Mono Centre” that celebrates the food, farmers, heritage and landscape of Mono. The Big Day includes a Mono Children’s Art Show (downstairs in the community centre), as well as two presentations featuring more county lore in Burns Church: a talk at 11 a.m. on heritage barns by historian Dr. John C. Carter, and strange-but-true tales by Carol Cholvat and Dick Byford of the Dufferin Circle of Storytellers at 1:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. Mary Lazier’s pottery is also featured at Holiday Treasures, an annual pre-Christmas show featuring forty artists and craftspeople. It runs from November 19 to December 5 at Dufferin County Museum & Archives, at Airport Rd and Hwy 89. Stars of Dufferin County is available at BookLore, Dufferin County Museum & Archives, or directly from Mary Lazier at redhen.ca

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왘 Robin Pouw Chrysoprase Neckpiece chrysoprase set in sterling silver with tube-set peridot, chocolate diamonds 1.5" x 2.5" 왔 Atanur Dogan Gamblers watercolour 27.5" x 19.5"

AutumnCanvas In The Hills is pleased to present our annual preview of the Festival Art Show & Sale – a sampling of some of the rich diversity of styles and media from among the 44 local artists featured in this year’s juried show. The Festival art show is the centrepiece of the Headwaters Arts Festival, which runs from September 24 through October 11 and celebrates art, music and literature and film throughout the Headwaters region. The art show is open over the Festival’s first two weekends, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the SGI Canada Caledon Centre for Culture and Recreation, north of Alton. Admission is free. The opening night gala on Friday, September 24, gives you a chance

왗 John Adams Approaching Hills acrylic 60" x 40" 왔 Steven Volpe Contrails oil on canvas 3o" x 22.5"

왖 Patrick Bogert Apple Wood Seed Pod Box wood 5" x 2" 왘 Ann Randeraad Noodle Bowl cone 6 stoneware 5" x 4"


왖 Ellen Cameron Can’t Catch Me! photography, giclée on canvas 6o" x 27" 왔 Tony Vander Voet Badlands Tapestry – Last Snow oil on canvas 36" x 36"

왖 John Ashbourne Agricultural Ghost – The Old Feed Mill at Clifford photo collage mounted in relief with painted edges 46" x 23" x 3"

to be first to see the artists’ work. The evening is catered by local chefs and features music by TJ Whitleaw and Trista Suke, dance by Krist Mitchnick, and traditional drumming and singing by the Peel Aboriginal Network. Come back to the show the following Friday evening for a feast of literary talent as authors Cathy Marie Buchanan, Terry Fallis, Terry O’Reilly and Kate Taylor discuss the art and toil of writing. For details of all the Festival events, including a great line-up of handson children’s activities, see the Festival program in this magazine or go to headwatersartsfestival.com.

왗 Pete Herlihy Manual Control giclée print 2o" x 17" 왔 Elena Henderson Immovable Force acrylic on raw canvas 3o" x 4o"

왖 Rosalinde Baumgartner Georgina glazed clay 13.5" x 14" x 9"


Don’ t wait for the next issue! visit inthehills.ca Between seasons, visit the magazine at its online home where our bloggers offer thoughtful, informative, often humorous reflections on life in the hills.

Prepare food in

Christine Thomas

Red Squirrel Musings Christine humorously recounts the trials she experienced on her return to country living.

George & Liz Knowles

A Year at Larkspur Hollow Follow Liz and George as the year unfolds in their expansive gardens.

Don Scallen

Notes from the Wild A passionate naturalist, Don reports on his observations of local plant and wildlife.

French cookware, new French ceramic in great fall colours Purveyor of quality kitchen & tableware Emile Henry • Global • Denby • Riedel • Cuisinart Sophie Conran • Saeco • Krups and more! Sign up for our monthly newsletter for recipes, culinary advice, seminars & more. 125 Broadway, in historic downtown Orangeville 519-942-5908 www.kitchentotable.com

Especially for parents and kids kidsinthehills.ca

Bethany Lee

Lara King

Megan Armstrong

Headwaters Nest

Nest Profiles

Kids online editor Bethany blogs and writes the “Headwaters Nest” column in this magazine.

Lara posts interviews with local moms and dads who live, work and parent in the hills.

In the Kitchen with Chef Megan Megan offers quick and easy menus busy young hands can help prepare.

making the world more

beautiful one room at a time

Holly Haner-Lo

Jennifer Jansen

Jean Hayward

The Nurtured Way

Simple Matters

Holly focus on healthy, natural options for birthing, food choices, and wellness.

With two children, Jennifer offers tips for green parenting in the countryside.

The Grammar Nanny

Photography by Gillian Gauthier

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

Fun lessons parents can do with kids to improve their language skills.

Marg Anquetil, DDCD

519-942-0602

decdens.com/anquetil


E D I B L E

H I L L S

by Rober to Fracchioni

I L L U S T R AT I O N S S H E L A G H A R M S T R O N G

Beauty and the Beet As winter approaches, the last of summer’s abundant greens start to droop and suffer from cool fall evenings. This brings sadness to the hearts of chefs like me. The summer, with week after week of diverse vibrant harvests, provided a wealth of wonderful produce and menu inspiration. The thought of the long winter ahead, with nary a green vegetable to sauté, can be a bit depressing. Fortunately, the season of root vegetables comes to the rescue. Fall brings its own abundance, in the form of taproots, tubers, rhizomes, corms and bulbs. Perhaps my favourite is one of the more under-appreciated and underutilized vegetables: the beet. The beet is not easy to love. It has a tough exterior, makes a mess of your kitchen, and threatens to slide off your plate and stain your linens. However, as we learn in life, sometimes the most complicated, messy, challenging situations provide the most

gratifying results. Once we learn how to handle them, life becomes beautiful again and we wonder why we were ever afraid. So how to handle the difficult beet? The cleanest way is to first trim the leaves off the bulb, then wrap each in foil, place on a pan and roast in the oven until tender. An average tray of beets that are three inches in diameter will cook in about 30 minutes at 350°f. Remove from the oven and unwrap from the foil. Once they are cool to the touch, use a heavy paper towel or an old dish rag to gently rub away the skin. A cooked beet will slice very easily. To collect the beet juices and avoid staining your cutting board, place a sheet of waxed paper or thick plastic wrap across your board before you chop. Personally, I think the brilliant flesh of a traditional beet is a glorious and rare colour among food. It is worth a little trouble to create a stunning red and purple salad or a velvety hot pink soup, or to serve a blackened gem with a roaring fuschia centre next to a seared steak. Once you’ve befriended the beet, I encourage you to experiment. Try using beets as you would potatoes or other root vegetables. After roasting, leave in their jackets and crush the inside flesh with a fork, adding

a little cream and fresh dill. Try a scalloped version with chèvre, or dice and add to a quinoa salad with a bit of mint. Thinly sliced with a mandoline, tossed in olive oil and sea salt, beets also make wonderful, nutrition-rich oven-baked chips. Nevertheless, if the threat of a purple explosion in your kitchen is more than you can countenance, specialty golden beets and white beets are a kinder, gentler way to enjoy the versatility of this vegetable. These varieties are not always available in grocery stores, but their rarity is what makes them special. At this time of year you can often find them at farmers’ markets and roadside stands. Yellow beets tend to be slightly milder and sweeter than red beets and can be used raw for salads and crudités. White beets are usually threaded with pink stripes and make a very pretty presentation when sliced. Golden, ruby red, or pink and white, beets will add a jewel-like element to any plate. Your guests, like mine, will appreciate the visual beauty and wonderfully sweet earthy taste, while you bask in the glory of having tamed the beets. ≈

Roberto Fracchioni is executive chef at The Millcroft Inn & Spa in Alton.

roasted organic beets with herbed goat ’s cheese and chive oil 3 3 3 3 oz 5 oz 2 stalks

red beets yellow beets white beets olive oil goat’s cheese fresh thyme, washed, picked and chopped 1 stalk fresh rosemary, washed, picked and chopped 3 leaves fresh sage, washed, picked and chopped

3 leaves fresh basil, washed, picked and chopped 2 stalks flat-leaf parsley, washed, picked and chopped 1 shallot, very finely diced ¾ cup grape seed oil ¼ cup rice wine vinegar 2 tbsp lemon juice 1 bunch chives, very finely cut

Trim any stem off of the beets. Rub olive oil all over the beets, coating lightly. Wrap each beet tightly with aluminum foil. Roast in the oven at 350°F until tender. In the meantime, place cheese in a mixing bowl. Let the cheese warm up to room temperature as you chop all the herbs. Mix the herbs into the goat’s cheese and season with salt and pepper. Peel and cut the beets into 3⁄8-inch-thick medallions. Blend the grape seed oil, rice wine vinegar, lemon juice and chives at high speed until all the bits of chive are completely puréed. To plate, layer the beets with ½ tbsp of goat’s cheese mixture between each slice. Drizzle with the chive oil. Serves 6.

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H O M E G R O W N

I N

T H E

H I L L S

by Nicola Ross

P H O T O S P E T E PAT ER S O N

closing the divide between farm and plate

I

’m sitting in the passenger seat of Gord McArthur’s swanky white Ford S350 crew-cab pickup truck. Gord’s red-haired son Don, 27, is in the back seat and we’re heading to a nearby farm to take a look at the black Angus cattle Gord pastures there. I’ve sort of known Gord for most of my life. The same age as my next eldest sister, he frequented the same hallowed halls of learning as I did (Belfountain Public School and Mayfield Secondary), but also spent a few years at the public schools in Alton and Cataract. Nonetheless, this is the first time that our conversation has extended beyond a few polite greetings. It’s one of those things. He was a farm kid and, even though he lived on the next farm south of where I grew up and we likely rode the same school bus from time to time, my dad was a city guy, so I was from away. Sitting in that truck, I feel as if I am crossing some kind of social divide. Gord is obviously pleased to be showing me his countryside from a truck that indicates he is doing okay, and I am fascinated to be shown the land I’d grown up on through the eyes of someone who has either farmed or wanted to farm for his entire life. Gord tips his cowboy hat to the back of his head as we climb out of the truck. He warns me to mind my step as we walk down a trampled path where pale blue chicory and Queen Anne’s lace poke up through rich green grass and the odd cow patty. I’m wearing sandals! About fifteen jet black cattle have 62

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

Pat and Gord McArthur in the field with their grass-fed black Angus cattle.

HEATHERLEA FARM MARKET the run of the land. It is a dream existence for them, except for the clouds of f lies that have their tails working overtime. There are a handful of half-grown calves, a few heifers, some cows and about the gentlest bull I’ve ever met. One of the cows is in heat, which may account for his lack of malice toward me. Gord explains that he practises “management-intensive grazing.” With about 125 beef cattle spread out over four farms, including his own, Gord is on the go 24/7. Once a week he moves each herd to a new field to give the grass they’ve just grazed thirty days to recuperate. My memory is f looded with the brown, close-cropped fields dotted with purple-capped thistles that we called pasture when I was kid. The fields we are now walking through are lush and healthy. And that helps explain the quality of the all-natural beef Gord produces. His cattle are grass-fed, but finished off on a mixed vegetable and grain ration that adds marbling and flavour. The cattle are given no additives.

17049 WINSTON CHURCHILL BLVD (S OF BUSH STREET)

519-927-5902 W W W.HEATHERLEA FARMMARKET.CA YEAR-ROUND TUES–WED 10 –6 THURS–FRI 10 –7 SAT 9–5 SUN 12– 4 HOLIDAY MON 10 –5 BL ACK ANGUS BEEF, TURKEY, CHICKEN, PORK, RABBIT, PHEASANT, PARTRIDGE, BISON, WILD BOAR, L AMB, EGGS SWEET & SAVOURY PIES CONDIMENTS FRESH VEGETABLES SOME FRUITS IN SEASON LOCAL HONEY

I grew up believing that my part of the Niagara Escarpment wasn’t much good for farming. Gord sees things differently: “You’d be amazed at how much protein this land can produce through cattle.”

Where I saw rocky fields fi lled with wildflowers and scrubby apple trees, and felt pleased that with the protection the Greenbelt Act and Niagara Escarpment Plan, they would likely never be paved over, Gord saw lost opportunity. “There is some great land around here, but it’s been let go,” he says. Gord has managed to piece together some 500 acres for pasturing his cattle and growing hay. Heatherlea Black Angus is the proprietary name of his breeding stock, which are shipped around the world. He adopted the name from his stepdad Gord McBride’s herd of Heatherlea Dairy Cattle. Recently, Gord has added market gardening to the enterprise, to supply his wife Pat’s latest endeavour: Heatherlea Farm Market. Now he has pumpkins, squash, rhubarb, sweet corn and gladiolas to contend with, and he is having fun building the farm’s first corn maze when I visit in late July. The farm market sprang from another business altogether: Gord and Pat’s short experiment running a bed and breakfast. They discovered their guests had an impressive appetite for local food. “One weekend, guests from our two rented rooms bought $1,100 worth of food, mostly beef,” Gord explains. “Then we grew a bit of sweet corn and I couldn’t believe how many people roared up our driveway to buy it.” When their road, Winston Churchill Boulevard, was paved, more and more commuter traffic began using it as a route from Erin, Hillsburgh and


beyond to get into Brampton, Mississauga and Toronto. “It used to be that you had to be located down close to Brampton to get the traffic,” Gord says. “Urban sprawl has been good for our business.” When the road through Belfountain was closed a couple of years ago, the traffic really increased past Heatherlea. Pat and Gord, along with Don and his wife Melinda, decided to seize the opportunity. In 2009, they converted their garage into a small but upscale store and fi lled a bunch of freezers with beef. Soon they added pork, chicken, turkey, bison, wild boar and lamb, and eventually even rabbit, pheasant and partridge. As the number of customers increased to some 100 people each week, they expanded their offerings further to include savoury and sweet baked goods (Pat is a great cook), condiments, eggs and fresh local vegetables. Overflowing in their small space, their family room was the next sacrifice to their entrepreneurial efforts. Polly Yawney, one of Heatherlea’s most dedicated customers, shops there so often that people joke she must have shares in the business. “I’m really fussy,” Polly protests. “I wouldn’t spend the money if it wasn’t worth it.” Polly is enthusiastic about Heatherlea’s beef, but is most effusive about the spinach and feta chicken sausage. And she has been a boon to Heatherlea: she comes from a family of fifteen kids, many of whom now frequent the on-farm store. Her mother, who lives in Sudbury, puts in an order whenever her daughter visits. She says she loves supporting the local economy and that Pat goes out of her way with special orders. “Where do you get that service anymore?” Polly asks. “We don’t consider ourselves story-

book farmers. We take farming pretty seriously,” Gord tells me. Theirs isn’t a hobby farm, but to keep their heads above water, the McArthurs don’t just run cattle, there’s also the landscaping and maintenance business, the fencing business, and now Gord and Don also sell and install large hoop houses. Meanwhile, Pat dreams of having a commercial kitchen and someone to help her and Melinda with the growing business. Asked what is the biggest barrier to growth, Pat replies deadpan, “Well, I need to sleep.” Melinda adds, “There is a lot of pressure on Kayleigh (her one-year-old daughter) to grow up so she can help out too.” Unlike her husband, Pat is a city kid who was once appalled to see the family she’d married into swatting flies that had invaded the farmhouse during the dog days of summer. She admits that her favourite part of the business is the cooking. Pat’s culinary skills are appreciated by more people than me. Gail Gordon Oliver, the publisher/editor of Edible Toronto magazine, has a farm not too far away. She can’t get enough of Heatherlea’s “so perfect” chicken pot pies, is a big fan of Pat’s rhubarb pies, and admits to being a rib-eye steak fanatic. “Heatherlea is pretty much where I buy my meat now,” she says. Heatherlea is a family business, and as I sit on the screened porch in the old red brick farmhouse, next door to where I lived for the first twentyone years of my life, I see Gord in a new light – one that closes the divide between farmer and consumer. With Pat, Don and Melinda looking on, he explains, “It’s pretty neat seeing what we can accomplish here. We’re telling the big corporations like Loblaws what to do.” ≈ Belfountain writer Nicola Ross is the executive editor of Alternatives Journal.

The small market has expanded into the farmhouse’s former family room.

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www.msllp.ca IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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BACK? BY D O N S C A L L EN | P H OTO S BY R O B ER T M c C AW

W

ithin the primeval forest cloaking what we now call Hockley Valley, an elk grazed warily on the lush vegetation of a floodplain meadow. Her senses had been finely honed by thousands of years of predation. She was alert to the scent

of wolves and of the people of the First Nations. Her olfactory powers were also cued to the telltale odour of the master stalker of the valley, the cougar. Cougars, she knew, could meld invisibly into the trees and rock and creep toward her with preternatural silence. She had managed to elude an attack once before. But she knew that another would come and that her vigilance must never waver.

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While suspicious of most For thousands of years in Ontario, elk and cougars performed a vital dance of prey and predator that ensured the continuance of both. The relationship persisted until a new type of human arrived on the landscape – European settlers with machines to cut the forest and guns to hunt both prey and predator. The elk were quickly decimated, and, except for a couple of doomed reintroduction efforts in the last century, were soon gone from the province for good. Seemingly the cougars – also known as pumas and mountain lions – were eliminated as well. The last cougar in Ontario – confirmed in the flesh – was shot at Creemore in 1884. By that year, nature was in full retreat, not only here in the hills, but throughout North America. Passenger pigeons had been eliminated entirely and other animals were pushed far to the north. Now, after the passage of more than a century, a modest “re-wilding” is underway. Bears and fishers are filtering back. Otters have been spotted again in our area. Turkeys have repopulated their former haunts with vigour. Elk, alas, seem wholly unsuited to the landscape we have created. The nearest populations are now far to the west. But what of the cougar? Has the cat come back? Some say it has. There have been many local sightings reported, but few have been verified. Pam Stewart, proprietor of the Rosemont General Store, offers one of the more credible accounts. “In the summer of 2008 I was crossing from field to field on my horse, near the Second Line of Adjala and 20 Sideroad. I saw an animal exit a woodlot and then, when it saw me, run to a nearby hedgerow. My initial thought was ‘dog’ – that is, until it jumped up on the trunk of a tree. It looked back over its shoulder, gave me a double take, and then dropped down and disappeared.” Stewart is sure she saw a cougar. Her husband Russ also says he has seen a cougar “three times around the Second Line of Adjala.” While sightings have been reported at several locations throughout the hills, the largest number have come from the Hockley valley area. In 2007, Christine Thomas and her husband had a sighting property on the Mono-Adjala Town Line, just north of Hockley Road. Last year, Thomas described her experience on this magazine’s website: “We were standing alone on his [their neighbour’s] balcony, enjoying

Although still relatively rare in Ontario, cougars – also called pumas or mountain lions – are among the most widespread carnivores in the Americas. The shoulder height of this handsome, elusive cat is 65 to 80 centimetres, its total length ranges from 1.5 to 2.7 metres, and an adult weighs from 30 to 90 kilograms.

cougar sightings, Stuart Kenn includes credible sightings among the criteria on which he bases his estimate of an Ontario population of 550 cougars. the valley. It was one of those wonderful sunny, warm Thanksgiving Sundays.” Christine saw an animal that she first thought was a house cat. At a glance, her husband identified it as a cougar. Christine looked again and realized her mistake: “It was huge. He sauntered through the backyard, along the top of the hill, then headed back down to the valley.” Another report in 2005 near Airport Road, north of Hockley Valley, described an animal in a tree after dark, “screaming a cat-like growl,” its “very large amber eyes” illuminated by the observer’s flashlight. Cougars have been reported crossing roadways in our area and reposing atop hay rounds. Attacks on horses have also been attributed to cougars. Evelyn Hubert of East Garafraxa had three mares attacked on her property in early 2009. As they protected their foals from a predator, their haunches were raked by claws and teeth. “One had very deep puncture wounds that in the vet’s opinion were likely caused by a cougar,” reported Hubert.

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hat are we to make of these occurrences? While it would be foolish to dismiss all the numerous local sightings, it also needs to be acknowledged that throughout North America, even where there are healthy cougar populations, the vast majority of cougar sightings are misidentifications. Christopher Spatz of the Eastern Cougar Foundation, an American organization “dedicated to the recovery of cougars in wild areas of their former range in eastern and central North America,” has little faith in cougar sightings. He told me, “No matter where you go east of the Mississippi you will find ‘volumes’ of sightings. It’s tough for people to hear, but sightings are the most unreliable indicator of cougar presence. We haven’t received a single confirmation from Nova Scotia to Mississippi via our sightings hotline in eleven years. And we sure wanted to.” Spatz’s statement is telling. The Eastern Cougar Foundation very much favours the repopulation of cougars to their former eastern haunts. It very much want sightings to be verified. But until now it has not been able to prove any sightings as reliable.

Stuart Kenn, president of the Ontario Puma Foundation, founded in 2002 to study cougars in the province, educate the public about them and promote their recovery, is also suspicious of most cougar sightings. He says, “Ninety-five per cent are not real.” Still, that statistic leaves 5 per cent breathing room. And Kenn himself includes credible sightings among the criteria on which he bases his estimate of the Ontario cougar population at about 550 animals. In fact, Hockley Valley is one region that particularly interests Kenn. “We get reports out of Hockley Valley all the time,” he says. So many that he recently set up cameras north of Hockley Road between the Second and Third Lines in an attempt to photograph a cougar in action. However, the fact that the cameras recorded no cougars didn’t surprise him: “The chance of a wide-ranging cougar passing a particular tree with a camera is pretty remote.” And Kenn still believes that “there is a resident female in the valley between Hockley Road and 15 Sideroad and between Airport Road and Third Line East in Mono.” Why a female? Well, one reason is that the territory is too small for a male. Male cougars typically roam vast territories of up to 1,500 square kilometres or more. Females are more sedentary and, as long as they have adequate prey, 100 square kilometres or so will do. To put this in local context, the rough rectangle bordered by Airport Rd and Highway 10, between Highways 9 and 89, is about 150 square kilometres. People who believe there are cougars in Headwaters can point to a recent study by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources that proves their presence in the province. According to Jolanta Kowalski, a media relations officer with the ministry, ongoing research by MNR scientist Rick Rosatte has turned up “small amounts of physical evidence (about 30 records), including scat (feces), tracks and DNA [that] confirm the presence of free-ranging cougars in parts of Ontario.” The fact that MNR was finally admitting that the big cats are in the province was treated as big news when it broke last June in the Ottawa Citizen. But according to Kowalski, the ministry “has been saying publicly that there is a population of cougars in Ontario at least since 2007.” In addition, the fact that the eastern cougar is classified as endangered in Ontario, and has been since 1971, indicates that MNR has tacitly acknowledged their presence since that time. To date, none of MNR’s definitive proof comes from the Headwaters region. The closest accepted evidence of cougars are tracks from Lindsay, just west of Peterborough. MNR’s cougar study will continue at least through next year. What Kowalski says she can’t abide is the persistent belief among many residents of continued on next page

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Join us in making history!! We need government that is fiscally responsible and environmentally intelligent.

We need the Green Party.

Our riding association is currently seeking a social media coordinator and an event planner. Contact us at info@dcgreens.ca or phone 1-877-553-0482, or visit our website at www.dcgreens.ca

cougars continued from page 65

Headwaters and beyond that MNR intentionally reintroduced cougars to control the burgeoning deer population. When I pressed her to elaborate on why that would be such a bad idea, she held firm: “I don’t want to legitimize this rumour by commenting further on it. MNR has never released cougars in Ontario.” While I can appreciate Kowalski’s frustration, I regret that she didn’t offer a more detailed explanation. It does seems implausible that MNR staff or their political masters would gamble their careers by taking part in such a secret scheme. At the same time, sceptics note that it is equally unlikely that the ministry would risk the scat hitting the fan, as it were, by admitting it had released cougars. 66

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

So whether it’s a rural legend or not, the widespread rumour is likely to endure. Nevertheless, cougars can find their way to us without the help of backroom schemers. According to Kenn, there are three types of cougars in Ontario: native Ontario animals that, contrary to belief, were never entirely wiped out; others released or escaped from captivity; and immigrants from other provinces and states. Cougars, especially young males in search of new territory, can move surprisingly long distances. Kenn believes that some of Ontario’s cougars have arrived from Manitoba, Wisconsin and Michigan. He points to the ice bridge linking Michigan and Ontario at Sault Ste. Marie as one probable conduit from the Midwest.

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f there are cougars in the hills, they are likely individuals, not a sustained population. Could such a population eventually be established? Possibly. Our hills contain plenty of cougar food. Deer is their staff of life and we have deer aplenty. And local cougars could round out their meals with a wealth of other animals, including turkeys, beavers, racoons and even porcupines. Cougars sometimes include smaller predators in their diet as well. Their presence would have the local coyotes looking over their shoulders. As stalkers, cougars seek the cover of trees, shrubs and rocks to cloak their movements. Especially with the increasing forest cover in our region, the very condition that also attracts deer, those local requirements are


amply supplied. However, cougars tend to avoid roads and most shun areas of human activity. The roads that network southern Ontario and the pronounced human presence would undoubtedly limit their numbers. So, how shall we respond to the possibility that there are cougars among us? Ecologists who favour the cougar’s right to return will be pleased. Most people today realize that predators are a necessary component of healthy ecosystems – that they help maintain populations of prey animals, such as deer, at numbers the environment can support. Remove predators and the negative effects cascade throughout the ecosystem. Excessive numbers of herbivores eat too many plants, eventually eating themselves out of house and home and denying that plant life to smaller creatures which are, in turn, dinner for all manner of larger animals.

The real question may be not whether cougars can survive here, but whether we will allow them to survive. However, the real question may be not whether cougars can survive here, but whether we will allow them to survive. If earlier Ontarians, much fewer in number and armed with unsophisticated weaponry, were successful in pushing the cougar to the brink, we would have little trouble forcing a resurgent contemporary cougar population back into oblivion. But is it possible to coexist? In an effort to do just that, California voted to ban sport hunting of cougars in an effort to ensure the survival of cougars in that state. The Californian decision was an ethical one: In the west, people are increasingly choosing to move from the cities into cougar territory. People are seen as the interlopers, not the cougars. Here we have a different dynamic. It is not us moving into the cats’ domain, but they into ours (discounting the fact that cougars were here for thousands of years prior to our arrival). Do cougars have a right to reclaim the hills? Or do they present an unacceptable threat to our safety and that of our pets, horses and livestock? Christopher Spatz notes, “Domestic dogs are implicated in livestock

depredations or harassment exponentially more frequently than wild predators, especially with cows and horses. But some people wish to demonize the animals least likely to be there. When cougars do predate livestock, it’s mostly sheep and goats.” Ontario currently offers no compensation for domestic stock killed by cougars. Kenn of the Ontario Puma Foundation wants this to change. Owners, he says, “should be granted compensation just as they are for bear, deer and coyote depredation.” More visceral than the threat to pets and domestic animals is the perceived threat to ourselves. Just how fearful should we be? Not very, it would seem. Cougars do sometimes kill people and those deaths are horrific. However, and I urge sceptics to check this statistic, only twenty-two people have been killed by cougars in all of North America since 1890. There is only one recorded death from the province of Alberta, a place that cougars have shared with a large population of people for decades. By way of comparison, dogs killed an estimated 281 North Americans between the years of 1982 and 2009 alone. Spatz of the Eastern Cougar Foundation likes to compare cougar attack statistics with those for deer-vehicle collisions in the United States: “220 people dead, 20,000 seriously injured annually, more than all other wildlife threats to people combined.” Death and injury caused by hitting a deer may make the local news. Cougar attacks, however, like airplane crashes, are covered internationally. It could be argued that just as intense media coverage generates an unrealistic fear of flying in some people, it can also create an unrealistic fear of cougars. Statistically, even in areas where they are common, cougars are simply not much of a threat. However, that’s cold comfort to the victim of a cougar attack or the relatives of someone who has become a cougar statistic. If cougars do eventually repopulate the east, there will be an occasional attack on humans. Although we calculate “acceptable risk” for all manner of things, maybe the cougars’ time has passed. Maybe cougars and other predators capable of killing us, even if this happens only rarely in relation to other dangers, can no longer be tolerated. The question to coexist or not may never become a great issue here. The southern Ontario landscape may simply be too developed for any longlasting cougar presence. An occasional cat may wander through, stirring continued on next page

For Nature. For Now.

Forever.

We’re working to conserve Ontario’s natural landscapes. You can help. Call 1-800-465-0029 ext. 263, or email ontario@natureconservancy.ca to make your gift today. Your children will thank you. www.natureconservancy.ca/on All photos by NCC: globally rare Lakeside Daisy on Manitoulin Island; a young Conservation Volunteer looks for frogs; the serene shore of Elbow Lake in the Frontenac Arch Natural Area

Charitable Registration No: 11924 6544 RR0001

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Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find us in better homes everywhere!

cougars continued from page 66

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local imaginations, and then retreat back to the north woods. But if cougars have come to stay, we will be the first generation in the hills in more than a century to have them among us. Our forbears banished

cougars from their midst. What will we do? â&#x2030;&#x2C6; Don Scallen is a naturalist who teaches elementary school science in Brampton. Read his regular blog, Notes from the Wild, at inthehills.ca

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FINDING EVIDENCE OF COUGARS IN OUR HILLS Colloquial names for cougars reďŹ&#x201A;ect their elusiveness: ghost cat, shadow cat, mystery cat. Most of us will never see a cougar. Even seasoned researchers who study them in prime cougar territory in western North America seldom see them. Trackers who hunt cougars almost never see them until their dogs have them treed. We have a much better chance of ďŹ nding signs of cougar presence â&#x20AC;&#x201C; signs that are considered far more credible evidence than sightings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pugmarksâ&#x20AC;? or tracks are one sign, though they can be difďŹ cult to distinguish from the tracks of a large dog. The claws seldom show. A good description of cougar tracks can be found at www.cougarsanctuary.org/tracks. Occasionally if a cougar is walking in snow, the long tail will leave an imprint. Other cougar signs include mounds of scraped earth, leaves and other debris soaked with urine and feces that the cats use to mark their territories. Cougar feces are usually longer than that of dogs, coyotes and even wolves, up to 22 centimetres or more in length. Unlike feces of domestic dogs, but in common with that of the wild canids, they almost always contain bone and hair. Like other cats, cougars will sometimes scratch earth over their droppings. Cougar kills can also give their presence away. Often cougars will drag their prey to a sheltered location. If this is done in a sandy or muddy area, drag marks will be apparent. Kills are often covered with leaves and branches after being partially consumed. This too can suggest a cougar in the neighbourhood, but be aware that wolves and bears sometimes do this as well. Cougars are usually silent but can make a variety of sounds, some similar to housecat voices, only ampliďŹ ed. The Ontario Puma Foundation website www.ontariopuma.ca/describe has samples of their vocalizations.

bobcat ~ 1.625"â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2.5" in length 68

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

coyote ~ 2.25"â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3.5" in length

large dog size varies widely

cougar ~ 2.75" â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4" in length

pussycat ~ 1"â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.625" in length


H E A D W A T E R S

N E S T

by Bethany Lee

flex time on the porch

I L L U S T R AT I O N S H EL A G H A R M S T R O N G

Goodbye commuting hello

Come to the Fair! The formation of agricultural societies and their associated fall fairs spread throughout Ontario in the 1800s. They are still a highlight of the harvest season and a great way to introduce your kids to local farmers, farm animals and crops, to see their friends in the 4H club in action – and, of course, to have fun on the midway. ontariofairs.org Local fairs still to come this season are: Shelburne September 17 – 19 Albion/Bolton September 23 – 26 Grand Valley September 24 – 26 Erin October 8 – 11

Hallowe’en fun in the light of day? You bet! Downtown Orangeville is a safe place to let your little ones run around in their costumes, collecting treats, visiting with ghosts and goblins, and crawling all over the giant hay spider that usually makes her appearance at the town hall. This date also marks the final farmers’ market for the season. Saturday, October 23, 10am – 2pm discoverbroadway.ca 70

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or a number of years, I donned my navy, black, white or tan corporate attire, got in my car in the dark, slipped a thermal carafe of coffee into the holder, and headed south to the city for work. I didn’t mind the commute, I told myself. In fact I enjoyed it. It was time to think. Time alone. Time to decompress. Then along came baby. In the first hazy days of parenthood, I didn’t think much about “work” at all. I was busy recovering and my brain was struggling to maintain some semblance of order. Everything I knew had been thrown out the window. My efforts centred on the cycle of sleeping, feeding and cleaning. Emails, project documents and approval processes just didn’t fit with this new reality. I tried to get my son to approve of a bottle, sent emails to friends in desperation for connection to my old life. And I tried to document every moment of my parental progress. Eventually, my brain settled down as I settled into new patterns. But I missed my office, my coworkers and the intellectual challenges that the corporate world had given me. Over that first year, I made a few visits to my old office. On the first one, I brought my son to introduce him to my co-workers. Panic set in when I realized that he needed changing. There was no baby change table in the washroom, so a co-worker offered up his desk. Unfortunately, it was one of those, um, “messy” changes, and not quite … contained. It just so happened that the desk belonged to the germ-o-phobe of the office. Deeply embar-

rassed, I cleaned up and warned another coworker that perhaps the janitors should be called to swab the decks. I handed in my temporary security pass and slunk out of the building. Ugh, it makes me cringe even now. The juxtaposition of suits and shiny floors with the very human element of my son’s messy bum made quite an impact on me. Needless to say, for the next few visits I arranged for babysitting and drove to the city on my own. As maternity leave, which at first seemed infinite, began to draw quickly to a close, I entertained the thought of a new way of working. Could I make a living and not travel to the city?


Would I be intellectually challenged? Would I miss the benefits and security of the people and projects that I knew? The answers turned out to be yes. And no. Well, it depends on the day that you ask. I decided not to return to my old position. One of the hardest things I had to do was return the salary top-up that my position provided. If you didn’t return for a minimum of six months, you had to pay it back. Ugh, again. But I knew that if I went back, I would never leave. So I struggled into a new way of working. I thought creatively about how I could work and live and parent and play here in the hills. But like parenting itself, in the world of selfemployment, there isn’t much you can know before you just go ahead and do it. So I dove in. I have made mistakes along the way: I over-promised and under-delivered, I relied on my son never to be sick, and I definitely have worked too hard for too little. But I also have had successes: I spend an amazing amount of time with my son instead of on the road. I have time to exercise with him here in the hills every day. And I have worked on some fabulous projects that twisted my neural pathways into jungle gyms I'd never imagined possible. I have been paid and have been able to maintain a comfortable living, though don’t be shocked when I tell you that money doesn’t grow on these countryside trees. My day no longer revolves around the quality of the coffee in the cup holder, though as I write this, I am sitting in one of Orangeville’s finest coffee houses with a large and lovely steaming cup by my side. There is a real estate deal happening next to me, and on my other side a personal trainer is prepping his client for a workout. The friendly white noise is just enough for me to get some work done. Sometimes I write here, sometimes I write late at night on my back porch while the neighbourhood sleeps. I have generally found (after almost six years) a fluid mix of work and pleasure, and even how to combine the two. I have honestly had very productive work discussions with clients while hiking the Bruce Trail, and successful morning sessions with other flexible workers while our kids tobogganed in the backyard. The freedom to look out my window and see my son at play, while I’m making a living? Well, I’m pretty sure that my time alone in the car, “thinking and decompressing,” has been replaced. ≈ Bethany Lee is the online editor of kidsinthehills.ca, a sister site to inthehills.ca, where she also has a regular blog.

Dufferin Town & Country Farm Tour This self-guided tour visits farms and agribusinesses in East Garafraxa. Families can visit beef, dairy and sheep farms, an equestrian facility, and a grain crop/elevator business, with added attractions and activities for children along the way. Pick up passports and driving maps on tour day at the Hills of Headwaters Tourism Information Centre at highways 9 and 10 in Orangeville. A donation to the local food bank is your admission. Saturday, October 2, 9am – 4pm 519-941-o454, thehillsof headwaters.com/farmtour

For people who love to smile

Dr Robert vanGalen b.sc, d.d.s Dr Katariina Korhonen d.d.s

Dufferin Parenting Support Network Parenting Workshops DPSN’s series of evening workshops support parents of school-aged children. Topics include discipline, communication, healthy anger and stress management. All workshops are free, but registration is required and seating is limited. The workshops run various dates from September through December, 7 – 9pm 519-94o-8678, dpsn.ca

Whether your kids line up for the school bus or make the trek to school on foot, we have some great online ideas to “green your routine” in ways that help both the environment and your pocketbook. Also this fall, if you’re lucky, you’ll spot a Hoppee The Mascot pin on a friend. We’re giving away limited edition collector pins to kids in the hills at several local events – so come on up and say hi! Your comments on our blogs are always welcome and help build a strong community for families living in the hills.

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ONTARIO GOTHIC

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P H O T O S P E T E PAT ER S O N

A MODEST LOG CABIN AND A GRAND VICTORIAN FARMHOUSE MERGE HISTORY IN CALEDON, THANKS TO HELEN AND JOHN MASON BY MI C HEL E GREEN

I

f you happened to be meandering along King Street or Heart Lake Road in Caledon on an August day in 2008, you might have noticed a log cabin chugging down the road. The cabin was making a four-kilometre journey from the land where it had stood since the 1840s to its new home on the foundation of a demolished cabin of the same era on John and Helen Mason’s heritage property. Now, two years later, reconstruction of the cabin is nearing completion and the Masons are planning a get-together in October to show it off. It all began when the Masons, members of Heritage Caledon (the municipal heritage committee), heard rumblings about the Victoria Business Park redevelopment at King and Hwy 10. A nondescript little storey-and-a half house was in the way and had to go. However, as the town’s mandatory heritage impact statement confirmed, beneath the home’s faded aluminum cladding was one of the town’s earliest structures. Caledon heritage officer Sally Drummond was adamant that this remnant of Chinguacousy history should remain in the area – and she had an idea. She had written the report when the Masons applied for heritage designation of their property in 2003, so she knew from the existing rubble foundation and artefact scatter where that property’s original log cabin had stood.

“I approached the Masons and they thought it would be a wonderful way to complete the whole historical property parcel,” Sally says. The Masons have lived on their Chinguacousy property, known as the Alexander Smith Farmstead, for four decades. Now retired, John, 82, hails originally from England and worked in property management in Toronto where he met and married Helen, a Scottish teacher/librarian. They originally purchased the 100-acre property with friends as a weekend retreat, but slowly “the weekends became longer and longer,” says Helen. They bought out their friends and moved permanently to the property in the early seventies. At first, they tried farming, raising beef cattle, pigs, chickens and feed crops, while starting a family. But, with antiquated machinery and financial limitations, the three-year farming experiment was a disaster, says John. “The only money I made during that time was from driving a school bus.” They sold off a fifty-acre parcel to the farmer next door and, since 1978, have been reforesting the remaining acreage. Through programs offered by Toronto Region Conservation Authority and the Town of Caledon, they have planted some 8,000 seedlings over the years. The heritage designation of their property applies continued on next page

left : Helen and John Mason pose in front of the nearly restored “Andrew Crawford House.” Furnishings in the log cabin include (far left) an ice-box, supplied by a neighbour in exchange for “a few loads of firewood,” the cradle in which all the Masons’ children once rocked, a cast iron stove (right) from a friend of Sally Drummond’s, and various other furnishing the Masons, inveterate collectors, have accumulated over the years. A temporary front door currently replaces the original one, damaged when the cabin was moved. top : The Masons’ classic Ontario Gothic home and outbuildings, known as the Alexander Smith Farm Complex, received heritage designation in 2003. IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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Floors that last a lifetime

www.unidec.ca 519.941.2883 877.941.2883

mason continued from page 73

to the “historic cluster” of the farmstead area, including orchard remnants, as well as to the significance of the original settlers, the Smith family, who owned the property for 110 years. The Masons endeavoured to preserve this history while making contemporary upgrades, specifically to wiring, insulation and heating. “The window frames, for example, you could see daylight through them,” says John. “They were sort of semisealed with what we found out later were Mr. Smith’s pyjamas.” Records show that in 1833 Andrew and Catherine Smith arrived from Invernesshire, Scotland. Wealthy and well-educated, they bought landholdings in Chinguacousy and Caledon townships including the Mason’s future 100-acre parcel.

The Smiths’ eldest son, Alexander, worked on the farm and is believed to have built and lived in the log cabin with his wife Euphemia (Effy) Graham. In 1864, Andrew divided his properties among his five eldest sons, and Alexander bought the 100 acres for $800. About a decade later, Alexander built and moved his family into the current Gothic-style brick house. The Smith family were respected stalwarts of the community and instrumental in establishing the Claude Presbyterian Church. (It is believed that the fi rst minister held Gaelic services in the Smith’s log cabin in the 1840s.) Two other Smith residences have also received heritage designation: an 1850s Georgian-style home owned by continued on page 76

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If you’re interested in sleuthing out the history of your own house or property, the best place to find your first set of clues is at your local archives. Depending on where you live in the hills, that will be Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Wellington County Museum & Archives, or the Region of Peel Archives. For Caledon residents, heritage officer Sally Drummond offers the following tips for your investigation at the archives: 쮿 Take the legal description of your property (the concession or plan and lot number) to the archives and ask to see the Abstract Index to Deeds. It will give you basic information, starting with when and to whom the Crown patent was issued. Subsequent registered transactions, including change of ownership, mortgages and wills, are listed and assigned an instrument number. The Peel archives has these records up to the early 1900s. 쮿 Once you have an instrument number, you can review the relevant document. Wills, for example, may offer clues such as where an owner came from, whether the property was their primary residence, and the like. 쮿 Census records will tell you such things as names, ages, occupations and family relationships, and whether the occupants were owners or tenants. Data from censuses conducted from 1851 through 1901 often describe the house size and construction material, such as ten-room stone house, log cabin, etc. Tax assessment roles provide the dollar value of the real property (land, buildings and fixed assets) and still more clues. A leap in value, for example, could suggest the addition of a new structure.

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The impressive U-shaped barn probably dates to about the same era as the property’s original log cabin. The Masons have converted the principal wing into a reception hall, used for the weddings of all their three children.

The Century Home illustrated here, near the village of Erin, is currently undergoing renovations.

쮿 The William Perkins Bull collection is a unique resource in Peel. Bull was a Chinguacousy/Brampton-area philanthropist in the 1920s and ’30s who travelled with a team of researchers throughout the county recording family stories. They contain personal family information that would be impossible to track through census information only. 쮿 Often descendants of early owners still live in the area, and may be willing to flesh out stories. 쮿 In the past decade, the Internet has made research much faster and easier. The website for the Peel archives, www.peelregion.ca/heritage, is currently under construction as part of the expansion of the Peel Heritage Complex. In the meantime, you can search for and see online such useful documents as the Illustrated Historical Atlas of the County of Peel, 1877, that contains maps showing lot boundaries by owner and even some early buildings.

www.rudyvandenbergrenovations.com 쮿 Information after the early 1900s can be found at the land registry office where the Abstract Index is available on microfilm. 쮿 Work at your research from both ends, tracking back from the present, as well as from the origins.

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쮿 Be prepared for a lot of leg work and inevitable dead ends. IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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Hwy 9: 2.5 miles E of Hwy 10, Orangeville 519-941-3667 David Young Readers Choice Award 2007, 2008 & 2009

Windows That Suit Your Style SUNSHINE TREES

Supply plant and transplant services. Various size trees and spades available.

The “Princess Pat” cook stove came with the house. It’s now purely decorative, but Helen cooked on it a few times before removing the chimney pipe which rose through the centre of the kitchen.

mason continued from page 74

1.800.361.5296 www.sunshinetreeplanting.com

iProRealty Ltd., Brokerage

Janna Imrie Sales Representative

1-866-506-1116 jimrie@trebnet.com www.ownontario.com

Farm-gate market offering drug-free black angus beef, bison, wild boar, lamb, chicken and pork. Also carrying an assortment of culinary delights from local producers. Taste You Can Trust Tues & Wed 10-6; Thurs & Fri 10-7; Sat 9-5; Sun 12-4

17049 Winston Churchill Blvd, Caledon 519.927.5902 www.heatherleafarmmarket.ca

MARGARET M

Custom Homes in Caledon East • quiet cul-de-sac • escarpment views • Energy Star homes 519-938-8417 Sales Office located at 15891 Airport Rd, Caledon East Sat/Sun & holidays, noon - 4:30

www.dalerosehomes.ca

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IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

Hwy 10, Caledon Village (South of lights) 519-927-3600 Closed Mondays

Andrew and Catherine on Kennedy Road, and an imposing 1860s brick home on Hwy 10, owned by John Smith (the Smiths’ fourth son, who went on to sit as a Liberal in the Ontario legislature). According to the heritage report, the Mason house is a classic example of Ontario Gothic architecture “characterized by polychromatic brick patterning with buff brick quoins and voussoirs, coursed polychromatic end chimneys, a projecting bay window, lancet and paired gable windows, a wrap-around porch, decorative bargeboard and an attached drivethrough carriage house/woodshed replete with the original farm bell on its roof.” The interior appears to have been designed as a duplex with two identical staircases that rose to two separate apartments, as well as independent kitchens and living areas. “It speaks to the standard idea of having multiple generations living together,” Sally Drummond says. Census documents show Alexander’s son Andrew, his wife Jennie, their children and farm help occupied six of the ten rooms. His mother, Effy, and sister, Marjory, occupied four rooms. Both Andrew and Effy were listed as heads of households, indicating that the two halves of the home were managed separately. After Andrew Smith died in 1941, Jennie lived on in the house with their son George and his wife Ida, until her death in 1957. George and Ida sold the farm to the Masons and

their friends in 1969. In their ongoing renovations, the Masons have removed the brick wall dividing the upstairs units, as well as one of the staircases. Of equal historic importance are the property’s outbuildings which predate the house, probably to around the time of the original log cabin. They include a U-shaped cluster of three barns, a chicken house and implement shed, as well as the original two-hole outhouse. The very large principal barn has been spotlessly cleaned by the Masons and served as reception hall for their three children’s weddings, as well as the occasional party. It boasts a dance floor, kitchen, toilets, mirror ball and twinkle lights. The addition of the Victorian-era log cabin, sitting within inches of the original cabin’s footprint, completes the historic complex. These past two years have been “a labour of love” in John’s words. However, they have not been without frustrations relating to the building code, permits and inspections. The most annoying was the engineering report required to assess the roof slope in relation to snow load. It seemed redundant considering that the roof has held up under the snow for 170 years. “Some of these requirements don’t work and should not be forced on heritage buildings,” Sally Drummond says. Eventually, though, all the i’s were dotted and the t’s crossed and the continued on page 84


Susan Brown Serving Mono, Mulmur, Caledon and Orangeville Sales Representative

519-925-1776 1-800-483-7740

Royal LePage Top 1% in Canada, 2009 View Full Details On All Our Listings At:

www.susanbrown.com

MARY KLEIN Sales Representative

905-454-1100 Direct: 1-866-999-5250

www.maryklein.com OVERALL TOP SALESPERSON - 2001, 2003 through 2009* Sutton Group - Brampton, Orangeville, Caledon, Erin

PROFESSIONAL REALTY INC BROKERAGE Independently Owned and Operated *Based on yearly gross sales

LUXURIOUS BUILDERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOME Unsurpassed quality! 3,735 sq ft stone bungalow, 3+1 bedrooms, 10ft ceilings, high end kitchen with appliances, open concept rec room with bar, home theatre rm, stunning landscaping. Extras galore! $1,099,900

18.6 ACRES - SECLUDED SETTING Forested lot with spectacular pond views. Upgraded custom 3,725 sq ft bungalow, 3+2 bedrooms, walkout basement, huge rec room, hardwood floors, stone fireplace, new kitchen, geothermal heating. $989,900

15.5 ACS - PONDS, BARN, IN-LAW Many upgrades to custom 4-bedroom home with walkout basement, 2-bedroom in-law suite. Tiered decking, hot tub, views, newer furnace, central air, windows and shingles. 3 ponds, barn/workshop. $834,900

ESTATE COUNTRY SUBDIVISION On 2.78 acres with conservation. Elegant custom 5 bedroom, office, hardwood, wainscotting, industrial quality roof, new cedar shakes, renovated baths, inground pool, manicured gardens. $689,900

RCR REALTY Brokerage

SUPERB CRAFTSMANSHIP With old world charm on 3 delightful acres. This spectacular home has been transformed throughout with quality upscale elements amid landscaped gardens, woods and privacy. Separate coach house. CALEDON $1,050,000

UTMOST PRIVACY ON 27 ACRES This uniquely designed home, with approx 5,000 sq ft of living space, features 2 separate living quarters. Spectacular Great Room with huge windows, walnut floors & stone fireplace. Stunning cherry kitchen with granite counters. MULMUR $879,000

IMMACULATE HOME ON 40 ACRES With pond located on a high spot overlooking rolling terrain and views of the countryside. Meticulous 7 year old brick bungalow, approx 3,600 sq ft. Walkout basement apartment. 2 fabulous outbuildings. MONO $779,000

GORGEOUS RANCH STYLE HOME On 20 acres of vistas and rolling land and close to Mono Cliffs Park. This home has elegance and style throughout with high quality finishing. Upscale kitchen, stunning solarium with huge windows. Barn outbuilding. MONO $669,900

SUPERB LOG HOME ON 6 ACRES With separate log studio and workshop, wide lawns and huge trees. This is a charming home with large windows, stone fireplace, pine plank floors, and hand hewn log beams exposed. MONO $579,900

PERFECT HOBBY HORSE SET UP ON 13.4 ACRES Charming cedar log open concept bungalow, beautifully finished with walkout basement. Steel barn with 5 box stalls and an open bay. Gently rolling acreage with 5 oak board paddocks. MULMUR $479,900

CENTURY HOME WITH ROOM FOR ALL On 5.56 rolling acres with scenic views. The house features many upgrades. Spacious main floor addition with gorgeous master suite. Barn, drive shed, paddocks and perennial gardens. MULMUR $469,000

ENCHANTING COUNTRY RETREAT This is the ideal weekend getaway in a private, park like setting protected by many evergreens. Large pond & dock, screened gazebo & guest bunkie. Open concept home with fp & huge picture window overlooking pond. NEAR HORNINGS MILLS $369,900

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ALTON UNITED CHURCH Beautiful & well maintained Church in Alton. Features cathedral ceiling on main floor, full finished basement with separate side entrance, kitchen, large recreation room and 2-2 piece bathroom. Side parking lot is paved. $259,900

92 ACRES - COUNTRY CLASSIC! Circa 1885. Beautiful farmhouse w/ lovely addition. Open concept family rm w/ cathedral ceiling & modern kitchen w/ granite counters, centre island & stone backsplash. 2nd floor overlooks the great room below. Land is worked. $699,900

RARE FIND - 2 HOMES ON 38 ACRES Spacious bungalow with multiple walkouts, gourmet kitchen, finished walkout basement, saltwater pool, pond + detached garage. Plus 2 bedroom home attached to main house by sunroom. $895,000

PRIVATE SANCTUARY - 48 ACRES Winding drive welcomes you to this unique property in Mono Hills w/ creek running through, mins from Mono Cliffs Park. Open concept w/ cathedral ceilings, exposed log beams from trees cut from property. Separate guest house. $895,000

ENCHANTING 24 ACRE PROPERTY Modern French farmhouse w/ captivating views over Hockley Valley. Features 5,000 sq ft of living space, 6 bdrms, all w/ ensuite baths, master on main level plus finished walkout basement, exceptional layout for entertaining. $1,500,000

FIRST TIME YOURS! Pick the finishing touches to this 4 level backsplit, open concept main level, 2 bedrooms upstairs. Lower level family room, 3rd bedroom and bathroom, laundry and walkout to yard. $407,000

PEACEFUL COUNTRY ON 19 ACRES! Well maintained & spacious bungalow set well back on paved road. Huge kitchen w/ breakfast counter & solarium overlooking pool. Sunken living room with woodburning fireplace, fin walkout basement & triple car garage. $699,900

LISTEN TO THE QUIET 1.8 acres, detached garage 20’ x 50’. 1 1/2 storey home with hardwood floors, convenient main floor laundry, large living rm w/ cozy woodstove. Multiple walkouts, master bdrm w/ 4 piece ensuite & walk-in closet. $484,900

IN THE HEART OF MULMUR Century homestead features approx 88.7 acres of rolling land on paved road with great views to the east. Bank barn, large workshop 40’ x 60’ & detached garage. Features large principal rms & updated windows throughout. $574,900

COUNTRY FARMHOUSE PURE & SIMPLE Great opportunity. 166 acres of land with 145 workable acres. Features 4 bedroom bungalow home, large barn has water and hydro, separate drive shed and silo. $689,000

SMALL BUT MIGHTY Well maintained two bedroom bungalow on 1/2 acre lot on outskirts of Orangeville. Basement has third bedroom, recreation room and exercise room/office. This immaculate home is great for commuters. $259,900

COUNTRY SETTING ON 91 ACRES 3 bedroom farmhouse on paved road. High and rolling land with approx 60 acres workable, 5 acres of hardwood bush. Original bank barn and large detached steel drive shed. $634,999

PERFECT COUNTRY PACKAGE 2 acres, brick bungalow, double car garage + detached 30’ x 40’ workshop. Home features open concept kitchen w/ walkout to rear deck & family room w/ Napoleon fp. Great views, main floor laundry w/ access to garage. $524,900

5 ACRE PROPERTY ON PAVED ROAD Private 5 acre property with 2 ponds, detached, insulated 30’ x 40’ workshop. Home has 3 bdrms, main flr laundry w/ 2 piece powder rm, master bdrm has 3 piece ensuite. Fin basement, separate 24’ x 40’ storage building. $429,900

SPRAWLING LOG HOME - 20 ACRES Walk to Mono Centre & Mono Cliffs Park. Set well back from road, spacious kitchen w/ antique cookstove, wood flrs, multiple walkouts, 6 bdrms on upper flr w/ central games rm & 2 staircases, bank barn, inground pool & pond. $730,000

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LAND FOR SALE 29 Acres - private parcel on paved road in Mono Township. $319,900 46.44 Acres - build your dream home in south Mulmur. $329,900 49 Acres - country property with pond, sand beach area and cabin. $224,900 3 Acres - great building lot backs onto small creek. $189,900

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**Broker of Record *Sales Representative 122 Main Street, Erin

WELCOME TO SOUTH DOWN FARM 488 acres, 13,000 sq ft house with spectacular views. 6,000 sq ft fin bsmt, 5-ensuite bdrms. 2nd house with 4+3 bdrms, 16-stall barn, greenhouse, pond with great gardens & large sugar shack. $18.5 Million Jamie Gairdner**

PICTURESQUE CALEDON ESTATE! 88 acres with manicured gardens, pond, pool and 4,600 sq ft main house and 1,000 sq ft guest house. Spectacular views, 4+2 bedrooms with marble ensuite baths, master suite with library, balcony. $3.5 Million Jamie Gairdner**

CALEDON GEM! European style house on 84 acres with a custom kitchen, 4 bedrooms, 2-bedroom apt, 3-car attached garage and detached 3-car garage/ workshop/office. Great views overlooking the countryside. $3.5 Million Jamie Gairdner**

PRIVACY IN BELFOUNTAIN! 4-bedroom stone house on 3.59 acres with long escarpment views. Small indoor pool/whirlpool, walkout to patio with hot tub, 2-level pond. Close to Caledon Ski Club, Devil’s Pulpit. $1,799,000 Jim Wallace*

WELCOME TO CALEDON MOUNTAIN DRIVE One of Caledon’s most sought after streets. 5,000 sq ft custom-built home on 2.8 acres. 20 ft ceilings, main flr mstr bdrm, att 2-car garage & sep 3-car garage w/ loft. $1,799,000 Jim Wallace*

RARE OPPORTUNITY! This 15-acre property is on approximately 1,500 ft of Credit River frontage and boasts some of the most incredible views of the Niagara Escarpment. Lovely 3+2 bedroom home with wrap-around porch. $1,795,000 Jim Wallace*

SPIRIT VALLEY FARM! Rare and gorgeous 94-acre property with lovely 3-bedroom bungalow beside a spring-fed pond. 8-stall barn and several paddocks with split rail fencing. $985,000 Jamie Gairdner**

IN THE HILLS OF CALEDON! This fabulous 3+1 bedroom home is nestled amongst mature trees on 2 acres. This builder’s home is perfect for entertaining and features 6 fireplaces, crown moulding and heated floors. $947,500 Jim Wallace*

WELCOME TO CEDAR DRIVE Raised bungalow with almost 4,000 sq ft of living space. 3.22 acres with 2,000 sq ft pool house/office. Lots of upgrades, kitchen with new granite, new cabinetry & built-in appliances. $779,000 Jim Wallace*

HWY 10 & FORKS OF THE CREDIT! On almost 5 acres on one of Caledon’s most prestigious streets, this 3,300 sq ft home has 3-car garage with studio above, hardwood floors, sunroom, basement walkout and hot tub. $699,000 Jim Wallace*

WELCOME TO THE CALEDON SKI CLUB! Enjoy the privacy of living at one of Canada’s most prestigious ski clubs. With 2,000 sq ft of living space, loft ceilings, dbl-sided fireplace and windows galore. $600,000 Jim Wallace*

YOU CAN SEE FOR MILES This 50+ acre property at the top end of Caledon has great building sites with privacy and south and north long views of surrounding countryside. $574,900 Bruce Livingston*

CALEDON SKI CLUB 12+ ACRE LOT Access your private 12+ acre building lot through these gates. Not on Ski Club property, but take advantage of the facilities. Treed property with driveway in place. $499,000 Jim Wallace*

WELCOME TO SOUTH 48 48 well-manicured acres of paradise. Private drive past the outdoor jumping arena to cleared land suitable and approved for future paddocks, barn, drive shed, garage and house. $449,000 Jim Wallace*

INVESTORS ONLY! Refurbished, fully leased building on Main Street of Erin is responsibility of the present owner who will continue as tenant. Net/net, a great investment. $375,000 Jamie Gairdner**

WELCOME TO STANDING STONE POND! 2.5-acre building lot w/ pond & incredible views of conservation lands & rolling hills. Driveway in, ready for your dream home overlooking Standing Stone Pond. $275,000 Jim Wallace*

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Kathy Ellis

“The Richie Group”

SEAN ANDERSON Broker

CHRIS P. RICHIE Broker of Record/Owner

Sales Representative

DALE POREMBA Sales Representative

Conveniently located in downtown Caledon East

905-874-3040 / 519-833-9714

905-584-0234 1-888-667-8299 www.remax-inthehills-on.com

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Making a move? I offer peace of mind! A local and trusted professional with proven results for 19 years

kellis@xplornet.com www.kathyellis.ca

A GEM AMIDST THE FOREST! Walls of windows, multiple walkouts and rooftop terraces bring the outdoors in to the living space of this modern, open concept home set on over 40 acres with a second residence for guests. $1,089,000

NATURE LOVERS DREAM! Scandinavian log with soaring ceilings, over-sized kitchen open to recently added family room with stone fireplace, extensive landscaping with waterfall on 2+ acres close to Hockley Valley. $649,900

GREAT HOME, FABULOUS PROPERTY Fantastic location! Close to 410 on quiet exclusive road in Caledon. Superb home w/ separate 2nd floor apartment. Walnut floors, granite, great kitchens, superb mstr bdrm w/ ens w/ huge w/i shower. 10 acres. $749,000

LANDMARK STONE SCHOOL, ERIN Circa 1869, cared for and updated with respect. Heart pine floors, tin ceiling in dining room, family room/sunroom addition, 4 bedrooms, updated kitchen, 2-car garage, very pretty and private property with pond and gazebo. $435,000

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! Totally upgraded home, new “Shelburne” kitchen, granite and hardwood. Unbelievable 50’ x 40’ shop, insulated, heated, s/s countertops, all on 9+ park-like acres close to the Bruce Trail. $879,000

41 ACRE ESTATE! True quality from the remote pool cover roll-back to the Lutron lighting, soaring ceilings, 3-season sunroom, dramatic waterfall down the face of the fireplace, ICF construction, nanny suite. $2,290,000

5 PRIVATE & LOVELY ACRES Pretty bungalow, updated with style and charm with fabulous addition. Master bdrm has stunning ensuite. Fresh and spacious kitchen. Lots of hardwood floors, fabulous bathrooms and spacious bdrms. Barn with hydro. 15 mins to Orangeville. $395,000

14+ LOVELY ACRES IN CALEDON Superb vacant land just south of Devil’s Pulpit Golf Course on quiet road. Create your own dream home here overlooking fabulous pond (pond site ready for development). Large building site already approved. $495,000

TORONTO SKYLINE VIEWS! An idyllic setting atop the Niagara Escarpment! This exceptional home has been extensively upgraded, floor-to-ceiling stone fireplace, renovated kitchen, saline pool with cabana and huge patio! $1,150,000

TRUE LUXURY ON 50 ACRES! Gated drive leads to spacious and regal home with superb landscaping. Gazebo overlooking pool and patio. 12-stall and 4-stall barn, 7 paddocks and trails. Bush, stream and countryside views. $1,995,999

TIRED OF YOUR JOB? Want to be your own boss? Fed up with commuting to work? Here is your chance to make a change in your life. This fabulous 25-acre property has lovely updated home with views of ponds. Two updated poultry barns and guaranteed income. $1,145,000

EXCEPTIONAL INSIDE & OUT Gorgeous home with newer kitchen, bathrooms, floors, 9+ ceilings, lovely fireplace, new addition with sunroom, walkout basement. Gardens and property with potting shed/barn, stone walls, unbelievable perennial beds. $619,000

COUNTRY COURT LOCATION! Long, pretty views on private acreage in south Mono, just north of Hwy 9. Vaulted ceilings, wide open spaces, 2 main floor bedrooms, sunroom off kitchen, 2 fireplaces, sauna and much more. $739,000

ISLAND LAKE ESTATE! An open and elegant atmosphere with soaring ceilings, Egyptian-themed rec room, resort like yard with pool, enchanting master suite with solarium sitting area, fireplace, dressing area, 7-piece bath. $999,000

BEAUTIFUL EXECUTIVE ON 11+ AC Many architectural features. Ash floors, beautiful built-in cabinets, high ceilings with floating beams, fabulous kitchen with centre island and breakfast nook, stunning master bdrm with lovely ensuite. Complete privacy near Terra Cotta. $1,190,000

FABULOUS 26+ ACRES Super completely updated home, lovely quality throughout. Unspoiled 26 acres with rolling fields, original stone fence rows, no pesticides used. $597,000

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BACK TO SCHOOL Incredibly charming, 1-1/2 storey, 3-bdrm brick schoolhouse w/ high ceilings in kit & living rm. Orig woodwork. Great inground pool. Workshop. Gardens surrounded by massive trees on 1-ac lot. $399,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS! Century barn converted to spectacular country home. Open concept main flr w/ great room & flr-to-ceiling stone fp. Lower level spa room w/ hot tub, sauna. Inground pool. 64 scenic acres. $1,350,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

A GOODLY AMOUNT OF... old fashioned love. Charming 4-bdrm Victorian w/ beautiful orig staircase, flooring, baseboards, doors & trim. Eat-in country kit. Bank barn, barn & drive sheds. 100 acres w/ views & rolling land. $1,100,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

RESIDENCE & BUSINESS IN ONE Brick century home with unique wrap-around porch. Inside you’ll love the original charm of hrdwd flrs, high baseboards & wainscotting. Separate 1,200 sq ft commercial building. $479,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

61+ ACRES WITH TRAILS Slightly rolling & heavily treed for privacy. Incl large electric metal security gate, underground conduits & driveway to approved building site for up to 4,000 sq ft home. Building plans available. $539,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

TRANQUIL SETTING - 188 ACRES with rolling land, views, creek, mixed bush, ponds & landing strip. Energy efficient bungalow w/ cathedral ceilings, solarium, screened-in porch & w/o lower level. Workshop & det 3-car garage. $1,799,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

HIDDEN PARADISE ON 7.7 ACRES Winding drive thru trees to updated 5,000+ sq ft home (incl lower level) w/ $275,000+ spent on reno’s. 3+2 bdrms, 3-car garage, 1,600 sq ft shop, custom deck w/ screened gazebo & hot tub. $799,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

NESTLED IN THE WOODS Scenic, maple-treed, 1-acre lot. 3+1 bdrm country home, open concept kit, dining & living rm w/ wood stove & door to screened-in porch. Fin bsmt w/ bdrm, rec rm & workshop/storage. $499,900 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

79 ACRES NEAR GEORGETOWN Sprawling 4-bdrm country bungalow renovated throughout. Finished bsmt with 2 bdrms, bath, kitchenette and family room. Bank barn, drive shed and grand insulated steel building. $1,485,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

COUNTRY ESTATE... set amongst the trees on 21 acres with 2-acre pond and fabulous views. Approx 6,000 sq ft of living space (incl w/o bsmt), grand foyer, 6 bdrms, 4 baths, open kit w/ granite countertops. $1,150,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

ON THE GRAND RIVER Stunning, open concept bungaloft features flrto-ceiling windows & cathedral ceiling in great rm, gourmet kit w/ granite counters, walkouts to 3 decks. Attached garage, workshop w/ hydro. $799,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

UPDATED TURN OF THE CENTURY w/ pine flrs & wide baseboards. Kit has oak cupboards, ceramic flrs & wood stove. Addition w/ kitchenette ideal for in-law suite. 25 acres, ponds, barn w/ 18 stalls, indoor arena & paddocks. $639,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

HORSES AND PLANES 98 acres w/ 5-bdrm Victorian farmhouse, horse barn, restored barn, workshop/warehouse, paddocks, hangar, runway, pond & acres of trees w/ circa 1850 log cabin hidden in the woods. $1,525,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

TWO HOMES & HORSE FACILITIES Main house has 5 bdrms, lrg country kit & w/o bsmt. Second residence ideal for in-laws or tenants. Indoor arena, wash stall, barn w/ 18 stalls, heated shop, 6 paddocks. 10 ac w/ pond. $939,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

B&B, BANQUET HALL...? Many possibilities for this gorgeous 12-acre property which includes 8 bdrm, 15 wshrm home with 3 levels of fin living space. Lower level w/o to patio & beautiful views. Staff apt. $1,299,999 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

THREE 98 TO 100 ACRE FARMS Two side-by-side & one across the road in scenic area w/ rolling hills & bush. Two have ponds, all have barns. Orig farmhouses in need of renovation & being sold ‘as is’. $549,000 to $699,000 Wayne Baguley* 519-941-5151

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VICTORIA PHILLIPS Sales Representative cell 416-953-4724

www.CountryHomesForSale.ca

Independently Owned and Operated

Sales Rep/ Manager cell 519-940-5050

15 GLORIOUS ACRES One of the areas finest hobby farms w/ barn, indoor arena, paddocks & access to trails. Lovely 2,500 sq ft house w/ designer decor throughout. Fin bsmt w/ walkout to exciting patio & inground pool area. Sep garage/workshop. $869,000

TWO SEPARATE HOUSES Situated on 60 acs this country estate features a 4,500 sq ft main house & a 2,400 sq ft second home. Totally sep, yet attached. Saltwater pool, stream, pond, workshop, barn & paddocks make this an amazing offering. $1,595,000

CREDIT RIVER FRONTAGE Fabulous Southern Plantation reproduction w/ 240 feet of frontage on the Credit River. Over 3,300 sf of luxury. Well off the road for complete privacy. Det 3-car garage & a sep guest house finish this package perfectly. $949,900

HARMONY DRESSAGE This exceptional equestrian facility is situated on 93 acres with 10 + 2-stall barn, 70’ x 160’ indoor arena, sand ring, paddocks and a custom-built 3-bedroom stone and board & batten bungalow. $829,000

EQUESTRIAN FACILITY This state-of-the-art facility features over 40 stalls in 3 barns. Situated on nearly 50 acs w/ numerous paddocks, 80’ x 200’ indoor arena & access to hundreds of acs of riding trails. Victorian homestead & staff apt. $889,000

TOTALLY RENOVATED THROUGHOUT This excellent brick & stone bungalow is situated on nearly 47 rolling acres w/ spring-fed pond & bank barn. Gorgeous cherry kitchen w/ built-in appliances & granite countertops. Hardwood & ceramics throughout. $679,000

STUNNING COUNTRY PROPERTY Outstanding double log home on a gorgeous treed 14+ ac lot. Large combo kit & dining area, w/o to screened-in porch. Flr-to-ceiling brick fp in living rm. 4 bdrms, 2 baths, fin bsmt. Beautifully decorated. Full or part-time home. $699,000

50-ACRE PRIVATE ESTATE This private retreat offers 4,000 sq ft with 5 bedrooms/4 baths. Gourmet kitchen and solarium. Multi-level walkouts to landscaped grounds, forest, stream and rolling meadows. Heated workshop/studio. $1,595,000

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jacquelineguagliardi.com 2006-09

2008-09

2006/07

Ronan Realty Brokerage

Independently Owned & Operated

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1.877.435.4336 Alliston 1-905-859-4477 Nobleton 1-888-943-0860 Orangeville 1-888-936-4216 Tottenham www.ronanrealty.com

519-833-0569 • 905-450-3355

RCR Realty, Brokerage

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HEATHER STIMPSON

905-584-2727 1-866-251-3232

*Sales Representative **Broker ***Sales Representative/Owner

PRIVACY & GREAT FISHING Entertainers’ paradise on 3+ acres overlooking the Grand River! 4 bedrooms and baths, indoor pool plus walkout lower level with floor-to-ceiling windows, sauna, games room, wet bar and more! $889,900

AFFORDABLE LUXURY Enjoy your privacy with a main floor master bedroom! 2 bedrooms upstairs with shared bath, open concept kitchen overlooking great room, finished lower level, large deck and yard, and new roof. $425,000

COUNTRY PARADISE! 42 acres with outbuildings and beautiful sprawling 4+1 bedroom bungalow, pool house, 8 person hot tub, saltwater pool. $999,900 Erin Chantler* 1-877-435-4336 www.erinchantler.com

LUXURIOUS LIVING! Fully fin executive home in prestigious Pine Forest Estates on manicured 2 acres. State-ofthe-art features, custom pool/spa, guest suite, 4-car garage + 6-car underground parking. $2,495,000 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

ROOM TO ROAM Nearly new 4 bedroom, 3,000 sq ft luxury home on pool-sized country lot backs onto fields with space between neighbours. Chef’s kitchen with granite and hardwood, large master suite and fine views. $650,000

LIVE, WORK & MAKE A DIFFERENCE Well established family-run seniors’ rest home seeks new owner to take existing turn-key business to next level. Updated charming Century home on large in town lot with peaceful pond view. $500,000

56 ACRE ESTATE Personal 5-hole golf course, mature gardens, gazebo overlooking waterfalls, 2 ponds. Many vistas to enjoy this tranquil setting. $1,700,000 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216 www.marcronan.com

VIEWS!! VIEWS!! Gorgeous custom built 4,200 sq ft country estate on 29-acre ravine lot. Extensive landscaping. 36’ x 18’ inground, solar heated, saltwater pool, sauna, propane fire pit & pond. $1,290,000 Marc Ronan*** 1-888-936-4216

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010


MOFFAT DUNLAP REAL ESTATE LIMITED, BROKERAGE

905-841-7430 www.moffatdunlap.com Moffat Dunlap*, John Dunlap**, Peter Boyd, Murray Snider, George Webster, Peter Bowers*** *Broker, **Broker of Record, ***Sales Representative

TOTAL PRIVACY, CALEDON Fully updated Napier Simpson bungalow. Great room with fireplace. Separate guest quarters or office. 5-stall stable, paddocks. 3-car garage + workshop. Immaculate. $1,295,000

CALEDON BUILDING LOT 16.56 acres bordering 100s of acres of conservation. Lovely rolling hills. Paved road frontage. Priced to sell! $349,000

“WATER’S EDGE”, CALEDON If you want a country property with a large pond, this is it! 3-bedroom home with glass elevator. Japanese inspired open spaces and tranquil gardens. Garage for 4 cars. Tennis. $1,998,000

GEORGIAN MANOR, CALEDON Renovated home. 3 finished levels with walkout to pool and gardens. Eat-in kitchen. Master suite with change room, deck and fireplace. Private valley, stream, tennis. 27 acres. $2,050,000

55 ACRES, HOCKLEY VALLEY Lovely rolling land and long views. Many bedrooms with private decks. Passive solar design. 5-bedroom home with 2-storey great room. 2-bedroom apartment. New Price $799,000

HOCKLEY VALLEY PROPERTY 3-bdrm country home set back from the road and overlooking 10 acres. Lovely gardens with mature trees. Situated on a quiet dead end road near Mono Centre village overlooking the Hockley Valley. $680,000

VALLEY VIEWS, THE HOCKLEY VALLEY The best views available! 159 acres. Dramatic site for custom bungalow, 80% complete. Pick the finishes. Stream, meadows, forest, valleys. Stunning setting. $1,495,000

BANKS OF THE CREDIT, ERIN Prestigious Pine Ridge Road. 3-bedroom Cape home overlooks ravine and river. Cedar shake roof, wonderful kitchen with granite counters and lovely views. $749,000

“HUMBERVIEW STABLE” Turn-key horse farm 15 minutes to Palgrave. 20 stalls. New board paddocks, arena, outdoor ring. Original farmhouse, staff apartment. River cottage alongside the Humber. 49.79 acres. Strong income!

“HIGH MEADOWS”, BELFOUNTAIN Immaculate 3-bedroom bungalow overlooks 43 acres. Stable, pool, lovely views. Pond. Mix of open fields and wooded valleys. Caledon Ski Club nearby. $1,250,000

122 ACRES, 2 HOME ESTATE, ERIN Main home with walkout lower level plus 2nd home alongside pond. Lovely views. Award-winning pool. Miles of trails. $2,595,000

EQUESTRIAN CENTRE, DUNDALK Highly successful Hunter/Jumper equestrian facility. Indoor arena, 36 box stalls, 9 paddocks with water, 3 round pens, grass ring, 2 sand rings, full size Dressage ring. Approximately 90 acres. $995,000

MANSFIELD SKI CLUB Immaculate 3-bdrm home on 1.59 acres at the foot of the Mansfield ski slopes. The house is filled w/ light from the many large windows and multiple w/o’s. Unique low maintenance landscaping w/ large mature trees. Asking $479,000

“DUKE FARM”, CALEDON Century farm of almost 100 acres. Good farmland with wonderful exposure to Airport Road. Minutes to Caledon East. Pond site. Asking $975,000

HIDDEN IN HOCKLEY VALLEY Renovated 3,000 sq ft log home overlooks trout pond. Stable and heated workshop. Saltwater pool, paddocks, stable. 12.2 acres. Asking $749,900

“WINDSONG MEWS”, TERRA COTTA Eb Zeidler designed estate! Main home, gatehouse and guest retreat overlooking pond. Heated workshop. Magical setting on 21 acres.

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Roger Irwin, Broker Barbara Rolph, Sales Representative

It’s About Lifestyle... 905-857-0651 rirwin@trebnet.com www.rolphirwin.com

RCR Realty, Brokerage Independently Owned & Operated

CALEDON - A LAKE & 50 ACRES Stone Victorian style home with lake views from principal rooms. Exceptional details granite, hardwood, slate. Spring-fed lake with beach, docks, fish. Mature forest, ponds, stream and wildlife. $2,900,000

8.6 ACRES ON CREDIT RIVER French country stone home adjacent to Lionhead G&C Club - 20 min to Oakville. Mature, secluded setting of gardens/trees overlooking river, valley. Wade, fish, walk to golf, lunch, dinner. $2,900,000

VIEW FOR MILES - 47 ACRES Breathtaking long views over pool from gourmet kitchen/breakfast area and great room with cathedral ceiling. Stone fireplaces, porches, 7 bdrms, 7 baths, fin w/o lower level, 3-car garage with finished loft. $2,195,000

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING Architecturally unique home overlooks pool and terraced wall of very large limestone rocks, with dramatic waterfall and lighting an oasis with superior and wonderfully creative details. $1,950,000

THE BOYNE MILL, MULMUR Stunning 325 acs w/ waterfall, river, large spring-fed pond & dramatic grdns. 3 levels of unique living space o/l the Boyne. Miller’s house, tennis court, pool. A once in a lifetime hunting & fishing paradise. $4,800,000

CREEMORE AREA RETREAT 37 with “the works” rolling acs with spring-fed pond, creek, woods, long s/e views & groomed trails. Super 2-level home with open concept great room, 5 bdrms. Mad River golf & Mansfield Ski Club close by. $799,900

GRACIOUS CREEMORE LIVING Beautiful custom design across from the park. Open concept living/dining w/ hrdwd flr, gas fp & w/o. Master w/ ens. Main floor den w/ ens. Lower level has 2 bdrms, spacious fam rm w/ gas fp. Steps to historic Mill St. $449,900

SECLUDED RETREAT, MULMUR Total privacy on 9.3 acres, wide open kitchen, screened-in porch, fireplace, acoustically correct sound room, 4 bdrms. Steps to Dufferin Forest. A birder’s paradise & gardener’s delight. Golf, ski, ride within 10 mins drive. $659,000

The log house, halfway to completion. The restoration project involved historical sleuthing, police escorts and nail-prying parties.

P H O T O CO U R T E S Y T H E M A S O N S

mason continued from page 76

29-by-20-foot cabin was successfully relocated, with considerable help – both fi nancial and physical – from the developer, the heritage committee and many other friends. Historically the log cabin was owned by the Crawford family from 1854 to 1888 and is known as the Andrew Crawford House. “Victoria was one of the earliest if not the earliest settlements in Chinguacousy Township” notes the heritage impact statement, and “therefore, from a strict historical perspective this property should receive some form of commemoration.” An extension had been added not long after the cabin was built and, over the years the twelve-inch high logs were covered over and over again, first with horizontal boards, then vertical boards, then the inevitable Insulbrick, and finally aluminum siding. A bathroom, installed in the corner of the second floor, was used as a passage to the addition, and the original floor and log walls in that area had been removed. The 1861 census shows that twelve people were living in the cabin – a claustrophobic number for such a small home by today’s standards. On moving day, the Insulbrick siding served one last purpose: it maintained the building’s integrity during the two-hour transport. In order to avoid overhead wires, the roof was removed and police and hydro escorts accompanied the house on its journey. Unfortunately the original wood-plank front door was destroyed during the process and John is on the lookout for an appropriate replacement. 84

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

Without assistance the Masons restored the log roof rafters, replacing missing ones with trees cut from their property. “That was rather scary,” admits Helen, a 69-year-old who looks far too petite for the back-breaking task. The Masons threw nail-removing parties at which friends pried thousands of hand-hewn nails from the roof sheathing, which John then reapplied. A source in Bancroft provided a replacement for the original roofing material – Ontario white cedar shingles. Another generous offer came from a man near Acton who had built his own log cabin and made replacement logs to measure for them, charging a mere dollar a foot. Helen has salvaged wallpaper bits from interior plaster walls, which she plans to frame and display. She enjoys telling the story of how she was observing an archaeological dig on the Crawford property and found a fragment of china that was identical to a piece she had found near her property’s old log house foundation. “Somebody said, ‘Oh, the Crawfords came to the Smiths’ for dinner and brought cookies and left the plate’,” she laughs. As the log cabin reconstruction approaches completion, the Alexander Smith Farmstead will have come full circle, a marvellous snapshot of how our forebears lived and worked. The Masons hope to be able to make the cabin available for people to see – possibly school groups and walking tours. “It’s been a lot of work,” Helen says, “but we’ve had some fun too.” ≈ Michele Green is a freelance writer who lives near Belfountain.

Ginny MacEachern B R O K E R

1-800-360-5821

RCR Realty, Brokerage

gmmulmur@bconnex.net www.ginnymaceachern.com

Independently Owned & Operated


1-866-901-0888 • 519-833-0888 www.BogertandBall.com info@BogertandBall.com Sue@ChestnutPark.com

We are delighted to announce that Sue Collis* has joined our team.

ERIN, CALEDON, MONO AND SURROUNDING AREAS Patrick Bogert** & Sandy Ball*

** Broker *Sales Representative

UNPARALLELED CALEDON COUNTRY - AN INVESTMENT IN LIFESTYLE None can compare. A stunning residence in complete privacy overlooks the most breathtaking views down the Credit Valley. 800 acres of conservation hills. Not a rooftop or light to be seen, your own world. All season indescribable views. Spacious, bright, open concept living spaces. Rooftop decks for summer dinners. Japanese Tea House for private thoughts. See for yourself! $2,195,000

KING COUNTRY - MEMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS! Fabulous family property. Large open concept bungalow, bright, very spacious. Rolling lawns completely surrounded by 52 acres of trails. Take a tour - down the valley, through the woods, over the ridges, stop for picnics, view spectacular countryside, all your own. Wonderful barn/studio/loft, separate guest house. A country wonderland. Muskoka or King? Only 20 minutes to the GTA. $1,650,000

NESTLED IN THE HILLS OF MONO The winding drive through the woods leads you back to this 47-acre paradise reminiscent of a country lodge. Soaring ceilings, large two-sided fireplace divides living from dining. Wall of windows to view down the swale across the rolling hills. Every comfort for family or friends. Master suite on main with adjacent study. Decks, gardens, gazebo, workshop ++. Superior Mono property. $1,495,000

A SPECIAL ARTISAN CRAFTED COUNTRY RESIDENCE ON 95 ACRES A peaceful secluded spot, close to all amenities. A beautiful wooded drive winds through to open rolling lawns and gardens surrounding this exceptionally designed and crafted residence. There is a magical natural pond, inviting year-round wildlife, and all season trails for hiking and skiing at your doorstep. Plus coach house with 2-bedroom apartment. Don’t miss seeing this property - it’s a unique treat! $1,079,000

IDEAL FAMILY COUNTRY LIVING - BE CHARMED A restored extended farmhouse on 96 private rolling acs. Pond, Credit River Creek, meadow paths, bush, views of rolling farmland. Set back from a quiet country road. A lrg sep workshop/studio w/ att dbl garage, inground pool. Room for horses, grow a vineyard your choice! (additional severed lot available). $1,395,000

CONTEMPORARY COUNTRY LIVING IN KING A contemporary country residence updated w/ sophisticated flair. Great layout for entertaining or family fun. Very private setting, well back from the road w/ inground pool, tennis court, det dbl garage & sep insulated studio/gym. Stone terraces to view ravine. The luxury of country living w/ easy commute to the city. $969,000

A LARGE FAMILY RETREAT IN CALEDON A very large well designed, solidly constructed country home in a quiet superb setting. A natural treed cathedral with the most spectacular unobstructed views across the Credit Valley. Large, open living spaces. This home is an easy to maintain ideal retreat for city commuters or full-time home. $995,000

AN EQUESTRIAN FARM - AUTHENTIC & GRAND Beautiful original barns and stables sit at the top of the hill overlooking 86 acres of land. Not many farm properties maintain the charm and attributes of this spectacular property. A large Victorian unspoiled farmhouse, ready for your personal attention. Minutes to all amenities. $1,189,000

DREAMS OF PROVENCE Family compound in Mono. A century stone farmhouse. Very private setting overlooks large natural spring-fed pond w/ backdrop of bush. A rebuilt century log guest house. A converted insulated barn/workshop/studio w/ upper loft. Old world charm w/ all modern comforts. 10 mins from Orangeville, 45 mins to Toronto. $799,000

SOPHISTICATED, STUNNING, SIMPLICITY Designers choice. A wonderful country residence with a polished elegant style. A beautiful setting with a spectacular view of Hockley Valley. Open concept living, great space for entertaining. Beautiful gardens, terraces, pool, stabled barn and paddock. Magazine perfect. See for yourself. 45 mins to airport. $995,000

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I L L U S T R AT I O N S J I M S T E WA R T

student scholarships. Part of Caledon Day; free art classes. Caledon East. Mary Lou Hurley, 416-508-5701; cacy.ca.

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OCT 2 : SHELBURNE GALLERY EVENT Reception and show by local

artists in historic town hall. 1-3pm. Gallery weekdays 8:30am-4pm. 203 Main St E, Shelburne. 519-925-2600 x 238; townofshelburne.com.

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OCT 2 & 3, 9 & 10 : WATERCOLOUR WORKSHOP WITH ATANUR DOGAN Hands-on instruction

in a variety of techniques. 10am-1pm. $95, register. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St W. 905-334-4231.

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OCT 2 & 3 : DRAGONFLY AWAKENINGS See what unfolds as

Dragonfly Arts on Broadway celebrates the arts. Featured artist Claudia McCabe, abstracts. Free. 189 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-5249, dragonflyarts.ca.

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m HEADWATERS ARTS FESTIVAL Events associated with the festival running from September 24 – October 11.

arts+crafts m NOW – OCT 15 (WEEKENDS) : CATHARSIS EXHIBIT Sketches of homes

and street scenes, abstracts, local photographs by Ilma Barayuga-Doherty. Sep 25, noon-4pm, poetry, music. 10am5pm. Ilma Arts Studio, 185 Diane Dr, Orangeville. 519-941-4533; ilmaarts.com.

m NOW – NOV 7 : BUCKETS OF COLOUR GROUP EXHIBITION Autumn-

coloured art in conjunction with Headwaters Arts Festival. Wed-Sun, 10am-5pm. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St W. 1-877-262-0545; headwatersarts.ca.

m NOW – NOV 11 : PETER ADAMS, THE LEIGHTON FARM PROJECT

Paintings, photographs of abandoned farmhouse on Mulmur’s Second Concession. Recipient of the Reed Cooper Bursary. Museum hours & admission. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Airport Rd & Hwy 89. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com.

m NOW – DEC 12 : A WOMAN’S TOUCH Exhibition of works by more than 30 Canadian women artists, 1890-2000. Museum hours & admission. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Airport Rd & Hwy 89. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com.

m SEP 18 & 19 : CANADA COLLECTS FALL FESTIVAL Canadian-made glass and

ceramics, 1850-1890. Museum hours & admission. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Airport Rd & Hwy 89. 1-877-9417787; dufferinmuseum.com.

m SEP 18 & 19 : HIDDEN TREASURES ART TOUR Let us do the driving! Fabulous art, sensational fall colours, 86

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OCT 2 & 3 : STUDIOS OF BRAMPTON

Self-guided tour, a variety of media in 12 studios. See website for map. 10am-5pm. studiosofbrampton.com.

H A P P E N I N G S

superb food throughout Hockley Valley. 9:30am-5pm. Bus departures throughout day from Future Shop parking lot. $40, from BookLore, Paper Moon, Dufferin County Museum. 519-941-8509; hiddentreasuresarttour.com.

SEP 25 & 26 : PURPLE HILLS STUDIO TOUR Self-guided tour of studios in

Clearview Township, presented by Purple Hills Arts and Heritage Society. 10am5pm. Start 13 Caroline St E, Creemore. 705-466-6317; purplehillstour.ca.

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SEP 25 & 26, OCT 2 & 3 : GYPSY MOTH VEST WORKSHOP Sonia Bukata

Pamela Purves, Susan Powell and Diana Hillman. Rustic furniture, bronze and wood sculpture, photography, watercolour and oil paintings. 10am-5pm. Silver Creek Farm, 16849 Kennedy Rd, Caledon. 519-927-5639; TAGartists.ca.

teaches how to make your own artistic garment. 10am-4pm. $100. For details & supply list, call Sonia, 519-833-1188; gypsymothdesigns.com.

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10 studios. Painting, sculpture, fibre, woodturning, stained glass and pottery. 10am-5pm. Map on website. 519-9253950; northof89.ca.

SEP 18 – 26 (WEEKENDS) : TAG OPEN STUDIO Ian Sinclair, Hugh Russel,

SEP 18 & 19 : HILLS OF ERIN STUDIO TOUR Self-guided tour of

various artists’ studios in Erin. 10am-5pm. 519-928-9668; hillsoferinstudiotour.com.

SEP 25 – OCT 3 (WEEKENDS) : NORTH OF 89 STUDIO TOUR Self-guided tour of

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SEP 25 – OCT 3 (WEEKENDS) : KATHRYN THOMSON OPEN STUDIO

5 invitational artists. Meet artists, enjoy locally sourced wine, hors d’œuvres. 5:3010pm. $50, reserve. SGI Canada Caledon Centre, 20490 Porterfield, N of Alton. 1877-262-0545; headwatersartsfestival.com.

Blown-glass vases, bowls, sandblasted sculptural pieces and torch-work bead jewellery, plus guests. 10am-5pm. 23 Grandview Rd, Grand Valley. 519-928-3155; kgthomson@295.ca.

m SEP 24 – OCT 11 : HEADWATERS

m SEP 25 – JAN 3 : BEING Outdoor

SEP 24 : HEADWATERS ARTS FESTIVAL OPENING GALA 37 juried and

ARTS FESTIVAL Celebrating the arts amid

the fall colours. Visual arts, music, dance, literature, film and kids’ events throughout Caledon, Orangeville, Erin, Dufferin. For full event details, see Festival guide in this magazine or website. 1-877-262-0545; headwatersartsfestival.com.

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SEP 24 – OCT 11 : OUTDOOR SCULPTURE Monumental and unique

sculpture on beautiful grounds of the SGI Canada Caledon Centre, 20490 Porterfield, N of Alton. 519-941-9300; headwatersartsfestival.com.

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SEP 25 & 26 : CALEDON HILLS STUDIO TOUR Self-guided tour features

oil, watercolour, acrylic and mixed media paintings, photography, glasswork, wood vessels, jewellery. 10am-5pm. 905-8802029; CaledonHillsStudioTour.com.

sculptures by Ted Fullerton representing nature and human nature. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St W. 519-941-9300; altonmill.ca

m SEP 28 : SPOTLIGHT ON CLIMATE CHANGE Artist/scientist Franke James

discusses personal actions to prepare for climate change. 7pm. $5. SGI Canada Caledon Centre, 20490 Porterfield, N of Alton. 905-951-0625; greentcaledon.ca. OCT 2: CACY FINE ARTS SHOW

Showcasing artistic talent for over 50 years. Proceeds to high school

OCT 2 – JAN 30 : DEFIANT SPIRITS: THE MODERNIST REVOLUTION OF THE GROUP OF SEVEN Explore the Group’s

mixture of modernist styles. Some rarely seen canvasses. Mon-Sat 10am-4pm. $15, seniors & students $12, family $30, parking $5. McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 10365 Islington Ave, Kleinburg. 905-893-1121; mcmichael.com.

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OCT 16 : CHILDREN FOR PEACE CARD EXHIBIT Display and sale of cards

created by local school children during Headwaters Arts Festival. Sponsored by DAREarts. 1-3pm. Free, donations appreciated. Alder Street Recreation Centre, Orangeville. 1-888-540-2787; darearts.com. OCT 16 & 17 : ORANGEVILLE ART GROUP SHOW & SALE Variety of styles

and mediums, includes work by local students. 10am-5pm. Food bank donation welcome. Orangeville Fairgrounds, 5 Siderd Mono, off Hockley Rd. 519-9275704; orangevillefairgrounds.ca. OCT 22 – 24 : POTTERY & WEAVING OPEN HOUSE Pat Burns-Wendland’s

handwoven dyed garments and accessories, Rosemary Molesworth’s whimsical functional pottery. 10am-5pm. 435552 4th Line Amaranth. 519-925-3056; rosemoles@rocketmail.com. OCT 23 & 24 : THE MAGIC OF CLOTH ACT IV–SWEET 16 Over 300 quilts in

show and sale by Dufferin Piecemakers Quilting Guild. Merchants, tea room. Quilt appraiser on site. Sat 10am-5pm; Sun 10am-4pm. $5. Orangeville Fairgrounds, 5 Siderd Mono, off Hockley Rd. 519-925-6589; orangevillefairgrounds.ca.


NOV 6 & 7 : A TRIO OF ARTISTS

Christmas open house for Jill Sadleir, Joyce Buck and Lesley McInally. Sat 10am-5pm; Sun noon-3pm. 995725 Mono-Adjala Townline, Rosemont. 705-434-3283; sadleir@mie.utoronto.

NOV 6 : LANDSCAPES IN WATERCOLOUR Instructed by local

painter Marianne Broome. Presented by Orangeville Art Group. 10am-4pm. Bring lunch. Free tea, coffee and cookies. $70. Victoria Parks Community Centre, Mono Mills. 519-307-0210; orangevilleartgroup.ca. NOV 13 : CHRISTMAS CRAFT SHOPPE

Caledon East United Church and Community Women’s Circle present crafts, baking, preserves, nearly-new table, refreshments. Portion of proceeds to Santa Fund. Vendors: 905-584-2815. 9am-2pm. 6046 Old Church Rd. 904584-9974; caledoneastuc@on.aibn.com

NOV 13 & 14 : HOLIDAY SHOW – KAILIIS MCINNES Colourful, whimsical art

and alpaca fibres. Kai-Liis Art Studio, 836100 4th Line, Mulmur. 519-925-0421. NOV 13 – JAN 2 : ’TWAS THE ART BEFORE CHRISTMAS One-of-a-kind art,

crafts, jewellery, fair trade products. Alton Mill, 1402 Queen St W. 519-941-9300; altonmill.ca. NOV 14 : HOSPICE DUFFERIN CHRISTMAS SHOWCASE Vendors, silent

auction, raffle, food booth, children’s area. 10am-3pm. Orangeville Fairgrounds, 5 Siderd Mono, off Hockley Rd. 519-9423313; hospicedufferin.com.

NOV 19 – DEC 5 : HOLIDAY TREASURES

Featuring seasonal creations by over 40 artists. Tues-Sat 10am-5pm; Sun noon5pm. $2. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Airport Rd & Hwy 89. 1-877941-7787; redhen.ca.

NOV 20 : CALEDON EAST PUBLIC SCHOOL CRAFT SALE Warm brunch by

Pathfinders, penny draw, book sale, a variety of artisans. Christmas shopping. 9am-3pm. 15738 Airport Rd. fimueller@ sympatico.ca.

community NOW – SEPT 30 : EAT LOCAL MONTH IN CALEDON Events all over town. Wine

and cider tastings, restaurants, canning bees, cooking demos and more. 9am5pm. 905-584-6221; eatlocalcaledon.org.

NOW – OCT 17 (SUNDAYS) : FARMERS’ MARKET AT HOCKLEY VALLEY RESORT

Fresh local produce. 10am-3pm. Third Line Mono, S of Hockley Rd. 1-866-462-5539; hockley.com.

SEP 16 – OCT 7 (THURSDAYS) : CALEDON FARMERS’ MARKET Fresh

local produce, featuring fun for the kids, live music and food demonstrations. 3-7pm. Albion Bolton Community Centre. 150 Queen Street S. 905-584-2272; caledon.ca. SEP 16 : FAMILY TRANSITION PLACE GOLF CLASSIC Presented by RBC

Dominion Securities. 9:30am registration, 11am shotgun start, 5pm reception/silent auction, 6pm dinner. Tournament $225;

dinner only $50. Caledon Country Club, 2121 Olde Baseline Rd. 519-942-4122; familytransitionplace.ca. SEP 17 : COALITION GOLF AND DINNER

Lunch at Club; dinner at private estate, food by Gourmandissimo. Live and silent auction. Sign-in 11, shotgun start 12:25, dinner 6:30. $250, incl 18 holes, cart, lunch, dinner. Dinner only $125. Caledon Country Club, 2121 Olde Base Line Rd. 905-838-3042; coalitioncaledon.com.

SEP 17 – 23 : CALEDON 7-DAY EAT LOCAL CHALLENGE How “local” can you

eat for a week? Register online. Great prizes. 9am-5pm. 905-584-6221; eatlocalcaledon.org.

SEP 18 : HOUSE TOUR 8 homes of distinction in the Orangeville area, door prizes, silent auction. 9am-4pm. Self-guided $35; VIP coach $70 (incl lunch). Proceeds to Headwaters Health Care Centre. Tickets, 519-941-2410; headwatershealth.ca. SEP 18 : MONO’S BIG DAY OUT

Celebrating Mono food, heritage, music, art, environment. Kids’ activities. 11am4pm. Free. Mono Centre. 519-942-8401; sball@inthehills.ca. SEP 18 – JUN : PANCAKE BREAKFAST

On the third Saturday of each month. 9-11am. $5, kids & seniors $3. Bolton United Church, 8 Nancy St, Bolton. 905-951-7182; a.burleigh@rogers.com.

SEP 18 & 19 : HEADWATERS GREEN LIVING SHOW Wind, solar, geothermal,

energy-efficient products and exhibits. Sat 9am-5pm; Sun 11am-4pm. Free. Orangeville Fair Grounds, 5 Sidrd Mono, off Hockley Rd. 519-217-5300; orangevillefairgrounds.ca. SEP 19 – 26 : SMILE COOKIE DAY

Indulge your sweet tooth at Orangeville’s Tim Hortons with a great cookie for a good cause. Proceeds to Headwaters Health Care Foundation. Noon. 519-941-2702; headwatershealth.ca.

SEP 23 : CALEDON FARMERS’ MARKET – BOLTON FALL FAIR Fresh local

produce. Limited fair opening, including the midway! 3-7pm. Albion Bolton Community Centre, 150 Queen St S. 905-584-2272; caledon.ca/farmersmarket.

SEP 23 : DUFFERIN WOMEN IN BUSINESS LUNCHEON Networking

lunch with Heather Colquhoun speaks on multi-generations in the workplace. 11:30am-1pm. $32, by Sep 30. Orangeville Agricultural Centre, 5 Siderd Mono, off Hockley Rd. 519-941-0490; gdacc.ca. SEP 23 – 26 : BOLTON FALL FAIR

Thurs: midway, homecraft building, 6:30pm. Fri: demo derby, 7pm. Sat: opening ceremony, 11 am. Sun: milking competition, noon. Livestock, produce, homecraft, 4H, entertainment each day. See website for full schedule & admission fees. boltonfair.ca.

SEP 24 – 26 : GRAND VALLEY FALL FAIR

Fri: blazing fiddles, fair ambassador, exhibits. Sat: livestock, demo derby, midway. Sun: church service, heavy horses, t&t pull. $7; teens $5; 12 & under free. Fair Grounds, 90 Main N. 519-9285754; vasdblackwell@execulink.com. continued on next page IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

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continued from page 87 SEP 30 : STARTING A SMALL BUSINESS SEMINAR Pros and cons of owning your

own business. 9am-noon. $10, reserve by Sep 23. Tony Rose Memorial Sports Centre, 40 Fead St, Orangeville. 519-941-0440; sbec@orangeville.ca. OCT 1 : ROAST BEEF DINNER 7-9pm. Reserve $13; at door $15; children 5-12 $6; under 5, free. Westminster United Church, 247 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-0381; westminsterorangeville.ca. OCT 1 & 2 : ERIN’S HOUSE TOUR

Friday evening local chefs prepare a course at each home. Fri 4-7pm, $45; Sat 10am-4pm, $25, from Renaissance and other village merchants. 519-8330872; villageoferin.com. OCT 1 – 3 : AWAKENING YOUR GODDESS Workshop for women to

reunite their spiritual and sexual self in safe environment. $550. Ecology Retreat Centre, Hockley Rd, Mono. 519-689-5308; tantra-sex.com. OCT 2 : CALEDON DAY Celebrate the

town’s heritage and beauty. Live entertainment, vendors and more. Ride a double-decker bus to view fall colours. Noon-8pm. 6311 Old Church Rd, Caledon East. 905-584-2272; caledon.ca. OCT 2 : BELFOUNTAIN SALAMANDER FESTIVAL Live entertainment, breakfast,

Triple Threat Performance Centre .dance. vocals. music. theatre.

.studio III dance. 35 Robb Blvd. Unit 8 Orangeville L9W 3L1 (519) 940-3840

BBQ lunch courtesy of Caledon West Rotary Club, silent auction, artisans’ and farmers’ market. 10am-3pm. 519-9273204; belfountain.ca. OCT 2 : OKTOBERFEST Live German entertainment, food, drink, prizes and silent auction. Hosted by the Mono Mulmur Citizens’ Coalition. 4-10pm. Mono Community Centre, Mono Centre. 519-925-2107; monomulmur.com. OCT 2 : THE MAPLES FALL FESTIVAL

Silent auction, kids’ crafts and games, wagon rides, petting zoo, craft vendors, BBQ and more. 9am-4pm. 513047 2nd Line Amaranth. 519-942-3310; TheMaplesSchool.com. OCT 2 : DCMA FALL BUS TOUR

An informative ride not soon forgetten. 10am-3pm. Tickets from Sep 1, $25, incl lunch, reserve. Dufferin County Museum & Archives, Airport Rd and Hwy 89. 705-435-1881; dufferinmuseum.com.

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OCT 6 : RUNNING A HOME-BASED BUSINESS SEMINAR Orangeville and

Area SBEC and Centre for Business and Economic Development present pros and cons of home business. 6:30-9:30pm. $10, reserve by Oct 1. 519-941-0440; sbec@orangeville.ca. OCT 7 : PALGRAVE TURKEY DINNER

Local turkey, vegetables and famous Palgrave pies! 4-8pm. $17; seniors $15; under 12 $8; preschool $2. Palgrave United Church, 34 Pine Ave. 905-8800303; palgraveunited.ca. OCT 8 – 11 : ERIN FALL FAIR & EQUINE TENT Truck & tractor pulls, demo derby,

homecrafts, singer Terry Sumsion, livestock shows, amusements. New Equine Tent: horse demos & clinics, equine marketplace, and more, plus appearance by Wellington County Mounted Police. 9am-10pm. $9; 4-day pass $30. 519-833-2808; erinfair.ca. OCT 11 – NOV 20 : SILENT AUCTION

NOV 6 : TURKEY SUPPER 100-year

tradition, all the trimmings, homemade pies. 4-8pm. Eat in/take out. $15; children $5. Mansfield Community Hall, Airport Rd. 705-435-6844; garebrown@sympatico.ca. NOV 12 : ERIN’S WINDOW WONDERLAND The magic of the season in festive

shop windows of historic downtown Erin. 6-9pm. 519-833-0872; villageoferin.com. NOV 15 – 20 : BOOK SALE Proceeds to

the library collection. 10am-3pm. Grand Valley Public Library, 4 Amaranth St E. 519-928-5622; grandvalley.org. NOV 18 : CHURCH & CHARITY LAW SEMINAR Hosted by Carters Professional

Corporation. 8:30am-4pm. Register $25; $30 after Oct 29. Portico Community Church, 1814 Barbertown Rd, Mississauga. 1-877-942-0001 x 230; carters.ca. NOV 18 : ZONTA’S WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Celebrate

Items from local community. Proceeds to library collection. See list at grandvalley. org after Oct 15. Bids during library hours. Grand Valley Public Library, 4 Amaranth St. E. 519-928-5622.

women who have made a difference to Brampton and Caledon communities. 5:30-9pm. Nominations by Oct 1. Pearson Convention Centre, 499 Main St S, Brampton. 905-459-0991; zontabramptoncaledon.com.

OCT 19 : LOW-COST MARKETING STRATEGIES SEMINAR Innovative,

NOV 20 : BAKE SALE 10am-4pm. Grand

inexpensive ways to promote your business. 9am-noon. Orangeville and Area SBEC and Centre for Business and Economic Development. $10, reserve by Oct 10. 519-941-0440; orangeville.ca. OCT 23 : PINK TIE GALA Sponsored by

Caledon Breast Cancer Foundation. Great entertainment, food. 5:15pm. $150 from Mille Notte Lingerie. Caesar’s Event Centre, Hwy 50, Bolton. 905-857-6489; caesarseventcentre.com. OCT 29 : TASTE OF AUTUMN Changing

courses – changing lives. Champagne, canapés at Alton Mill. Dinner, music, silent auction at Millcroft Inn. Sponsored by Orangeville Rotary. Proceeds to Hospice Caledon Bethell House. 6-10:30pm. $175-$225. Tickets, 519-216-6515. NOV 5 – 14 : ROYAL AGRICULTURAL WINTER FAIR Largest indoor agricultural

and equestrian exhibition in the world. Ontario gourmet foods and wine. Equestrian competitions. Livestock and produce exhibits. Adults $20; children & seniors $16; under 4, free. Exhibition Place, Toronto. royalfair.ca.

Valley Public Library, 4 Amaranth St E. 519-928-5622; grandvalley.org.

theatre+film m

SEP 23 – 26 : RHINESTONE COWGIRL – A TRIBUTE TO DOLLY PARTON Leisa Way and The Wayward

Wind perform new tribute concert. Sep 23-25 8pm; Sep 26 2pm. $39.16. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway, Orangeville. Theatre Orangeville. 519-942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca. SEP 24 – 26 : FOOTLIGHT FOLLIES

Olde Tyme Music Hall. Fri, Sat 8pm $27; Sun 2:30pm $22. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com. SEP 27 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – GET LOW (USA-PG) A tale of

guilt, loss, loneliness and redemption. 4:30, 7 & 9:20pm. $8 from BookLore & Galaxy Cinemas, Orangeville, 519-9415146; mondaynightmovies.ca.

m

OCT 2 : DUFFERIN TOWN & COUNTRY FARM TOUR Self-guided tour of farms in

Accredited teachers in R.A.D. and P.A.E.C. Specialized classes Ages 2-1/2 to adult Recreational - Competitive Guitar and Piano Program

www.studio3dance.net 88

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

East Garafraxa and East Luther. Passports and map on day of tour at Headwaters Tourism info centre, Hwy 10 & 9, Orangeville, or FS Partners, Cty Rd 109 & 5, Grand Valley. Admission: food bank donation. 1-800-332-9744, 519-942-0984. OCT 3 : HARVEST HOME FESTIVAL

Displays of pioneer and present-day farm activities. Green Legacy 1-millionth tree planting. Refreshments. Noon-4pm. $2. Wellington County Museum & Archives. 0536 Wellington Cty Rd 18, Fergus. 1-800-663-0750; wcm.on.ca.

OCT 1 : ARMCHAIRS, AUTHORS & ART Presentations by authors Cathy

Marie Buchanan, Terry Fallis, Terry O’Reilly and Kate Taylor. 7-10pm. $25 from BookLore or Festival Hotline, 1-877-262-0545. SGI Canada Caledon Centre, 20490 Porterfield, N of Alton. headwatersartsfestival.com.

m

OCT 4 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP (USA, UK) British street artist

Bansky and other graffiti artists at work. Special screening, speaker, refreshments. 7pm only. $12, from BookLore. Galaxy Cinemas, Orangeville. 519-942-4724; www.mondaynightmovies.ca.


OCT 14 – 31 : SKIN FLICK Adult comedy,

written and starring Norm Foster, with David Nairn, Maria Dinn, Susan Greenfield and Jamie Williams. Wed & Sun, 2pm; Thurs, Fri, 8 pm; Sat, 3 & 8pm. $32.38 to $39.16. Town Hall Opera House, Orangeville. Theatre Orangeville 519942-3423; theatreorangeville.ca. OCT 22 : DUFFERIN CIRCLE OF STORYTELLERS Stories with live musical

accompaniment in intimate Historic Corbetton Church at Dufferin County Museum & Archives. 7-9pm. $10, from BookLore (Orangeville); Jelly Craft Café (Shelburne); Curiosity House (Creemore) and museum. Airport Rd & Hwy 89. 1-877-941-7787; dufferinmuseum.com.

SEP 14 – JUNE (TUESDAYS) : LET’S GET TOGETHER Connect with other families

about parenting a child with special needs, birth to six years. Light dinner. Siblings welcome. 5:30-7pm. Free. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090; cp-cc.org.

Create Lasting Memories

SEP 25 & 26, OCT 2 & 3 : KIDS’ FEST – HEADWATERS ARTS FESTIVAL More

than a dozen fabulous hands-on creative activities for kids, including bookmaking, pottery, mask-making, dancing, drawing horses and much more. For full program, dates, registration, see Festival guide in this magazine or website. 1-877-262-0545; headwatersartsfestival.com. SEP 29 : THE CALEDON CRUNCH

Elementary students across Caledon crunch on a local apple – all at the same time – to support the local food system. 11am. 905-584-6221; eatlocalcaledon.org.

OCT 24 : CHILDREN’S HALLOWE’EN PARTY Mono’s Hallowe’en party. Crafts,

costume parade, entertainment, treat bags. 1-4pm. Child & adult $5; under 2, free. Register by Oct 21. Mono Community Centre, Mono Centre. 519-941-3599. judyk@townofmono.com.

music OCT 25 : MONDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES – MAO’S LAST DANCER (PG)

True story of ballet dancer Li Cunxin, from impoverished family to leading light of Mao’s Revolution, to defection to USA. 4:30, 7 & 9:20pm. $8, from BookLore and Galaxy Cinemas. 519941-5146; mondaynightmovies.ca. OCT 29 & 30 : MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT Musical comedy of King

Arthur and his knights in quest of the holy grail. $85-$105. Fri 8pm, Sat 2 & 8pm. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca. NOV 4 – 20 : BAD YEAR FOR TOMATOES

Misfortunes of a famous TV actress seeking to get away from it all. 8:15pm. Nov 13 2:15pm & church dinner/theatre 6:30pm. Fri/Sat $15; Thu & mat $12. Caledon Townhall, 18365 Hurontario St. 519-9275460; caledontownhallplayers.com.

kids YEAR-ROUND (THURSDAYS) : ADJUSTMENTS AFTER BIRTH SUPPORT GROUP

Share your experience and learn coping strategies in supportive environment. Child care provided. 2-3pm. Free, register. Caledon Parent-Child Centre, 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090; cp-cc.org.

NOW – OCT : FOOT CLINICS Dr. Katrina

Kulhay offers free foot clinics for children, 4 to 18, to assess walking patterns and problems, and suggest corrective exercise or supports. Erin. 1-866-909-9955, kulhaywellness.net.

SEP 13 – 18 : CHILDREN’S EARLY LEARNING PROGRAMS – REGISTRATION

Free programs: You and Your Baby, Baby Playtime, Mother Goose, and many more. 9:30am-4pm. 150 Queen St S, Bolton. 905-857-0090; cp-cc.org.

SEP 16 : ORANGEVILLE COMMUNITY BAND REHEARSAL Non-profit band’s

Bring a Friend Night – short rehearsal, potluck refreshments. 7-9pm. Free. ODSS, 22 Faulkner St, Orangeville. 519925-6149; orangevillecommunityband.ca.

McLEAN-SHERWOODS SU PP LIE PA RT Y RE NTAL S &

Free On-Site Consultations TABLES, CHAIRS, LINENS, DINNERWARE, BBQ’S, CASINO EQUIPMENT, WEDDING ACCESSORIES, TENTS & MORE! IN BRAMPTON 190 Bovaird Dr West, Unit 24 905-459-5781 IN ORANGEVILLE 400 Townline, Unit 11 (beside Wimpy’s) 519-307-5781

www.mcleansherwood.com

SEP 19 : THE CONCERT In aid of local musician Matthew Shawn Fleming. Performers include Mark Dubois, David Nairn, Leisa Way, Larry Kurtz, The Evil Orange Consort and many others. Directed by Bruce Ley. Proceeds in trust for Matthew’s medical expenses. 7:30pm. $35, incl refreshments. Town Hall Opera House, Orangeville. Ticket information at 519-942-3423; jbell@theatreorangeville.ca.

m

SEP 24 – 26 : RIBSTOCK AT GREYSTONES Live music as local chefs

cook ribs. Sat: Shining Stars, 1-4pm. Sun: Rib cook-off. Outdoors. Greystones Inn & Spirits Pub, 63 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-2235; greystonesinn.ca.

m

SEP 25, OCT 2 & 9 : ACOUSTIC HARVEST Evening concerts with Kevin

Breit and Russel Boswell, The Houseplants, Matt Brubeck, Michael Herring and others. $25. Aardvark Music & Culture, 169 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-941-4100; aarvarkmusic.ca. OCT 1 : CALEDON CHAMBER CONCERTS Elizabeth Dolin, cello, and

Bernadene Blaha, piano. 8pm. $30; 16 and under, $15. BookLore, Howard the Butcher, Forster’s Book Garden. St James Anglican Church, Old Church Rd, Caledon East. 905-880-2445; caledonchamberconcerts.ca. OCT 1 : TRIO D’ARGENTO From Bach to

Carmen to European jazz, these three virtuosi provide lively entertainment. 8pm. $30/$15 students. Orangeville Concert Association. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-942-3423; tickets@orangevilleconcerts.ca. continued on next page

Oktoberfest 2010 OCTOBER 2, 2010 4 pm to 10 pm MONO COMMUNITY CENTRE

Join in the Oktoberfest celebrations Live German entertainment Oktoberfest food & drink Door prizes & silent auction Tickets: 519-925-2107 or info@monomulmur.com

www.monomulmur.com

GE A Mono Mulmur Citizens’ Coalition fundraiser ! TY Sponsored by: ON OUR N E S L EDERHO ARTHURS FUEL • AVISON YOUNG • BLACKSTOCK FORD LINCOLN HILL ‘N DALE LANDSCAPING • ORANGEVILLE INSURANCE SERVICES IN THE HILLS • SIMPLE/PETE’S DONUTS • ROY’S SERVICE CENTRE

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

89


A

C A L E N D A R

O F

A U T U M N

H A P P E N I N G S

OCT 12 : GARDENING WITH NATIVE TREES & SHRUBS Talk by Sean Fox.

Silent auction of garden-related items. Orangeville Horticultural Society. 7-9:30pm. Orangeville Seniors Centre, 26 Bythia St. j-cutter@sympatico.ca.

OCT 30 : HUMBER VALLEY – CALEDON HILLS BRUCE TRAIL CLUB Moderate

OCT 16 : RURAL LANDOWNER WORKSHOP Learn aspects of rural

15km, medium speed. Hiking boots. No dogs. 9am-2pm. 14111 Queen St N, Bolton. 519-883-1840; caledonbrucetrail.org.

property management. 8:30am-3:30pm. Rosemont Hall. 705-721-4444; ontariostewardship.org.

NOV 5 : FORKS OF THE CREDIT – CALEDON HILLS BRUCE TRAIL CLUB

OCT 25 : BEES AND POLLINATORS

continued from page 89

m OCT 1 – 3 : HEADWATERS SHINING STARS Contest showcasing local singing talent. Finalists perform at the Home and Lifestyle Show where judges choose 3 winners from 3 age categories. Oct 1 6pm; Oct 2 11:30am; Oct 3 10:30am. Free. Orangeville Agricultural Fairgrounds. 5 Siderd Mono, off Hockley Rd. 519-216-1917; gdacc.ca.

outdoors+ environment SEP 18 : FIND MUSHROOMS FASCINATING? Mushroom identification

walk with naturalist Bob Bowles. 10am1pm. $10. Venue tbc. 705-435-1881; forestmanager@dufferinmuseum.com.

appreciated. Orangeville & District Senior Centre, 26 Bythia St. 519-925-3968; javison@rogers.com.

Shelburne & District Horticultural Society meeting with speaker Janna Dodd. 7:30pm. Mel Lloyd Centre, Shelburne. 519-9252182; shelburne@gardenontario.org. OCT 26 : THE SECRET LIFE OF LICHENS

Troy McMullin, lichenologist, U of Guelph, describes lichens’ role in science, medicine, etc. 7:30pm. Free, donations

Moderate to strenuous 21km loop, 5.75hr, variable terrain. No dropouts. 9:30am-4pm. Creditview Rd. 905642-2408; caledonbrucetrail.org. NOV 19 : HOCKLEY VALLEY – CALEDON HILLS BRUCE TRAIL CLUB Strenuous

21km, 6.25hr, hilly. No dropouts. Hiking boots. No dogs. 9:30am-4pm. Airport Rd & 7 Siderd Mono. 905-642-2408; caledonbrucetrail.org.

N O T I C E

SEP 18 : EVERDALE’S CARROT FEST! OCT 12 – DEC 2 : LIVE MUSIC AT ROSE THEATRE Oct 12 & 13: Engelbert

Humperdinck $90-110. Oct 14: Spirit of the West $41-61. Oct 15: Howie Mandel $85-105. Oct 19: Shakura S’Aida $27-47. Oct 20: Roch Voisine $67-97. Oct 22: Gerry Dee Live $37-57. Oct 29: John Sherwood (jazz pianist) $25. Nov 19: Honeymoon Suite $32-52. Nov 20: Freddy Vette and the Flames $28-48. Nov 22: Vienna Boys’ Choir $38-58. Nov 24: Mark Masri $36-56. Nov 26 & 27: 1964 The Ultimate Beatles Tribute $41-61. Nov 26: Adi Braun (jazz vocalist) $25. Nov 30: JIGU! Thunder Drums of China $27-47, children $18, students $8.50. 12:30 & 7:30pm. Dec 2: Gord Bamford $44-64. All performances 8pm except as noted. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln, Brampton. Box office: 905-874-2800; rosetheatre.ca OCT 16 : BOB MILNE’S RAGTIME The

great ragtime and boogie woogie pianist. Matinée and afternoon tea with Bob, catered by The Pantry Shelf. 2:30 & 8pm. $29. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com NOV 5 : ROBI BOTOS TRIO Music by

one of the great contributors to Canada’s jazz scene. 8pm. $30; students $15. Orangeville Concert Association. Town Hall Opera House, 87 Broadway, Orangeville. 519-942-3423; orangevilleconcerts.ca.

Fall harvest celebration – bales of fun. Noon-5pm. $5; kids free. 5812 6th Line, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4859; everdale.org. SEP 19 : PALGRAVE TERRY FOX RUN

Free breakfast by Palgrave Rotary. Walk/ run/jog/bike. 8am-1pm. Trans Canada Trail at Brawton Dr Shelter. Orange Hall, Birch Avenue, Palgrave. 905-583-0088; pvswain@rogers.com. SEP 21 – NOV 16 (TUESDAYS) : CALEDON HILLS BRUCE TRAIL CLUB

Group hike on different sections of the Bruce Trail from Dundas to Singhampton. 9:30am-2pm. 905-453-2254; caledonbrucetrail.org. SEP 26 : LILACTREE FARM OPEN GARDEN Garden features a variety of

climbers, bulbs and perennials. 10am4pm. Free. 547231 8th Siderd, Mulmur. 519-925-5577; lilactree@sympatico.ca.

OCT 3 : MONO CLIFFS OUTDOOR EDUCATION CENTRE Open House:

Free. New Hope Salvation Army Church, Riddell Rd & Townline, Orangeville. 519-925-6149.

EcoSchool highlights, site tour, children’s treasure hunt. 1-4pm. 755046 2nd Line Mono. 519-942-0330. toes.tdsb.on.ca.

NOV 14 : CHRISTMAS ON THE HORIZON

OCT 6, 20, NOV 3, 17 : HEADWATERS FLY FISHING CLUB Meeting and slide

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

P U Z Z L I N G

S O L U T I O N S

Six More Buttons Needed! Our solution; there are more.

SEP 28 : NIAGARA ESCARPMENT OLD-GROWTH CEDARS Illustrated talk

NOV 7 : ORANGEVILLE COMMUNITY BAND Remembrance Day concert. 7pm.

90

To find an event: At www.inthehills.ca, click EVENTS on the menu bar, or click on a date on the calendar at the bottom of our home page.

Horticultural Society meeting with speaker, Wayne Townsend, curator of Dufferin County Museum. 7:30pm. Mel Lloyd Centre, Centre St, Shelburne. 519-9252182; shelburne@gardenontario.org.

Muir Family Band and guests celebrate the history of country music. 8pm. $20. Century Church Theatre, Hillsburgh. 519-855-4586; centurychurchtheatre.com.

Music by the Orangeville Chorus, Sweet Adelines International. Tasty treats, silent auction. 2pm. $20. Horizons Event Centre, 633419 Hwy 10, Mono. 519941-6785; horizonseventcentre.com.

To submit an event: Please go directly to www.inthehills.ca and click EVENTS on the menu bar. That takes you to the listings page. A second click on SUBMIT YOUR EVENT (below the calendar) takes you to our easy-to-complete form.

SEP 27 : HISTORIC GARDENING IN DUFFERIN COUNTY Shelburne & District

by Peter Kelly, research director at Rare, a land reserve, and author of books on cliff ecology. 7:30pm. Free, donations appreciated. Orangeville & District Senior Centre, 26 Bythia St, Orangeville. 519-925-3968; javison@rogers.com.

NOV 6 : THE ROUTES OF COUNTRY The

For the past ten years, our event listings have been prepared in partnership with Alison Hird through her website WhatsOn.ca. But Alison is retiring her site, and that means there are changes to the way you submit and find events online.

show. 7:30pm. Oct 20 & Nov 17: fly-tying lessons. Mono Mills Community Centre, 33 Victoria Cr. 519-940-9499; murakamgca@yahoo.ca.

Chuck’s Bus Breaks Down Again once over lightly – gossip column good afternoon – mixed company calculated risk – pie in the sky e equals mc2 – Noel – white lies reading between the lines it’s against the law a bad spell of weather What Am I? The four letter word is ‘farm’. At the Primrose P.S. Reunion Louie is 12 and Louisa is 24.

from page 94

Almost Perfect Armoured Car Heist Three to four million dollars or so in tens, twenties and fifties will not fit into a Volkwagen Beetle with four adults. They will have to leave much of the money or some of the team behind. Silas Renarm Returns (to Palgrave) More creases will bend away. toward away


MARKETPLACE ART & CRAFT

C AT E R I N G

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES

(cont’d)

Forrest Custom Carpentry Established 1986

Design, Build, Install Wall Units, Bars, Home Offices Call Gary for a Free Estimate 519-323-1121/1-877-454-9522 www.forrestcustomcarpentry.com

CONCIERGE SERVICES

Studio Holiday Show Nov 13 & 14

Kai-Liis McInnes

8

519-925-0421 4th Line Mulmur A participant in the Festival Show & Sale - Sept 25 & 26, Oct 2 & 3, Alton

8

Weekenders & Travellers Feel confident about routine maintenance, repairs and security when you’re away from home. Pietro Fanzo 519-938-5199 countrymanormanagement@bell.net

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES

• Artwork in various media • Specializing in animals and rural scenes

ALL-MONT LTD. Garage Doors & Electric Operators

“The Original Ones” Linda McLaren, Orangeville 519-925-6040

Residential • Commercial Industrial Sales • Installation • Service Visit our showroom 48 Centennial Rd, #20 Orangeville

The Outback Gallery & Gifts IN MONO CENTRE

519-942-1956

Unique Hand-crafted Gifts by Local Artisans

B. A. WOOD MASONRY

Thurs - Sun 12 to 5pm Evenings by chance or appointment

519-942-1351

R&M Stucco Superior quality & service Interior/exterior plaster/stucco finishing Marco or Rose Mary Andreozzi

705-434-0248

Tony Calabrese Stone Mason Flagstone Patios & Walkways Drystone Retaining Walls • Stone Facing Fireplaces • Repairs & Restoration

905 456-9964 Brampton

Specializing in Stone & Restoration Work Brick • Block

BIRD FEEDING

Brian Wood

519-941-5396

Caledon Mountain Wildlife Supplies • Wild Birdseed / Feeders / Nesting Boxes • Pet Food & Supplies / Wildlife Feeds • Crafts / Books / Nature Accessories “We’re here to help you help nature.” 18371 Hurontario Caledon Village Tel 519-927-3212 Fax 519-927-9186 Brian Thayer

CAKES

E C O - F R I E N D LY P R O D U C T S Eco-Friendly Products & Gift Ideas!

ZOLTAN POTOVSZKY

MASONRY

BRICK • BLOCK • CONCRETE • FIREPLACES • STONE Serving Dufferin County & Creemore Area

(705) 434-3285

Insured and Licensed

834263 4th Line EHS 2.5km N of Hockley Rd

519-943-1490 Open by Appointment

100% Bamboo Bedding • Klean Kanteens Pure Cappings Beeswax Candles Recycled Glassware • Eco Gift Wrap Bird, Bat & Butterfly Houses Sacred Stones Jewelry • Singing Bowls & Much More! See Our Website for Upcoming Events

www.VisionsInTheWoods.com

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 519-942-8401 OR EMAIL INFO@INTHEHILLS.CA IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

91


MARKETPLACE EQUESTRIAN SERVICES

H E A LT H & W E L L - B E I N G

LANDSCAPING

(cont’d)

Victorian Sand Cast Aluminum Reproductions • Estate Lighting • Table & Chair Sets • Fountains & Garden Ornaments Open: Wed-Sat 10-6, Sun 11-5 936577 Airport Road, Mansfield

705-434-0200 www.once-a-tree.ca

QUALITY, AFFORDABLE RIDING LESSONS SAFE FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE Children & Adults - Learn at your own rate Private, Semi-Private, Group - FREE introductory Lesson Certified instructors for all levels, beginners to advanced Erin, one minute N of Hwy 24 on Trafalgar Rd 519-833-2591 www.greydenequestrian.ca

FOOD

School of Miracles workshops & classes

- meditation - reiki healing - psychic development - readings Heather Scavetta, R.N. Reiki Master, teacher info@schoolofmiracles.ca 519.927.3387 www.schoolofmiracles.ca

LANDSCAPING Serving Caledon and all surrounding areas since 1994. Quality Care, Professional Service for both Residential and Commercial needs. Variety of seed mixes available including: Kentucky Bluegrass, Ornamental Wildflowers, Environmentally Friendly ‘Ecograss’ Call for quote 905 880 8909 / 416 577 8909

Greg Frangakis caledonhydroseeding.com

CALEDON PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

DAVE’S BUTCHER SHOP Beef, pork, veal, lamb, chicken, fish - Sauces, rubs, marinades Alder Street Mews, 75 Alder St, Unit 4, Orangeville www.davesbutchershop.ca 519-415-MEAT (6328)

1 Queensgate Blvd, Bolton

FURNITURE

TOPNOTCH

606286 River Road, Mulmur

(Prince of Wales & River Road) Open: 8am-4pm weekdays Free Consultation on Weekends by Appointment Phone: 519-941-6231 or 519-925-0057 Fax: 519-925-4010 Email: pjw1211@aol.com

PARTIES

Pottery Parties in the Hills Art parties for Birthdays, Schools, Corporate Events, Ladies’ Nights, Showers and Fund Raisers. Paint Ceramics & Play with Clay. Cakes & loot bags available.

519.942.9022

Any seasonal work

Where scaly isn’t scary!

• Tree Cutting • Topsoil • Mulch • Wood Chipping • Leaf Blowing

• Exciting packages to choose from • Great idea for birthdays, club meetings, corporate events, camps... • Interactive presentations with a variety of exotic critters Jennifer 519-925-1165 www.partysafari.ca

905 880 8909 / 416 577 8909

905-857-9040 www.mercatofinefoods.ca

P.J. Williams Ontario Land Surveyor

www.potterypartiesinthehills.com

Relax on the weekends, let us do the work

Bakery & Deli Gelato • Espresso Bar Hot Table • Pastries & Cakes Catering Available

LAND SURVEYING

COLD CREEK

LANDSCAPING & L AWN MAINTENANCE INC.

PEST CONTROL

SPECIALIZING IN WEEKLY LAWN MAINTENANCE AND LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION SERVING THE AREA FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS

PHONE 1 888 880 4118

OR

905 880 4118

CONSIGNMENT FURNITURE

Where Things of The Past Are Present

We sell carefully chosen, well priced, quality pre-owned home furnishings on consignment. Visit our showroom at Hwy 10 & King St, Caledon. www.topnotchfurnishings.com keith@topnotchfurnishings.com

647-297-0611

Custom design, manufacture & repair of quality furniture for home & office Call or write today for our product brochure 3creeks@sympatico.ca 519-833-9510 / (after hours) 2182 ERIN

PET SUPPLIES & SERVICES Garden Design & Installation Property Maintenance Nursery Stock Supplied & Planted Concrete Garden Ornaments David Teixeira 519-942-1421

MARKETPLACE: CLASSIFIEDS DON’T GET ANY CLASSIER For Winter Issue Call by October 15, 2010

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 519-942-8401 OR EMAIL INFO@INTHEHILLS.CA 92

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010


MARKETPLACE PET SUPPLIES & SERVICES

(cont’d)

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

These are signs that your pet’s current food needs to be looked at: • Overweight • Frequent paw licking • Hairballs • Biting root of the tail • Dry, flaky or greasy skin • Smelly ears or skin • Excessive shedding • Stiff joints/arthritis • Recurring ear infections 47 Broadway, Orangeville 519-942-8187 113 Victoria St W, Alliston 705-434-3311 226 First Ave E, Shelburne 519-925-3471

PET Portraits

DOGS, CATS, HORSES References provided from happy customers!

in watercolour by J.Gray

since 1925

Call & Compare

Home Auto Commercial Farm Financial Services Life

Competitive Rates

Payment Plans

A member of the Precept Group Inc.

35 Main Street, Erin Tel: 519-833-9393 • 1-800-930-4293

TREE SERVICES

TREESCAPES

joan@grayterartservices.com

MOVING TREES SINCE 1983

• Supply and Plant Mature Trees • On-Site Transplanting • Pruning and Removal • Snow Removal

519-942-1507 Fall Special on Spruce Trees

TUTORING

SEPTIC SERVICES

homework help, personal tutoring, exam reviews, prep courses, mastery courses, video game design camp 1-866-519-MATH (6284) 519-307-0989 295A Broadway, Orangeville www.mindovermath.ca

action Satisf ANTEED GUAR

519.927.3454 or 416.690.7262

(cont’d)

Riley

of Toronto

Teaching Children to Read Kindergarten to Grade 6 Better Reading • Better Grades • Better Lives One-on-one Tutoring

PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES TREE SERVICES

Tutor in the Hills

Charles Emerson Tree Service

MARKETPLACE: CLASSIFIEDS DON’T GET ANY CLASSIER For Winter Issue Call by October 15, 2010

905-801-5891

519-927-0101

www.tutorinthehills.com

WELL DRILLING

ISA Certified Arborist

Free Estimates & Consultation Tree Removal & Pruning P Bucket Truck Service Emergency Work P Year Round Service Clean & Reliable Workmanship Fully Insured

Barbara McKee, BA, OCT

McCauley WELL DRILLING New and Cleaned • Pump Sales and Service 519-217-0331

www.charlesemersontreeservice.com

Licenced Technicians Free Estimates

Bed&Breakfast D•I•R•E•C•T•O•R•Y

COUNTRY HOST BED & BREAKFAST HOMES Accommodating guests and visitors throughout Alliston, Beeton, Caledon, Cookstown, Erin, Hillsburgh, Hockley Valley, Innisfil, Mansfield, Mono, Orangeville, Thornton, Tottenham and Lake Simcoe cottages. Established 1998. Proud recipient of Customer Service Excellence and Best Accommodation awards. Gift certificates, garden weddings, bridal showers, small conferences, hot tubs and pools. Open year-round. Singles from $65; Double from $85. Lesley Burns 705-436-3686 www.countryhost.com info@countryhost.com

JENNY’S PLACE B&B Come and enjoy our beautiful Victorian home, walking distance to downtown Orangeville, theatre, dining and shopping. Each of our rooms has a television and DVD, and we offer a selection of books and movies. In addition, we also have a separate bed sitting room with a cozy wood stove, ensuite bath and kitchenette and separate entrance. Great for skiers, hikers, romantic getaways, and even for commuters. In the summer we have a beautiful huge deck, overlooking a half-acre of lawn and trees. Besides our hot or continental breakfasts, coffee and teas are always available in our guest kitchen. Open year round. Rates from $70 to $120. Chris Leith 519-938-8866 www.thehillsofheadwaters.com/jennysplacebedandbreakfast jennysplace@gmail.com

BLACKSMITH HOUSE This c1895 Victorian home in picturesque Creemore (“one of the 10 prettiest towns in Canada,” Harrowsmith Country Life) in the valley of the Mad and Noisy Rivers is ideally situated for visiting many places of local interest and taking scenic drives with breathtaking views of Georgian Bay and the Niagara Escarpment. We offer quiet relaxation, individual attention, warm hospitality, delightfully furnished guest rooms, and delicious Canadian cooked breakfasts. Member of the Federation of Ontario Bed & Breakfast Accommodation. Single $90; Double $135. John and Jean Smart 705-466-2885 www.blacksmithhouse.ca enquiries@blacksmithhouse.ca

THE STREAM A tranquil base in the Hockley Valley offers queen-size sleigh beds and the sound of the stream to lull you to sleep. A cedar deck and hot tub overlook the forest, winding trails and foot ridges. Open-plan in cedar, glass and slate features indoor 30-foot tree and fireplace that burns five-foot logs. Minutes to hiking, biking, golfing, skiing, and dining. Seeing is believing - drop in and say “hi”. Singles from $85; Doubles, private and shared baths, $125-$150. Discounts for stays over 2 nights. Kersty and John Franklin 519-941-3392 www.streambb.com www.bbcanada.com/thestream john@streambb.com

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010

93


a Puzzling Conclusion

by Ken Weber

Six More Buttons Needed! Chuck’s Bus Breaks Down Again

Insert six more buttons into the grid below (only one per square) in such a way that when you are finished there will be exactly three buttons in each row and three buttons in each column of the grid.

When Chuck’s school bus broke down again, this time between Sandhill and Tullamore, he had a load of grade ten students. Always prepared, Chuck passed out these translation puzzles. The students got the first two right away (“once over lightly” and “gossip column”) – but they were designed to get everyone started. When the relief bus arrived fifteen minutes later the students has solved all but one. How many can you “translate” in fifteen minutes?

noon good

r–ixs+k

Although it was rumoured that the authorities had asked Silas Renarm to retire from the business of selling tonics and elixirs, he nevertheless appeared at Buck’s Annual Turkey Shoot in Palgrave with a brand new batch of strange liquids, as well as a brand new type of puzzle. He called the liquids Renarm’s Potency Potion and he called the puzzle the Palgrave Paper Problem. Silas’s instructions for the puzzle were these: “Draw an X on a single sheet of paper and fold it in half with the X on the inside. Then fold it in half three more times. “To win a prize for solving the Paper Problem,” Silas went on, “you must answer this question correctly: When you unfold the paper with the X facing you, will there be more creases bending toward you or more bending away from you? Or will there be an equal number of each?”

g o s s i p

once lightly

n

p

Silas Renarm Returns (to Palgrave)

o m y a c

sπky

LAW

IT’S

w h i t e

E E Q U A L S M C

Primrose P.S. Reunion abcdef ghijk mnopq rst uv wxyz /r/e/a/d/i/n/g/ wheather wh

What Am I? Choose one letter of the alphabet from each line below. The correct choices, in order, will produce a four letter word that answers the question: “What am I?”

My first is not in Inglewood, although I am in Belfountain. I’ve never made it into Shelburne, but I’m all over Garafraxa. There’s a spot for me in Cataract and Corbetton (Crombie too). And I’m smack in the middle of Mono Mills.

At the Primrose school reunion, Louie was surprised to discover he was now half as old as Louisa. Six years ago he was just one-third her age. After a bit of thinking he realized that twelve years from now he would be two-thirds her age. How old are Louie and Louisa right now?

Hint: There was a time when I was everywhere in these hills.

A N

I N

T H E

H I L L S

M I N I

M Y S T E R Y

The Almost Perfect Armoured Car Heist So far everything had gone like clockwork. After the regular pickup at the bank in Grand Valley, he had returned to Highway 9 and turned right toward Arthur. But where he was really heading was Luther Lake to hook up with the fourth member of his team. If things had gone smoothly at her end, she was waiting there now with a getaway car for the team and all the cash they were carrying. Stealing a car had to be easy these days, he thought, with the country so nuts about centennial year and

Expo 67. People weren’t paying attention. At long-term parking at the Malton airport, it should have been a snap. He slowed to turn north up the 13th Sideroad and then accelerated hard. Another break! There was no car on Highway 9 to see the turn and none on the 13th. His two partners in the back nodded at each other in silent relief. The big armoured car was making a dust cloud now and that was not good, but getting to the lake fast to make the switch was crucial.

They were now into what his company called a “dead zone,” where twoway radios were useless. He checked his watch. Seven minutes left before he would normally make the mandatory call-in to the dispatcher – but that wasn’t going to happen today! Once again he slowed to make a right turn, this time onto the 8th Line which petered out at Luther Lake. One more minute. This was going great! The armoured car was filled with bags of cash, used tens, twenties and fifties

picked up that morning on the run from banks in Bolton, Orangeville, Erin and Brampton. Had to be three to four million. And there she was with a car, a blue Volkswagen Beetle! He’d told her to steal something ordinary, preferably dirty, and definitely not red – so she had got it right. Except for one thing. All of a sudden the heist had turned into a less than perfect crime. Why had the armoured car heist turned into a less than perfect crime?

solutions on page 90 94

IN THE HILLS AUTUMN 2010



In The Hills Autumn 2010