Interior Design's Best in Design 2021

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best in design


4 INTERIOR DESIGN


from the editors Welcome to Best in Design, 2021! For the past decade we’ve been proudly producing this “Best in” series, with our focus running the gamut from category-specific—like Best in Residential, Commercial, or Hospitality, for example—to surveying a wide range of project types such as this multigenre best in everything compendium. The world has changed immeasurably since our last BID book in 2019. What has remained constant is the depth and breadth of the superlative architecture and interior design we are honored to showcase. Between the soft-touch matte-finish covers of this “bookazine” (as we like to call it since the trim size exactly matches the magazine’s), you will find chapters devoted to residential, hospitality, workplace, and more. Some projects are a firm’s best recent work; others are considered their best of the decade, or best ever. All offer inspiring insights into that studio’s output—with handy on-page links to the firm’s Instagram account and website pointing the way to the rest of their portfolio. These homes, hotels, restaurants, offices, schools, galleries, and more, from compact apartments to complex million-square-foot campuses, arise from the minds of Interior Design Hall of Fame members such as Clodagh, Steven Harris, Lauren Rottet, and Debra Lehman Smith (to name just a few Famers within), up-and-coming talents, well-known global multinationals, and solo practitioners. A sneak peek: a vibrant Chicago elementary school with a decidedly noninstitutional aesthetic by Lothan Van Hook DeStefano Architecture, a captivating new hotel in Tokyo by Rockwell Group, a Minneapolis tech office that features a genius design move by Studio BV, Brininstool + Lynch’s sympathetic midcentury renovation in Malibu, and close to 100 additional projects. Bravo to all these extraordinary firms who have participated in Best in Design 2021. They’ve proven once again just how exciting this global stage of design really is. Plus, we could all use some positivity and inspiration these days. Dive in!

BESTINDESIGN 5


workplace

residential: indoor/outdoor MONTAUK HOUSE / DESAI CHIA ARCHITECTURE

10

FIELD NATION / STUDIO BV

68

HUNTING VALLEY RESIDENCE / DIMIT ARCHITECTS

14

MULTINATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY / MKDA

72

FAMILY RETREAT / STINESSEN ARKITEKTUR

16

SWINERTON / SHIMODA DESIGN GROUP

74

MARIPOSA HOUSE / BRININSTOOL + LYNCH

18

76

VERTICAL COURTYARD HOUSE / MONTALBA ARCHITECTS

22

KEARNY POINT BUILDING 78 ANNEX / WXY ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN

SAGAPONACK BARN COMPOUND / STEVEN HARRIS ARCHITECTS

24

FOUR O SIX / BELZBERG ARCHITECTS AND SIMON HAMUI DESIGN STUDIO

26

WME / HASTINGS

78

HORIZON THERAPEUTICS / LAMAR JOHNSON COLLABORATIVE

80

COVINGTON & BURLING / LSM

84

THE OPEN HOUSE / TOBIAS ARCHITECTURE, INC.

32

CHICK-FIL-A SUPPORT CENTER / SMALLWOOD

86

HAMMERSLEY RIDGE OVERLOOK / ANIK PEARSON ARCHITECT

34

HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS / ENV

88

BEACHSIDE RESIDENCE / ROGER FERRIS + PARTNERS

36

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION / ANNE SNEED ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS

90

BLACKEDGE CAPITAL / LAMAR JOHNSON COLLABORATIVE

92

ACCENTURE INDUSTRY X.O CENTER / AECOM

94

INDEED / JPC ARCHITECTS

98

CENTERBRIDGE PARTNERS / LSM

100

CHILMARK HOUSE / SCHILLER PROJECTS

40

MIDCENTURY HOUSE / FISCHER ARCHITECTURE

42

MEATPACKING TRIPLEX / DE-SPEC

44

WOOD HOUSE / BRININSTOOL + LYNCH

46

MOUNTAIN MODERN / ROBBINS ARCHITECTURE

50

TRANQUIL ABIDING / STUDIO MM ARCHITECT

52

HOWARD GILMAN FOUNDATION / WXY ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN

102

STRATFORD CREEK RESIDENCE / MATT GARCIA DESIGN

54

FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANY / AECOM

104

RUSSIAN HILL RESIDENCE / HUANG IBOSHI ARCHITECTURE

56

BOLTON GLOBAL CAPITAL / MKDA

106

FAMILY RETREAT / PFAU LONG ARCHITECTURE

58

COLAB AT BELL WORKS / NPZ STYLE + DÉCOR

108

TONAL HARMONY / DREWETT WORKS

60

EISNERAMPER / FCA

110

CORONADO RESIDENCE / BILL BOCKEN ARCHITECTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN

62

LOCAL INITIATIVES SUPPORT CORPORATION / MKDA

112

MASK HOUSE / HASTINGS

64

LAW FIRM / KEISER ASSOCIATES

114

HEADSPACE / MONTALBA ARCHITECTS

116


contents best in design 2021

hospitality CONRAD WASHINGTON, D.C. / ROTTET STUDIO

120

VIRGIN HOTELS NASHVILLE / HASTINGS AND MARKZEFF

124

UMARI CASA MONT TREMBLANT / 2PI R DESIGN

126

HOTEL MAGDALENA / LAKE | FLATO ARCHITECTS

128

MIRAVAL BERKSHIRES RESORT & SPA / CLODAGH

132

NEW YORK STATE CABINS / WXY ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN

134

H TASTING LOUNGE / LIV DESIGN STUDIO

136

AURORA LODGE / STINESSEN ARKITEKTUR

138

KIMPTON SHINJUKU TOKYO / ROCKWELL GROUP

142

TORONTO MARRIOTT MARKHAM / II BY IV DESIGN

144

SETA / DREAMTIME AUSTRALIA DESIGN

146

CRANES / //3877

150

CACHE CREEK RESORT HOTEL / HBG DESIGN

152

COOPER’S HAWK WINERY & RESTAURANT / ARIA GROUP ARCHITECTS

154

residential: artful living

SKI VACATION HOUSE / IBA DESIGN ASSOCIATES

190

SULAIMAN RESIDENCE / HUMA SULAIMAN

192

BACK BAY RESIDENTIAL TOWNHOUSE / ALAN TANKSLEY, INC

194

PENTHOUSE / MOJO STUMER ASSOCIATES

198

CHELSEA PENTHOUSE LOFT / MAR SILVER DESIGN

200

RANCH HOME / KEISER ASSOCIATES

202

EQUESTRIAN RANCH ESTATE / BLAIR BURTON INTERIORS

204

mix LEGACY CHARTER SCHOOL / LOTHAN  VAN HOOK DESTEFANO ARCHITECTURE

208

CENTRO DE ARTES NADIR AFONSO / LOUISE BRAVERMAN ARCHITECT

210

TOM BRADLEY INTERNATIONAL TERMINAL AT LAX / FENTRESS ARCHITECTS

212

CENTENNIAL PLANETARIUM ADAPTIVE REUSE / LEMAY

214

THE ISTANBUL BUTCHER / DREAMTIME AUSTRALIA DESIGN

218

MOYNIHAN TRAIN HALL / ROCKWELL GROUP

222

SHARJAH RESEARCH TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION PARK / ROAR

224

ASPIRE HOUSE / MARY DOUGLAS DRYSDALE ASSOCIATES

226

MANHATTAN TOWNHOUSE / STEVEN HARRIS ARCHITECTS

158

GALLERY HOUSE / DKSTUDIO ARCHITECTS

162

CARNEGIE / ENV

228

TEAHOUSE / TSAO & MCKOWN ARCHITECTS

164

MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER / FENTRESS ARCHITECTS

230

TUXEDEN ESTATE / MARY DOUGLAS DRYSDALE ASSOCIATES

166

CONCORD METROTOWN / LIV DESIGN STUDIO

232

DEEPWATER BAY VILLA / CREAM

168

ILLINOIS STATE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER / LOTHAN VAN HOOK DESTEFANO ARCHITECTURE

234

HARBOR LANDING AT GARVIES POINT / THE CHILDS DREYFUS GROUP

236

CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY / RDG PLANNING & DESIGN

238

GREENPOINT LOFT / STUDIOSC

172

BEL-AIR RESIDENCE / DE LA TORRE DESIGN STUDIO

174

IN LIVING COLOR / ANTROBUS DESIGN COLLECTIVE

176

HAMPTONS FAMILY GETAWAY / SOPHIE GIRARD DESIGN

178

47-49 GREENE STREET / DXA STUDIO

180

SHADOWBOX / JOHNSON CHOU INC.

184

FRIO RIVER FAMILY RETREAT / BLAIR BURTON INTERIORS

186

TRIBECA RESIDENCE / JASMINE LAM DESIGN STUDIO

188

TEN YORK / II BY IV DESIGN

240

EQ3 FLAGSHIP / KENNE SHEPHERD INTERIOR DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

242

O’HARE INTERNATIONAL CENTER / DAVIS + DAVIS INTERIOR DESIGN

244

index

246



residential: indoor/outdoor The allure of nature wending into the home—and vice versa, interior comforts flowing out into the landscape—is enduring. Floor-to-ceiling glazing and skylights pull in sun and views while courtyards, gardens, and patios make the most of outdoor living. (And check out that pool within a pond…)


Desai Chia Architecture

MONTAUK HOUSE NEW YORK

Arjun Desai and Katherine Chia, co-founders of New York–based Desai Chia Architecture, are committed to authentic design that expresses a project’s location. “We always research a site and its personality so the building is grounded in its context,” the principals say. For a home in Montauk, they explored local upside-down houses, which have bedrooms on the ground floor and living spaces above. “We experimented with the typology and layered in programmatic flexibility that could accommodate a range of scenarios,” they say. Built for a family of four, the house pro­ motes interaction and flows easily between indoor and outdoor spaces. Three bedrooms, a family room, and a garden terrace occupy the lower level; a master suite, two home offices with a shared terrace, and livingdining rooms are upstairs. A breezeway, shaded by a cantilevered roof, promotes ventilation and extends the living area outside. A shou sugi ban rot-proof wood rainscreen hovers above the concrete walls and allows the facade to breathe. Wrapping into the interiors, it references the vernacular architecture while articulating a crisp modern form. End-grain oak floors reinforce the rugged aesthetic. Initially conceived as a summer getaway, the house easily adapted to become the family’s pandemic refuge and is now their year-round home.

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PROJECT TEAM ARJUN DESAI, AIA; KATHERINE CHIA, FAIA; RYAN ERB; KENNETH MITCHELL; TROY LACOMBE KEY CONSULTANTS MURRAY ENGINEERING; SASKAS SURVEYING COM­PANY, PC.; CHRISTINE SCIULLI LIGHT + DESIGN; ARAN CONSTRUCTION; SUMMERHILL LANDSCAPES; NEW YORK BUILDING TECHNOLOGY GROUP; HAJEK LAND PLANNING PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL WARCHOL

desaichia.com; @desaichiaarchitecture

Clockwise from opposite top: The kitchen, with custom lacquer-finish cabinets and Caesarstone counters, connects to the breezeway. 10-foot-high sliding glass doors line the living room and the entire southern facade. The exterior stair that connects the breezeway terrace to the garden is concealed behind an angular, sculpted form. The base of the house is cast-in-place concrete.

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 11


Completed 2018 3,000 square feet, plus 1,000 square feet of outdoor terraces BSA/AIA NY Housing Award; AIA NY Residential Review Exhibition; AIA Long Island Archi Award; SARA National Design Award; SARA NY Design Award of Honor; The Architecture MasterPrize

Clockwise from top left: Shou sugi ban–treated wood sheathes the facade. A cantilevered roof extends over the breezeway on the southern side of the house. The breezeway includes outdoor dining and seating areas. The master bedroom has oak-veneered closets.

“In this project, we learned a lot by experimenting with the ‘upside-down house’ typology that is prevalent in Montauk”

12 INTERIOR DESIGN


RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 13


Dimit Architects

HUNTING VALLEY RESIDENCE, OHIO

Dimit Architects was founded in 2004 by Scott and Analía Nanni Dimit. The firm is a natural outgrowth of their shared design beliefs bred from an interest in preserving the historical built fabric of their community, while at the same time remaining environmentally responsible. Regardless of the project size, the architects at Dimit endow their structures with a sense of identity and verve. The active family who commissioned this residence requested an understated modern design to enhance the beautiful rolling site fronting a small private lake in Hunting Valley, Ohio. The primary living spaces are arranged in a series of low single-story pavilions sheathed in white stucco and ipe wood. Floor-to-ceiling glazing is provided for most living spaces, including a monumental “lift-and-slide” glass door facade that allows the entire main living room to open onto the rear entertainment patio and swimming pool terrace. Interior features, per Analía Nanni Dimit, include a standout series of adjustable vertical wood panels that screen the arrival foyer from the main living room. Clean and minimal detailing and a palette of white and walnut throughout provide refined sophistication. As Scott Dimit sums up, “It represents the most completely realized representation of our architectural values in a single-family home to date.”


Completed 2020 14,378 square feet PROJECT TEAM SCOTT M. DIMIT; ANALÍA NANNI DIMIT; MATTHEW SOMMER; KATIE HOPPER KEY CONSULTANTS 9TH AVENUE DESIGNS; POLARIS ENGINEERING; WHS ENGINEERING; PISTONE & TESAURO BUILDERS PHOTOGRAPHY CHRISTIAN PHILLIPS

dimitarchitects.com; @dimitarchitects

Clockwise from opposite top: Planes of walnut and white convey a sense of modernism and provide a seamless flow between interior and exterior spaces. Adjustable wood screens separate the arrival foyer from the main living room. Expanses of floor-toceiling glass with minimal trim frame views. Reflecting pools flank the main entry. A refined materials palette fosters a sense of calm. The rural property is sited adjacent to woodlands.

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 15


On a ridge overlooking a fjord in northern Norway, Stinessen Arkitektur has constructed an eco-conscious retreat for a family with small children and their guests. The complex consists of several separate cedar-clad cabins housing bedrooms, a sauna, and a living and dining room, respectively. Occupying a clearing in the forest, they are linked via a central winter garden and covered “in-between” areas with concrete floors and blackened-oak ceilings. “The separation of volumes emphasizes the transition between spaces and activities and tells a story of everyday journeys,” principal architect Snorre Stinessen notes. The organization of the volumes provides privacy and a connection with nature; it also controls and reduces the energy needed for heating in the

Stinessen Arkitektur

FAMILY RETREAT, MALANGEN, NORWAY

cold climate, because some areas are comfortable at lower temperatures. The garden, with a fireplace and outdoor kitchen, functions as the entry to the building and provides extra ventilation in the summer. Stinessen’s thoughtful use of eco-friendly materials also distinguishes the project. All wood comes from sustainably harvested forests, including the oak walls that bring warmth to interior spaces. For the cabin facades, the architect had cedar panels treated with iron sulfate and then left outside for months to achieve an even patina. Gray and weathered, they fit right into the rugged landscape.

16 INTERIOR DESIGN


Clockwise from opposite top: A chic family retreat in Malangen, Norway, occupies a ridge overlooking a fjord. Intermediate spaces between the cabins have concrete floors and blackened-oak ceilings. In the kitchen, interior surfaces are oak. A frameless slab of glass is the only thing separating the sauna from the wintery landscape. Cedar panels treated with iron sulfate clad the exterior of the cabins.

Completed 2017 2,200 square feet Interior Design Best of Year Award; A+ Award; International Design Award; The Architecture MasterPrize; Iconic Award

PROJECT TEAM SNORRE STINESSEN KEY CONSULTANTS TERJE SMITH-MEYER; SVENNEBY SAG OG HØVLERI PHOTOGRAPHY STEVE KING; TERJE ARNTSEN

snorrestinessen.com; @snorre_stinessen RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 17


Brininstool + Lynch MARIPOSA HOUSE, MALIBU, CALIFORNIA

Named the Mariposa House because of the abundant butterfly activity in the area, this renovated 1955 residence is an exemplar of the California modernist style. Brininstool + Lynch’s clients initially purchased the property because of the lush canyon site in the Santa Monica Mountains, which was also uncommonly private and expansive for Malibu. They knew such parcels were rare, but they were also enticed by the home’s excellent bones, originally the work of local architect Alfred T. “Hap” Gilman, who admired the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Led by founding principal Brad Lynch, the design team began a thoughtful reimagining of the house by stripping it back to its barest elements—specifically a few stone walls and many of the original roof beams. The renovation brings back much of the authentic midcentury spirit while updating nearly every system to the highest present-day standards, including an important earthquake-resistant structural retrofit. Douglas fir beams and tongue-and-groove ceilings as well as a new terrazzo floor span the entire house and continue outside, blurring the line between the interior and exterior, a key hallmark of California modernism. Clean lines and a carefully considered materials palette provide calming spaces with various functions, sensitively defined by custom walnut millwork (see the kitchen cabinetry, for instance) and the careful arrangement of vintage and contemporary furniture.

18 INTERIOR DESIGN


PROJECT TEAM BRAD LYNCH; PABLO DIAZ; DAVID MULDER; SARAH PEIL WINSTEAD KEY CONSULTANTS PEAK SURVEY; PARKER-RESNICK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING; CALIFORNIA ENERGY DESIGNS; PAMELA BURTON & COMPANY; CRAIG R. WILLIAMS CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY CHRISTOPHER BARRETT

brininstool-lynch.com; @brininstool_lynch

Clockwise from opposite top: The 1955 California modernist house by local architect Alfred T. “Hap” Gilman was sensitively renovated by Brininstool + Lynch. A Douglas fir tongue-and-groove ceiling, painting by Keiko Hara, and ceramic pieces by Toshiko Takaezu meet in the living room. Chairs from Knoll cluster around the dining room’s custom table. The pool patio, with a Knoll table and chairs in the foreground and vintage Van Keppel-Green loungers in the distance. Each of the five bedrooms includes its own adjoining patio and custom walnut millwork.

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 19


“There was an opportunity to respect what was there—and enhance it”

20 INTERIOR DESIGN


Expansive glass walls along both elevations make the house almost completely transparent, but pollinator gardens and plantings native to the Santa Monica Mountains provide absolute privacy from surrounding properties.

Completed 2020 5,600 square feet Residential Design Architecture Award Citation

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 21


Montalba Architects VERTICAL COURTYARD HOUSE SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA

Dissolving the boundaries between indoors and out is the design intention of this single-family residence in Santa Monica Canyon. The project combines two concepts in an L-shape plan: an enclosed courtyard atrium bisected by landscaping, and two volumes comprised of horizontal planes and balconies sutured by a connective bridge. The three-story courtyard atrium feeds light through each of the home’s floors, including the subterranean level. Greenery folds down through this central courtyard via concrete tiers. Further blurring boundaries are louvered wood screens. “Given the lot’s size and the neighborhood, the biggest challenge was making sure we didn’t overbuild and create something that didn’t coexist with the surrounding homes,” Montalba Architects founding principal David Montalba says. “So we decided to go vertical with proportions, centering the house around a courtyard atrium that connects all three volumes to create moments of simplicity and poetry.” Also inspired by Swiss design, the project balances the crispness of its concrete architecture with softer, warmer millwork. The strength of the concept is found in the subtle layering of spaces, the light and landscape, and the materials. It is not best understood by one image, but through the weaving of many. The home unfolds through discovery.

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Completed 2019 5,450 square feet

PROJECT TEAM DAVID MONTALBA, FAIA, SIA; ALEX SALICE; DEREK BUELL; MICHAEL KNOPOFF; ALEX KITH; JOSH RUSSELL; EDDIE WINN; VICENTE SHUM KEY CONSULTANTS THE OFFICE OF GORDON L. POLON; PBS ENGINEERS; SEAN O’CONNOR LIGHTING; ELYSIAN LANDSCAPES; SARLAN BUILDERS; WYNN ENGINEERING PHOTOGRAPHY KEVIN SCOTT

Clockwise from opposite top: Moveable wood louvers around the master suite’s balcony allow privacy while still transmitting light. Retractable doors provide connection to the surrounding landscape and sustainably cross-ventilate the home. Floor-to-ceiling windows create a viewing experience of the vertical courtyard and bring in daylight to the basement level. Open upper risers yield natural illumination for the flight below, to the lower level. An open-air courtyard with a teak soaking tub expands the master suite. Monolithic concrete contrasts with warm wood throughout.

montalbaarchitects.com; @montalbaarchitects

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 23


Steven Harris Architects SAGAPONACK BARN COMPOUND, NEW YORK

“In an uneventfully flat former potato field we built an art barn for jet-

interior, the art does the talking. There’s even a tall, narrow slot in the wall

setting collectors,” begins Interior Design Hall of Famer Steven Harris, the

of the living room for bringing in large artworks that do not fit through

renowned architect known for a highly modern yet site-aware design

doors or windows.

ethos. “We love honoring vernacular architecture while reinterpreting it to

The standout infinity pool embedded into an artificial pond is by Rees

fit our design intent.” The project consists of five connected single-story

Roberts + Partners. Rather than ending abruptly, the pool extends and

buildings with delicate, flat-roof, glass connectors. Vernacular barn details

blends into the pond, creating an extensive plane of shimmering water.

were abstracted to achieve a minimalist version of the traditional wood-

Beyond, the view sweeps over the landscape and trails off into the horizon.

and-shingle construction. Unfinished Alaskan yellow cedar envelops the

The view is enticing, but few things compare to coming back home.

structures, with fieldstone bases and chimneys. Working with the interior designer Luis Bustamante, Harris forged a

PROJECT TEAM STEVEN HARRIS; JOHN WOELL; ALEJANDRO FERNANDEZ DE MESA

comfortable, contemporary environment with minimalist construction

KEY CONSULTANTS REES ROBERTS + PARTNERS; LUIS BUSTAMANTE

details like limed plain-sawn oak floors. In the unassumingly elegant

stevenharrisarchitects.com; @stevenharrisarchitects

24 INTERIOR DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPHY SCOTT FRANCES


Clockwise from left: “The guiding adjectives for our Sagaponack project were gracious, easy, modern,” says architect Steven Harris. The quietly dramatic landscape gesture, the pool in a pond, is a fabulous conversation starter. Large artworks are brought into the house through the tall and narrow “art slot” between the two windows on the exterior face. A manicured garden by the house meets the marshy pond; as the eye travels across the water, the landscape grows more and more lush.

Completed 2017 Interior Design Hall of Fame member AIA and Interior Design Best of Year Awards

RESIDENTIAL

BESTINDESIGN 25


Four O Six is a triumph of design and precision nestled in the heart of Beverly Hills, California. Brought to life by architect Hagy Belzberg, interior designer Simon Hamui, and builder and developer Dugally Oberfeld, the house showcases meticulous craftsmanship and offers an approach to residential living inspired by oasis and escape. Flanked by continuous indoor-outdoor water features, the entry serves as introduction to the material play inside. Belzberg and Hamui devised a commanding steel-reinforced pivot door in eucalyptus wood, brass, and green onyx. Belzberg elevated and exposed the structural steel beams while clerestory windows bathe the interiors in natural light from above. Beyond the gallery, glass pivot walls line a sweeping great room, fusing generous living and dining areas with the landscaped grounds beyond

Belzberg Architects and Simon Hamui Design Studio FOUR O SIX, LOS ANGELES

via a studied sequence of airy spaces that are seamlessly interconnected. Conceived for an art lover, the house boasts expansive canvas-ready walls and recessed backlit niches for the display of treasured pieces. Extra-wide plank floors and texturized walnut and brass details exude warmth. Designing for simplicity is a complicated process, but Belzberg and Hamui helped take Dugally Oberfeld’s vision and translate it into reality. Hamui then warmed the interior by wrapping walls in wood and layering in finishes such as bronze, taupe leather, pewter steel, and leather-finish stone. Together, the result is a house that is undeniably grand in scale yet intimate in design, one that strikes just the right balance of welcome and comfort, elegance and sophistication.

PROJECT TEAM HAGY BELZBERG; ALICE HERNANDEZ: BELZBERG ARCHITECTS. SIMON HAMUI; JOHNNY HAMUI; KEES DE HAAN; JESÚS SUÁREZ: SIMON HAMUI DESIGN STUDIO. MAURICIO OBERFELD: DUGALLY OBERFELD KEY CONSULTANT STEPHEN BILLINGS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL CALDERWOOD, BRUCE DAMONTE

belzbergarchitects.com; @belzberg_architects simonhamui.com; @simonhamui docorp.net; @dugallyoberfeld

26 INTERIOR DESIGN

Clockwise from top left: In the great room, the formal living area’s travertine fireplace incorporates two cutouts that serve as frames for a pair of special art pieces. In signature style, Hagy Belzberg and Simon Hamui play with interconnected volumes and clean lines to deliver a contemporary approach to California luxury living. The media room’s sunken lounge is flanked by glass pivot doors with walnut slats. The superscale front door designed by Belzberg and Hamui is eucalyptus wood detailed with brass and green onyx.



“We were looking to capture L.A.’s laid-back atmosphere without compromising refinement” The Four O Six infinity-edge swimming pool boasts an original surprise: a floating cabana.

28 INTERIOR DESIGN


RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 29


Completed 2019 21,000 square feet Clockwise from top left: Wood cladding brings warmth and refinement to the home. Made of gray ash and honed Bardiglio marble, the master bath’s double vanity folds out to form a built-in daybed. The master bedroom’s expansive glass doors open to the pool. Hamui’s custom millwork is expertly detailed. Whether open or closed, glass pivot doors along the rear facade maximize uninterrupted views of the garden. The show kitchen, designed and manufactured by Hamui, is made of crosscut walnut and leather-finish black forest marble and features an island with a retractable solid-wood counter bar.


5

6

2

1

3

4

0

20

40

80 N

1 ENTRY

0

10

20 ft

2 GREAT ROOM 3 KITCHEN/FAMILY ROOM 4 MEDIA ROOM 5 MASTER SUITE 6 POOL

RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 31


Tobias Architecture, Inc.

THE OPEN HOUSE, MALIBU, CALIFORNIA

Imagine a life on the beach where there is nothing between you and the Pacific Ocean. That is an oft-stated but rarely achieved aspiration of residential architecture on the Southern California coastline. The Open House in Malibu by Tobias Architecture embraces this goal with two full floors of slide-away glass panels on its oceanside exposure, essentially turning rooms with a view into open-air verandas at the push of a button. Founding principal architect Lester Tobias has been designing homes on Old Malibu Road, a famous stretch of the coastline, for more than two decades. Many clients come with preconceived notions of what a beach house should be. But in the case of the Open House, what the homeowners requested was not an aesthetic but rather a lifestyle response. This design modus operandi allowed the residence to be shaped from the inside out, with the large, rectilinear concrete masses of the building yielding a gallerylike aesthetic inside. The main level consists of one large loft-style space, with a presentation kitchen bolstered by a full prep pantry behind. The upstairs is apportioned so that the master suite commands the entire 100-foot expanse of oceanfront exposure—a true natural decadence in today’s modern world. Topping it all off, literally, is a roof deck with fire pit, spa, and, of course, that peerless ocean view.

32 INTERIOR DESIGN


PROJECT TEAM LESTER TOBIAS; CRISTINA SCHILKE-DIAZ; HENRY PHILIPSON; ROXANA PEREZ ANTONIO; MARCO GIACOMOZZI KEY CONSULTANTS PACIFIC VIEW CUSTOM HOMES, INC.; PARKER RESNICK STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING PHOTOGRAPHY CHARLIE HOBERMAN/VOLO MEDIA

tobiasarchitecture.com; @tobiasarchitecture

Clockwise from opposite top: The Malibu residence sits proud and unapologetic on its site, taking full advantage of sun, stars, wind, and waves. The plan narrows at the west end, creating a well-proportioned media zone for movie nights or simply gazing at the fire. Nothing but glazing separates the master suite from the Pacific Ocean. The tub and shower area leaves nothing to the imagination—for either the bathers inside or the surfers outside. The main floor is open plan, with furniture groupings providing defined areas of intimacy.

Completed 2021 5,645 square feet RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

BESTINDESIGN 33


Clockwise from opposite: Poised on a single-story concrete base that nestles into a wooded ridge, the house boasts myriad balconies capturing views of the nature conservatory across the valley. The south-facing master bedroom’s slide-fold doors glide open to create a sleeping porch, complete with drop-down screen to keep mosquitoes at bay. The cedar ramp ascending to the green roof terrace is reminiscent of logging and mining structures in the client’s native Washington State. Anik Pearson was commissioned to provide integrated services for both architecture and interior furnishings.

Anik Pearson Architect

HAMMERSLEY RIDGE OVERLOOK, WINGDALE, NEW YORK

In 2004, Anik Pearson was asked by her clients to find a rural property on which they could build a family compound. Requirements were that the site be easily accessible from New York City and should offer prospects for slowly developing the compound’s program over several decades. The long-term vision was to create a main house, a guesthouse, a caretaker’s house, and a dance studio, all of which would eventually become a legacy for the clients’ children and grandchildren. Pearson found a largely unimproved 68-acre property in upstate New York near the Hammersley Hill nature conservancy. For almost a decade, she coordinated the infrastructure improvements to build the first edifice on the site: the main house. “It was a key project for us in that the clients gave us full creative license to realize our vision of integrating Scandinavian and Korean design principles into a unique landscape,” Pearson notes. The eco-friendly home promotes connection to the wooded land through an external ramp linking balconies, porches, and a terraced green roof. Throughout, emphasis is given to ease of maintenance. Native plants added to the landscaping require no irrigation or mowing, and naturally resilient materials like copper flashing, Rheinzink standing-seam roofing, porcelain tile, and an untreated cedar rain screen were selected with a view to ensuring that this compound serves multiple generations with ease. PROJECT TEAM ANIK PEARSON, RA, AIA; DAN WEBRE KEY CONSULTANTS ROBERT BUMP CONSTRUCTION; REED HILDERBRAND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS; GREENE STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING; RENNIA ENGINEERING DESIGN; PAVANE & KWALBRUN CONSULTING ENGINEERS; TUNE STREET PHOTOGRAPHY PHILIPPE CHENG

aparch.net; @anikpearsonarchitect

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Roger Ferris + Partners BEACHSIDE RESIDENCE, WESTPORT, CONNECTICUT

The clients requested a sturdy, low-maintenance home on a flat coastal

From a distance, the residence looks almost like a cluster of Monopoly

property that could withstand the constant activity of a young family.

houses. The gabled shapes and familiar door and window openings

Architect Roger Ferris’s solution was a quartet of white gabled forms—

acknowledge regional and historical precedent but combined in a new

two-story barnlike structures with shared public spaces on the ground

and referential manner. The scale and materials—fiber-cement clapboard

floor, bedrooms above, and a double-height great room in the center. The

siding, zinc trim, and standing-seam zinc roofing—are not traditional at all.

buildings are linked by glass arcades with steel sash windows and doors

“I wanted to see how far I could abstract the idea of the vernacular New

that also function as entry points. Along with the great room—a vaulted

England style without losing what it means to be in a warm farmhouse on

space with a fireplace and dining area—the central volume contains the

the water in Connecticut,” Ferris says. The beguiling result speaks for itself.

kitchen, family room, and a pair of bedrooms. A sitting-room library, utility and mud rooms, and garage occupy the other structures. All the spaces flow together naturally but provide separation for multiple group activities. 36 INTERIOR DESIGN

PROJECT TEAM ROGER FERRIS, AIA, RIBA; ROBERT MARX, AIA, LEED AP; MYRON MIRGORODSKY; TOM HINE PHOTOGRAPHY PAÚL RIVERA; DURSTON SAYLOR

ferrisarch.com; @rogerferrispartners


Clockwise from left: The gabled forms and familiar door and window openings respond to the regional and historic precedent of the area, while the fibercement siding, zinc roof, and steel sash windows announce the present. Adjacent to the entry is the kitchen, containing an informal breakfast area and sitting room. The glass connector functions as the front door. Upon entry there, visitors peer through a thick punctuated wall into the double-height central great room.

Completed 2018 7,720 square feet AIA Connecticut Award

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“From a distance, the residence looks almost like a cluster of Monopoly houses” Linked by glass-enclosed walkways, the gabled volumes boast bright, open interiors with generous glazing that provides limitless opportunities to appreciate the waterfront environment.

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Completed 2016 6,000 square feet AIA New England Design Awards

Schiller Projects CHILMARK HOUSE, MASSACHUSETTS

“Chilmark House is the foundational work of Schiller Projects,” firm founder and principal Aaron Schiller asserts. “The designs formulated there blossomed into key ideas that connect our entire portfolio.” It was just as he was finishing his first year of graduate studies at the Yale School Clockwise from left: A glass-wrapped corner of the Chilmark House living room has unencumbered views of the meadow and Atlantic Ocean to the south. The barnlike building’s standing-seam roof is slightly torqued. A concrete fireplace anchoring one end of the living area encases two steel structural columns. The board-formed concrete stair wall’s distressed surface texture results from being poured against salvaged battens pitted with fungal decay. Schiller reupholstered the Mies van der Rohe dining chairs himself and designed the walnut table. The house is clad in charred cedar siding.

of Architecture that Schiller was hired by a relative to build a year-round residence at Chilmark, a town on Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. Schiller found a mentor in one of his professors, Alan Organschi, and teamed up with his firm, Gray Organschi Architecture, on the barnlike design and build. The upper volume, which contains the main living spaces, has bleached ash interiors offering a sense of enveloping lightness. The lower level, which houses the gym, media room, and four bedrooms, is largely constructed from board-formed concrete. The exterior of the structure is wrapped in charred cedar siding, a rot-resistant cladding that takes on a silvery sheen on sunny days—an effect that guided the team’s choice of a matching color for the standing-seam roof. To produce the 244 planks needed for the facade, the team rented a warehouse in the Bronx where the timber was burned by hand. As for furnishings, Schiller drew on his early, up-close exposure to the masters of midcentury design in the Miller House, his grandparents’ fabled Eero Saarinen–designed residence in Columbus, Indiana. PROJECT TEAM AARON SCHILLER; COLIN CLELAND; PAUL BENCH: SCHILLER PROJECTS. ALAN ORGANSCHI; LISA GRAY: GRAY ORGANSCHI ARCHITECTURE. KEY CONSULTANTS ATELIER TEN; CALEB WOODARD WOODWORKING PHOTOGRAPHY MATTHEW CARBONE; DAVID SUNDBERG

schillerprojects.com; @schillerprojects

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Completed in 2019 4,025 square feet AIA East Bay Design for Integration Residential Award, Design Commendation

Clockwise from left: The large wood-sash sliding doors, paneled ceiling, and downlights—all original—were restored. The new tranquil master suite addition references the scale and flow of the original home. Fischer Architecture opened the formal dining area to the new kitchen by way of pocket doors that slip behind the original wood paneling. The firm designed a new swimming pool and patio with integral hot tub to replace the original kidney-shape pool.

Fischer Architecture MIDCENTURY HOUSE, KENTFIELD, CALIFORNIA The Kentifield Midcentury House is a beloved 1945 home designed by renowned architect Henry Hill that has been carefully renovated and expanded by Fischer Architecture, a Bay Area firm led by Andrew and Kerstin Fischer. The original house is a classic example of the Second Bay Tradition, which celebrated the informality of a new postwar lifestyle by using simple floor plans and increasing indoor-outdoor connection. The new owners purchased the property in 2013, aiming to keep its character while making contemporary modifications such as adding a large kitchen with an outdoor dining area, a new master suite, and a guesthouse that functions as a pool house for outdoor entertaining. With all these changes, the Fischers approached their work with respect for the original materials palette, massing, and details, endeavoring to quietly enhance and complement the existing building fabric. “We have had the good fortune of working on several Henry Hill houses, but this was an especially humbling commission,” Andrew Fischer says. “We’re proud of the way we were successful in knitting new and old together, bringing distinction with minimal contrast to the places where new spaces meet their historical counterparts. The result is a home that our clients tell us they absolutely love living in.” PROJECT TEAM ANDREW FISCHER; KERSTIN FISCHER; ANDREW HOTZ KEY CONSULTANTS GREGORY PAUL WALLACE; DAVID JOHN BIGHAM; COLOR FOLIO DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY MATTHEW MILLMAN

fischerarchitecture.com; @fischerarchitecture 42 INTERIOR DESIGN


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De-spec

MEATPACKING TRIPLEX, NEW YORK The name De-spec, an abbreviation of the term “de-speculative,” announces the New York multidisciplinary firm’s critique of speculative construction, particularly housing developments in which generic homes are built with custom-home pricing. Instead, founder Farnaz Mansuri favors an utterly bespoke approach that centers the client and site. Mansuri had already updated political consultant Bernard Whitman and husband Constantin Mitides’s townhouse, set on the ground floor and basement level of a 1930 apartment building, when the flat upstairs

Completed 2017 1,320 square feet

became available, offering an opportunity to transform the spaces, each just 12 feet wide, into an airy triplex. The three floors shared a wall of glass opening to the building’s communal garden but the rest of the house was gloomy. By replacing the newly acquired apartment’s roof with an angular skylight, daylight could permeate throughout. Mansuri also cleverly opened things up another way, slicing nine feet off the garden-facing end of the street-level floor plate to allow light to suffuse

something much grander. An open white-oak staircase links the formerly

Clockwise from top left: Two dark apartments were united to form a skylit triplex with white-oak floors. The exterior staircase is painted steel. A floating walkway leads to the master bedroom door framed in oak. In the below-grade living room, a Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance chair sits in front of white-oak stairs that lead up to the communal garden.

disjointed levels, rising from the now airy below-grade living room

PROJECT TEAM FARNAZ MANSURI; TOM SHEA; JONATHAN PAKAKI; AZHAR KOTADIA

the lower spaces and to create a connection between the three levels at the landing—proving that sacrificing a few feet can be the key to gaining

through the second-level kitchen and dining areas up to the master suite on top, creating an overlay of circulation and habitable spaces.

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KEY CONSULTANT CONNOLLY ENGINEERING PHOTOGRAPHY FRANK OUDEMAN

de-spec.com; @ despec_design


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Founded by David Brininstool and Brad Lynch in 1989, Brininstool + Lynch is the recipient of over 50 major design awards, including AIA Chicago Firm of the Year, 29 AIA Design Excellence Awards, and four American Architecture Awards. This house, one of the firm’s breakthrough projects, is an intriguing exercise in creating privacy within an urban neighborhood while providing an abundance of open, bright space. The major move was to screen part of the exterior behind custom copper panels cut out with a unique, blocky, mid-mod pattern. “In the city, everybody has their blinds or drapes drawn,” Lynch notes. “In this house the light goes straight through—you get a sense of sky, but the perforated composition allows that without ever having to pull the shades for privacy.” The detail continues inside: To absorb sound, some millwork ceilings are perforated with random squares in a pattern derived from the exterior latticework. Housing the communal areas, the ground floor is open and animated. The living room even sports a large laylight of patterned acrylic that

Brininstool + Lynch WOOD HOUSE, CHICAGO

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filters dappled sun from the skylight above. The second floor is quiet and subdued, necessarily so since it’s where the family bedrooms are located. Accessed by a tucked-away wood stair, the third floor includes a private study and a guest suite, each with its own deck and green roof.


Clockwise from opposite top: A view into the living room, where weathered copper panels hang above the fireplace. The front volume has a brick masonry facade, the one behind is screened with custom perforated-copper panels. The cut-out pattern filters daylight into the spacious master bedroom on the second floor. The room is contemporary in detailing, yet textured, warm, and serene. PROJECT TEAM BRAD LYNCH; DAN MARTUS; DENA WANGBERG; JOICE KRYSAK; HILLARY HYSON; EIRIK AGUSTSSON KEY CONSULTANTS COEN+PARTNERS; GOODFRIEND MAGRUDER STRUCTURE; MOSHE CALAMARO & ASSOCIATES; AA SERVICE COMPANY; GOLDBERG GENERAL CONTRACTING PHOTOGRAPHY CHRISTOPHER BARRETT

brininstool-lynch.com; @brininstool_lynch


Completed 2013 7,900 square feet AIA Chicago Divine Detail Honor Award; Copper Development Association North American Copper in Architecture Award; Chicago Athenaeum American Architecture Award; AIA Chicago Interior Architecture Honor Award; Residential Architect Design Award Citation

Looking north through the courtyard into the kitchen and media area; on the left is the elegant open-riser stair built of walnut wrapped around steel plates.

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“We wanted the facade to be a composition”


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Robbins Architecture

MOUNTAIN MODERN, COLORADO

Celeste Robbins, principal of Robbins Architecture, believes that a home should be filled with warm and livable spaces to connect—both with family and friends within the home and to the natural environment outside. Her designs have a sense of openness and relate to their surrounding landscape with swaths of glazing framing ever-changing views of the great outdoors. “Nature doesn’t get it wrong,” Robbins says. “It has an intrinsic beauty that you can count on to bring warmth and serenity to a home.” That was especially true for a family vacation house on 89 acres of Rocky Mountain ranchland in Colorado. Given the majesty of the environment, Robbins and her team sought to bring nature indoors. They expressed the strength of the mountains and the tranquility of the wild grasses in materials and forms, like the building’s horizontal board-formed concrete planes that appear to balance on wide glass walls. In the double-height entry, a floating staircase with crystalclear balustrades maintains transparency and views. Living areas extend outside via glass pocket doors that lead to a pool, hot tub, exercise pavilion, and fire pit. Lighting plays an important role throughout, with layered illumination and shadow strengthening the architectural intent. Minimal landscape design keeps the focus on the expansive ranchland, while thoughtful details create a sense of intimacy within it.


PROJECT TEAM CELESTE ROBBINS; ANU SRINIVASAN; ED WITKOWSKI KEY CONSULTANTS SHAWN HENDERSON; HOERR SCHAUDT; BG BUILDINGWORKS; KL&A ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS; 186 LIGHTING DESIGN GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY STEVE HALL/HEDRICH BLESSING; STEVE FREIHON/ TUNGSTEN

robbins-architecture.com; @robbinsarchitecture

Clockwise from opposite top: A sculptural floating staircase animates the double-height entry. Structural glass windows, stained-wood soffits, and accent walls create warm, welcoming spaces. The house opens to a pool, hot tub, and fire pit. Living and dining areas flow into one another and connect to the outdoors. The house sits on 89 acres of ranchland in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains.

Completed 2016 10,000 square feet AIA Divine Detail Award RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

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Studio MM Architect

TRANQUIL ABIDING, GLEN SPEY, NEW YORK

Founded in 2010 by Marica McKeel, Studio MM is a modern-minded residential architecture firm with offices in New York City and the Hudson Valley. A recent standout from the studio is Tranquil Abiding, a house that thoughtfully responds to the clients’ spiritual practice. It was after years of involvement with the Buddhist community in upstate New York that McKeel’s clients decided to plant roots closer to their temple in Glen Spey. Studio MM designed a house composed of four semi-connected pavilions that hover above the earth, splayed like a fan. “The pavilions are gently pulled apart, creating interstitial spaces that physicalize the Buddhist concept of sunyata, or emptiness,” McKeel explains. Their siting on the 115-acre wooded plot is driven by three elements: the temple, the path of the sun, and a creek that runs through the middle of the property. The meditation pavilion sits directly on axis with the temple, while the main bedroom overlooks the burbling creek. The living room is oriented due south, maximizing sunlight. Bedrooms and living spaces emphasize simplicity: quiet, cozy rooms that are modest in scale and clear in intent. “Our clients were interested in design that minimizes clutter and organizes daily routines as a way of gaining mental clarity,” says McKeel. Inspired by connection to the

PROJECT TEAM MARICA MCKEEL, AIA; COLBI CAMPBELL KEY CONSULTANTS HOBBS, INC.; SILMAN; CABINET DESIGNERS; HARBROOK FINE WINDOWS DOORS & HARDWARE PHOTOGRAPHY BRAD FEINKNOPF

maricamckeel.com; @studiommarchitect 52 INTERIOR DESIGN

land, stone excavated from the site and chiseled by hand was applied to the facade as a contrast to the expanses of glass that connect interior and exterior. In the meditation pavilion, on the other hand, windows are drastically scaled back, allowing the focus to remain intently on ritual.


Clockwise from opposite top: Tranquil Abiding, an upstate New York house centered around Buddhist spiritual practice, is composed of four pavilions that appear to float above the site, evoking a sense of serenity akin to that of meditation. The focal point of the main entry is a colorful Buddhist   thangka painting. Each pavilion is oriented toward a particular element— a nearby temple, the path of the sun, a creek—resulting in a fan-shape layout. A Morsø freestanding fireplace anchors the primary living area. The warm wood kitchen is by Bulthaup.

Completed 2020 2,408 square feet

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Matt Garcia Design STRATFORD CREEK RESIDENCE, AUSTIN, TEXAS

The site was beautiful and untouched but deemed by most people as too steep to build on, dropping 50 feet as it did from streel level to a dry creek abundant with wildlife. But Matt Garcia, founder of his eponymous residential design firm in Austin, thought differently. He envisioned a dwelling that would maximize the unusual site. The house is set up as a pair of boxes—a two-story main living space for the owners and a separate, one-story guesthouse—connected by a carport. Large expanses of glass on the creek side give the residents a sense of floating above nature. Voids in the cedar-clad architecture provide uninterrupted views through the house, framing the wilderness beyond. A few years after the project was completed, the clients requested a small addition to serve as a music and exercise space. The addition was placed Clockwise from top left: The house feels as if it’s in the wild yet is only minutes from downtown Austin. Rough cedar cladding warms and softens the architectural massing. The new addition’s living area includes a sofa by B&B Italia and a table from Gubi. The private outdoor shower, with a freestanding JEE-O fitting, rewards the owners after a workout. The master bedroom in the main house enjoys views of the trees and the creek below; the bed frame and credenza are from the LAX Series by MASHstudios and the side chairs are by Poliform.

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a full level below the original house, further pushing the living and outdoor spaces toward the creek, deep into the natural environment. The exterior is wrapped in shou sugi ban burnt-cedar siding—a reference to the original structures but with a darker, moodier tone. “As the house and landscape have aged together, the buildings disappear into the site more and more every day,” Garcia says. “Nothing is more satisfying and rewarding.”


Completed 2017 3,200 square feet

PROJECT TEAM MATT GARCIA; NICOLE MARSHALL KEY CONSULTANTS WESTSHOP DESIGN; BATTAGLIA FINE HOMES PHOTOGRAPHY CASEY DUNN

mattgarciadesign.com; @mattgarciadesign

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Completed 2012 5,000 square feet AIA San Francisco Small Firms Great Projects publication Clockwise from left: The new design establishes a strong connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, adding balconies and terraces accessed via glass doors that blur interior-exterior boundaries. An extra-long kitchen island segues into a breakfast bar. The property now has a fourth-floor addition, which contains the master suite. The designers introduced modern functionality and a light-filled contemporary aesthetic to the Edwardian-era residence’s 5,000-square-foot interior.

Huang Iboshi Architecture

RUSSIAN HILL RESIDENCE, SAN FRANCISCO Founded in 1998 by Emily Huang and Gregory Iboshi, this thoughtful San Francisco architecture and design studio “creates poetry out of the practical.” The transformation of an Edwardian house in the city’s Russian Hill district is characteristic of the firm’s ethos of respect for history and simplicity. The hillside property offered incredible views of the city from every direction but the historic home did not take full advantage of this. Huang Iboshi’s design “pulls the city into the house,” while respecting the building’s stout structure and classic exterior. Although views are the initial attraction, “light is what really makes this design,” Iboshi notes. Key strategies included removing existing walls where possible, adding skylights, and installing a floating staircase to replace several flights of steps haphazardly located in different parts of the original interior. Made of wood and glass, the staircase not only connects four floors but also channels a column of light down from the skylights, illuminating what was previously a dimly lit residence. Now everything feels open to views and natural light with a strong connection between indoors and outdoors—a flow that is further enhanced with clean, simple furnishings, crisp, tailored details, and a serene palette of pale oak and Calacatta marble. As Iboshi puts it, “We believe modernity is not a style but a way of thinking about design for the present time.” PROJECT TEAM GREGORY IBOSHI; EMILY HUANG; JOHN CHOI KEY CONSULTANTS BICARDO BUILDERS INC; DOUBLE-D ENGINEERING; COLLIER WAREHOUSE; VELLA GLASS; SOLHER IRON PHOTOGRAPHY OPEN HOMES PHOTOGRAPHY

hi-arch.com; @huang_iboshi_architecture 56 INTERIOR DESIGN


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Pfau Long Architecture

FAMILY RETREAT, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

Despite the endless flow of thirsty tourists to its fancy wineries, California’s Napa Valley remains first and forever an agricultural region. That heritage is aptly honored by a residential compound planted amid the vineyards and designed by Pfau Long Architecture. (Pfau Long’s merger with Perkins&Will brought its residential expertise to the latter firm’s San Francisco studio, where Peter Pfau is now design director.) As a second home for a client in the hyperkinetic tech industry, “the place needed to be a relief from over-stimulation,” Pfau reports. Strikingly clad in Port Orford cedar, the house and its attendant guest cottage, pool house, pottery studio, and garage are odes to historic rural forms—even though they are sharper and more minimal. “To connect them with the site, it was a matter of ‘carving away’ at the structures with windows and doors. When the glass doors are opened, the rooms become akin to open-air pavilions,” Pfau adds. The design gains clarity from the simplicity of its materials palette— wood, dark gray metal, concrete—and archetypal forms. Interiors defer to the architecture (and the views) with clean lines and muted hues. The landscape architect emphasized native and low-water plantings, including cork oak and olive trees, plus a mix of ornamental grasses and hardy perennials that lend color year-round. The flowers are planted behind the house in alternating bands that echo the rhythmic rows of the surrounding vineyards. PROJECT TEAM PETER PFAU; MELANIE TURNER; HELEN SCHNEIDER KEY CONSULTANTS LUTSKO ASSOCIATES; ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING DESIGN; GFDS ENGINEERS; ENGINEERING 350; DELTA CONSULTING & ENGINEERING; GRASSI & ASSOCIATES PHOTOGRAPHY ART GRAY

pfaulong.com; @pfau_long_architecture

Completed 2016 6,700-square-foot main house Clockwise from top left: In the living area, Rodolfo Dordoni sectional sofas gather around three sculptural cocktail tables by Belgian craftsman Kaspar Hamacher. The gable-ended main house is essentially a long, two-story barn intersected by smaller, similarly shaped vol­umes, all clad in cedar siding milled to show saw marks. An Antonio Citterio armchair occupies a corner of the master bedroom. Even the property’s pool house embodies indoor-outdoor living, blurring the boundaries be­tween the two.

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Drewett Works TONAL HARMONY, PARADISE VALLEY, ARIZONA

For the residence of a surgeon and his family who were seeking the modernism they loved but had never lived in, Drewett Works founding architect C.P. Drewett crafted a desert pavilion with floating cantilevered rooflines hovering above clerestory windows that flood the interior with natural light. Although the lot has east-west orientation, the house was designed to capture mainly north and south light. “It’s more desirable and soothing,” Drewett notes. To site the house so that adjacent properties were not visible, Drewett sunk a portion of the structure, including the entry, office, and master bedroom wing, partly underground. “The subterranean nature of the home offers a humble approach from the street,” he explains. “But once inside, there’s still interior grandeur.” In the expansive main living area, sliding doors pocket into the wall, opening to a poolside patio with a multisided fireplace. Materials such as steel, quartzite, and hemlock wood reoccur, creating a tonal desert color palette. The sybaritic master bathroom repeats key details too, such as custom maple cabinetry that can also be found in the kitchen. After a relaxing soak in the master bath’s freestanding tub, which shares a double-sided fireplace with the bedroom, the homeowners can head to their viewing balcony to take in the Sonoran sunset. Bliss. PROJECT TEAM C.P. DREWETT, AIA, NCARB KEY CONSULTANTS OWNBY DESIGN; ARGUE CUSTOM HOMES; REFINED GARDENS PHOTOGRAPHY DINO TONN

drewettworks.com; @drewettworks

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Clockwise from opposite top: A serene dining space is visible at the entry but tucked away from the main living areas. Large-format quartzite cladding, champagne-color metal fasciae, and hemlock ceilings create a tonal color palette that embraces the desert landscape. Glass walls provide mountain views in bedrooms. The master bath’s elegant freestanding tub is warmed by a two-sided fireplace it shares with the master bedroom. A portion of the house, including the office and master bedroom wing, is partly subterranean.

Completed 2020 6,574 square feet RED Awards; Best in American Living Awards; Gold Nugget Awards; The Nationals Gold Award; ASID Arizona North Design Excellence Awards RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

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Bill Bocken Architecture & Interior Design CORONADO RESIDENCE, CALIFORNIA

“Truly good design works to better the lives of the people who inhabit it,” says Bill Bocken. “That is the most important objective.” The architect brings 35 years of experience to the table, practicing in California on projects where site, structure, and interiors work together in perfect harmony. His recent family home for a contractor client in Coronado, a resort city on a peninsula in San Diego Bay, stretched the design flexibility of his firm from historical homes to uber-contemporary projects. The two-story residence takes the concept of indoor-outdoor living to the maximum, with a plan organized around a rear courtyard with a pool and pocketing doors that transform the home into a series of covered patio areas that blend the interior with the exterior. “The rooms communicate with each other across the courtyard and the pool, versus how a typical house is set up, where you’re going from one interior space to another,” Bocken says. “It’s all about informality.” There are no imposing hallways or giant foyers. Instead, the easy flow of functional spaces demonstrates a Zen-like restraint, bolstered by materials such as plaster walls, granite flooring, and rough-hewn wood accents.

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Completed 2020 4,500 square feet

PROJECT TEAM BILL BOCKEN, AIA PHOTOGRAPHY MEGHAN BEIERLE-O’BRIEN

billbocken.com; @billbocken

Clockwise from left: All rooms of the house open to a tranquil zero-edge pool and outdoor lounge. The living room, where a slight reveal at the tops of walls separates them from the ceiling plane, is furnished with a modular steel coffee table and a large artwork commissioned for the space. A pivoting gate leads into the property, where on the upper level of the residence, sliding wooden shutters provide privacy from the street.

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The clients, a recently retired couple whose careers were spent in the public eye, asked for an open and modern home veiled from the street—a place for a somewhat quieter lifestyle, more suited to family gatherings, personal business interests, and general daily living. As its name suggests, the elegant residence the homeowners got “is an expression of their public persona while simultaneously conveying who they are in private,” says firm principal David M. Powell. “It leverages the power of design to convey their unique personalities.” Eschewing typical residential forms, the front facade—a 160-foot-long by 16-foot-tall cast-in-place concrete wall screened by a palisade of weathering-steel panels—establishes the “mask” metaphor by obscuring

Hastings

MASK HOUSE, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

the few points of visual connection between the exterior and the interior, which is accessed through a narrow, slotlike entrance. Inside, a courtyard typology brings focus to the heart of the house. At the center of the plan, a large hearth room opens onto a covered living area before spilling out into the courtyard beyond. The east wing contains guest quarters and a fitness room, while the west wing holds the master suite and bath. The exterior wall of the master bathroom is fully glazed and opens onto

Completed 2015 6,500 square feet AIA Gulf States, AIA Tennessee, and AIA Middle Tennessee Awards

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a secret garden slid in between the house and the adjacent hill. As one moves through the home, the initial impression of formal architecture gives way to a casual, generous residence, thereby completing the mask concept.


PROJECT TEAM DAVID M. POWELL, FAIA; CHRIS M. DAVIS, AIA; MATT SPAULDING PHOTOGRAPHY ALBERT VECERKA/ESTO; ZACH GOODYEAR

hastingsarchitecture.com; @hastingsarchitecture

Clockwise from opposite top: The front facade, a massive cast-in-place concrete wall, is further screened by a palisade of Corten steel plates. The rear facade is almost all glass to connect the living areas seamlessly to the central courtyard and negative-edge swimming pool. Inside, a continuous skylight separating the ceiling from the concrete wall casts animating shadows on the art-ready surface. The outdoor living room is shaded by a 12-foot-deep overhang, the top side of which helps reflect natural light through clerestory windows deep into the house. The large hearth room has an ipe ceiling that, thanks to strategically placed glazing, appears to float weightlessly above the space. RESIDENTIAL INDOOR/OUTDOOR

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HUANG IBOSHI ARCHITECTURE, WEEKEND RETREAT IN INVERNESS, CALIFORNIA: PAUL DYER PHOTOGRAPHY


workplace

The office may have temporarily decamped to the home during the global pandemic, but forward-thinking experiential workplaces that foster real collaboration, offer enticing amenities, and put wellness front and center are always in business. Call it the best kind of branded content.


Studio BV

FIELD NATION, MINNEAPOLIS

The rich storytelling skills of Studio BV founder Betsy Vohs are on full display in one of her firm’s earliest completed projects. The job entailed designing the first office of a tech company, with a mandate that the new digs embody its business—providing a digital marketplace to connect corporations with technology gig workers—in physical form. “Field Nation’s work is rooted in coding and developing a software platform,” Vohs notes. “The client couldn’t describe it easily to outsiders; it was all technical jargon.” So, the designer decided to tell the story without words. One confident, bold, and simple move defines the space: A network of orange conduit, designed in close collaboration with electricians, proved to be the ideal visual metaphor for showing what Field Nation does. The conduit system starts in the elevator lobby and then morphs and twists over and around the office, guiding the way through different zones and creating screening elements and enclosures for partial privacy in the open work space. It is at once wall pattern, sculpture, canopy, divider, and even light fixture (various pipes cleverly terminate in already wired pendants).

PROJECT TEAM BETSY VOHS; COURTNEY LEHMANN KEY CONSULTANTS FRASER-MORRIS ELECTRIC CO.; GARDNER BUILDERS PHOTOGRAPHY COREY GAFFER

studio-b-v.com; @studio____bv 68 INTERIOR DESIGN

“The conduit is a shape-shifter that helps connect people throughout the space,” Vohs explains. “It makes concrete the ideals of the company and showcases the power of design.”


Clockwise from opposite top: Emerging from a backlit logo in Field Nation’s lobby, a custom network of electrical conduit acts as a visual metaphor for the company’s business: connecting corporate clients with IT gig workers. The conduit morphs and twists throughout the Minneapolis office. It defines space and aids wayfinding. It is the only component in the workplace that represents the client’s brand color. The entertainment area, like the work spaces, has a raw, industrial vibe.

Completed 2018 35,000 square feet Interior Design Best of Year Honoree


Some sections of the conduit terminate in bold light fixtures.

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Clockwise from left: Yellow lounge chairs accent a touchdown area in the insurance company’s office. An outdoor terrace overlooks downtown Stamford, Connecticut. Moss wall panels by Nordgröna absorb sound outside the café. Studio Lilica fiberglass pendants add to the double-height reception area’s bright and airy feel.

Completed 2020 17,100 square feet

MKDA

MULTINATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY, STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT When a London-based insurance company opened an office in Connecticut, it asked MKDA to design a chic workplace that reflected both its brand identity and the surrounding area. “The client wanted a light, bright space with pops of color from their logo to infuse it with personality,” senior vice president and design lead Beth Genova says. The office had an entirely open plan, so the MKDA team needed to carve out places for focused work. The designers transformed huddle and breakout areas into vibrant rooms hung with photos of the cities in which the company has offices. New hoteling spaces support employees visiting from other locations and anticipate future growth. A calming, mostly white backdrop and expansive windows ensure a clean, open feel throughout. The café is the hub of the office, with sleek appliances, concrete floors, pendant lighting, and a double-height ceiling that provides a sense of grandeur and scale. To muffle potential noise, the team installed acoustical panels and ceiling clouds. From the café, doors open onto a private terrace, more akin to a high-end rooftop bar; with cushy lounge chairs and timber dining tables, it functions as a casual social area. Ultimately, the office achieves the perfect balance between sophistication and creativity, promoting an optimal work environment for all employees. PROJECT TEAM BETH GENOVA; JULIA LINDH; TED CATINO; DANIELA VANEGAS KEY CONSULTANTS JLL; GTL CONSTRUCTION; WORKSPACE PHOTOGRAPHY ALEXANDER SEVERIN

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Shimoda Design Group SWINERTON, SANTA ANA, CALIFORNIA

Partners Susan Chang and Joey Shimoda founded Shimoda Design Group in 2000 with a commitment to adaptive reuse. The Los Angeles firm celebrates history, scale, and context; 90 percent of its projects start with existing structures. “We’re interested in the cultural and socioeconomic conditions that are important to the narrative of the project,” Chang says. “Understanding these factors helps connect the project to the community and give meaning to its place.” This awareness was especially important at a landmark structure in downtown Santa Ana, California: the 1929 former Builders Exchange. The Beaux-Arts building is an important example of the advanced construction techniques used in its time, including steel reinforcement, plate glass, and gas steam heat. But it had fallen into disrepair when Swinerton, a construction services company, acquired the site in 2016. Chang and her team honored the building’s heritage and showcased Swinerton’s in-house craftsmanship. Together, they preserved the interior,

PROJECT TEAM SUSAN CHANG; JOEY SHIMODA; GARINE GABRIELIAN; MARCUS HERNANDEZ; AYU HALIM; RUIPENG CHENG; TYLER LIANG; ERIK ARRIAGA; TODD TUNTLAND KEY CONSULTANTS EVAN RAAB ARCHITECT; GRIMM & CHEN STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS PHOTOGRAPHY BRIAN DOLL; BENNY CHAN/FOTOWORKS

shimodadesign.com; @sdgarc

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exposed the structure, and highlighted salvaged items like a two-ton steel beam. Electrical conduits and stud walls become screening elements and concrete forms become furniture partitions, pushing the conventions of construction practices through unexpected materials. The result conserves and celebrates both the building’s history and Swinerton’s legacy.


Clockwise from opposite: Steel and oak-batten stairs lead from the ground floor to the office kitchen. Open workstations now fill the renovated 1929 Builders Exchange building. A suspended conference room with metal-panel cladding, glass, and oak battens overlooks work pods. Stud walls and electrical conduits screen a project-manager station. Tom Dixon light fixtures hang over the stone kitchen island.

Completed 2020 24,000 square feet IIDA SoCal Calibre Awards Finalist

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Completed 2020 90,000 square feet New Jersey Future Smart Growth Award

Clockwise from left: The annex renovation preserves the former Navy shed’s historic details, such as a craneway and sawtooth windows. The BLDG 78 graphic identity serves as a visual tool to improve circulation. Colorful booths create a welcoming coworking space. Suspended from the original steel beams, a distinctive staircase looms above a zesty satsuma-hued lounge.

WXY Architecture + Urban Design KEARNY POINT BUILDING 78 ANNEX, KEARNY, NEW JERSEY

A 130-acre site on the Hackensack River, Kearny Point was once a major Navy shipyard, launching vessels for battle in World War II. Now it’s reinventing itself as an innovation campus, with master planning by WXY Architecture + Urban Design in collaboration with Studios Architecture. One of the first structures to be renovated is the Building 78 Annex, a two-story shed that the WXY team transformed into a vibrant creative workplace. The Annex showcases the industrial facility’s historic character, preserving a naturally lit craneway and distinctive sawtooth windows. An integrated stormwater management system, carbon adaptation garden and carbon sink, and a microgrid with solar and battery storage bring the space into the 21st century. The design centers around four thematic pillars: walking, working, meeting, and looking. WXY used bridges and landings to improve circulation and created a spacious café for people to meet. “With its range of work and production spaces, the Annex provided an opportunity to use urban design strategies to make places where people feel comfortable,” principal-incharge Claire Weisz notes. “Two distinctive stairs and three diagonal bridges orient people within the long structure.” The design also considers the impact of the pandemic by including improved ventilation, air filtration, and plenty of space to practice social distancing. PROJECT TEAM CLAIRE WEISZ, FAIA; MARK YOES, FAIA; LAYNG PEW, AIA; ROBERT DAURIO KEY CONSULTANTS STUDIOS ARCHITECTURE; LOOP LIGHTING; AMA ENGINEERING; READY SET ROCKET; SILMAN; HUNTER ROBERTS CONSTRUCTION GROUP; NOWHERE OFFICE PHOTOGRAPHY GARRETT ROWLAND

wxystudio.com; @wxystudio 76 INTERIOR DESIGN



Hastings WME, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

The design of the global talent agency’s first outpost in the country music capital was driven by the concept of duality—a workplace that’s at once approachable, welcoming, and relaxed, yet also unapologetically unscripted, impassioned, and confident. In keeping with WME offices in Beverly Hills, London, and elsewhere, the Nashville beachhead embodies the agency’s brand and culture while adopting the southern town’s spirit of hospitality. Rejecting status-quo agency layout and aesthetics, the

PROJECT TEAM DAVID M. POWELL, FAIA; AARON PETERSEN, NCIDQ PHOTOGRAPHY ERIC LAIGNEL

hastingsarchitecture.com; @hastingsarchitecture

architects favored balancing refined interventions within the raw two-story space. Thus, exposed ceilings, structures, and systems provide a backdrop to elegant millwork. Blackened steel and polished concrete are countered with clean, white planes and large expanses of glass that define the work space against the unmanicured shell. The traditional floor plan—private offices located along the glass curtain wall and assigned by seniority—was replaced by an openneighborhood concept with zones seating six agents each and a bay of assistants at the center. Each neighborhood is organized as a communal space intended to foster collaboration and impromptu conversation. Enclosed offices, where necessary, have glass fronts, allowing natural light to flood inner areas. Outfitted with amphitheater seating, a two-story gathering stair establishes a vertical connection while embodying the dual nature of the office as a meeting and learning space and a performance and party venue with gobsmacking views of the Nashville skyline.

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Clockwise from opposite top: LED illumination shines through die-cut apertures in the blackened-steel reception desk, above which hang hundreds of autographed drumsticks. In the elevator lobby, 8-foot-diameter custom pendant fixtures inspired by snare drums act like giant stage lights. Each employee lounge has its own vibe inspired by a famous Nashville night spot, such as the Exit/In. The gathering stair connecting the two office levels is outfitted with seating and wired for full production capabilities so it can transform into a performance venue. Stocked with a choice array of Gibson guitars, the listening room is for both acoustic and electric music.

Completed 2016 40,000 square feet Interior Design Best of Year Honoree and IIDA Tennessee Award


Clockwise from left: Visitors are greeted by a wall of greenery hosting interchangeable wood or steel blocks that rotate the organization’s awards. Each of the campus’s three buildings features a spectacular five-story stairwell with oak-veneer slats and moss panels. A variety of meeting and hospitality spaces pepper the campus. Throughout, organic timber detailing expresses the value of connecting with nature.

Completed 2021 650,000 square feet

Lamar Johnson Collaborative HORIZON THERAPEUTICS, DEERFIELD, ILLINOIS

In January 2020, Horizon Therapeutics brought back Lamar Johnson Collaborative to complete the renovation of the biotechnology company’s newly acquired 70-acre campus in Deerfield, Illinois. The three-building complex is home to more than 500 employees, with room to grow and adapt as the workplace evolves over time. The state-of-the-art facility is full of engaging amenities to attract and retain talent. There’s a Starbucks coffee hut, a full-service cafeteria, the Horizon café, snack pantries on every floor, a fitness and wellness center, and a landscaped terrace, to name a few. The existing interior was sterile, so LJC sought to make the environment as healthy and exciting as possible. Increasing access to natural light and sprinkling live plants throughout helped foster connections to nature, and free-form furniture and design details add energy. From start to finish, the renovation took LJC approximately 10 months, all while working around COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Generating live fly-through models versus presenting paper sketches aided in meeting the ultra-quick turnaround goal. Moreover, it allowed Horizon to see every square inch of LJC’s concept and attain a full contextual understanding of the team’s design thinking. PROJECT TEAM TODD EMEOTT; AL FIESEL; JESSICA STATZ; RACHEL WALTER; RICHIE HANDS; LINA CHIU; JAMESON SKAIFE KEY CONSULTANTS CBRE; CLUNE CONSTRUCTION; BOS; FOUR FOUR DESIGN; AMBIA LIGHTING DESIGN; ALVINE ENGINEERING; ENGINEERING PLUS PHOTOGRAPHY TOM HARRIS

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“We believe our work is a fundamental expression of optimism for the future, and that design is a means to effect positive, enduring change” 82 INTERIOR DESIGN


Color-changing LED cove lighting allows employees to set their preferred mode for focus and relaxation.

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Completed 2014 500,000 square feet Interior Design Hall of Fame member

LSM

COVINGTON & BURLING, WASHINGTON, D.C. When Covington, a law firm approaching its 100th anniversary, moved to CityCenterDC, a six-building mixed-use complex by Foster + Partners, it used the transition to update the office for the future. Covington now occupies 80 percent of two interconnected buildings, which are joined by centralized stair towers and bridges, connections that became an organizing element for the interiors by LSM, founded by Interior Design Hall of Fame member Debra Lehman Smith. Visual permeability—from interior to exterior, building to building, and within the office—supports connectivity. More than 95 percent of the firm’s employees have access to natural light from their workstations, and glass fins between private offices expand views to the exterior. Atria and bridges are a source of vitality with 70 meeting spaces organized around circulation, making it easier for staffers to gather informally. (The layout has been so successful, a Covington partner noted that in the first two days alone she had more interactions with colleagues than in one month in the old building.) The ground level includes a 100-seat auditorium and a semipublic gallery committed to hosting at least 20 community events per year. And LSM commissioned late Venezuelan artist Carlos Cruz-Diez to create site-specific mural installations, plus a system of colored plexiglass fins

Clockwise from opposite: Carlos Cruz-Diez’s Transchromies and Physiochromie introduce color and interest inside the Covington office as well as outside the building. Conference rooms and pantries face inward to the atrium stairwell to increase employee interaction. Warren Platner seating and tables are among the classic modernist pieces furnishing lounge areas. Occupying two office towers, conference rooms have views across the pedestrian way below, creating a sense of activity on every floor.

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along the windows fronting the pedestrian arcade. It’s a way of giving art back to the city. PROJECT TEAM LSM STUDIO CORE TEAM KEY CONSULTANTS STRUCTURE TONE; DEWBERRY; THORNTON TOMASETTI; FISHER MARANTZ STONE; CMS; CERAMI & ASSOCIATES; CARLOS CRUZ-DIEZ; LISA AUSTIN & ASSOCIATES; UNIFOR PHOTOGRAPHY MARIO CARRIERI/UNIFOR; PRAKASH PATEL; JON MILLER/HEDRICH BLESSING

lsm.com; @lsm_studio


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Smallwood

CHICK-FIL-A SUPPORT CENTER, ATLANTA

In 2015, Smallwood was asked to help longtime client Chick-fil-A with the wholesale renovation of the 1990s support center on the company’s corporate campus. The complex consists of a pair of office buildings, one five stories, the other seven, connected by an elevated walkway. By observing workflows, Smallwood arrived at a highly cus­tomized balance between open and enclosed spaces for both resident and mobile employees throughout. This was achieved by calculating the ratio of individuals on a floor and creating a balance of both heads-down and collaborative zones, including various workstation types (mostly unassigned), nooks for quiet work, phone rooms, and meeting areas that vary in size and furnishings. The result was enthused end users, an increase in productivity, and a workplace that doubled in capacity. Every detail down to the furniture and accessories was thoughtfully designed, with moments of surprise and whimsy to reflect Chick-fil-A’s

PROJECT TEAM AMANDA WING; LINDSEY MORRIS; JEFF VINCENT; PIERRE MAELI; ALLY YORK; CHRISTINA WERK; CHUCK HULL; STEVE DUBBERLY PHOTOGRAPHY ERIC LAIGNEL

smallwood-us.com; @smallwoodinc

personality. (Smallwood even brought in materials used in the fast-food giant’s stores to remind office occupants to be mindful of those retail workers and their purpose.) There’s also a new Work Café—which allows flexibility for those without a dedicated desk and functions as overflow for the dining café—where a lower lighting level and rustic elements such

Completed 2021 179,000 square feet

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as built-in reclaimed-wood booths provide a low-key environ­ment that encourages creativity.


Clockwise from opposite top: Each floor at Chick-fil-A’s support center has a wel­come plaza with custom graphics; the view beyond is the elevated walkway connecting the two buildings, which are activated with charging stations and heads-down work pods. Dynamic architectural boxes were added to extend beyond the existing precast floor openings; sliding glass doors overlooking the lower levels allow users to sit in on all-hands meetings held in the atrium below. Haven pods by Allermuir and BuzziSpace pendants aid in controlling acoustics in the open office. In the Work Café, custom booths are made of reclaimed wood. Each floor has a library intended for quiet work. WORKPLACE

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One of the largest and oldest publishing companies in the world was at a crossroads. With the print media landscape in a state of flux, and uncertainty about the future of the industry looming, HarperCollins entrusted ENV to design and implement its path forward. The company executives decided to move away from Midtown Manhattan, a location where all major publishers were historically located—just one of many audacious changes. The literal and symbolic shift from the old and established to the exciting and uncharted would inform a new office ideology, one with more efficient floor plans, less waste, more choice, and better communication across departments.

ENV

HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS, NEW YORK

Coming from 20 floors of small floor plate at 10 East 53rd Street and moving to 4 ½ floors of much larger floor plate downtown, at 195 Broadway, a cultural and office renovation happened simultaneously. A modular conferencing center, interconnecting stairs, and open floor plans set a new benchmark in the industry. Preserving and honoring HarperCollins’ legacy, a monumental vision wall became a backdrop for

PROJECT TEAM DAVID RUSH, AIA; ANNIE LEE; ROLAND QUIRION; HERBY JOSEPH; MIN CHOE KEY CONSULTANTS STRUCTURE TONE; RDA; HAWORTH PHOTOGRAPHY ERIC LAIGNEL

env-team.com; @envdesignteam

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the 20-by-30-foot feature staircase. This award-winning project would set high standards, not only in the world of publishers, but also for ENV, with president David Rush saying it was one of the most satisfying experiences he had ever had as a problem solver. Call it opening a new chapter.


Completed 2014 185,000 square feet CoreNet NYC Commercial Interiors Project of the Year Award

Clockwise from opposite top: Literary quotes abound. The new office boasts a conference center of four connected rooms with removable walls that allow for maximum flexibility and large corporate events. Books from the publisher’s list are displayed in niches on walls throughout. A “grab and stay” pantry on the 23rd floor becomes a hub to gather in. A large central stair makes collaboration between departments easier than ever.

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Clockwise from below: In reception, guests can sit on leather lounge chairs from Jean de Merry and take in sweeping views of the Bay Bridge. Sculptural Stingray chairs in walnut bentwood are by Thomas Pedersen. The fun, uncluttered, and flexible break room makes a statement with pops of fuchsia.

Think banking is dry? Think again. For its San Francisco office, this nationwide financial institution selected a raw, industrial, decidedly nontraditional floor-through space near the Embarcadero to take advantage of water views while being near transit and city life. Then it tapped longtime collaborator Anne Sneed, founder and principal of Anne Sneed Architectural Interiors, to plan and design the interiors. Execs requested the team incorporate an open work space with separated zones for specific tasks, flexible conference rooms with views out to San Francisco

Completed 2020 15,000 square feet

Bay, spaces for one-on-one meetings, a break room, and zero private offices at the perimeter windows. “We maintained the relationship of the open office and reception adjacent to the glass curtain wall to allow natural light deeper into the space,” Sneed reports. “The more private, intimate spaces are located toward the central core, open to and facing the open offices, thus promoting interaction among the staff. Individual

Anne Sneed Architectural Interiors

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION, SAN FRANCISCO

offices work as small meeting areas, eliminating the need for extra common meeting rooms.” The materials palette reflects the industrial quality of the SoMa neighborhood, softened with the use of comfortable furnishings, luxe fabrics, and pops of color. Exposed concrete floors, open ceilings, steel, and glass run throughout. Custom wood workstations add the warmth of timber—and have just enough height to provide seated occupants with visual privacy. Fresh, fun, and stylish? Check, check, and check. PROJECT TEAM ANNE SNEED; LENA BRION; TODD BROWN; KRISTINE BENESEK; CAROLINE CURRY; SUNEE NELSON; JOHN WATERS; JULIE MORISOT KEY CONSULTANTS URBAN LIGHTING; DAVID ALLEN COLLECTION; MAIDEN STEEL; DFM; MIA DELCASINO PHOTOGRAPHS; ONCE UPON A FRAME PHOTOGRAPHY JIM BRADY/BRADY ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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Lamar Johnson Collaborative BLACKEDGE CAPITAL, CHICAGO

Young and energetic trading and technology firm BlackEdge Capital engaged Lamar Johnson Collaborative to create an office that was “an extension of our life,” says the company’s founder and managing partner Josh Mateffy. “We take our work seriously, but not ourselves.” The trading floor is admittedly an intense environment, so the LJC design team, led by associate principal Lance Yeary, conceived a serene, sophisticated environment to help staffers keep their cool. Large portions of the floor plate are given over to communal areas such as a fitness center, café, and games area, offering relief from the frantic pace of global finance. Quiet spaces are distributed throughout, ranging from an enclosed nap room with acoustic drapery and dimmable lighting to semi-private areas. The interior architecture is subtle and refined yet industrial, creating a dialogue between the luxe detailing of the new interventions and the urban context of the West Loop building, located in Chicago’s former meatpacking district. As a finishing touch, LJC defined long corridors as gallery space leading from reception through the open plan; a place where BlackEdge could display artworks through a partnership with a local gallery. The rotating exhibitions inject the office with ever-changing visual interest and invite restorative reflection. PROJECT TEAM LANCE YEARY, IIDA, LEED AP; SARAH JACOBSON, AIA, LEED AP

Completed 2019 9,400 square feet 92 INTERIOR DESIGN

KEY CONSULTANTS BIG CONSTRUCTION; IMEG CORP. PHOTOGRAPHY STEVE HALL/HALL+MERRICK PHOTOGRAPHERS

theljc.com; @lamarjohnsoncollaborative


Clockwise from opposite: An oak-slat wall with a composed rhythm invites visitors to explore the gallery and café beyond. The tactile wood wall introduced in reception gives way to sharp, boxy architecture enclosing the trading area conference room. The cozy nap room, with acoustical drapery, allows staffers to create their own environment by adjusting the dimmable, color-changing lighting system. The café and lounge are connected directly to the entry, creating a hospitality-forward first impression.

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Completed 2020 28,000 square feet

Clockwise from top left: The Accenture Industry X.0 Center is composed of two pyramidal structures that formerly housed a museum. In the prototyping lab, curtains can cordon off different areas during events, providing a “wow” moment when flung open to reveal new products. An opening in the wall provides a view of the work space from the main entrance. Stairs lead to a technology lab.

AECOM

ACCENTURE INDUSTRY X.0 CENTER, BILBAO, SPAIN Headquartered in Los Angeles, AECOM is an integrated design firm that tackles complex infrastructure, engineering, and architecture challenges around the world. The transformation of a former technology museum in Bilbao, Spain, into the Accenture Industry X.O Center—an 80-person office and showroom for the multinational consulting and services provider—is fresh evidence of AECOM’s creative thinking. The 2009 building comprises two pyramidal volumes connected by an underground passage. The triangular floor plans and varying ceiling heights were appropriate for exhibitions but not for a workplace. With little natural light, the dark spaces could be noisy and were labyrinthine in organization. AECOM strategically updated the building with tactical interventions that respected the original structure. It moved the main access to the center of the building, so visitors could easily disperse to the showroom, meeting areas, or shared desks. The design team added a mezzanine with extra workstations and cut openings in the floors, walls, and roof to brighten the space and help people orient themselves. “It was a radical transformation that gave the building new life,” director and design principal Elvira Muñoz notes. The sustainable approach also proved that adaptive reuse is possible even when the programs are drastically different. PROJECT TEAM ELVIRA MUÑOZ; DIEGO GARCÍA-SETIÉN; SERGIO HERREROS; SERGIO FABÓN; NÉSTOR CANDELA; BORJA GARCIA-CARRILLO; JULIA MINGORANCE KEY CONSULTANT INBISA PHOTOGRAPHY MIGUEL DE GUZMÁN/IMAGEN SUBLIMINAL

aecom.com; @aecom_design

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“Interventions pivoted on cutting tactical openings in the floors, walls, and roof, showing the hidden tectonics behind the white walls”

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In 1986, JPC Architects provided interior architecture to one client: Microsoft. Today, the Pacific Northwest firm has over 70 talented staffers who work for an extensive list of local, national, and international corporate clients. One of these is the employment website Indeed, whose concise tagline says it all: “We help people get jobs.” Indeed’s new Seattle office is located on the top 11 floors of a 38-story downtown tower with sweeping views of Puget Sound. Even though the company had leased a significant amount of space, it wanted to keep a sense of community. To help achieve this, JPC gave the top two levels over to the lobby, café, working kitchen, and conference room, with a deck on the roof. To promote real connection in the work spaces, the remaining nine office floors were organized around Dunbar’s number— a hypothesis, developed by a British anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist in the early 1990s, that humans have a capacity for 150 meaningful relationships. Keeping the principal in mind, JPC divided the

JPC Architects INDEED, SEATTLE

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work levels into three distinct “Dunbar Communities,” each with its own typically northwestern palette of blues, greens, or neutrals, and each with an amenities-rich middle floor featuring pantries, meeting areas, and game rooms.


Clockwise from opposite top: The feature stair draws attention to the company’s iconic tagline. The double-height café on the 38th floor is the place to eat, meet, and socialize. Game rooms and pantries are placed on the middle floors of the three “Dunbar Communities” for employees to take a break and play ping-pong, pool, or arcade games. In the game rooms, linear slats inspired by Seattle’s history of engineering and manufacturing evoke images of industrial artefacts such as aircraft or ship-hull ribs. Reception features a video wall, panoramic waterfront views, and a connecting stair between the 37th and 38th floors.

PROJECT TEAM MARK PETERSON; MARTIN GRUBE; SUSAN GRIFFIN; MEGHA VAIDYA; PATRICK BUTLER; DIANA LEE; MAYUMI YOSHIZAWA KEY CONSULTANTS PACIFIC LIGHTING SYSTEMS; IMAGE MILL; KPFF CONSULTING ENGINEERS; EDGEQUARTERS PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS EDEN

jpcarchitects.com; @jpcarchitects

Completed 2021 200,000 square feet WORKPLACE

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Completed 2016 45,000 square feet IIDA Interior Design Competition Winner; IIDA Mid-Atlantic Chapter Honorable Mention; AIA DC Chapter Design Award Interior Design Hall of Fame member Clockwise from top left: LSM firmly roots the Centerbridge reception in Mies van der Rohe’s landmarked Seagram Building by replicating finishes from the International Style tower’s lobby. Corner spaces enjoy Park Avenue vistas. Bespoke glass patterns provide space-enhancing detail throughout. Artist Spencer Finch’s mobile installation hangs in the new two-story atrium that improves visual connectivity and reflects the firm’s operational transparency.

LSM

CENTERBRIDGE PARTNERS, NEW YORK In 2016, LSM spearheaded the expansion and reconfiguration of Centerbridge Partners’ existing offices in the Seagram Building. The investment firm’s founders were committed to staying in the iconic Mies van der Rohe tower where they had started their business, despite the challenges the landmarked structure now presented. Simultaneously respecting and enhancing the building, the LSM team—led by founding partner and Interior Design Hall of Fame member Debra Lehman Smith— introduced finishes and spatial characteristics that echo the archetypal modernist design. The elegant and understated results speak to a “one firm, one team” culture, where operational transparency and collegial respect are paramount. The major intervention—a two-story atrium and open stair—is now the heart of the workplace, increasing the sense of connection; overhead, a mobile installation of reflective glass panels by artist Spencer Finch evokes the calm of a Zen garden. Visible from the street, the luminous ceiling in the perimeter offices is landmarked. But by replacing strategic components in the original lightboxes, LSM was able to provide improved energy efficiency, better quality light, and refined acoustical properties without altering the fabled Miesian aesthetics. PROJECT TEAM LSM STUDIO CORE TEAM KEY CONSULTANTS STRUCTURE TONE; MG ENGINEERING; SEVERUD ASSOCIATES; FISHER MARANTZ STONE; PRECISE AV; LONGMAN LINDSEY; SPENCER FINCH; AMIEL & PHILLIPS; UNIFOR; SVEND NIELSEN PHOTOGRAPHY PETER AARON; MARK ALAN ANDRE/LSM

lsm.com; @lsm_studio

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WXY Architecture + Urban Design HOWARD GILMAN FOUNDATION, NEW YORK

The Howard Gilman Foundation supports performing arts organizations in New York City, including theater, dance, and music companies. For HGF’s new headquarters in a building on Bryant Park, WXY Architecture + Urban Design took inspiration from the philanthropic institute’s origins in the wood industry: Its namesake founder made his fortune as inheritor of the Gilman Paper Company, which processed timber into paper products. WXY filled the office with the warmth and personality of oak and pine, which will wear over time and change with the office. Wood slats and mullions, reminiscent of music scores, provide cohesion between spaces while also allowing individuality within. The foundation is committed to environmental responsibility, so WXY used reclaimed and sustainably forested timber throughout. “Wood framing, furnishings, and flooring are all either entirely salvaged or from locally managed forests,” principal-incharge Claire Weisz notes. Natural wood also has a lower carbon impact than steel and aluminum. The WXY team worked closely with the client to test possible layouts before the lease was signed. The final design is tailored to the foundation’s needs, creating a variety of areas for collaboration along with quiet spots for reading and writing. Weisz adds that the project embodies a people-first philosophy, with the all-wood environment cocooning everyone who visits in a warm glow.


Clockwise from opposite: At the Howard Gilman Foundation headquarters a gut renovation created high-performance infrastructure to support the arts philanthropy. The new interior includes a kitchen and hot-desking area. The firm kept meeting rooms flexible for a variety of uses. Reclaimed and sustainably forested wood fill the office.

Completed 2019 5,300 square feet NYCxDesign Awards Honoree

PROJECT TEAM CLAIRE WEISZ, FAIA; MARK YOES, FAIA; LAYNG PEW, AIA; ROBERT CASTRO KEY CONSULTANTS DENHAM WOLF REAL ESTATE SERVICES; PLUS GROUP; CONVERSANO ASSOCIATES; TRI-LOX; TAURINO MANAGEMENT PHOTOGRAPHY ALBERT VECERKA/ESTO

wxystudio.com; @wxystudio WORKPLACE

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Completed 2020 27,000 square feet

Clockwise from top left: At the San Francisco offices of a financial services company, AECOM contrasted exposed ceilings with wood herringbone flooring. Corridors were designed to emphasize the client’s impressive art collection and, in doing so, make transient spaces more meaningful. Bay windows create cozy collaborative spaces. The work café at the heart of the office can be used for lunch, meetings, or ping-pong breaks.

AECOM

FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANY, SAN FRANCISCO

The fourth-tallest building in San Francisco, 555 California Street is a local landmark with panoramic city views and a facade of bronze-tinted glass. One tenant, a financial services company, hired AECOM to modernize its office, consolidate its footprint, and create collaborative work spaces that break down boundaries between teams. AECOM also had to incorporate a client-facing side into the existing program. Led by Los Angeles design director of interiors James Merchant, the team conceived spaces that reflect the taste and aspirations of the firm’s customers. “Our inspiration came more from the world of hospitality than the workplace sector,” Merchant says. “We juxtaposed raw and refined, pairing a clean modern plan with rich, tailored textures.” Exposed ceilings meet jewel-tone accents and crisp furnishings, while the neutral palette never distracts from the view. At the heart of the office is a flexible new café suitable for meetings, presentations, lunch, or table tennis; a corridor hung with original art doubles as a gallery. In reception, scalloped wood paneling alludes to the skyscraper’s distinctive bay windows, which reference the residential vernacular of San Francisco. A homelike feel extends throughout, with veined quartz countertops, oil-rubbed bronze details, and wood herringbone flooring creating a comfortable and contemporary work space. PROJECT TEAM JAMES MERCHANT; EILEEN KICKISH; TIM HINKLE; JADE LI; SARAH DEVINE KEY CONSULTANTS JLL; SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP; SWINERTON; MURPHY BURR CURRY, INC.; SYSTEMS SOURCE PHOTOGRAPHY TERRANCE WILLIAMS/WUNDR STUDIO

aecom.com; @aecom_design

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RESIDENTIAL

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MKDA

BOLTON GLOBAL CAPITAL MIAMI

Clockwise from bottom left: Custom artwork brightens OFS workstations at Bolton Global Capital’s Miami office. Flooring is herringbone ceramic tile throughout. Reception’s custom marble desk and angular LED lighting reference Bolton’s geometric logo. The custom vinyl wall covering’s palm frond brings a tropical vibe to the café. A conference room’s ombré acrylic wall evokes Miami sunsets.

Bolton Global Capital is a private wealth management firm with headquarters on a leafy colonial property outside of Boston. For the design of its Miami office, Bolton wanted to pair its genteel New England brand with the vibrant culture of South Florida. MKDA obliged with a sophisticated workplace that emphasizes community and transparency. The office is located in the prestigious Four Seasons Hotel building, which has an angular perimeter that might have seemed like a technical limitation. The MKDA team, led by senior project designer Kamilah Bermudez, decided to use this geometry to highlight Bolton’s angular logo, bringing in similar forms throughout the space. Angular details appear in the elevator lobby, rendered in textural bush-hammered marble; in the custom marble reception desk; and in linear LED lighting. The team referenced the hardwood floors and antique chandeliers of the headquarters with wood-look herringbone floor tiles and modern mixedmetal pendant fixtures. MKDA also infused the office with local elements. Outfitted with a custom palm-frond vinyl wall covering, Havana-style tile, and mismatched spindle-back chairs, the spacious pantry resembles a Cuban café. Orange

Completed 2020 17,000 square feet

ombré back-painted glass evokes colorful Miami sunsets, while windows frame expansive water views. PROJECT TEAM KAMILAH BERMUDEZ; AMANDA HERTZLER; TONYA WATTS; ERIN LONDON KEY CONSULTANTS MODULAR CONTRACTORS; EMPIRE OFFICE PHOTOGRAPHY BARRY GROSSMAN

mkda.com; @mkda_design

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NPZ Style + Décor COLAB AT BELL WORKS, HOLMDEL, NEW JERSEY

“As the lead designer of the new Bell Works, I feel honored to pay homage to the history of Bell Labs,” says NPZ Style + Décor founder Paola Zamudio, who was responsible for turning part of Eero Saarinen’s iconic 1962 research facility into a contemporary coworking hub. “Everywhere you walk you’ll find Saarinen references, midcentury-modern features, and experimental science and technology. I call it retro futurism: taking the past and connecting it to the future,” Zamudio continues. “During my research I realized Saarinen and I have many things common. He was an architect who loved design and I am a designer who loves architecture. We both immigrated to this country at the age of 13. His father, Eliel Saarinen, was an architect who passed the torch to him. My mom, a decorator, passed her skills to me.” The coLab coworking space is a homage to the Bauhaus era, when Saarinen pushed the limits of modern design. It’s a place for entrepreneurs, innovators, and hard workers—those who come together to create, connect, and get things done, just like the scientists, engineers, and Nobel Prize winners who populated the building 50 years ago. Zamudio considered every detail, from the psychological effects of color and its impact on wellness to the importance of plants in the work space and even the music that plays throughout.

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Clockwise from opposite top: Modern phone booths are soundproofed with the help of patterned cork tiles from Spinneybeck. In a lounge area, Hightower Nest Easy high-back chairs make it possible for people to have private conversations without disrupting neighbors; the planters are by Most Modest. Geometric wall coverings by Designtex help keep a conference room’s occupants inspired. Freestanding shelving and funky books, plants, and decorative objects create a whimsical, cozy feel in the main kitchen. Private offices and open areas are carpeted with tiles from Interface that lend visual unity to the 30,000-square-foot coworking space.

Completed 2019-2021 30,000 square feet

PROJECT TEAM PAOLA ZAMUDIO; BROOKE PETRANY KEY CONSULTANTS SOMERSET DEVELOPMENT; BELL WORKS; G3 ARCHITECTURE; STANTEC ENGINEERING; PROQUAL ELECTRIC PHOTOGRAPHY JONATHAN HÖKKLO; OFF BEET PRODUCTIONS

npzdesign.com; @npz_studio WORKPLACE

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FCA

EISNERAMPER, NEW YORK

The CEO of EisnerAmper challenged the FCA designers: “If our new offices look like an accounting firm, we will have failed.” The die was cast: All work spaces in the five-floor New York City headquarters, including a landscaped terrace, would be unassigned. The shift turned out to be incredibly prescient considering the 2020 pandemic. With the aid of a mobile reservations application, all employees are now able to select in advance where they will be working, see what kind of population density they should expect, and know that the application will never allow seat assignments that do not meet distancing guidelines. Talk about peace of mind. The office spans floors six through ten, and has its own private groundfloor lobby, too. Upstairs, open work spaces are organized into scalable neighborhoods. Each floor has four neighborhoods, with their own distinct groupings of desks and meeting spaces, and their own individual personality. “Biomimicry tells us that the brain responds positively to natural triggers such as light, views, patterning, and textures,” notes design principal Mark Harbick. To that end, daylight and views permeate all spaces, while biophilic-inspired materials and a robust live-plant program support wellness. In short? It’s an accounting firm that looks like no other.


Completed 2020 125,000 square feet IFMA NYC Awards for Excellence for the Design and Construction of a New Facility over 100,000 square feet

PROJECT TEAM MARK HARBICK, AIA, IIDA, NCARB, LEED AP; ANTHONY COLCIAGHI, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C; ANN HOFFMAN, IIDA, LEED AP; GORHAM HOM, RA, NCARB; MARGARITA BUKHARINA; CHELSEA PUCA; ERIC KLINGLER, AIA KEY CONSULTANTS J.T. MAGEN & COMPANY; VVA; ROBERT DERECTOR ASSOCIATES; O’DONNELL & NACCARATO; CERAMI & ASSOCIATES; AIRSPACE; EXP PHOTOGRAPHY FRANK OUDEMAN

fcarchitects.com; @fcarchitects_inc

Clockwise from opposite: The glass walls of the boardroom retract, merging with the client lounge to create a flexible event space in which all furniture is mobile and reconfigurable. Visitors are greeted in the ethereal elevator lobby by digital messaging highlighting the firm’s global presence. Central to each floor is a common area in which to convene with one’s team. Unexpected areas of respite dot the facility, like this seating nook beside the personal lockers.

WORKPLACE

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MKDA

LOCAL INITIATIVES SUPPORT CORPORATION, NEW YORK

LISC, a nonprofit that helps underserved communities tap public and private resources, viewed its move from New York City’s Garment District to Downtown Manhattan as a catalyst for a cultural shift. The relocation was an opportunity to embrace the latest design trends, including transitioning from a closed environment into an open-plan work space with different collaborative areas. For MKDA—a family-owned full-service architecture, interior design, planning, and advisory firm founded in 1959 as Milo Kleinberg Design Associates—it was crucial to establish connectivity between the two floors with a staircase that terminates in collaboration lounges on both levels. The 75 percent open-plan environment features 47 interior offices, 142 perimeter workstations, and an array of free-address spaces for focused and group work. Even before the pandemic, LISC had 20 percent of its employees working from home. Many of the solutions MKDA originally came up with to support these remote workers are now discussed as part of the hybrid model for the workplace of the future. Flex spaces support in- and out-of-office employees and include private rooms and phone booths, huddle rooms equipped with the latest videoconferencing technology, hoteling areas, and two multipurpose rooms that combine into one large boardroom. The reimagined workplace also emphasizes health and wellness, with ergonomic height-adjustable desks, natural woods, earthy colors, and living green walls to improve air quality.

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Clockwise from opposite top: Staffers can play tic-tac-toe in the breakout lounge. A multipurpose boardroom can be divided with a Skyfold partition. A Stix LED pendant fixture hangs above the interconnecting staircase. Huddle rooms have full video conferencing capabilities and Plyboo fractal wall panels. To differentiate reception and other special areas, the MKDA team covered parts of the exposed slab ceiling with wood-slat structures incorporating suspended light fixtures.

PROJECT TEAM DANIEL DESIENA; JASON WEST; RAYMOND HERRERA; TAYLOR FIREBAUGH KEY CONSULTANTS NEWMARK; ELYSIUM CONSTRUCTION; SOS PHOTOGRAPHY GARRETT ROWLAND

mkda.com; @mkda_designs

Completed 2019 60,700 square feet WORKPLACE

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Keiser Associates LAW FIRM, NEW YORK

A large law firm in New York came to Keiser Associates with a challenge. It wanted to create a conference center with a multipurpose room that was acoustically sound and could accommodate different law disciplines and meetings, from a real estate closing to a presentation of litigation results. “The space not only needed to be flexible in its functionality, but also required a sophisticated aesthetic for the firm’s clientele of Fortune 500 companies and high-net-worth individuals,” Keiser president John G. Dyon notes. The Keiser team started by finding a folding acoustical wall system that could be configured into separate spaces, then spent hours testing and confirming its sound-management claims. Next, they examined how to place the closets that housed the folding walls, so they would connect with window mullions to ensure the acoustical seal. The length of a city block, the multipurpose room can hold more than 200 people when configured into an auditorium. Most of the time, it’s divided into meeting rooms, each with its own recording and audio/video capabilities. Conference rooms have flip-top marble tables with casters that can be easily reconfigured or removed; on busy days, the rooms are reconfigured four times. French marble floors, hand-tufted carpets, and leather chairs ensure an elegant atmosphere throughout.

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Clockwise from left: Reception is outfitted with a hand-tufted wool carpet, burl wood veneer panels, and a custom marble, bronze, and wood desk. Leather chairs circle a marble and bronze table in a large meeting room. A flexible conference room can be split into seven acoustically sealed spaces. Wood furniture distinguishes the associates’ offices.

Completed 2018 27,500 square feet

PROJECT TEAM JOHN G. DYON; ROBERT ROSINSKI; KAREN KIM; DANILO BARZA KEY CONSULTANTS FMC & ASSOCIATES; ROBERT DERECTOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS PHOTOGRAPHY WING WONG

keiserassociates.com

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Completed 2019 20,000 square feet

Clockwise from left: Cascading wood panels partition high-traffic areas from communal and private work zones. A 25-foot-high hangar door opens the stadium-seating area to a newly created courtyard. Another retractable door connects the café to the courtyard. Thomas Heatherwick Spun chairs and other seating allow Headspace staff to work outside.

Montalba Architects HEADSPACE, SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA

The headquarters of the meditation app Headspace is a campus of four industrial structures, three of them renovated by Montalba Architects. The most recent (and extensive) undertaking entailed interconnecting two of these steel structures. In true Southern California spirit, the work brought in and connected with the outdoors. Montalba transformed an erstwhile parking space into a courtyard; furnished with chairs and tables, it can be an alfresco work space accessed by a bifold door. When raised, there’s no line between inside and out. When closed, it still lets daylight permeate the interiors, where Montalba added a stadium stairway, its benchlike treads inlaid with terrazzo-pattern rubber, its sidewall covered with sound-dampening felt. Overhead, a double-sided screen drops down for viewing from both stair and courtyard vantage points. Another highlight is the ample café under an exposed truss ceiling. The crisp, white environment, just beyond the stairway, has custom lacquered millwork and Caesarstone counters. Work areas surround it, but so does a huddle lounge. It all contributes to a fluid environment for Headspace staffers. It’s part free-address, ergo the plethora of lounge and outdoor options, and partially dedicated, with systems and conference rooms in place both upstairs and down. Mindful indeed. PROJECT TEAM DAVID MONTALBA, FAIA, SIA; AMANDA WEBBER; JORDAN BARTELT; JENNIFER LOESCHE; LAUREN RICE KEY CONSULTANTS SHAWMUT DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION; SARLAN BUILDERS; LABIB FUNK + ASSOCIATES; PBS ENGINEERS; SEAN O’CONNOR LIGHTING; JLA; PAMELA BURTON AND COMPANY PHOTOGRAPHY KEVIN SCOTT

montalbaarchitects.com; @montalbaarchitects

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HUANG IBOSHI ARCHITECTURE, WEEKEND RETREAT IN INVERNESS, CALIFORNIA: PAUL DYER PHOTOGRAPHY


hospitality

Armchair travel the world—from sun-soaked Sydney, Australia, to the Norwegian Alps high above the Arctic Circle—by way of this jet-setting portfolio of hotels, restaurants, lodges, and resorts that stir the design imagination. Grab your passport.


Completed 2019 412,769 square feet Interior Design Hall of Fame member Interior Design Best of Year Award; 5 International Property Awards; Chicago Athenaeum American Architecture Award; Global Future Design Award; Urban Design & Architecture Design Award

Rottet Studio CONRAD WASHINGTON, D.C.

The nation’s capital is an international beacon of majesty, ingrained history, and, now, optimism for the future. Herzog & de Meuron and Rottet Studio, collaborating on architecture and interiors, respectively, sought to solidify these qualities in the Conrad, a Hilton hotel. The 11-story, 360-room property is decidedly not a boutique hotel, but instead a true luxury destination. Super contemporary and, of course, chic, thanks to Interior Design Hall of Fame member Lauren Rottet, the hotel exudes said luxury through materials: walnut, Calacatta marble, limestone, bronze, and light, both natural and supplemental, the latter emanating from fantastical fixtures. There’s a story line, too. The main lobby, situated on the third floor, was inspired by an early American village whose inhabitants stroll from place to place. Now it’s the guests strolling and noting details, like the bar’s bronze-trimmed cylindrical form. Arriving in their generous quarters, they come upon a dining-cum-work table, sconces that reference colonial lanterns, and a subtly bowed wall with mood lighting projecting from its cove. Meanwhile, a bank of built-in power outlets and USB ports above the nightstands are among the 21st-century amenities. “The influences Clockwise from opposite: Rottet Studio designed the interiors of the Conrad Washington, D.C. as a contemporary rendition of the early American town square, where life was lived in and around a central plaza. Cove lighting softly illuminates a standard guest room. The sculptural third-floor central atrium court features natural materials such as bronze and stone. A marble welcome desk is backdropped by timber paneling in the ground floor lobby.

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that should linger with you,” Rottet observes, “are the feelings of true warmth, handmade craft, and creative resourcefulness.” PROJECT TEAM LAUREN ROTTET; ANJA MAJKIC; KRISTIN AMUNDSEN KEY CONSULTANTS HERZOG & DE MEURON; HINES; HILTON; HKS; PARKER INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY ERIC LAIGNEL

rottetstudio.com; @rottetstudio


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“The concept of a village influenced the emphasis on points to gather in and from which to flow” The pre-function stair area has a restrained, minimalist aesthetic inspired by Shaker architecture.

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Hastings and Markzeff VIRGIN HOTELS NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

Situated on the edge of Music Row, Virgin Hotels Nashville opened in quintessential 2020 fashion—during the heart of the pandemic—in a new 14-story, 200,000-square-foot tower by Hastings and design partner Blur Workshop. As the hospitality chainlet’s first ground-up building, it presented a unique opportunity to translate Virgin’s established brand into a new medium. Architectural inspiration was taken from the 20thcentury masonry warehouses that continue to be part of the urban fabric of the city. “There is an honesty and familiarity in this building type that the public gravitates toward,” Hastings associate principal Matt Spaulding explains. “We wanted to harness that phenomenology, while still creating an authentic experience.” The modern interpretation of this vernacular focuses on form, order, texture, and materiality. Brick masonry detailing provides appropriate scale and texture, while a celebrated expression of post-and-lintel construction distinguishes the primary tower facade, where large windows also reference warehouse glazing. Founded by British multihyphenate Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group

PROJECT TEAM DAVID M. POWELL, FAIA; WILLIAM W. HASTINGS; BLAINE KIMBROUGH, AIA; ETHAN KELLER, AIA; ANDY CHO, AIA: HASTINGS MARK ZEFF; STACIE MEADOR; ERIKA BRITTON: MARKZEFF PHOTOGRAPHY ERIC LAIGNEL; JUSTIN CORDOVA

hastingsarchitecture.com; @hastingsarchitecture markzeff.com; @markzeffdesign 124 INTERIOR DESIGN

has long spread its particular type of insouciance across its airline, record label, and even vodka. That cheek permeates the company’s hotels, too. Virgin Hotels Nashville’s quirky interiors, such as the Shag Room bar’s mammoth fringed chandelier inspired by similarly tassled Western shirts, come courtesy of New York design firm Markzeff.


Clockwise from opposite: Limewash paint and polyester velvet appoint the library’s 13-foot-high banquette niche, which is surrounded by reclaimed rough-sawn Douglas fir planks. All Virgin Hotels guest rooms are outfitted with the chainlet’s proprietary bed design, here trimmed in leather. Custom pendant fixtures made of plates enliven the private dining room. In the Shag Room, the hotel’s private lounge bar, a deep-pile rug joins a five-tier chandelier trimmed with Western-shirt-style fringe. The upper floors of the 260-key, 14-story hotel—a ground-up building by Hastings in partnership with Blur Workshop—offer commanding views of downtown Nashville.

Completed 2020 200,000 square feet


2pi r design

UMARI CASA MONT TREMBLANT LAC-SUPÉRIEUR, CANADA

Partners in life and business, Steen Lin and Calland Lee lead as co-principals at the helm of their Toronto multidisciplinary design studio, 2pi r. Originating from Brazil and Hong Kong, respectively, the couple first crossed paths at Ryerson University. Since then, they have accumulated more than 20 years of experience on hospitality and residential projects. Umari Casa is a collection of soulful accommodations allowing travelers to book a “home away from home” experience. For the brand’s contemporary ski chalet in mountainous Québec, Lin and Lee devised interiors with a hearty dose of personality as an intended contrast to the quiet black-box exterior. The open-concept main level has heated concrete floors and floor-toceiling windows framing the snowy views outside. “These apparently colder elements serve beautifully as a canvas to showcase the many handpicked items that compose the personality of the casa: white-oak millwork, linen upholstery, limewashed walls, and wood-burning fireplaces,” Lee says. Accessories tell stories rather than simply filling space. “As designers, we truly believe that there are things we just can’t replicate, and those are the works of hands and the works of time. By incorporating handcrafted pieces and characterful vintage objects, we hope to connect people to a place in

PROJECT TEAM CALLAND LEE; STEEN LIN KEY CONSULTANTS YH2 ARCHITECTURE; UMARI SOUL PHOTOGRAPHY EVAN DION; VALERIE LACROIX; CHLOÉ CRANE-LEROUX

2pirdesign.com; @2pirdesign 126 INTERIOR DESIGN

time,” Lin explains. The project reflects what the new luxury really means: a connection to nature; time slowed down; and simple, sustainable materials over extravagant finishes.


Clockwise from opposite top: The living room, with floor-to-ceiling glazing, is anchored by a floating fireplace; an oversize pendant above the dining table creates a cozy ambience. Custom Turkish guest towels pair with handpicked accessories by Umari Soul. The minimalist Scandinavian exterior in black cedar and cast concrete is by YH2 Architecture. The staircase is steel and oak. Custom bunk beds tucked under the sloping roofline are a favorite of guests. Another bedroom features a wall of custom built-in white-oak closets.

Completed 2018-2019 1,500-square-foot interior plus 1,000-square-foot outdoor patio Interior Design Best of Year Honoree; The International Hotel & Property Awards Best Ski Chalet

ROGER FERRIS + PARTNERS ROGER FERRIS PHOTOGRAPHY PAÚL RIVERA

ferrisarch.com

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Lake|Flato Archıtects

HOTEL MAGDALENA, AUSTIN, TEXAS

Best known for its vibrant music scene and University of Texas flagship campus, Austin now claims fame for a hospitality distinction: Its 89-key Hotel Magdalena is the first boutique hotel in North America built primarily of mass timber. Award-winning Lake | Flato selected the material for myriad reasons. Both structural and the primary finish throughout, the wood is completely exposed, enabling guests to learn the story of how the property—four interconnected structures surrounding a tree-studded courtyard—was built. The mass timber panels, structural walls, and porches were all prefabricated off-site, so sustainability, efficiency, and quality control all come into play. Additionally, the limited materials palette contributes to ecological bona fides as does the fact that rooftops collect rainwater to be stored in underground cisterns and used for landscape irrigation. As for aesthetics, the timber components “provide a warm, textured material in the guest rooms and common outdoor porches,” principal David Lake observes. In both public areas and private accommodations, Hotel Magdalena presents an indoor-outdoor experience. Entry to the property is marked by a heritage live oak tree preserved during construction. It sits between the lobby and the Summer House restaurant; filled with vibrant furnishings selected by hotelier Bunkhouse Group, both interiors spill into the leafy courtyard. Back inside, guest rooms are organized around single-loaded corridors, allowing most to have individual patios overlooking the pool and garden.

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PROJECT TEAM DAVID LAKE; SOPHIA RAZZAQUE; MICHAEL BRITT; MELINA PHILLIPS; JEF SNYDER; TODD WASCHER; GRACE BOUDEWYNS; DAN MOWERY; SAM VONDERAU; PAVAN IYER; SARA TODAVCHICK; KEVIN HYUN KEY CONSULTANTS BUNKHOUSE GROUP; STRUCTURECRAFT; TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS; ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERS COLLABORATIVE; MYCON GENERAL CONTRACTORS; INTEGRAL GROUP; WGI; BIOHABITATS PHOTOGRAPHY CASEY DUNN; NICK SIMONITE

lakeflato.com; @lakeflato

Clockwise from opposite top: The lobby features Moroso furniture and shelves with books and assorted objects while the gift shop, curated by Bunkhouse Group, offers apparel, fragrances, and travel games. A wall hanging by New York artist Michele Quan enlivens the street-level waiting area below the lobby. Custom banquettes and soapstone countertops furnish the Summer House restaurant, while its lattice ceiling references the 1950s Terrace Motor Hotel that once occupied the site. Shaded porches and terraces recall the lake houses of Texas Hill Country.

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Completed 2020 100,000 square feet American Society of Landscape Architects Texas Chapter Honor Award; AIA Austin Design Award for Excellence

Clockwise from right: The buildings, with semienclosed stairwells, surround the pool and landscaped courtyard with furnishings from Kettal. Guest baths are in one of four hues expressed through Kismet tiles. Sleeping quarters have custom millwork and exposed timber ceilings. Each bathroom showcases a bold singular color scheme of either blue, red, yellow or green. 130 INTERIOR DESIGN


“Our designs evolve from the honesty of modernism”

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Completed 2020 Complex set on 380 acres World Spa Awards Best Wellness Retreat

Clodagh

MIRAVAL BERKSHIRES RESORT & SPA LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS Irish-born Clodagh, a constant force in the design field, has created everything from cosmetics packaging to million-square-foot hotels. From her Manhattan studio, the Interior Design Hall of Famer oversees three distinct divisions of her firm: Clodagh Signature, Clodagh Collection, and Clodagh Design. It was the latter that conceived Miraval Berkshires, a wellness resort on 380 protected acres in Massachusetts that joins the brand’s other locations in the Arizona desert and Texas Hill Country. The great hall welcomes visitors, sheathed in reclaimed barnwood complemented by gray concrete flooring, both of which provide grounding to the otherwise open-plan, vaulted space. Generous sofas and tables, also of repurposed wood, offer understated luxury. The 100 guest rooms and suites are havens inspired by country house glamour and New England comfort. Warm cranberry, amber, and navy tones underscore easy living, with subtle tactile materials like shirting plaids, woven wools, and cotton ticking. Naturally, all rooms feature the wellness modalities for which Clodagh is known, such as chromatherapy, bio-geometry, aromatherapy, and feng shui. There’s even a Tibetan singing bowl in every room. Finally, there’s the standout spa, accessed by a “path to wellness,” a meditational walk through a wood-clad portal designed to encourage a serene state of being. PROJECT TEAM CLODAGH; JOSE ACHI; NEESHA REDDIVARI; ELIANA LEE PHOTOGRAPHY JAMES BAIGRIE

clodagh.com; @clodaghdesign

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Clockwise from opposite top: The indoor pool at Miraval Berkshires has walls clad in stained cedar. A king guest room is furnished with lamps from Stone and Sawyer Workshop and custom RH nightstands. Miraval’s signature mandala designed by Alberto Amura and made of local metals graces the Life in Balance Spa’s “path to wellness.” A cozy enclosed outdoor lounge is warmed by an indoor fireplace. The spa’s quiet lounge is outfitted with seating by RH.

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Completed 2018 670 to 784 square feet AIA New York State Excelsior Awards Award of Distinction

New York State Parks commissioned WXY Architecture + Urban Design, in association with Stantec, to create the first vacation cabins at Wildwood State Park on Long Island Sound. The 10 structures are clad in cedar shingles, with reclaimed mahogany detailing and metal roofing, and made to last for decades. The WXY team members challenged themselves to

WXY Architecture + Urban Design NEW YORK STATE CABINS WADING RIVER, NEW YORK

create public amenities that not only “wow” but are also ultra-functional and easy to maintain. The one- and two-bedroom buildings—each with a bathroom, kitchenette, screened porch, and durable furniture—echo the Works Progress Administration cabins from the 1930s, which provided quality yet affordable accommodations. Unlike the dark, cramped cabins found in older campgrounds, these rooms are bright and spacious, with large windows and natural wood surfaces. The open floor plans are comfortable for large families and also meet ADA requirements. “The cabins fit into the landscape, offering views of nature from every room, cross ventilation, and asymmetrical roofs,” WXY principal-in-charge Claire Weisz says. “The design reflects their importance as an accessible public option for people of all ages and backgrounds.” The structures can

Clockwise from top left: New York State commissioned WXY Architecture + Urban Design for 10 vacation cabins at Wildwood State Park on Long Island. Cedar shingles clad the one- and twobedroom structures. Designed to withstand generations of families, the cabins have simple, durable furnishings that are easy to maintain.

also be prefabricated, so they can be easily and efficiently replicated and installed throughout the state. PROJECT TEAM CLAIRE WEISZ, FAIA; MARK YOES, FAIA; TIM BACHELLER KEY CONSULTANTS STANTEC; CASHIN ASSOCIATES; NYPRHP LONG ISLAND REGION PHOTOGRAPHY ALBERT VECERKA/ESTO

wxystudio.com; @wxystudio


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LIV Design Studio H TASTING LOUNGE VANCOUVER, CANADA

Marriott Bonvoy, which operates Vancouver’s emblematic Westin Bayshore hotel, approached LIV Design Studio with an intriguing proposition: convert a cavernous and underused space in the lobby into an elegant bar. Co-founded by Olivia and Tiffany Lam, the studio conjured an Art Deco–inflected lounge that references Howard Hughes’s storied 1972 residency at the hotel. The American magnate’s fascination with aeronautics informs the custom Lasvit art-glass installation cascading from the ceiling. Each piece of Bohemian crystal is positioned to mimic the air currents generated by an airplane propeller. Look closely at the nearby 21-foot-long bar and you’ll see repeating patterns, from the embossed brass drink rail to the custom-stamped ice cubes in every cocktail—details showcasing the depth of the design and branding work. It was challenging to create an opulent lounge that fit aesthetically with the adjacent spaces, which are finished in maple panels and beige limestone floor tiles from the 1980s. The team used LIV’s signature Visually Led Design (VLD) process of highly accurate renderings to present ideas and refine them on the fly. “By investing in precise CG renderings, we can more effectively communicate our vision to clients and contractors,” Olivia Lam says. “This ensures the integrity of the final product, and we find it the simplest way to fully conceptualize a design.”


PROJECT TEAM OLIVIA LAM; DICKSON CHU KEY CONSULTANTS LASVIT; BERMANFALK FURNITURE; METRO WALLCOVERINGS; SYMMETRY LIGHTING; MILLIKEN; DESIGNTEX PHOTOGRAPHY EMA PETER

liv.ca; @liv.designstudio

Completed 2018 1,765 square feet IDIBC Award of Merit; IDIBC Award of Excellence for Branding; IDIBC People’s Choice Award; Design et Al The International Hotel & Property Awards Shortlist

Clockwise from opposite top: LIV Design Studio created a stamp for the ice cubes used in the bar’s cocktails, a small detail that encapsulates the extent of the branding work undertaken by the firm. A rendering, integral to the firm’s Visually Led Design process, showcases the project’s outdoor lounge. Brass-finish screens feature a design that references a propeller’s rotating movement—a nod to Howard Hughes, who once resided at the hotel, and his fascination with aeronautics. The Art Deco–inspired interior features plush velvet seating evocative of 1930s speakeasies. HOSPITALITY

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Stinessen Arkitektur

AURORA LODGE, LYNGEN, NORWAY

Located above the Arctic Circle in the Lyngen Alps, Aurora Lodge is surrounded by wilderness. The 50-acre property, which slopes down to the Norwegian Sea, plays host to eagles and elk, with the Northern Lights filling the sky in winter. When designing the six-room hotel, Stinessen Arkitektur wisely chose not to compete with nature. With traditional forms of shelter in mind, principal Snorre Stinessen devised a minimalist A-frame structure with glass walls, 16-foot ceilings, and a focused material palette. Exteriors are clad in Nordic green copper that withstands the salty air and matches the forest in summer. Interior walls are lined in ecologically sourced rift-cut silver fir or European oak, which softens the feel of the high-ceilinged rooms. On a natural plateau, the main building is divided into two volumes: one with suites and living spaces, the other with a large communal kitchen and dining room. A covered internal courtyard—with a hanging fireplace— connects them. Suites look out onto snow-capped mountains and birch, fir, and pine trees. A creek runs beside the pathway between an annex suite and a private sauna; a single slate slab forms the bridge across it. Standing there, the only sound you hear is water rippling over pebbles.

PROJECT TEAM SNORRE STINESSEN; EMANUELA BONARDI; CAMILLA AUSTAD KEY CONSULTANTS POLAR LIFE HAUS; LOGPRO CONSTRUCTION; FEINSCHNEKKER PHOTOGRAPHY SNORRE STINESSEN; AUGUST STINESSEN

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Clockwise from opposite top: Stinessen Arkitektur clad the lodge’s A-frame main building in Nordic green copper. The steel kitchen and oak dining table are by Bulthaup. European oak lines the en-suite bathrooms, which have AXOR fittings and AntonioLupi furnishings. A Poliform wall system and Patricia Urquiola sofa outfit the west-facing living room. Suites have Hästens beds and linens.

Completed 2021 2,200 square feet A’ Design Gold Award; Architizer A+ Awards; LIV Hospitality Awards

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“This project is about relating to, respecting, and inviting nature in— not only into the building, but into your mind”

Clockwise from right: The 50-acre property overlooks the Norwegian Sea. Wood slats form three levels of benches in the sauna, which offers both privacy and water views. Marble tiles by Giovanni Barbieri clad a shower seat. An annex suite sits behind the main building. 140 INTERIOR DESIGN


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Rockwell Group’s concept for the Kimpton Shinjuku Tokyo hotel’s guest rooms and dining and amenity spaces was inspired by omotenashi, the Japanese spirit of full-hearted hospitality. “The interior design captures the vibrant energy of Tokyo’s Shinjuku district,” Rockwell partner Shawn Sullivan notes. “Merging the past and the present, we explored layered textures and materials inspired by the duality of modern Tokyo and the country’s ancient history.” Eclectic styles echo local design. As guests enter the first-floor cafe and bar, a neon “Oh Tokyo” sign recalls the commercial neighborhood’s

Rockwell Group KIMPTON SHINJUKU TOKYO

signature glowing lights. Off the second-floor elevator lobby, guests are immersed in a contemporary brasserie where a multitiered dining experience allows the room’s energy to flow across all tables. Guest rooms play on the concept of okaeri—Japanese for welcome

home—with a natural and neutral palette that boasts playful surprises. A floral metal inlay on the shou sugi ban wood headboard is a modern twist on Japan’s famous tradition of ikebana flower arrangements. Elevated event spaces include a nature-inspired art gallery that doubles PROJECT TEAM DAVID ROCKWELL, FAIA; SHAWN SULLIVAN, RA; MERAV LAHR; CATHERINE YATRAKIS; CARMEN CHAN; ELEONORA RINALDI KEY CONSULTANTS NIKKEN SPACE DESIGN; SALA DESIGN; NOOSA DESIGN CO. PHOTOGRAPHY YOSHIHIRO MAKINO

rockwellgroup.com; @rockwellgroup

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as a wedding chapel. There’s also a grand ballroom, where fluted plaster walls are reminiscent of Japan’s rolling hills and a rose-tinted bubble chandelier reflects on the mirrored ceiling, creating an illusion of endless glittering lights.


Completed 2020 98,000 square feet

Clockwise from opposite top: Aged-brass pendants bring industrial flair to the Jones Café & Bar. With layers of sheer drapery, custom window screens, and pearlescent plaster walls and ceiling, the Gallery is an ethereal space for weddings and other special events. Guest rooms provide a serene retreat from the bustling Shinjuku neighborhood. Cast concrete, hand-carved wood, and blackened-steel detailing at the reception desk evoke old and new, traditional and contemporary. In the District dining room, blue plaster walls create a rich backdrop while a custom brass picture rail adds graphic interest as it winds around artwork and sconces.

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II BY IV DESIGN TORONTO MARRIOTT MARKHAM, CANADA

For Marriott International’s first North American rebrand, II BY IV DESIGN showcased the hotel company’s identity: contemporary yet classic, and brilliantly inspired by the community. The design team, led by principal Keith Rushbrook, incorporated those values throughout, taking inspiration from the Downtown Markham neighborhood, a new development outside Toronto known for its tech hubs and diverse culture. “Surrounded by an enlightened community, the Toronto Marriott Markham is an opportunity to feel and live hospitality at its finest through the excellence of design,” Rushbrook says. An eye-catching crystal light installation, crafted in the Czech Republic, brings drama to the neutral yet stylish lobby. Titled Draco, the 3,300-pound sculpture winds 223 feet across the ceiling like a dragon’s tail. Colors, textures, bold lines, and beautiful finishes create a sense of movement and

PROJECT TEAM KEITH RUSHBROOK; DAN MENCHIONS KEY CONSULTANTS THE REMINGTON GROUP; MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL; PRECIOSA LIGHTING; QUADRANGLE ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY GILLIAN JACKSON; DAVID WHITTAKER; NORM LI

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vitality throughout the hotel. The infinity pool, meanwhile, seems to belong to an edgy modern resort, with custom site-specific graphic vinyl wall art by Rollo Phlecks that’s reminiscent of stained glass. When sunbeams illuminate the panels, swimmers are immersed in soothing colored light.


Clockwise from opposite: The lobby of the Toronto Marriott Markham in Ontario, Canada, incorporates several thoughtful design features, including cocktail booths with convenient charging stations. Regal neutrals create an inviting atmosphere. Draco, a custom crystal ceiling sculpture by Preciosa Lighting, is the lobby’s striking 223-foot-long centerpiece. Rollo Phlecks’s vinyl artwork Harmonious Universe #8 resembles stained-glass panels in the pool area.

Completed 2018 192,000 square feet Rethinking the Future Award for Hospitality; SBID International Design Excellence Awards Finalist LEED Silver

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Dreamtime Australia Design SETA, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

Michael McCann, principal of Dreamtime Australia Design, knows how to create a unique sense of place. Before founding his firm in 1995, the Miami native opened and operated more than 80 restaurants, bars, and nightclubs around the world and worked in luxury hotel management for brands like Mandarin Oriental. With Dreamtime, he’s designed restaurants across Australia, but none quite like Seta, which gave him the chance to install a contemporary Italian restaurant inside a handsome heritage building, Australia’s first savings bank, dating to 1849. McCann and his team wanted the restaurant to feel refined, inviting, and exciting, embracing Italian culture and the warmth of the Victorian setting. They homed in on design details that would give Seta an enchanting but tasteful ambiance. A custom hand-cut marble mosaic floor evokes Venetian dining rooms, while deep-red jarrah-wood paneling with copper-inlay detailing has an Old World feel. Illuminated timber with hand-laid marquetry frames the dramatic bar. On the mirrored bar top,

PROJECT TEAM MICHAEL MCCANN; HELEN MORROW; MARY PATERSON; SERGE LINNIK; MAURICE PATTEN; ROYA RICHMOND; MICHELENA MCCANN KEY CONSULTANTS MAAS & CO; DENGATE JOINERY; ALEXANDRIA TILES PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL GOSNEY/ELBOW ROOM PRODUCTIONS

dreamtimeaustraliadesign.com; @dreamtimeaustraliadesign

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silver cutouts mimic a Venetian damask pattern. Golden onyx weaves throughout the space. “We blended ageless, bespoke features and custom furniture to set the scene for an equally timeless Italian dining experience,” McCann says. The result is an eatery unlike any in Sydney.


Clockwise from opposite: A 19th-century bank building houses Seta, a contemporary Italian restaurant in Sydney by Dreamtime Australia Design. The massive crudo bar is marble. Custom chandeliers hang from the original Victorian ceiling in the private dining room. Restrooms reflect the building’s classical style while also evoking Venice.

Completed 2020 6,500 square feet

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“It’s an inviting, comfortable slice of la dolce vita”

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A digitally printed tapestry hangs on a jarrah-woodpaneled wall in the sumptuous dining room.

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//3877

CRANES, WASHINGTON, D.C. Interior design firm //3877 begins every project with a simple but effective process: ask questions and listen carefully to the answers. “We want to understand the desires of each client so we can impactfully use design to address each aspiration,” says David Shove-Brown, who cofounded the firm with fellow principal David Tracz in 2011. Cranes, a Washington, D.C. restaurant and sake lounge from internationally renowned chef Pepe Moncayo, explores the intersection of Spanish and Japanese cuisines, and the design infuses the essence of the menu into the interior. Inspired by the compositional beauty of the chef’s creations, the design is defined by understated yet rich materiality: dark textures, polished metals, moody lighting, and sweeping

Completed 2020 11,000 square feet Shikoku Kasei Design Contest Silver Medal; IES Illumination Awards of Merit

architectural features that double as art installations and wayfinding. Favoring a Japanese aesthetic, the team created vignettes that backdrop patrons as they move from the vestibule entry past the bar and sake lounge and into the main dining area, exhibition kitchen, and private dining rooms. The color story, defined by warm wood tones, copper accents, and deep-green details, visually grounds the project as a whole.

AECOM JAMES MERCHANT, EILEEN KICKISH, TIM HINKLE, MITCH TURNER, JADE LI, MEGAN ZELL, SARAH DEVINE, HAMID ALI, BRETT SHWERY PROJECT TEAM CRESA, ARC ENGINEERING, NISHKIAN CHAMBERLAIN, ENGINEERING PLUS, BANGMAC CREATIVE, PIVOT, NEWSON BROWN ACOUSTICS, TASLIMI CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY TERRENCE WILLIAMS/WUNDR STUDIO

aecom.com


PROJECT TEAM DAVID TRACZ; DAVID SHOVE-BROWN; MOLLY FORMAN; MEGAN HAMMAKER; LESLEY GOLENOR; JEAN-PAUL FIEDLER KEY CONSULTANTS FACE ASSOCIATES; FDS DESIGN STUDIO; CM KLING + ASSOCIATES; STRUCTURA PHOTOGRAPHY CLARENCE BUTTS; REY LOPEZ

3877.design; @3877.design

Clockwise from opposite top: Downlighting used to maximize shadow play creates a moody atmosphere in a restroom. In the sake lounge, up-lit acoustic panels emulate origami, and custom furniture is by Mandy Li Collection. The main dining room offers a view to the exhibition kitchen, framed by a Satori plaster feature wall. Glass cranes by artists Kevin Chambers and Gina Words float above the bar.

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The Cache Creek Resort Hotel represents HBG Design’s contextual interior design approach at its finest. The 459-key hotel expansion is brimming with influences from Northern California’s Capay Valley and its agrarian landscape. HBG’s interior designs always begin with connection to story. “Our approach is much like articulating the subplots or events that make up the larger narrative. Our interior designers connect these story elements to create cohesion and depth in every space,” interior design director Emily Marshall says. The HBG team titled their concept “Plentiful Valley/Fertile Ground,” inspired by the resort’s owner-operator, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, which produces its own wines, olive oil, honey, and almonds in the valley. Through the seasons, the landscape evolves, as mirrored in the rich yet refined palette: soft lilac from almond blossoms, and warm red, burgundy, and green shades sparked by tomatoes, olives, and grapes as they ripen under the warm summer sun. An ode to the honeybee and its importance to agriculture, the lobby bar is surrounded by four

HBG Design

CACHE CREEK RESORT HOTEL, BROOKS, CALIFORNIA

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hexagonal-shape columns and honeycomb screens that give intimacy to the energetic lounge space. Guest rooms and suites, on the other hand, offer tranquil respite with minimal color contrast to mimic nature at its most calm and serene.


Completed 2020 450,000 square feet

Clockwise from opposite top: The lobby expresses the energy and life of the Capay Valley. The Presidential Suite living room has a handpainted custom wall covering from Phillip Jeffries designed to mimic almond blossoms in the surrounding valley. Guest rooms and suites offer scenic views from every window. The Presidential Suite is influenced by Las Vegas style “super suites,” with opulent fixtures such as a tub fill that pours from the ceiling. Cascading pendants animate the sushi bar.

PROJECT TEAM GEOFF WYONZEK; EMILY MARSHALL; NATHAN PEAK; JONATHAN LARSON; CHRIS DEVINE; PAUL TOWERY KEY CONSULTANTS CAMBER HOSPITALITY; ILLUMINATING CONCEPTS; ESLICK DESIGN & YESCO/ROD CLIFFORD; APF; DESIMONE CONSULTING ENGINEERS; NV5 ENGINEERING PHOTOGRAPHY PETER MALINOWSKI/INSITE ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

hbg.design; @hbgdesigningexperience HOSPITALITY

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Clockwise from opposite: The two-story wine tower dominates the atrium spanning the site’s second and third floors, where Cooper’s Hawk’s two main dining rooms are located. Retail, a tasting bar, and the wine tower occupy the second level, where herringbone flooring is created with ceramic tile. The host station behind the main bar is backed by a wood-plank feature wall. The existing facade with historic signage was updated by adding outdoor patio seating on the second level.

Completed 2019 23,687 square feet

A longstanding Aria client, Cooper’s Hawk has numerous restaurants nationwide. Conceptually and physically, winemaking takes center stage at this, its flagship location. And what a stage it gets in the historic Esquire Theater building located in the heart of Chicago’s Gold Coast. Decidedly a hybrid, the project solves a densely interwoven program addressing dining, renovation of a storied interior, and a tribute to all aspects of viniculture. These elements play out over the building’s three levels, each with a different functionality. On the ground floor, just inside the entry, a massive display of wines with international provenance and a custom art installation fashioned from 1,600 wine corks set the tone for what’s to come. On the second level, a retail section plus the beloved restaurant component come into play. Brass chandeliers overlook a tasting bar backed by the interior’s pièce de résistance: a soaring two-story wine tower lit by cascading fixtures fashioned as stylized barrels. The top level provides full-scale glamour, with a custom bubbly chandelier that sparkles above a U-shape bar. “We played with the concept of raw materials like steel and plaster

Aria Group Architects

COOPER’S HAWK WINERY & RESTAURANT, CHICAGO

juxtaposed against exotic woods and ornate iron workings,” project designer Elizabeth Kozlik says. “It was the dichotomy that allowed us to create an experience that honored the history of the Esquire Theater in a modern way.” The 100-person, Chicago-based full-service architecture and design firm got it right, down to the last drop. PROJECT TEAM JOE VAJDA; DAN BERNATEK; VICTOR BAEZ, JR.; ANA HERNANDEZ; ELIZABETH KOZLIK; STACEY BOUWMAN; EVELINA URBONAITE KEY CONSULTANTS BTR ENGINEERING; TRIMARK SS KEMP; INTERNATIONAL CONTRACTORS INC.; PREMIER ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS; ARCHISTORIC PRODUCTS; PAUL PUNKE; VISUAL IMPACT MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY EMILIA CZADER

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HUANG IBOSHI ARCHITECTURE, WEEKEND RETREAT IN INVERNESS, CALIFORNIA: PAUL DYER PHOTOGRAPHY


residential: artful living Edgy city lofts, dignified townhouses, and casual family retreats—though disparate, these captivating projects have a through line: Their panache derives from inward-gazing charms, from funky textiles and epic art to offbeat wall treatments and soothing natural materials. Have a look around.


Steven Harris Architects MANHATTAN TOWNHOUSE, NEW YORK

With more than 50 Manhattan townhouse renovations completed over the years, Steven Harris Architects stands as an expert in the project type. For a four-story residence located in New York City’s West Village and constructed in the late 19th century, the architecture and design teams transformed glamorous yet dated interiors into a sparkling contemporary showplace for a couple embracing modernity. Every level, including the cellar, was reconfigured and rebuilt. Starting at ground, where the entry foyer presents see-through views to the elegant living room and backyard, each floor is dedicated to a particular activity and makes its own design statement. The common denominator throughout is an impeccable mix of elements, mostly modern in heritage. The living room, for example, combines wire-brushed oak paneling with a rare Le Corbusier tapestry and a custom table with Ib Kofod-Larsen chairs. The family musician has a dedicated playground in a leather-clad room complete with grand piano and gallery. Meanwhile the heart of the home is below. Standing 20 feet tall, the dining room–embellished with full-height bookshelves, an intricate Philip Smith mural, and an Ingo Maurer chandelier–is the

PROJECT TEAM STEVEN HARRIS; JOHN WOELL; ABIR AHMAD KEY CONSULTANT REES ROBERTS + PARTNERS PHOTOGRAPHY SCOTT FRANCES

stevenharrisarchitects.com; @stevenharrisarchitects 158 INTERIOR DESIGN

pitch-perfect setting for urbane conversation among the couple’s frequent guests. To all this, the architects add their own pièce de résistance: a glass and concrete penthouse addition atop a lushly landscaped roof terrace.


Clockwise from opposite: The living room’s iron-frame glass apertures open to the rear garden. A rare Le Corbusier tapestry adorns the living room. High-drama, the doubleheight dining room designed by Rees Roberts + Partners (who also oversaw landscaping) is inspired by Yale University’s Sterling Memorial Library; the chandelier is Ingo Maurer’s Golden Ribbon. Just outside the leather-clad music room hangs an Alexandre Logé chandelier, sourced in Paris. The garden was designed to accommodate both quiet family evenings and events.

Completed 2016 4,150 square feet Interior Design Hall of Fame member


“Modernism meets nature in the penthouse addition”

The continuous wood ceiling plane of the penthouse emphasizes the seamless flow of space inside and out.

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dkstudio architects GALLERY HOUSE, TORONTO

Located in an upscale Toronto neighborhood, the Gallery House replaces a neglected bungalow from the 1940s with a home that doubles as a personal art gallery for the owners’ extensive collection. Composed of wood, glass, limestone, and steel, its two above-ground floors mirrored by a two-level basement, the residence is unapologetically modern. On the main floor, the large, open-plan living, dining, and kitchen suite is expressed as a glass box wrapped in a cedar frame. Sitting politely above this is an elegant limestone volume enclosing the second-floor bedrooms. East-west breezeways flanking a grand central stair serve to organize circulation as well as to subtly direct the eye on an invisible path through the house (and, consequently, past the rich trove of fine art and artefacts on display). The owners, though not artists themselves, possess a sophisticated design sensibility, making refined craftsmanship a must throughout. A key example is the elegant staircase: Clad in rift-cut white oak, it bends and flows between the floors, naturally lit from skylights

PROJECT TEAM DMYTRIY PEREKLITA; TARAK JOSHI; DIANA HYUN; NICOLE LEUNG KEY CONSULTANTS BLACKWELL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS; CUCCO ENGINEERING + DESIGN; HADDAD GEOTECHNICAL INC. PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL MURAZ

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above. “The intention was to create an emotive space in which the lines were blurred between architecture and interior, home and gallery,” firm president Dmytriy Pereklita notes. It’s safe to say that with this house, the owners have added yet another work of art to their collection.


Clockwise from opposite top: The dining area, with a Soleil Noir pendant by Luceplan, is backdropped by an Indiana limestone fireplace and an open bronze display featuring pieces from the owners’ soapstone collection. Gray veins in the white quartz kitchen countertop lead the eye to the fireplace artwork. The ground floor is organized to allow for air and light to circulate through two breezeways flanking the central stair. The custom oak screen on the stair has bronze-trim niches that feature pottery by the wife of the client couple. Through its stark, abstract design, the powder room takes simple daily acts like washing hands to a new level of ritual. The exterior is composed of cedar, Indiana limestone, and metal volumes that intersect and stack, quietly reminiscent of art galleries old and new.

Completed 2021 6,110 square feet

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Clockwise from left: The veranda overlooks an old-growth pine forest. Geothermal heating helps to achieve an energy-conscious design despite the vast expanses of glazing. An elm sculpture by Lars Zech stands on an ipe hardwood deck. Forest views replace the expected mirror above the master bathroom’s 22-foot-long custom fumed-oak vanity. The house is built with Douglas fir posts and beams, fumed to a dark, teaklike hue.

Completed 2017 3,000 square feet

Tsao & McKown Architects TEAHOUSE, POUND RIDGE, NEW YORK

East meets West and indoor-outdoor. Those familiar tropes were particularly pertinent for Interior Design Hall of Fame members Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown when they began work on a weekend retreat for Philippines-born fashion designer Josie Natori and her JapaneseAmerican husband, Ken, a financier. Tsao and McKown conceived the single-story structure as a kind of teahouse. It’s built with fumed Douglas fir posts and beams, which reduced the need for internal load-bearing walls. The result is both airy and cozy. Sunshine pours in through the sliding glass doors and the asymmetrical skylights angling upward from the flat roof. The brightness enhances the overall palette of earth tones, peppered with the purple and chartreuse of the furnishings—many designed to complement the Natoris’ antiques. Tsao and McKown led the landscaping design in collaboration with Saeko Brundage, and it’s as considered as the interiors. The veranda overlooks a Japanese-style garden, while the master suite’s garden boasts a burbling fountain. There’s also an ofuro soaking tub outside, where one can survey views of an old-growth forest. The shower, however, is inside, albeit enclosed in full-height glass. Between the insects, the neighbors, and the weather, “the idea of an outdoor shower is often more appealing than the reality,” Tsao notes wryly. PROJECT TEAM CALVIN TSAO; ZACK MCKOWN; JONATHAN HOOVER; RICHARD RHODES KEY CONSULTANTS SILMAN; CONSULTING ENGINEERING SERVICES; WALD STUDIO; SAEKO BRUNDAGE; GEODESIGN INC.; PRUTTING + CO. CUSTOM BUILDERS PHOTOGRAPHY SIMON UPTON

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Completed 2016 10,000 square feet NKBA Awards

Mary Douglas Drysdale Associates TUXEDEN ESTATE, BETHESDA, MARYLAND

“This project was key for me for many reasons,” declares Mary Douglas Drysdale, principal of residential interiors studio Mary Douglas Drysdale Clockwise from left: For a casual feel, Drysdale slipcovered chairs in the entry hall. White beading accents the family room’s blue paneled walls. A view of the formal living room, its French and Italian antiques juxtaposed with a sculptural Wendell Castle coffee table. Drysdale enjoys the clash of old and new. The neoclassical mantel is thought to be original to the 1920s house. Drysdale painted the kitchen in tonal stripes, coating the cabinets in a blue base color, then adding stripes 50 percent lighter and 150 percent darker.

Associates, which specializes in historic renovation and interior planning, often with an emphasis on art acquisition. “For one, they were among my first clients, and this was our eighth project together.” For this go-around, Drysdale renovated the family’s 1920s suburban estate while maintaining its impressive proportions. (The property is a double lot, which allowed a deep setback from the road, giving the house great prominence.) The clients love color, so Drysdale balanced strong hues with barelythere glazes. To wit: the clementine tone that lights up the informal living room and the palest duck-egg blue of the family room’s paneled walls. “I enjoy the elegance of formal architectural detail,” Drysdale says. “The use of moldings and millwork upholds classical proportions and establishes balance, while contemporary art and modern furniture loosen things up a bit.” Drysdale has always favored rooms with mixes: antiques, transitional pieces, modern art, and unexpected finds. “Such an approach says more to me about the complexity of taste and eras than a room that’s perfectly balanced and of one moment in time,” she concludes. Amen to that. PROJECT TEAM MARY DOUGLAS DRYSDALE; KACY HOLCOMB KEY CONSULTANTS WINCHESTER MILLWORK; CACAFUEGO ARTS & DECORATION PHOTOGRAPHY RON BLUNT; FRANCESCO LAGNESE

marydouglasdrysdale.com; @marydouglasdrysdale

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Cream

DEEP WATER BAY VILLA, HONG KONG

“I believe that the finest architecture and interiors have distinctly human and poetic qualities,” says Antony Chan, founder of multidisciplinary studio Cream. Chan is an award-winning architect—rated one of the 50 best designers in the world in the prestigious Andrew Martin International Design Awards—and a leading figure in the Hong Kong design scene. Before founding his firm in 1999, he worked with the legendary interior designer Andrée Putman in Paris. In this Hong Kong residence, historical awareness and eclectic moves are immediately apparent in the living room, where a bronze wall-frame containing illuminated Murano glass “candles” suggests the modern equivalent of an Edwardian club. On the other hand, the PROJECT TEAM ANTONY CHAN; REEVIS WOO PHOTOGRAPHY VIRGILE SIMON BERTRAND

cream.hk; @c.r.e.a.m.s.t.u.d.i.o

organic pattern of the carpet and the angular legs of the chic glass table are completely contemporary. Wall treatments are equally diverse. Above the fireplace, asymmetric ribbing decorates the ceramic tiles

Clockwise from top left: A bronze wall-frame in the living room features stacked, tubular Murano glass lighting that subtly references lit candles. Its ribbed effect is echoed in the carved details of the stair’s marble balustrade. An aerial view of the lush garden and swimming pool. The stately entry to the first-floor bedroom. In another bedroom, a handpainted wallpaper with sunset-inspired striations meets a leatherupholstered headboard panel. 168 INTERIOR DESIGN

cladding an operable panel that conceals the television. A similar relief detail repeats on the staircase’s elegant marble balustrade. Another highlight? Metal-frame, textured-glass paneling in the master suite is Chan’s witty reinterpretation of artist Piet Mondrian’s legendary grids. A different approach appears in the dressing room, where the wallpaper is reminiscent of agate and the rug sports a bold animal print.



Completed 2020 3,600 square feet

Clockwise from right: Multitextured glass panels in a Piet Mondrian–inspired frame provide a glimpse of the sensuous bathroom inside. The stair increases in transparency as it ascends. Clad in beige marble, the master bathroom has a half-height fluted wall in the same stone behind the tub. The master suite’s bed panel is upholstered in fabric by Marcel Wanders for Louis Vuitton’s Objets Nomades collection. 170 INTERIOR DESIGN


“It’s a witty fusion of history and art”

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A young couple making the move from Manhattan to Brooklyn in search of more space—they were expecting their first child—found what they were looking for in a Greenpoint condo building that had two stacked units for sale. To gut and combine the spaces into one duplex superapartment, the clients commissioned StudioSC, a collaboratively minded team of New York architects and designers founded in 2014 by Stephen Conte and Carolina Escobar. Conte and Escobar partitioned the layout into distinct public and private zones that spring from the triple-height entry foyer. The lower level is where the family can entertain, cook, dine, and read while

StudioSC

GREENPOINT LOFT, NEW YORK

enjoying views of Manhattan across the river. Behind the kitchen, a staircase leads to a dramatic catwalk with glass balustrade that provides access to the upper level housing bedrooms and a den. Plumbing and utility soffits on the ceiling and walls had to be concealed, “one of the project’s biggest challenges,” Escobar says. The designers built strategically placed new walls and “pushed and pulled” existing ones to create a clean backdrop for useful custom built-ins. The goal of the interior architecture and furnishings, Conte explains, “was to

PROJECT TEAM STEPHEN CONTE, AIA; CAROLINA ESCOBAR; IRENE BLAZQUEZ KEY CONSULTANT JJS MANAGEMENT PHOTOGRAPHY GARRETT ROWLAND

studiosc.net; @studiosc_nyc

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create a minimal but warm environment.” Key to conjuring that sensibility is the white-oak kitchen, the island’s marble-slab top artfully cantilevered by way of an under-mount bespoke steel plate.


Completed 2020 2,700 square feet Two apartments combined into one duplex

Clockwise from top right: A view from the living area to the kitchen reveals the underside of the catwalk above. The family room is anchored by a Maralunga sofa from Cassina and a limestone coffee table by Yucca Stuff. A vignette in the master bedroom features a custom vanity topped with a Blue de Savoie marble shelf, a Bower mirror, and Apparatus Studio sconces. The custom white-oak wall and bookshelves above were created to hide plumbing bumps that marred the existing wall; the dining table is by Samuel Accoceberry Studio, chairs are from GTV, and the pendant light is by Lindsey Adelman. A leatherupholstered bed strikes a note of simple luxury in the master bedroom.

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Clockwise from opposite: In the foyer, the main stair with a curved steel handrail inspired by Richard Serra envelops a Comet chandelier by London artist Stuart Haygarth; Wendell Castle’s bronze chaise echoes the sinuous metal swoop. Carolyn Ray was commissioned to create the paneled landscape behind the master bed. A monumental vase by Ai Wei Wei punctuates the new entry vestibule, grafted onto the existing facade. Karl Springer’s Onassis parchment-wrapped chairs surround a vintage Vladimir Kagan dining table, while a branch sculpture in bronze and porcelain by artist David Wiseman brings the outdoors in.

de la Torre design studio BEL-AIR RESIDENCE, LOS ANGELES

Completed 2018 30,000 square feet Short-listed for the International Design & Architectural Awards, Luxury Residence in the Americas This storied Los Angeles property began life in the 1930s as a Tudor duplex by famed Old Hollywood architect Paul R. Williams. While the clients adored the location, perched on a hill near the Bel-Air Country Club, the traditional style of the house was at odds with their minimalist sensibility. When Ernest de la Torre, founder of de la Torre design studio, presented a bold plan that would allow them to keep their beloved home of 10 years and also get the modern abode of their dreams, they were all in. An extensive renovation ensued, with the demolition of half the duplex. In its place, architecture firm Rios Clementi Hale Studios built a new modern wing. The original Tudor brick portion was given a fresh black-and-white look, and de la Torre masterminded the interiors. As a board member of LACMA, the client had an impressive art collection to draw upon. Colorful sculptures by Ai Wei Wei dot the exterior, while inside the contemporary work of painters like Mary Weatherford mingle effortlessly with new and vintage pieces of European and Southeast Asian provenance. To avoid an endless succession of white rooms, de la Torre employed compression-expansion techniques of alternating dark and light spaces. Throughout, there is a delicate interplay between Eastern design (a nod to the client’s Malaysian heritage) and Western elements. It’s a harmonious study of contrasts. 174 INTERIOR DESIGN

PROJECT TEAM ERNEST DE LA TORRE; ELYSE PETRELLA; ERIC ROBLEDO KEY CONSULTANTS RIOS CLEMENTI HALE STUDIOS; DAVID WISEMAN; CARPENTERS WORKSHOP GALLERY; EDWARD FIELDS; LA MANUFACTURE COGOLIN PHOTOGRAPHY PETER MURDOCK

delatorredesign.com; @delatorredesign


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4,000 square feet Completed 2019

Antrobus Design Collective IN LIVING COLOR, MIAMI BEACH

This Miami Beach residence for Camille and Patrick McDowell is interior designer Alison Antrobus’s most colorful and layered project to date. “The real power of the home is in the seamless transition between electric colors, intense patterns, vintage fixtures, and whimsical art,” Antrobus says. “Even with so much happening visually all at once, you are still able to breathe between vignettes and appreciate each curated element.” Camille McDowell’s love of color and passion for collecting midcentury vintage lighting led the way in selecting finishes and furnishings. “But before we could unleash the Crayola box, we had to address a structural column parked in the middle of the main living area,” Antrobus notes. She wrapped the column in white lacquer with bronze wallpaper panels and backlit rose quartz, mirrored the volume on its opposite side, and connected the two elements with shelves to create a bar for entertaining. In some instances, colors were dictated by the clients’ love of a

Completed 2017 3,835 square feet

particular piece. For example, the pink-and-black theme of the dining room was sparked by Gucci’s heron wallpaper, and the yellow guest bedroom was designed to work in concert with a vintage canary-hued

PROJECT TEAM ALISON ANTROBUS KEY CONSULTANT ASR CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY BARRY GROSSMAN

antrobus-collective.design; @antrobus_design_collective 176 INTERIOR DESIGN

Murano glass lamp. In another guest room, Florida living is celebrated with wit in the form of tropical-foliage wallpaper and a Hans Wegner chair upholstered in metallic-lime leather.


Clockwise from opposite: The main gallery showcases the clients’ art collection, which inspired Antrobus to explore color as never before. The dining room wallpaper is by Gucci. In the entry vestibule, a 1960s Karl Springer console meets custom-printed wallpaper by Porter Teleo. Custom shelves with backlit quartzite panels in the cocktail lounge backdrop armchairs by Minotti, a cluster of tables from Meridiani, and a patterned rug designed by Martyn Lawrence Bullard for The Rug Company. In a guest bedroom, Mock Rock wallpaper by Ghislaine Viñas for Flavor Paper accompanies beds from ModShop that echo the hue and curves of a vintage Murano glass lamp. RESIDENTIAL ARTFUL LIVING

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Sophie Girard Design HAMPTONS FAMILY GETAWAY WESTHAMPTON BEACH, NEW YORK

beachfront. The property includes six bedrooms and six bathrooms and underwent a thorough redesign. The erstwhile porch was annexed to

“I think the French approach to style, that you should wear the dress and

create a large, open living space that connects to a new outdoor terrace,

not let the dress wear you, very much applies to interiors, too,” Sophie

the kitchen was relocated, and a new master suite was installed. All

Girard says. “The most successful spaces are the ones that feel effortless.”

bathrooms, as well as the basement, were gut renovated. The client brief

Paris-born Girard’s namesake firm, which she founded in New York City

was to create a relaxing getaway that the family (with young children)

in 2012, specializes in residential interiors. A Hamptons vacation property

could enjoy year-round. Taking cues from the Hamptons coastline,

she recently designed is an example par excellence of her studio’s

Girard delivered a modern spin on the beach-chic aesthetic through

characteristic style: fresh and modern, pared-down and relaxed.

carefully edited furnishings and finishes. The result is a fresh, airy, and

The house is centrally located in a quiet neighborhood in Westhampton Beach, a five-minute drive to the popular village 178 INTERIOR DESIGN

inviting space featuring a color palette of limewashed whites and natural materials such as jute, raffia, rattan, and oak.


Completed 2019 4,000 square feet

Clockwise from opposite: Entertaining is at the heart of the home, as evidenced by the expanded great room—with walls painted Farrow & Ball’s Wimborne White—that connects to the outdoor terrace. The children’s playroom features a climbing wall and seating modules by Nugget that double as gym mats. The kitchen showcases custom cabinetry mixing matte lacquer and light oak finishes. A glimpse into the serene master bedroom with a lamp by Homenature atop a nightstand by 57st Design. Eskayel’s Cocos Chloros wallpaper defines the powder room. PROJECT TEAM SOPHIE GIRARD, NCIDQ KEY CONSULTANTS NICHOLAS VERO ARCHITECT; JL MILLWORK INC. PHOTOGRAPHY SOPHIE GIRARD DESIGN

sophiegirard.com; @sophiegirarddesign

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DXA studio 47-49 GREENE STREET, NEW YORK

47-49 Greene Street, a six-story building in New York’s landmarked SoHo district, was built in 1886 for manufacturing and is an example of the area’s iconic post–Civil War iron-and-masonry construction. DXA studio, founded in 2011 by Jordan Rogove and Wayne Norbeck, was hired in 2015 for the restoration of the building’s street facade and the conversion of floors 2 to 6 into high-end single-family condominiums. “Much like the artists who were attracted to the empty SoHo lofts in the 1960s, we were drawn to the building’s high ceilings, abundant light, and expansive floor plates,” Norbeck says. The apartments are designed to celebrate these traits, with the team focusing on retaining as much open, unprogrammed floor space as possible. The plan arranges the private zones (bedrooms, bathrooms, and storage) toward the back of each unit while the front is kept more fluid, with living spaces bleeding into one another. In both the kitchen and the den, the team changed gears, lowering ceilings and wrapping the spaces in warm white-oak millwork. “While we were committed to maintaining the characteristics of the loft, we were acutely aware that we were designing a home,” Rogove explains. “Introducing a residential scale was important to make the space inviting.” There is a high level of craft and customization throughout—DXA’s way of speaking to the bygone manufacturing era that gave the neighborhood so much of its character.

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Clockwise from opposite top: The custom steel-frame flutedglass doors are designed to tuck away when fully open. In the master bathroom, a set of book-matched statuary marble slabs backdrops a freestanding Wetstyle tub. The master suite is designed as a progression of spaces, with the 17-foot-wide bedroom leading to walk-through his-and-her closets and then the master bath. The den mimics the kitchen with its white-oak millwork. The main living spaces are organized to retain as much open, unprogrammed floor space as possible.

Completed 2021 19,527 square feet

PROJECT TEAM JORDAN ROGOVE; WAYNE NORBECK; SARAH KEANE; AXELLE ZEMOULI KEY CONSULTANTS ROBERT SILMAN ASSOCIATES STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS; B2 ENGINEERING DPC; HOME INTEGRATION SPECIALISTS; JENKINS & HUNTINGTON; SAGE BUILDERS; CANOVA; MANHATTAN STEEL DOOR CO. PHOTOGRAPHY EVAN JOSEPH; FLORIAN HOLZHERR

dxastudio.com; @dxastudio

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“We introduced a high level of craft and customization into the project as a way of speaking to the bygone manufacturing era of the neighborhood”

Clockwise from right: To introduce warmth to the design, the kitchen has lowered ceilings and is wrapped in warm white-oak millwork, creating an intimacy that contrasts with the grander living areas. A powder room’s honed Fior di Bosco marble vanity pairs with ebonized wood-veneer panels. A view of the den with the bifolding and sliding doors retracted. Brushed copper Vola plumbing fixtures pair with a custom walnut vanity in the master bathroom. 182 INTERIOR DESIGN


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Completed 2019 1,305 square feet

Johnson Chou Inc. SHADOWBOX, TORONTO

ShadowBox is a house, of course. But, more poetically, it is also an instru­ Clockwise from left: The kitchen accesses a courtyard featuring a Japanese maple tree, fire pit, and reflecting pool. Since the house faces a busy street, exterior openings were minimized. Floating-tread stairs cast the­atrical shadows. In the master suite, the bed and bath areas are separated by a sheer cur­tain; beyond, folding doors open to reveal a Juliet bal­cony. The second-floor dining room is enclosed on one side by a catwalk. The continuity of light extending deep into the unconventionally located lower-level living room imparts an impres­sion the triple-height space is not actually below-grade.

ment for witnessing the passage of time. Its crisp white interior walls act as a blank canvas, capturing shadows of trees swaying in the breeze, in effect projecting the exterior environment inside. Like a reverse sundial, beams of light move across the walls and floors, yielding moments that are mesmerizing, cinematic, fleeting. In an instant, shadows transform or disappear altogether, revealing the juxtaposition between the perma­ nence of the architecture and the ephemeral of the natural. Located in the Upper Beaches area of Toronto, the residence faces a busy, at times cacophonous, arterial road. As a result, exterior openings were mostly minimized to a single horizontal strip window. Inside, Johnson Chou created a heightened sense of progression through varying spatial scales. From the one-story kitchen, the dining room is double-height, and the basement living room is triple-height, invoking a sense of expansion or compression as one walks through the home. Catwalks and floating stairs continue the flow of space and sight lines. “ShadowBox is the purest expression of our design methodology to date,” says Chou. “It distills the ideas that we’ve been challenging ourselves with over the years: space, time, movement, form, and light.” PROJECT TEAM JOHNSON CHOU; SILKE STADTMUELLER KEY CONSULTANTS TORCON CANADA; ROBERT DESIGN GROUP; AYA KITCHENS; WILLIS SUPPLY CO.; RJW ENTERPRISES; LUMINA SALES; EUROLITE PHOTOGRAPHY BEN RAHN/A-FRAME STUDIO

johnsonchou.com; @johnsonchoudesign 184 INTERIOR DESIGN


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Established in 2004, Blair Burton Interiors is a family-owned business serving clients in Central Texas and beyond with a focus on high-end residential interior design. “Our approach centers around the interplay of elegance and simplicity,” founder Blair Burton explains. “We believe that sophistication and comfort can coexist.” This project, a family retreat along the Frio River in the heart of Texas Hill Country, solidified a key style for the firm: “what we call the Hill Country Modern aesthetic,” Burton says. “It was also one of our first projects with Shiflet Richardson Architects and builder Dalgleish Construction.” The complex, surrounded by 300-year-old cypress trees, was conceived as a legacy asset that would be used by generations. There’s a main house—with the communal living room, dining area, and kitchen—and three large guest cottages with multiple bedrooms. Generous natural light, peaceful palettes of gray-blue and gray-green, and natural materials such as wood flooring reclaimed from century-

Blair Burton Interiors FRIO RIVER FAMILY RETREAT, TEXAS

186 INTERIOR DESIGN

old Kentucky fences connect the home with its surrounding landscape. Interiors were designed with durability in mind. Fabrics can handle dripping swimsuits with ease, while the locally quarried stone floors positively welcome the pitter-patter of wet feet. “This house ultimately inspired what has become our firm’s motto,” Burton confides. “Soulful homes with style and substance.”


Completed 2013 with phase two completed 2018 7,500 square feet PROJECT TEAM BLAIR BURTON KEY CONSULTANTS DALGLEISH CONSTRUCTION COMPANY; SHIFLET RICHARDSON ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL FINKEL/PISTON PHOTOGRAPHY; NICK JOHNSON

blairburtoninteriors.com; @blairburtoninteriors

Clockwise from opposite top: The ceiling at the entry is clad in reclaimed wood. In the great room, a hand-forged iron chandelier surveys a sisal rug. The master bedroom is airy, its white shiplap walls and vaulted ceiling accented by reclaimed beams. The steel bridge connecting the main building, where the common living areas are, to the master-suite cottage is lit by glass pendants.

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Jasmine Lam Design Studio TRIBECA RESIDENCE, NEW YORK

Completed 2018 2,200 square feet

This three-bed, three-and-a-half-bath apartment was designed for a young family in the world-renowned Manhattan edifice by Herzog & de Meuron nicknamed the Jenga building. Interior designer Jasmine Lam improved upon the developer’s white-box scheme by adding custom millwork throughout, plus architectural cove lighting and plenty of accent and ambient lighting. A new Calacatta marble kitchen island and dining table were designed to function well together in the open plan. New entry millwork allowed Lam to showcase a sculptural mirror, provide bench seating with storage underneath, and flush-mount a TV facing into the living room. This freed up the main wall in the living area for artwork (in lieu of having a large TV). Millwork in the master dressing area transformed this room into a luxury closet of folding and sliding doors, hidden safes, and 10-foot-high mirrors. The clients asked for a contemporary space that felt relaxing and comfortable for young children and adults. Lam provided a soft color palette in grays and blues that complements the skyline views and worked with the clients to incorporate art from their family collection as well as to source new works for added spice. Clockwise from opposite: Custom millwork that frames a Robert Sukrachand mirror and houses a storage bench defines the entry. The open plan living-dining area is suffused with blues and grays. Jasmine Lam Design Studio incorprated artworks from the clients’ collection throughout, and added select new pieces. The serene master bedroom opens onto a private balcony. 188 INTERIOR DESIGN

PROJECT TEAM JASMINE LAM; NATALIA PASCOVICH; KAREN LOC KEY CONSULTANTS T.O.M. CONSTRUCTION; COLONNA MARBLE PHOTOGRAPHY MARIETTA LEUNG

jasminelam.com; @jasminelaminteriordesign


RESIDENTIAL ARTFUL LIVING

BESTINDESIGN 189


When Erin Iba, founder of Iba Design Associates, first visited this 1970s house in the Rocky Mountains, she expected to simply update the space with new furniture and lighting. After a look around, she saw that many dated “improvements” had left the two-story house feeling nondescript and in need of a substantial renovation. “We decided to build back the bones,” she says. That is, she would create her own version of the house’s history with architectural elements and focal points that would give the place character. An open staircase and white-oak flooring throughout instantly unified the space. Iba stripped paint from exposed ceiling beams, installed custom steel-and-glass sliding barn doors, and gave the fireplace a steel surround with exposed tack nails. “We tried to maintain the quirkiness of the 1970s ski house—otherwise, it would be just another

Iba Design Associates SKI VACATION HOUSE VAIL, COLORADO

190 INTERIOR DESIGN

second home,” Iba notes. The clients, a family of five, needed the house to accommodate both cocktail soirees and pizza parties, with flexible spaces and sturdy furniture. Iba chose a marble coffee table that the kids could dance on, upholstered sofas with bleachable velvet, and tucked away ample storage for craft supplies. Graphic wallpaper and striking artwork, such as a graffiti mural in the den, bring in plenty of personality.


Clockwise from opposite top: A graphite drawing by Tim Main rests on a bar cart. Barn doors lead to a child’s bedroom hung with papier-mâché animal heads. T. Franz, a high school student from Boulder, Colorado, painted the graffiti mural in the downstairs den. Floral wallpaper by Ellie Cashman Design enlivens the master bedroom. Velvet-upholstered sofas—handily bleach cleanable—surround the chic marble coffee table in the soaring living room.

Completed 2017 2,200 square feet Luxe Interiors + Design cover PROJECT TEAM ERIN IBA; ABBEY PULS KEY CONSULTANT WALKER FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY MINTON REDFIELD

ibadesignassociates.com; @ibadesignassoc

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BESTINDESIGN 191


Huma Sulaiman SULAIMAN RESIDENCE, BANGALORE, INDIA

Completed 2011 4,000 square feet

“This project is very close to my heart, as it was my home when my family and I lived in Bangalore, India, for three years,” explains interior designer Huma Sulaiman. “It is a true reflection of my personality, style, and who I am as a designer and collector. The interior wasn’t created using a mood board or a master plan. Instead, it was an amalgamation of our collected art, family memorabilia, my husband’s personal effects from his days as a bachelor (or some at least!), my children’s art, and our treasures from traveling around the world.” As effortless and organic as that may sound, it did require careful orchestration to move the Sulaiman household from Dallas, Texas, to Bangalore. The family was downsizing from a 6,000-square-foot

Clockwise from top left: The bed in the master suite is one of the very few new furniture pieces bought for the house. Glimpsed from the hallway, the round foyer table is made of petrified wood. The artwork in the dining nook is by Balinese creative Bagus Rai. The main living area, animated by a classic LC4 chaise and a red-lacquer cabinet by Peter Maly, opens out to the garden and pool.

home to a 4,000-square-foot one—a modernist concrete edifice with floor-to-ceiling walls of glass that pulled the surrounding lush tropical gardens inside. The biggest challenge was what to ship over and what to leave behind. In the end, Sulaiman edited down a sympathetic mix of vintage pieces (such as chic brass bedside lamps) and sentimental items, creating an inviting family home. “Some of my favorite memories there

PROJECT TEAM HUMA SULAIMAN PHOTOGRAPHY SHAMANTH PATIL

humasulaiman.com; @humasulaimandesign 192 INTERIOR DESIGN

were spent during the monsoons, gazing through the glass at droplets bouncing off the water in the pool,” she recalls. “It was priceless.”



Alan Tanksley is an American designer who has specialized in residential interiors for more than 35 years. His unique and thoughtful environments exemplify the principles of classic design and decorating, informed by a modern sensibility. This project, his fourth for the same couple, demonstrates the advantages of an ongoing, ever evolving dialogue between client and designer (a triplex penthouse apartment currently under construction will bring their total collaborations to five). “One of the many benefits of running a successful business for over three decades is the opportunity it affords to work with repeat clients as their lives evolve,” Tanksley says. “That unique feeling of familarity, respect, and trust can only be achieved over time. In a sense, we’ve grown up together.” The elegant Boston townhouse was purchased as a pied-à-terre for the empty nesters, who needed a space that their four grown-up kids could visit and enjoy, too. The couple loves entertaining, so a game room was a must-have, along with streamlined and sophisticated interiors. (See the sitting area’s simple backlit walnut wall panels,

Alan Tanksley, Inc. BACK BAY RESIDENTIAL TOWNHOUSE, BOSTON

actually mounted right on top of existing moldings.) Custom, vintage, and designer pieces combine effortlessly with blue-chip art. So taken were the clients with their new dwelling, in fact, that they opted to make it their primary residence.


Clockwise from opposite top: Artwork by Clara Blalock hangs in the breakfast area, with a custom banquette and table with chairs by Richard Wrightman Design. The kitchen’s custom dining island is crafted of walnut. Holland & Sherry’s Desert Storm wallpaper envelops a bedroom. Travertine surrounds the game room fireplace. In a sitting area off the entry, walnut panels were mounted on existing moldings; a Claude Venard painting provides a finishing touch.

Completed 2018 4,420 square feet

PROJECT TEAM ALAN TANKSLEY; KATE KAISER; JO ROMAN KEY CONSULTANTS HICKOX WILLIAMS ARCHITECTS; ADAMS + BEASLEY ASSOCIATES PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL J. LEE

alantanksley.com; @alantanksleyinc RESIDENTIAL ARTFUL LIVING

BESTINDESIGN 195


Clockwise from opposite: Wayne Pate’s Poppies Noir wallpaper from Studio Four NYC animates another bedroom. Gentleman’s Gray by Benjamin Moore & Co. distinguishes the office. A custom screen by Christophe Côme separates the bedroom from a petite lounge. The media room is a contemporary interpretation of a London members’ club.

“The interior exemplifies the classic principles of thoughtful design”

196 INTERIOR DESIGN



Completed 2020 4,500 square feet AIA Long Island Archi Commendation Award

Clockwise from top left: Doors throughout are blackened stainless steel and bespoke wire glass. The central living and dining area includes a Stealth pool table by 11 Ravens and a custom bar made of glass, metal, wood, and stone. The kitchen in high-gloss white with turquoise glass detailing is raised on a plinth of polished marble, a sharp contrast to the monolithic poured-concrete floors and industrial aesthetic found in the rest of the home. Pop art throughout adds color and character.

Mojo Stumer Associates

PENTHOUSE, MIAMI BEACH

Mojo Stumer approached the design of this Miami Beach penthouse with a singular goal: to give the longtime clients a jewel-box apartment worthy of the world-class panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean the space afforded. From early planning, all options were on the table to reconfigure the space in any way necessary to maximize the livability of the home. The kitchen was relocated to have more prominence in the open living-dining area, and the master suite repositioned for greater separation between the public and private portions of the penthouse. The plan is purposefully aligned to carry visitors lineally from the oversize entry doors and through the beautifully detailed entry hall, with an expansive picture window overlooking the sea as a visual end point. An intricate layering of ceiling planes and floating lacquered and stainless-steel beams reduces the scale of the hall, enhancing the transition into the primary living area, which has a higher ceiling. The simplicity of monolithic concrete walls and floors is continued throughout the residence, which is accented with blackened steel and stained oak, touches of saddle leather, and pops of colorful art. The kitchen is raised on a plinth, partly to facilitate building mechanics but also to boost its presence as a contrasting polished-white box against the otherwise industrial finishes. . PROJECT TEAM MARK STUMER, AIA; JOE YACOBELLIS, AIA; JESSICA LICALZI; MIKE DOYLE; ROBERT MANETTA; DESMOND TAVERNIER KEY CONSULTANTS CASTRO CUSTOM CABINETRY; FIOCCHI GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY MARK STUMER

mojostumer.com; @mojostumer 198 INTERIOR DESIGN


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Mar Silver Design CHELSEA PENTHOUSE LOFT, NEW YORK

Completed 2018 2,000 square feet

The New York duplex apartment occupied the top two floors of a new building in the heart of Chelsea’s gallery row. It already had a lovely double-height living room, an open (if a little small) kitchen, two bedrooms, and two bathrooms. But some tweaks were in order. The client enlisted Connecticut-based designer Mar Silver for the task. She cleverly evolved the blueprints, introducing additional loft space—open to the living room—for a much-needed home office and increasing the kitchen’s footprint to a more usable size. A muted color palette in different tones is explored throughout: light and airy in the living room and corridors, medium gray in the bedrooms, and dark in the office. Floor-to-ceiling sheers hung from the 20-foot-tall

Clockwise from top left: A deep-gray lacquer finish sets the tone for a collection of antique artefacts in the home office. In the living room, Mar Silver created a double-height feature wall to accommodate a fireplace, showcase art, and obstruct the view into the kitchen and the lofted office above. The custom king-size bed in the master suite is upholstered in cashmere. In the dining area, where a midcentury table is paired with comfortable leather chairs, 20-foot-tall windows offer expansive views of the Hudson River. Sculptural metal shelves in the kitchen create yet more opportunity for displaying art.

windows filter the light and add layers of calm, while soft handmade rugs anchor rooms and absorb noise. “Our client is an avid art collector,” Silver notes. “That set the grounds for our aesthetic vision and the philosophy of the space.” In the living room, a corner shelving unit showcases key pieces from the collection, extending an invitation to reverie and contemplation. Silver customized furniture and finishes for every room, too, and introduced statement pieces that make the space utterly

PROJECT TEAM MAR SILVER; CRINA POPESCU PHOTOGRAPHY BJORN WALLANDER

marsilver.com; @marsilver_

200 INTERIOR DESIGN

personal, a private microcosm tailored to the client’s needs that balances minimalism with casual sophistication.


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BESTINDESIGN 201


Keiser Associates

RANCH HOME BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NEW JERSEY

A 1950s ranch home—untouched since the late ’70s—was in dire need of a refresh. Keiser Associates gutted and refashioned the most dated areas, including the kitchen, which now has textured laminate cabinets, porcelain-tile flooring, a glass backsplash, and engineered-stone countertops. The biggest alteration came about when the design team proposed raising the kitchen’s existing ceiling from 8 feet to a pitched plane that reaches up to 11. Since the skylights were to remain, this change in headroom now brings more daylight into the kitchen and neatly replicates the pitched roof over the living area. The fireplace the family gathers around was faced with unsightly soot-stained brick, so the team switched it out for a clean, ethanol-burning ventless fireplace and covered the brick with porcelain tile and a marble hearth. The overall philosophy was to keep the mid-mod aesthetic but bring it into this century. “The project was a great way to step back in time and think about how designers then would have created the aesthetic with today’s materials,” says lead designer John G. Dyon. The client already had many 1950s Knoll and Herman Miller pieces that were upholstered in muted earth tones. The addition of vibrant new artwork enhances the special furnishings the client had procured over the years, such as an Isamu Noguchi table and a Tobia Scarpa rosewood sofa.

202 INTERIOR DESIGN


PROJECT TEAM JOHN G. DYON; ROBERT ROSINSKI; KAREN KIM; DANILO BARZA KEY CONSULTANT MHD HOME FURNISHING DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY WING WONG

keiserassociates.com

Clockwise from opposite: Knoll Brno counter stools in leather pull up to the kitchen island, topped in engineered stone. The existing 1950s wood and ribbed glass wall separates the entry from the living and dining area, and two skylights drench the space in light. Flooring in the guest bathroom is herringbone porcelain tile. The master bathroom’s porcelain-tile shower stall is accented with glass tile and nickel-finish fittings.

Completed 2020 2,000 square feet

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Calling all horse lovers! Located a mere 30 minutes from downtown Austin, this equestrian-themed development incorporates wide open lots and shared space, including stables for horseback riders. The house in question, with interiors by Texas designer Blair Burton, features an open floor plan with antiqued wood beams, steel-frame glass doors and windows, clean-lined finishes, and wide-plank oak floors. It is a refined take on the Hill Country Modern aesthetic, influenced by the property’s proximity to Austin and its intended use as a primary residence. The subtle palette of richly textured and layered neutrals allows the views and landscaped exterior spaces to enter and fill the home. The mix inside is a nod to refined rustic, with leather upholstery and an antique desk (a family heirloom) in the library; a sumptuous vintage runner in the

Blair Burton Interiors EQUESTRIAN RANCH ESTATE AUSTIN, TEXAS

kitchen; a cut-marble-tile and brass vanity in the powder room; and nubby linen drapes and pillows in the master bedroom. “A well-designed home should reflect the people who live within its walls,” Burton states. “This project was a delight to work on because of the owners’ sophisticated aesthetic and their desire to meld that elegance with comfort and livability.” It’s safe to say, she nailed it. PROJECT TEAM BLAIR BURTON KEY CONSULTANT EPPRIGHT HOMES PHOTOGRAPHY MOLLY CULVER

blairburtoninteriors.com; @blairburtoninteriors

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Clockwise from opposite top: A velvet-upholstered bed and new— but antiqued—wood beams in the master bedroom introduce the Hill Country Modern aesthetic in this Texan home. In the living room, a linen sofa cozies up to a masonry fireplace with stone surround. Crittall-style windows brighten the library. The kitchen island cleverly becomes a built-in breakfast nook on its opposite side. The back porch is defined by a casual and relaxing assemblage of loungers plus a daybed swing.

Completed 2019 7,000 square feet Home Builders of America Association, Best Custom Home; Max Awards, Best Kitchen RESIDENTIAL ARTFUL LIVING

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HUANG IBOSHI ARCHITECTURE, WEEKEND RETREAT IN INVERNESS, CALIFORNIA: PAUL DYER PHOTOGRAPHY


mix

From showrooms to show houses, residential developments to commercial hubs: It’s all in the mix. Whether at an iconic airport, a butchery, a state emergency operations center, or a planetarium, bold architectural moves pair with intriguing interior treatments—all exactingly tailored to the client. Stir it up!


Legacy Charter School stakeholders had one major requirement for their three-story elementary school. “They were concerned that while the project needed to be durable and inexpensive, it couldn’t appear institutional,” says LVDA principal Avram Lothan. “They explained that for this inner-city Chicago neighborhood, ‘institutional’ meant jail or the courthouse—places that often convey a strained relationship with the surrounding community.” The sensitive scheme that emerged from these conversations balances efficient planning with a layered design strategy, leveraging colorful architectural elements and proven, cost-effective construction. The building, like the education provided within, insists that limited resources are no excuse for poor performance.

Lothan Van Hook DeStefano Architecture LEGACY CHARTER SCHOOL, CHICAGO

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Corrugated perforated-aluminum panels and a lightweight metal lattice form an affordable, high-performance “solar veil” that casts an ever changing display of shadows on the painted precast-concrete facade. On the roof, a solar photovoltaic system helps reduce ongoing operating costs. Most importantly, however, the colorful, fun, and highly sustainable building has engaged the community—a compelling illustration of which is that it has received no graffiti. The neighborhood has even sweetly dubbed the edifice the Crayon Box. Its bright colors and playful forms have positively reshaped how the community perceives the institutional presence of a new school.


Completed 2017 62,225 square feet LEED Platinum AIA Chicago Distinguished Building Award and Divine Detail Award PROJECT TEAM AVRAM LOTHAN, FAIA; BRYNDIS PAPE; LOUISA CARNOVALE; SAMANTHA DOBRUSIN; KERRIE MISTRY, AIA KEY CONSULTANTS RME STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS; RTM ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS; PRISM ENGINEERING; WOLFF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE; W.B. OLSON PHOTOGRAPHY BARBARA KARANT

lvdarchitecture.com; @lvdarchitecture

Clockwise from opposite top: Being a one-off, the new school building, with its bold facade, allowed LVDA to reinvent the wheel and test assumptions that are hardwired into most school district standards. The vibrant lobby of the three-story elementary school echoes the exterior. An upper-grade classroom. The building—with a gymnasium that stays open after hours—serves grades pre-K through eighth, with an anticipated population of 520 students. The front elevation, as seen from the southwest corner, is planted with native prairie grasses and a rain garden. MIX

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Louise Braverman Architect CENTRO DE ARTES NADIR AFONSO BOTICAS, PORTUGAL

Founded by Louise Braverman, a graduate of the Yale School of Architecture and Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, this practice is an advocate of inventive architecture keenly situated in its time, place, and culture. The studio has won over 50 design awards, resulting in its selection as a New York Architectural League’s Emerging Voice and invitations to present work at the Biennale Architettura in Venice, Italy, on five separate occasions. Braverman’s standout project from the past decade is the Centro de Artes Nadir Afonso, a museum in Boticas, Portugal. “Designing a project to display the art of Nadir Afonso—who, earlier in his life, worked for Le Corbusier—was a unique opportunity. It allowed me to work with an enlightened client who understands the value of creating aesthetically complex architecture that feels inevitable,” Braverman remarks. The single-artist institution fuses a lucid contemporaneity with the rich materiality and sustainability typical of Portuguese design. Sliced into a steep hillside, the concrete-and-glass structure is divided into two distinct but connected parts: a light-filled multiuse cultural center looking out over City Hall and, nestled in the back, a vast below-grade exhibition space topped by a green-roof park. The latter, designed in the spirit of Alonso’s geometric abstraction and in the tradition of landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx, naturally modulates internal temperature—all while delighting the senses.


Completed 2013 20,000 square feet Chicago Athenaeum American Architecture Award; AIA New York State Design of Excellence Award; Re-Thinking the Future Sustainability Award

PROJECT TEAM LOUISE BRAVERMAN, FAIA; ARTUR AFONSO; JOHN GILHAM; YUGI HSIAO; JING LIU; SNOW LIU KEY CONSULTANTS PAULO PEREIRA ALMEIDA, ARQ.; ARTUR AFONSO; MARIA JOÃO FERREIRA, ARQ.; JP ENGENHARIA, LDA; MM ENGENHARIA, LDA PHOTOGRAPHY FERNANDO GUERRA

louisebravermanarch.com; @louisebravermanarch

Clockwise from opposite top: Retaining walls of recycled cyclopean are visible outside the gallery windows, creating the sense of viewing art within a rustic stone grotto. Located within the entry hall but highly visible from the street, a floor-to-ceiling portrait of Nadir Afonso introduces visitors to one of Portugal’s most beloved sons. The green-roof park reflects the spirit of both the geometric abstraction of Afonso’s art as well as the work of Roberto Burle Marx, the late Brazilian landscape architect. The dynamic concrete form beckons pedestrians inside. An African mahogany stair rail creates a warm and textural path to and from the museum’s second-floor auditorium.

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Completed 2016 1.2 million square feet Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award Clockwise from left: Clerestory windows fill the 150,000-squarefoot great hall with diffused sunlight, and vaulted ceilings create a dramatic sense of arrival. Air Garden, a bead-chain installation by Ball-Nogues Studio, occupies the North Light Well. The once-outdated facility now boasts dynamic new seating areas. Building services are integrated into the superstructure, which is inspired by the waves of local beaches.

Fentress Architects TOM BRADLEY INTERNATIONAL TERMINAL AT LAX, LOS ANGELES “What makes the architecture in the new Tom Bradley International Terminal so significant is that it represents the majestic quality and contemporary philosophies of Los Angeles. Its inspired design solution is in response to its setting, the beautiful waves of the Pacific Ocean,” says Curtis Fentress, principal in charge of design for the LAX modernization. TBIT’s 1984 infrastructure needed a major overhaul to keep pace with more modern airports. In 2008, the city’s largest public works program to date was launched, aimed at providing the city with a world-class airport. A year-long visioning process and public feedback informed the design concept: what defines L.A. The most common themes that were shared included beaches, city, mountains, sunlight, trendsetting, and creativity. As the largest LEED Gold terminal in the world, TBIT’s design recharges the once-outdated facility with 18 new gates, more efficient facilities, and dynamic dining and retail options, all while capturing the essence of the city’s character. Midcentury style lounges are reminiscent of L.A.’s favorite cafés. And the terminal’s rhythmic roofline evokes the Pacific Ocean. PROJECT TEAM CURTIS W. FENTRESS, FAIA, RIBA; THOM WALSH; TOM THOEBALD KEY CONSULTANTS HNTB ARCHITECTURE; BASE ARCHITECTURE; WALSH AUSTIN JOINT VENTURE; JOHN A. MARTIN & ASSOCIATES; MARTIN/MARTIN; MIYAMOTO INTERNATIONAL; SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP; TMAD TAYLOR & GAINES; HATCH MOTT MACDONALD; ARCHITECTURAL ENERGY CORPORATION; HORTON LEES BROGDEN LIGHTING DESIGN; MRA INTERNATIONAL INC.; SARDI DESIGN; MOMENT FACTORY; DIGITAL KITCHEN; SMART MONKEYS INC. PHOTOGRAPHY NICK MERRICK/HALL+MERRICK PHOTOGRAPHERS; LAWRENCE ANDERSON

fentressarchitects.com; @fentressarchitects

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Lemay

CENTENNIAL PLANETARIUM ADAPTIVE REUSE, CALGARY, CANADA

Canadian firm Lemay, an integrated architectural practice founded in Montreal in 1957, recently undertook the mammoth task of rehabbing Calgary’s 1967 Centennial Planetarium, one of the city’s most important examples of Brutalism. The former children’s science museum was sitting empty when Lemay took on the project, and many team members had fond memories of the original space. It was imperative, then, for the designers to intervene in a meaningful way that would also help this historic site receive a heritage designation. “Much of the design process was spent researching, uncovering, and drawing out ideas while physically in the empty space in order to imagine its new use and how it could complement the character that already existed,” says lead designer Grace Coulter Sherlock. The result was a second life for the Brutalist building as an arts center comprising two theaters, large open galleries, and a grand atrium. The project team stripped back layers, revealing the original

PROJECT TEAM GRACE COULTER SHERLOCK, B.A., MARCH; DEDRE TOKER; LAURA GRANDAN; DAVID WOO; ASLAM KASSAM KEY CONSULTANTS REMEDY ENGINEERING; SMP CONSULTING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS; READ JONES CHRISTOFFERSON CONSULTING ENGINEERS; WATT CONSULTING GROUP; SCATLIFF+MILLER+MURRAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY JAMIE ANHOLT

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cast-in-place concrete structure. The interior features original tile mosaics, exposed concrete formwork walls, sculptural dropped acoustic-panel ceilings, and a signature terraced theater. These historic gems have been showcased using a delicate material touch—think copious glass and “painting” with daylight.


Clockwise from opposite: Accessibility was a key component of the planetarium’s restoration, and a remarkable aspect of the original building is that it already contained myriad sculptural concrete ramps to navigate the various floor levels. The warm wood auditorium. It was important to the team to respect the 1967 building’s Brutalist character. Lemay revealed and highlighted the original cast-in-place concrete structure. A light-filled gallery.

Completed 2019 115,000 square feet IDA Design Awards Bronze International Design Award; MASI Gold Award, Institutional and Health Care; Canadian Interiors Best of Canada; AIA The Architect’s Newspaper Best of Design Awards Honorable Mention


“We respected the design aspirations of the past while introducing contemporary elements to give the space a new lifespan”

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The erstwhile planetarium’s soaring celestial theater.

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Dreamtime Australia Design THE ISTANBUL BUTCHER, TURKEY

In 2010, Dreamtime Australia Design redefined the classic butcher shop with Victor Churchill in Sydney, Australia, creating a marble-floored, Old World–style store that displays fine meats on copper-and-glass shelves. Seven years later, founder and principal Michael McCann elevated the category yet again with The Istanbul Butcher in Turkey. The basic concept was to include virtually all back-of-house work spaces within the customer areas, showcasing the store’s cleanliness and the craft of butchering. The shop announces this premise from the street: Framed by hand-carved travertine cladding, one front window is actually a refrigerated glass-and-onyx-walled cold room in which carcasses hang in full view from a custom rotating copper rack. Inside, the timberpaneled, 16-foot-high space looks more like a European jewelry store than a meat market. Custom Italian-made copper refrigerated cabinets exhibit premium meat and house-made terrines and pâtés; a copperand-marble charcuterie counter displays cured artisanal meats; and handmade glass mosaic tiles form the wall behind the deli. At the center of the store is a glass-walled “theater” where skilled butchers display their craft like sushi chefs. Standing in front of a hair-on-hide leather wall, they expertly carve chops and filets on round French-oak blocks—and help turn a trip to the market into an immersive retail experience.

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Completed 2017 3,450 square feet Interior Design Best of Year Honoree WIN Awards Finalist

PROJECT TEAM MICHAEL MCCANN; SERGE LINNIK; MARK BROWNSCOMBE; ROSE SORKETH Clockwise from opposite top: Custom copper-and-glass cases display artisanal groceries. Hand-cut Italian marble by New Ravenna clads the floor. KEY CONSULTANTS NEW RAVENNA; KREON; KREOO; ZIRVE STONE GALLERY; IGLU; KYLE BUNTING; JNJ MOSAIC; TONER Customers receive concierge-style assistance at a sales counter in the middle of the store. Cured meats are displayed in a custom charcuterie PHOTOGRAPHY MIRHAN BILIR PHOTOGRAPHY counter. Hand-carved Italian travertine enlivens the facade. dreamtimeaustraliadesign.com; @dreamtimeaustraliadesign

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Clockwise from right: One storefront window comprises a refrigerated room in which specialty cuts of meat hang from rotating copper racks and a backlit onyx wall resembles burning embers. A hair-on-hide leather wall covering by Kyle Bunting backdrops the “butcher theater.” Handmade glass mosaic tiles form the wall behind the deli counter.

“Behind the specialty cuts, a backlit onyx wall resembles burning embers”

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Completed 2020 5,900 square feet

Clockwise from left: Original artwork digitally applied to glass panels was inspired by architectural line work in the original Pennsylvania Station. The project leveraged Rockwell Group’s vast experience in choreographing movement through public space. The new waiting area recalls the grand architectural lines of historic train stations. Millwork is walnut, the sconces were inspired by Pennsylvania Sta­tion’s 1910 globe fixtures, and niches frame Stan Douglas’s photographic panels commissioned by Empire State Development and the Public Art Fund.

Rockwell Group MOYNIHAN TRAIN HALL, NEW YORK

The Moynihan Train Hall expands the nation’s busiest railroad hub—Penn Station in New York—across 8th Avenue into the historic James A. Farley Post Office Building, part of a mixed-use redevelopment of the entire block. The century-old building was designed by McKim, Mead & White, the same firm behind the original Pennsylvania Station across the street in 1910. The Moynihan Train Hall offers enhanced passenger facilities for Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor and Long Island Rail Road riders, all within a grand hall by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Rockwell Group was tasked with conceiving Amtrak and LIRR’s ticketed waiting room, with a brief to bring liveliness to the transitional space. The concept was inspired by the grandeur and glamour of classic train stations, including Moynihan’s early 20th–century neighbor, and their soaring, light-filled concourses. The team took a deep dive into seating at historic stations and brought a sense of inviting luxury to this waiting area with warm woods and deep-blue upholstery. There are four seating bays, with freestanding high-top tables, as well as sinuous built-in benches, with charging outlets, all wrapped in walnut slats for a uniform look. Above, along a wall, is a series of nine photographic panels by Stan Douglas. They reconstruct significant but little-known moments spanning Pennsylvania Station’s half-century lifespan, standing as vivid evocations of the city’s forgotten history. PROJECT TEAM DAVID ROCKWELL, FAIA; RICHARD CHANDLER; DIONYSIOS KALTIS; HILLI WUERZ; EMIR DOGAN; HAYDEN MINICK KEY CONSULTANTS SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL; BOLD PHOTOGRAPHY SCOTT FRANCES

rockwellgroup.com; @rockwellgroup 222 INTERIOR DESIGN


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Roar is an architecture and interior design studio founded in 2013 by architect Pallavi Dean in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Clever education spaces hold a special place in the firm’s portfolio. To wit: this expansive innovation park in Sharjah for which Dean oversaw the interiors. Conceived to en­courage a dialogue between academia and industry to produce cutting-edge enterprises, the campus encompasses two atriums, leasable offices for startups and incubators, coworking space for students and faculty, offices for the Sharjah Research Technology and Innovation Park and other blue-chip tenants, and a day care center. The distinctive atriums interpret the concept of falaj, the ancient Arab irrigation system where water flows from underground stores via gravity. Two large stretch-fabric clouds—parametrically designed and suspended from an imposing height of almost 100 feet—are the standout features of the first atrium, their flowing lines evoking the falaj system. In the second

roar

SHARJAH RESEARCH TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION PARK UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

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atrium, along balustrades on each level, swooping 3-D metal mesh woven with live plants creates a similar feeling of liquid movement. The plan is also interspersed throughout with indoor lawns, an effective way to promote grounding and positively impact the daily experience of all who pass through the building’s doors.


Clockwise from opposite top: A pair of large stretch-fabric cloud fixtures is the standout feature of one of the site’s two atriums. The hip day-care center is one of several key amenities. While many spaces in the building are playful, offices and conference rooms are a bridge to the corporate world, reflecting a mature and sophisticated design language. Sculptural 3-D metal mesh is intertwined with live plants on each level of an atrium. Bronze-finish accents add elegance. The chic customer service center.

Completed 2020 Over 270,000 square feet Frame Awards Global Emerging Designer of the Year; AD Design Awards Designer of the Year PROJECT TEAM PALLAVI DEAN KEY CONSULTANTS NADER GAMMAS LIGHTING DESIGN; J&D HOLDINGS; AME CONSULTING & TECHNICAL SERVICES PHOTOGRAPHY OCULUS PROJECT

designbyroar.com; @designbyroar


Mary Douglas Drysdale Associates ASPIRE HOUSE, MCLEAN, VIRGINIA

Completed 2020 800 square feet

When Mary Douglas Drysdale was asked to design a room from scratch for the Aspire House show home in McLean, Virginia, she decided on the master bedroom. “My goal was to provide a comfortable room with seating, overlooking the garden landscape, for imaginary art collectors,” the Mary Douglas Drysdale Associates principal says. “Show houses can be great fun to do,” she continues. “Normally, we design for others, with all that assignment implies. In a show house, we can do what we might do for ourselves.” The master bedroom, with its 10-foot-high ceiling, now has elegant

Clockwise from top left: The bedroom entry and sitting area includes, on the left, a Steven Cushner canvas above a low shelf for ceramics and objets d’art. The creamy, sunlit bedroom is vivified by contrasting black accents, such as the handmade quilt and curtains. The circular pink artwork is by Linling Lu. Upholstered stools pick up on the rosy color. A wall of geometric art surveys plush seating.

PROJECT TEAM MARY DOUGLAS DRYSDALE; JANE DUNNING; MIKE LIDWIN KEY CONSULTANTS HEMPHILL ARTWORKS; STARK CARPET; B&B ITALIA; LEE INDUSTRIES; MY ATELIER; SCHALLER GALLERY; TWIN DIAMONDS STUDIOS DECORATIVE PAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN COLE

marydouglasdrysdale.com; @marydouglasdrysdale 226 INTERIOR DESIGN

trim and millwork detailed by Drysdale. She sourced or commissioned handmade quilts and curtains for warmth and texture, contrasting blocky black accents against nubby neutral textiles. For a splash of enlivening color, pink stools pick up on the same saturated hue in a stunning Linling Lu canvas. Plenty of shelves for displaying accessories, books, and other treasures dress the room without being overly fussy. In all, it’s a project that showcases Drysdale’s unique design philosophy: “For a complete expression of interior design, detail the architecture, place the art, and select furnishings that express both elegance and utility.” And she did.


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Carnegie has been a trailblazer in the contract textile and wall covering industry for over 70 years. Constantly challenging the status quo, the company developed groundbreaking solutions as cleaner, safer alternatives to PVC—including plant-based textiles, thermoplastic olefin technology, and its proprietary Xorel. ENV shares this commitment to sustainability. It was a significant opportunity for the design firm, having been a specifier of Carnegie for years, to partner with the textile company on the reimagining of its showroom as an experience center. The new space is meticulously planned to flow from an open showroom into a collaborative design zone, and on into working areas for sales and library teams. Every area is multifunctional: for instance, the open showroom displays new product while doubling as a space for entertainment and education. A focal point is the Design Ally area,

ENV CARNEGIE, NEW YORK

with custom color-tunable lighting that makes it the perfect place to experiment with the way hues look under different light conditions. Throughout, Carnegie’s products are seamlessly integrated, not only as display, but as interior and architectural elements. PROJECT TEAM ANNIE LEE, NCIDQ, IIDA, WELL AP, LEED AP ID+C; DAVID CHAGNON; HERBY JOSEPH KEY CONSULTANTS CHETRIT GROUP; EMPIRE OFFICE; COLORTONE; SPK LEWIS PHOTOGRAPHY ERIC LAIGNEL

env-team.com; @envdesignteam


Completed 2020 5,000 square feet

Clockwise from top left: Textiles from Carnegie, the first and only PVC-free textile and wall covering company, hang from custom hooks. Petite seating areas ground the colorful reception lounge. The Design Ally area has a skylight fixture with color-tunable LED lamps to enable customers to review colors under different conditions. Sound-dampening textures grace work areas. Carnegie’s expanded product lines, including upholstery fabrics, acoustical wall coverings, and draperies, are displayed on seating throughout. MIX

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Completed 2020 1.4 million square feet IIDA Rocky Mountain Chapter Best Serve Award; World Architecture News Award; USGBC South Florida GalaVerde Leadership Award; Miami Hospitality Design Awards Special Recognition Award Clockwise from left: Natural light and modern glass paneling define the west lobby. The design team translated satellite images of coral and sandbars into custom patterns for carpets throughout public circulation areas. Swooping curves and glistening white columns punctuate the grand ballroom’s pre-function lobbies, drawing inspiration from Miami’s modernist architecture. Based on undulating ocean waves, the exterior’s angled aluminum fins filter in dappled light.

Fentress Architects MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER “The design was inspired by biomorphic sea forms,” says Curtis W. Fentress, speaking of the eye-catching envelope of the Miami Beach Convention Center his firm designed. “Like scales, or the different fins you might see on marine life.” Fentress Architects, the firm he founded in 1980, has designed $43 billion of architectural projects worldwide, visited by more than 650 million people annually. Their defining project was to transform the 1950s MBCC into a global hub for arts, culture, and technology befitting its reputation as a world-class destination for such major events as Art Basel. One of the greatest challenges was harmonizing the grand scale of the building with the intimacy of human scale to create flexible, intuitive, and daylit spaces. Inspired by undulating ocean waves, the exterior facade’s fins—angled aluminum forms—filter dappled light throughout the lobbies and pre-function spaces to provide a seamless transition between indoor and outdoor environments. PROJECT TEAM CURTIS W. FENTRESS, FAIA, RIBA; MIKE WINTERS; JOHN KUDRYCKI; BRENT OTSUKA KEY CONSULTANTS ARQUITECTONICA; WEST8; CLARK CONSTRUCTION COMPANY; WALLACE ENGINEERING & STRUCTURAL CONSULTANTS, INC.; ME ENGINEERS; KIMLEY-HORN AND ASSOCIATES, INC.; ILLUME PHOTOGRAPHY TOM CLARK; MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER; DUFFY LEE; ROBIN HILL

fentressarchitects.com; @fentressarchitects

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Founded by Olivia and Tiffany Lam, LIV Design Studio’s philosophy of Visually Led Design (VLD) turns fantasy into reality via state-of-the-art CG renderings. “Clients love how they can see the finished product before even breaking ground,” Tiffany Lam explains. “It gives them confidence in the co-created vision.” From interior design and branding to illustration and animation, each LIV element complements all the others. The firm’s three fundamental pillars of tech/design/culture coalesce in Concord Metrotown, which will be the largest planned community in Burnaby, British Columbia. Unparalleled in its ambition, and slated to be the tallest residential tower in Western Canada, the development is at the heart of the city’s transformation plan for a new sophisticated and sustainable downtown. The multiresidential design encompasses myriad spaces. Already completed, the presentation or sales center; next up, communal areas; then, consideration of the individual units in a spectrum of forms and sizes. From start to finish the process will take years. “Imagine the shift and flow of consumer preferences that can occur over this period,” Olivia

LIV Design Studio CONCORD METROTOWN, BURNABY, CANADA

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Lam notes. “We don’t have a crystal ball to predict future trends. Instead, we rely on our expertise and design sense to create future lived spaces.” But they’ll incorporate a biophilic-design approach to reimagining the attitudes around condo living in all its aspects.


Clockwise from opposite top: A spectacular floral installation swathes the completed presentation center lobby. Luxe finishes from marble to fluting will adorn the future lobby. A collection of the materials that will form the interior palette. The future exterior, shown here in a CG rendering that is part and parcel of the firm’s design process, features a conservatory garden inspired by a Fabergé egg. The organic-modern style of the building interior in another rendering.

On the boards Presentation center completed 2021

PROJECT TEAM TIFFANY LAM; OLIVIA LAM; KEN LIAO; DEANNA MOK; TOMOKO YAMASHITA; JOANNA KADO KEY CONSULTANTS IBI GROUP; PWL PARTNERSHIP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS INC.; NEMETZ (S/A) & ASSOCIATES LTD.; YONEDA & ASSOCIATES PHOTOGRAPHY YUAN SHENG HE

liv.ca; @liv.designstudio

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Completed 2005 60,000 square feet AIA Chicago Distinguished Building Award and Divine Detail Honor Award; AIA Illinois Mies van der Rohe Award; SARA Design Award of Excellence

Lothan Van Hook DeStefano Architecture ILLINOIS STATE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS

Avram Lothan, design principal of Lothan Van Hook DeStefano Architecture, has practiced architecture for over 30 years, long enough to know that government projects can be a minefield of competing interests. So, when the Chicago firm won the contract to design the Illinois State Emergency Operations Center, which is partly funded by the Department of Homeland Security, Lothan was disciplined. “We strove for a degree of clarity in our thinking, not only to keep us focused on the brief but also to facilitate the consensus building required,” he explains. “The design was as simple as we could make it.” Working on a tight schedule, the team aimed to create a secure building that didn’t look like a bunker. Limestone panels screen the glass lobby, overlapping like infantry shields to prevent a direct line of sight from the street. Copper screening unifies the design and maintains Clockwise from top left: Glass, limestone, and copper distinguish the exterior of the Illinois State Emergency Operations Center. The double-height State Incident Response Center, where agencies gather in an emergency, anchors the building. Limestone panels overlap to prevent a direct line of sight from outside. The facade ushers light into the reception area. The building balances security, technology, and design. Sophisticated copper screening unifies the structure. 234 INTERIOR DESIGN

privacy; even the cladding systems have elegant detailing. Inside, the doughnut-shape layout centers on a double-height response center, where two dozen agencies come together during an emergency. As Lothan notes, “This project required us to focus our process, yielding the kind of results we usually think require more money and time.” PROJECT TEAM AVRAM LOTHAN, FAIA; KEVIN SCHELLENBACH; JACKIE KOO; MARY ANN VAN HOOK; DUANE SOHL; BRIAN FOOTE; KAREN DUNSFORD; INSUNG CHU KEY CONSULTANTS ESD; RME STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS; DANIEL WEINBACH & PARTNERS, LTD; RIVER CITY CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY BARBARA KARANT

lvdarchitecture.com; @lvdarchitecture



The Childs Dreyfus Group HARBOR LANDING AT GARVIES POINT GLEN COVE, NEW YORK

Essentially a new and self-contained neighborhood, this multibuilding complex boasts 28 acres of parklike surroundings, including a milelong waterfront esplanade. For its 385 rental units, the Harbor Landing residential building promises the maximum in modern living thanks to a full panoply of amenities. They include lobby lounges, cafés, business centers, a 24-hour fitness facility with yoga room, club and private dining rooms, bicycle storage, retail, and even a dog spa. Perks extend outdoors too: a pool with sun deck and fire pits to say nothing of neighboring playgrounds and hiking trails. For its part, The Childs Dreyfus Group designed many of the public spaces as well as selected finishes for the apartments. The team went both luxe and industrial, the latter alluding to the area’s manufacturing roots. Ergo reception’s stone desk in a wood-veneered niche and adjacent leather-upholstered seating: The wood’s light tone nods to the nearby white-sand beach while the azure upholstery is inspired by the sparkling sea. In contrast, blackened-metal window frames and exposed steel for a mezzanine read all industrial. PROJECT TEAM THE CHILDS DREYFUS GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY SANDRA RAYMEN

childsdreyfus.com; @childsdreyfus

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Completed 2020 385 rental units 6,220 square feet of amenity space

Clockwise from opposite: A half-moon marble desk sits within an elegant wood-lined niche in reception. Throughout, reclaimed wood and metals pay homage to the history of the industrial waterfront neighborhood. The Childs Dreyfus Group designed many of the public spaces as well as selected finishes for the rental units. A private lounge with kitchenette is defined by timber beams.

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RDG Planning & Design CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY, OMAHA

Imagine an of-the-moment academic environment where small pods of students are technologically connected to their instructor and classmates, many of whom are spread across a large, state-of-the-art building. That’s what RDG, an integrated national design firm with six locations, more than 175 employees, and projects in 48 states, achieved with this contemporary school of dentistry in Omaha. For students, the design of the four-level building exemplifies the future of educational facilities. There are spaces for collaboration and simulation as well as anatomy labs in which students can gain empirical experience. Rather than the traditional approach—sitting in a lecture hall and taking notes—active-learning classrooms incorporate technology for more effective engagement. Because the school offers a high level of care to many downtown residents, particularly those in underserved populations, design discussions also centered around how the space might provide enhanced services to the community at large. From the onset, the strategy was to fulfill a “moral responsibility to care for creation,” and indeed, RDG’s design for the new facility has increased patient capacity from 12,000 to 15,000 per year. Hear, hear.

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Clockwise from opposite: In addition to educational spaces, the dental school includes a chapel accommodating daily public access to mass, prayer, reflection, and spiritual counsel. The clinic’s waiting area offers a light-filled space in which patients can relax as they await appointments. The school engages pedestrians, patients, students, and faculty at the street level through access and amenities. Mock operatory spaces abet hands-on learning.

Completed 2018 267,000 square feet of new construction PROJECT TEAM BENJAMIN KROLL, AIA, LEED AP; JOE LANG, AIA; BRIAN HALSEY, AIA, LEED AP; MIKE HOUSTON; SCOTT LUNDBERG, RA KEY CONSULTANTS ALVINE ENGINEERING; TD2; NV5 PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL ROBINSON; THOMAS GRADY

rdgusa.com MIX

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II BY IV DESIGN TEN YORK, TORONTO

TEN YORK is a striking addition to the Toronto skyline. The narrow glass wedge rises 735 feet above downtown, making it one of the tallest residential towers in the city. Dan Menchions and Keith Rushbrook, founders of the Toronto-based firm II BY IV DESIGN, made sure the interiors would also stand out. Since 1990, the partners have brought a passion for innovation and creative design solutions to developments across Canada and abroad, specializing in vertical living and lifestyle projects. That background made them an ideal fit for the mix of spaces at TEN YORK, which includes hospitality-style amenities like a spa, juice bar, and spin studio. The four-story lobby, a 40-foot-tall glass vitrine, reflects the grandeur of the exterior envelope. A custom spiral stair serves as the main artery connecting amenity levels and is the focal point of the common areas. Influenced by the architecture, these spaces feature vertical textures of glass and faceted concrete. Four art installations by Josephine Meckseper, one mimicking crumpled metal, set the tone for the entire project, with sleek stainless-steel columns and a glazed soffit framing the works. Inside

Completed 2019 615,000 square feet Urban Design & Architecture Design Awards; SBID International Design Excellence Awards; BILD Awards Finalist

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and out, the building is a tribute to the neighbourhood and exemplifies the absolute balance of structural resilience and material beauty. PROJECT TEAM DAN MENCHIONS; KEITH RUSHBROOK KEY CONSULTANTS TRIDEL; WALLMAN ARCHITECTS; JANET ROSENBERG & STUDIO; BRAD GOLDEN + CO; JOSEPHINE MECKSEPER PHOTOGRAPHY DAVID WHITTAKER

iibyiv.com; @iibyivdesign


Clockwise from right: Mixed-media artworks by Josephine Meckseper enliven the lobby and the sidewalk. A spectacular spiral stair winds in front of a wall covering by REPUBLIC OF II BY IV, the product design studio founded in 2012 by the owners of II BY IV DESIGN. Vertical textures of glass, stainless steel, and faceted concrete define the lobby.

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Founded in 1993, New York–based firm Kenne Shepherd Interior Design Architecture has extensive experience working with established brands looking to move into the U.S. market or expand their presence there. The woman-owned studio, a certified Woman Business Enterprise, has collaborated with notable luxury and lifestyle labels including Salvatore Ferragamo, Calvin Klein, and Wolford. And, most recently, EQ3, a young Canadian furniture retailer. “EQ3’s design aesthetic is very much in alignment with our own,” firm principal Kenne Shepherd notes. “They design and manufacture much of their furniture, and their product line is curated with a consistent modern aesthetic.” The gridded facade of the brand’s Manhattan flagship store is echoed in the straightforward simplicity of the white-oak display fixtures inside,

Kenne Shepherd Interior Design Architecture EQ3 FLAGSHIP, NEW YORK

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arrayed in a linear grid. As shoppers progress through the store, vignettes unfold seamlessly. The oak displays can be rearranged seasonally to create new stories. Although all three levels are connected by an elevator, special attention was given to the design of the stairwell in order to entice customers to move from floor to floor. The stair stringers are backlit, casting a soft glow on the adjacent wall that draws the eye upwards, encouraging and inviting customers to explore.


Clockwise from opposite top: With its ample glazing, EQ3’s Seventh Avenue storefront provides a full view of the extensive furniture line—and warmly minimalist interior architecture—within. Flooring throughout is prefinished wide planks of plain-sawn white oak. The high-efficiency LED linear track lighting offers complete flexibility with respect to illuminating the merchandise. Back-lighting of the metal-and-concrete stair leads the eye up to the second floor and down to the lower level. Second-floor vignettes showcase bedroom furniture, lounge seating, and accessories.

Completed 2019 11,800 square feet

PROJECT TEAM KENNE SHEPHERD, AIA, LEED AP ID+C, WELL AP; AHN TO: KENNE SHEPHERD. THOM FOUGERE; ALEXANDRA ALLEN: EQ3. KEY CONSULTANTS ARC ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN STUDIO; COOLEY MONATO STUDIO; GABOR M. SZAKAL CONSULTING ENGINEERS; ARCHITECHNOLOGY DESIGNS PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL JOHNSON; THOM FOUGERE

kenneshepherd.com; @kenneshepherd


Davis + Davis Interior Design O’HARE INTERNATIONAL CENTER ROSEMONT, ILLINOIS

Located near Chicago’s famed airport, the O’Hare International Center had become unappealing to current and prospective office tenants. Red-granite floors and walls enveloped the entire lobby and an outdated security desk in the center appeared like a relic from yesteryear. The space needed thoughtful and strategic enhancements, increased light levels, and engaging and dynamic amenities. Davis + Davis targets developers who purchase undervalued properties with solid infrastructures but that need rebranding, repositioning, and revitalization of look and function. So, the interior architecture and design firm was ideally positioned to take on the task of reimagining the Center’s interior for Bridge Investment Group, including two lobbies, an auditorium and lounge, a lower-level lounge, and an outdoor patio. “The goal was to ensure that the building’s occupants are engaged as they progress through the lobby to the elevator core and on to the amenity pavilion,” principal and design director Michelle Davis explains. That meant creative and easily cleanable design elements that activate curiosity. Existing granite is covered with large-scale Fiandre porcelain tile, new flooring resembles pressed metal, and walls look like white marble. A custom chandelier cascades from the main lobby down to the lower lounge, drawing the eye through the levels. And in the auditorium lounge, the designers developed a new seating area with high-top tables serviced by an underutilized coat closet turned coffee bar.

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Clockwise from opposite: New flooring resembles pressed metal. The renovation expanded the potential tenant profile to include tech companies and creatives while maintaining the sophistication necessary to retain accountant and legal sectors. In the elevator lobby, each 60-by-30-inch section of marble-look porcelain wall tile was laid on the floor and vein-matched prior to install; the ceiling design was created using paint on drywall, accented with a linear light down the center. The new patio pergola is a hit with tenants.

Completed 2020 12,500 square feet

PROJECT TEAM MICHELLE DAVIS; JAMIE JORDAN; KRYSTEL ROBINSON; LIZ THOMPSON-DYKES; HOWARD DAVIS; SAMANTHA SMIGELSKI; IVONA GRUJEVSKI KEY CONSULTANTS FITZGERALD ARCHITECTURE PLANNING DESIGN; OSTRANDER CONSTRUCTION; BEAR CONSTRUCTION; EPIC FLOORS PHOTOGRAPHY JEFF GARLAND

davisinteriordesign.com; @davis_and_davis MIX

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index

//3877. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 II BY IV DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144, 240 2PI R DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 AECOM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94, 104 ALAN TANKSLEY, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 ANIK PEARSON ARCHITECT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 ANNE SNEED ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 ANTROBUS DESIGN COLLECTIVE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 ARIA GROUP ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 BELZBERG ARCHITECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 BILL BOCKEN ARCHITECTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN. . . . . . 62 BLAIR BURTON INTERIORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186, 204 BRININSTOOL + LYNCH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 46 CLODAGH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 CREAM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 DAVIS + DAVIS INTERIOR DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 DE LA TORRE DESIGN STUDIO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 DESAI CHIA ARCHITECTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 DE-SPEC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 DIMIT ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 DKSTUDIO ARCHITECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 DREAMTIME AUSTRALIA DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146, 218 DREWETT WORKS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 DXA STUDIO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 ENV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88, 228 FCA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 FENTRESS ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212, 230 FISCHER ARCHITECTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 HASTINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64, 78, 124 HBG DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 HUANG IBOSHI ARCHITECTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 HUMA SULAIMAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 IBA DESIGN ASSOCIATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 JASMINE LAM DESIGN STUDIO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 JOHNSON CHOU INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 JPC ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 KEISER ASSOCIATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114, 202

KENNE SHEPHERD INTERIOR DESIGN ARCHITECTURE. . 242 LAKE|FLATO ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 LAMAR JOHNSON COLLABORATIVE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80, 92 LEMAY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 LIV DESIGN STUDIO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136, 232 LOTHAN VAN HOOK DESTEFANO ARCHITECTURE. 208, 234 LOUISE BRAVERMAN ARCHITECT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 LSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84, 100 MARKZEFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 MARY DOUGLAS DRYSDALE ASSOCIATES. . . . . . . . 166, 226 MAR SILVER DESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 MATT GARCIA DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 MKDA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72, 106, 112 MOJO STUMER ASSOCIATES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 MONTALBA ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 116 NPZ STYLE + DÉCOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 PFAU LONG ARCHITECTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 RDG PLANNING & DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 ROAR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 ROBBINS ARCHITECTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 ROCKWELL GROUP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142, 222 ROGER FERRIS + PARTNERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 ROTTET STUDIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 SCHILLER PROJECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 SHIMODA DESIGN GROUP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 SIMON HAMUI DESIGN STUDIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 SMALLWOOD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 SOPHIE GIRARD DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 STEVEN HARRIS ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 158 STINESSEN ARKITEKTUR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16, 138 STUDIO BV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 STUDIO MM ARCHITECT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 STUDIOSC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 THE CHILDS DREYFUS GROUP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 TOBIAS ARCHITECTURE, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 TSAO & MCKOWN ARCHITECTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 WXY ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN. . . . . . . .76, 102, 134

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INTERIOR DESIGN   BEST IN DESIGN EDITOR IN CHIEF, HON. IIDA CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Cindy Allen BOOK EDITORS Georgina McWhirter Jen Renzi Peter Webster Annie Block Nicholas Tamarin ART DIRECTOR Karla Lima ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Stephanie Denig CREATIVE SERVICES Marino Zullich CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Rebecca Dalzell CLIENT SERVICES Kay Kojima PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Kevin Fagan

CHAIRMAN OF SANDOW Adam I. Sandow

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Erica Holborn

VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLISHER Carol Cisco

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EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND DESIGN FUTURIST AJ Paron

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGERS Ava Ambrose Michael Croft

CONTROLLER Emily Kaitz

VICE PRESIDENT, INTEGRATED MARKETING Kelly Thomas INTEGRATED MARKETING DIRECTOR Brittany Lloyd INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER Lorraine Brabant EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FINANCE AND OPERATIONS Lorri D’Amico

ON THE FRONT COVER AECOM’s Accenture Industry X.O Center in Bilbao, Spain. Photography: Miguel de Guzmán/Imagen Subliminal

ON THE BACK COVER Richard Frinier’s Swim chair by Brown Jordan. Photography: Eric Laignel, courtesy of Brown Jordan.

VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE SALES Katie Brockman VICE PRESIDENT, PARTNER AND PROGRAM SUCCESS Tanya Suber DIRECTOR, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Joshua Grunstra

Copyright © 2021 by Interior Design magazine ISBN: 978-0-578-97518-4 Published by Sandow LLC, Boca Raton Florida Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. All images in this book have been reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the artists concerned and no responsibility is accepted by the producer, publisher, or printer for any infringements of copyright or otherwise, arising from the contents of the publication. Every effort has been made to ensure that credits accurately comply with information supplied.

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