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2016 LIFESTYLES / FAITH / PHILANTHROP Y / FASHION / COMMUNITY / FINE ARTS / CULINARY

2016


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LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

Photography by: Derrick Bryant

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elcome to the second issue of The Book The Woodlands ! We are so touched by the amount of support and positive feedback about our inaugural issue from our neighbors in The Woodlands. We hope you enjoy this issue as well. “Giving Back” was a common theme throughout this issue. From the articles to the ads and philanthropic events, there is an abundant amount of giving which truly makes this community unique and special. Working at Interfaith of The Woodlands, we are constantly seeing the generosity of donors, volunteers, board members, and clients. Whether it is time or resources, our community’s priority is to contribute to our neighbors in need. Our food pantry is filled daily with volunteers sorting and receiving food then distributing to families in crisis that come to Interfaith. This year, we are on track to serve nearly 20,000 individuals with food assistance. Interfaith assists not only families, but Seniors as well. Recently, we attended Interfaith’s Senior Community Games. Over 100 Seniors came together for a fun day filled with games, a spelling bee, talent show and more. We had the pleasure of getting to know Reverend Thelma, a 100-year old retired reverend that served as the torchbearer to kick off the games. She offered wise advice to many who came in contact with her throughout the day. Thelma shared, “In order to give back to the community, you need God in your heart. He will give you love so you can love your neighbor and help those in need.” Thelma is right! The Book The Woodlands will continue to provide funds for Interfaith’s Programs & Services while building a more loving and caring community through service.

Executive Editor

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Editor In Chief

Managing Editor


FALL/WINTER 2016, VOLUME I, ISSUE 2

INTERFAITH BOARD OF DIRECTORS Ray Sande rs – Chairm an Rabbi Matthe w Be rge r Pastor Ste ve Bradle y Pastor Roche Cole m an Fathe r Pat Garre tt Dr. Daniel T. Hannon Je ff Harde r Dr. Charle s T. Hankins Dr. Ste phe n C. He ad B r ynn Ballard Huntsm an Im ran Iqbal Robe rt W. Johnson Kate L aukie n Nanc y De cke r L e nt Pastor Frankie Mazzapica Patrick K. Mulle n Ste ve Pate Sallie Raine r Roland Ramire z Dr. E d Robb Fathe r Ge rald Se v ick Richard A. Shappard Debra Sukin, P h.D. Ale x Sutton Josh Urban Dr. B ruce Webb Mario M. Coll, E x- Offic io

INTERFAITH BOARD OF ADVISORS Pe te r Huntsman, Chairm an Jim Blair Arthur Bre dehoft Joel De re tchin Re ve re nd Don Gebe rt Dan Hause r CJ Hayne s Ge orge Lindahl Je ff Shiple y Tim Welbe s

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Table

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FALL/ WI NTE R, 2 016

OF CONTENTS LETTER FROM THE EDITORS INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS BOARD OF DIRECTORS/ADVISORS PUBLICATION STAFF MEMBER CONGREGATIONS FINE ARTS – BRINGING MUSIC TO THE WOODLANDS COMMUNITY – GEORGE LINDAHL COMMUNITY – HOMETOWN HEROES CULINARY – SWEET BITES FASHION – FALL/WINTER LIFESTYLES – MINDING YOUR MODERN MANNERS LIFESTYLES – INTERIOR DESIGN TRENDS FINE ARTS – ART FROM THE HEART LIFESTYLES – FITNESS TRENDS COMMUNITY – CANOPY COMMUNITY – GROWTH THROUGH SERVICE PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY EVENT SPOTLIGHT FAITH – THROUGH SERVICE


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FALL/WINTER 2016, VOLUME I, ISSUE 2 A Community Publication Benefiting the Programs and Services of Interfaith of The Woodlands

INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS Presid en t & CEO: Missy He rndon

MISSION STATEMENT Th e Book T he Woodlands is a lifestyles pu blic ation a b out , fo r a nd of T he Wood lan d s, Texas. Th e in ten t is to highl i ght t he “soft wa re” o f our great area, th e “good ” of th e people who l ive, work a nd pl ay he re an d th e “ valu es” th at make ou r area u n iq u e. Si m ply put , i t i s a beau tifu l d isplay of th e gen erosity of c u l t u re, lux ur y, e le gan ce an d qu ality of Th e Wood lan d s area.

P UBLICA T ION S TAFF

WRITERS

E xec u tive Edi tor: Miss y He rndon E d i tor i n Chi e f : Sh an n on Mills Man agi n g/So ci a l Edi tor: L indy Johnson Fas h i on Edi tor: Elvira Cauthe n Prod u c t i on Ma na ge r: G len da We ndt

Karen Carroll Mindy Jones Carey Scasserra

Adve rt i s i n g A ssoci a te /Edi t i ng : Mindy Jone s Adve rt i si ng A ssoci a te : A n n Ryde r Prod u ct i on A rt i st : Pamela Mann Ad m ini st ra t ive : Ly ndie Pa tchell Ad m i n ist ra t ive : Stefan ie Ca ndelari PR / Ma rke t i ng : Ch els ey Wright

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Luc y Gomez Nickole Kerner Bobley L orrie Parise

C RE ATIVE C ON T RI B UTO RS Chief Photographer: Derrick Br yant Graphic Designer/Creative Director: Jen McDonald

E DITORIAL O FFI C E The Book The Woodlands publication is published bi-annually with seasonal issues Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter by publisher, Interfaith of the Woodlands. The inclusion of advertising is considered a service to readers and is not an endorsement of products or concurrence with advertising claims. Copyright © 2016 by Interfaith of the Woodlands. No part of the contents of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the permission of Interfaith of The Woodlands. The publication is not responsible for the return of unsolicited materials provided for editorial consideration. POSTMASTER: If undeliverable, please send to: 4242 Interfaith Way The Woodlands, Texas 77381. The Book The Woodlands publication is edited to inform and entertain readers about The Woodlands, Texas and surrounding areas for their enjoyment. It reflects many viewpoints of contributing readers, writers, photographers and illustrators.

4242 Interfaith Way The Woodlands, Texas 7 7 381 281.367.1230

NEXT ISSUE SPRING/SUMMER 2017 Contact thebookthewoodlands@woodlandsinterfaith.org if you are interested in being an Ad Partner.

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

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Doug Whittle DiscPro Printing & Graphics Norm Pegram Premier IMS


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INTERFAITH of The Woodlands MEMBER CONGREGATIONS With a variety of organized religions participating in Interfaith’s daily activities, we truly are an “Interfaith” organization that promotes benevolence and compassion within the community. Adventist Fellowship Church of The Woodlands Alden Bridge Presbyterian Church Bahai Faith of The Woodlands Celebration Church of The Woodlands Central Church of Christ Christ Church United Methodist Community Baptist Church Community Christian Church Congregation Beth Shalom of The Woodlands Covenant United Methodist Church Crossroads Baptist Church Faith Bible Church Faith United Methodist Church First Church of Christ, Scientist Flask of Oil Church Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Grace Presbyterian Church HopePointe Anglican Church Impact Church of The Woodlands International Christ’s Fellowship Joyful Life Church Living Word Lutheran Church Lord of Life Lutheran Church, ELCA New Haven House of Prayer New Hope Christian Church Northstar Church Northway Church Northwoods Unitarian Universalist Church

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Spirit of Joy Lutheran Church, ELCA St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church St. Cyril of Jerusalem Orthodox Church StoneBridge Church Sts. Simon & Jude Catholic Parish The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints College Park Ward |Conroe 1st Ward | Conroe 2nd Ward Conroe 3rd Ward (Spanish) | Glen Loch Ward Imperial Oaks Ward | Legends Ward | Montgomery Ward Oak Ridge Ward | Spring Trails Ward Woodlands 1st Ward | Woodlands 2nd Ward The Crossing Church The Hilltop International Christian Center The Redeemed Christian Church of God (Tower of Refuge) The Shepherd’s House The Woodlands Christian Church The Woodlands Community Presbyterian Church The Woodlands First Baptist Church The Woodlands United Methodist Church Timber Lakes Baptist Church Trinity Episcopal Church Unity Circle of Light White Stone Faith Church Woodland Oaks Church of Christ Woodlands Church Woodlands Community Church Woodlands Islamic Center Woodlands Masjid


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Music

BRINGING

TO THE WOODLANDS

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Provided by The Pavilion

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hey had dreamed of this since the beginning of their budding suburban community – a vision to provide performing arts to its residents, a desire to bring people together, a hope that music could make The Woodlands a happier place. A vision with unwavering resolve for it to be realized, George and Cynthia Mitchell always desired a musical venue for their young town with the promise that it would bring everyone closer to the arts. In The Woodlands: The Inside Story of Creating a Better Hometown, author and former President of The Woodlands Development Company, Roger Galatas writes, “It was George’s vision of the town. It was a labor of love for Cynthia.”

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Dream to Reality Inspired by the lovely Zilker Park in Austin, Cynthia Mitchell attended a ballet performance there with her daughter as they watched from a grassy hill, says Jerry MacDonald, President and CEO of The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion since 2003. “Mrs. Mitchell had a passion for the arts and wanted to make them accessible to the community without having to go to downtown Houston,” he remarks. In the early years of The Woodlands as the population swelled, there was a need to establish the necessary amenities for its growth such as additional neighborhoods, schools, health care and much more. A location for outdoor entertainment remained a significant piece in completing The Woodlands, however, it required an informed, yet creative strategy adhering to the original master plan.


In 1986, the Mitchells founded the Center for Performing Arts at The Woodlands, a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to the cultural enrichment of The Woodlands through music appreciation and education. Cynthia Mitchell was a woman with a distinct affection for the arts, and she aspired to establish a musical venue focused on presenting classical music and performance, including the symphony, ballet and opera, with expectations of creating a place where people could enjoy beautiful music together. “She knew The Woodlands would benefit from this type of experience and set out to make this idea her legacy,” MacDonald says. The mission statement was the same then and now: present a diverse offering of performing arts, enhance appreciation for the arts, and provide educational programs about the arts as well as training and opportunities for young artists. Rock Pays for Bach When the Mitchells and developers realized that presenting classical music to an audience of 500 or less may not financially support their ideas for helping the community experience the arts, a proposal was brought to them by Houston-based PACE concerts. Originally, the concept for the outdoor facility was much smaller in scale, but all agreed that in order to feature classical music they would have to enlist more popular artists to finance the classical arts. Rock Pays for Bach remains the essential model for the charitable offering of performing arts the Mitchells envisioned so long ago. “The dream was to have the symphony and arts organizations and it was very expensive to do that,” says Jeff Young, VP of Operations, who has Continued on next page...

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personally witnessed the vision that emerged into reality. Young began working with the venue twenty-six years ago gaining his experience doing odd jobs until he graduated from college and was hired as a full-time employee. “It was all about exposing and educating the community in the arts, a place where families can live, work and play in the same place,” he recalls. As the vision of the musical project changed and expanded, the plans went from “500 seats on a hill” to a full-scale amphitheater with 6,000 seats providing all types of musical entertainment. With a talented team behind it, generous donations from The Mitchells and the hallmark model wherein Rock Pays for Bach, The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion was brought to fruition. “The Pavilion needs the big shows, but we always keep in mind the original intent Mrs. Mitchell had for our world class venue,” MacDonald says. Becoming The Pavilion In April of 1990 with The Woodlands’ population hovering around 30,000, The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion opened with a star-studded event weekend featuring the Houston Symphony, Frank Sinatra, Alabama and Clint Black. Keeping in line with George Mitchell’s dedication to maintaining nature’s surroundings, The Pavilion was created with the same philosophy where people could enjoy music outside underneath the stars. “It literally was The Pavilion in the trees,” MacDonald says. He adds that when The Pavilion first opened its doors, there was not much else in The Woodlands. “It gave a reason for visitors to come to The Woodlands and like the smart businessman Mr. Mitchell was, he knew if they came here for a show and saw the town, they might want to move here. The Woodlands has grown very fast essentially around The Pavilion since then,” MacDonald says. Music Appreciation and Education From the humble plans of seating a few hundred to the current capacity of over 16,000 guests, The Pavilion has upheld its original purpose throughout all the growth and renovation over the years as a nonprofit organization with hundreds of volunteers and part-time staff. The Performing Arts Season during the summer features the Houston Symphony, Houston Grand Opera and Houston Ballet as patrons can enjoy free mezzanine or lawn seating outdoors amidst a beautiful natural setting unlike anywhere else. Many more programs fulfill the Mitchells’ vision, such as The Texas Music Festival Orchestra that showcases young talent and events like the Children’s Festival and Holly Jolly Jingle. Educational outreach, an integral part of The Pavilion’s mission, supports fine arts students and seeks to educate new young audiences in the arts. Several events continue to grow year after year such as Musical Scores, which has expanded from 200 to 6,000 students and teachers serving at-risk middle school students with the reward of a fun field trip to a performance. None of this could be possible without Rock Pays For Bach, which provides funding from the big-ticket shows promoted by Live Nation, The Pavilion’s successful partner and concert promoter. Today, the majority of attendees for the fine arts shows come from within 20 miles

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F I N E A RT S | Bringing Music to The Woodlands

CYNTHIA AND GEORGE MITCHELL demonstrating the true heart for this community. Whether it’s the big-name artists, a classical show or a youth program, Young explains, “The diversity of what we do here is greater than anywhere else in the country.” The Pavilion Today Referred to often as the “Crown Jewel” of The Woodlands, The Pavilion continues to live up to that title today. According to industry leader, Pollstar Magazine, The Pavilion has ranked in the top five amphitheaters in the world since 2010 and recently earned the number one spot in the second quarter of 2016. It has expanded beyond what was ever imagined offering music to the entire Houston area and beyond. “The Pavilion stimulates a substantial economic impact on The Woodlands community,” MacDonald remarks. As Young describes, The Pavilion is “insurance” to the community mentioning that 80 percent of concert attendees come from outside Montgomery County. “We are here because of people coming in the doors. We have to keep them engaged and it’s all about the live experience, the live entertainment,” Young says. Just as The Woodlands experienced changing from a small suburb to a sprawling township, George and Cynthia Mitchell’s simple dream of an outdoor musical locale transformed into an extraordinary first-class venue. In 2015, The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion celebrated 25 years of bringing renowned artists and acclaimed music to its community while still providing musical education and enrichment to local audiences. MacDonald reflects on the importance of this for the foundation of our community, “Of all the places in The Woodlands that they created, The Pavilion was one of the places that meant the most to them both. They left their mark on this community and The Pavilion.”

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Lindahl GEORGE

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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s a ten-year-old boy, he began collecting fossils which fueled his natural curiosity for rocks and his interest in geology for years to come. George Lindahl III, local resident of The Woodlands and philanthropist, was raised in Birmingham, Alabama where he began digging in the southern soil and ultimately followed his passion for rocks and fossils to pursue a successful career in the oil and gas industry. A geologist and geophysicist by education, his training led him to a successful 45-year career in oil and gas. Lindahl speaks fondly about his upbringing where he grew up with a father who made a living as a steel worker and a mother who devoted her time to being a homemaker. His father always encouraged him to excel in his education, and his mother had a huge heart for helping others. After years of traveling and many moves, Lindahl was named CEO and President of Union Pacific Resources where he often worked a grueling eighty-hour week. In 2000, following the merger of two Fortune 500 companies, Lindahl continued his executive position as Vice Chairman of Anadarko Petroleum. “I got to the top and said ‘Ok there’s little left to accomplish.’ It was a very lonely place,” Lindahl recalls. He speaks about his “mountaintop calling” while he was on a mission trip where his experience brought him to the conclusion, “I’ve learned a lot about business, made a lot of money, and it’s time to start helping others.” This began his passionate journey into making a difference in the lives of people and helping change local charities for the better. As he served on multiple boards and capital campaigns, he realized he could not only help them financially but he could use his executive experience to make a nonprofit organization more successful. With his personal philosophy to help “The Least, Last, Lost and Looked Over,” Lindahl has provided what he refers to as transformational investing of funds and service to Goodwill Houston, Montgomery County Women’s Center, Angel Reach and The Woodlands United Methodist Church. One of the most recognized investments Lindahl provided was to Goodwill Houston for the Power of Work campaign which allowed Goodwill to implement a new business model, open over 40 new retail stores and create nine Job Connection Centers – all with the end result of becoming debt free. “You don’t give money to charities, you make investments and expect returns,” Lindahl says. “He doesn’t just help with money or tell the story, but he got in there and learned first-hand by actually mentoring,” Sandra Carpenter, Co-founder and Executive Director of Angel Reach in Conroe, says about Lindahl. Angel Reach, a charity in which Lindahl is heavily involved, offers young people who have aged out of the foster care system support, such as housing, training and assistance. Lindahl has devoted his time to mentoring a few young men by his consistent interest in their lives where he meets with them regularly and has taken them on annual mission trips to Honduras where they can grow spiritually and help others. “He is tireless,” Carpenter said of Lindahl when she spoke of his dedication to this organization, whether he was purchasing homes, planning their first major fundraiser, or gathering a strong volunteer base. “He knows that people want to help and he’s the conduit between the story and the people who want to help. He’s the connector,” she says.

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CO M M U N I T Y | George Lindahl As simple as it is to create a 501(c)(3), many organizations tend to be unsuccessful because they don’t have a consistent funding mechanism, Lindahl remarks. “Most charities generate little cash from internal projects,” he says. Lindahl has created his own scorecard for investing in a nonprofit organization which grades the organization and discloses where there is need for improvement. A charity should score an 80 or above to be a successful nonprofit. The mission is essential, but he also expresses the reasons people want to support a cause, “You’ve got to touch somebody and change their heart. If you don’t do that, they’re not going to get involved.” Lindahl has plenty to do outside of investing in nonprofit organizations, but it’s clear he has a heart for others. He loves spending time with his family and his eight grandchildren and rarely gives up a chance to go to University of Alabama football games including several national championships. And Lindahl hasn’t forgotten his love for geology as he continues to support geological scholarships at the University, his alma mater. He says, “I have been very blessed. It took me 53 years to figure out there is more to life than taking and that it was time to give back. And when you do give back, that’s when you experience real joy.”

Scorecard for Evaluating a NonProfit Organization 1. General & Administrative Expenses - less than 20% (Best practice-less than 10%) 2. Mission Statement - Is it short and accurate? 3. Significant Internally Generated Revenue 4. Board Diversity and Participation 5. Signature Fundraising Events 6. Debt - No debt should be the goal 7. Two to Three Detail Measurements for Success 8. Leadership with Passion for the Cause 9. Understand the “Main Thing” and Focus On It 10. Succession Plan in Place for Top Team Created by George Lindahl

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Heroes

HOMETOWN

Article by: Shannon Mills and Lorrie Parise | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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ive Hometown Heroes were recently honored at The Woodlands Celebration of Excellence Gala. Serving as role models for volunteerism and dedication to The Woodlands community, each hero shared their thoughts on giving and the importance of making a difference in the community. Since this annual tradition began in conjunction with The Woodlands 25th Anniversary Celebration in 1999, 109 individuals and 14 businesses have been selected to receive this prestigious award. Congratulations to all of these heroes who continue to provide leadership and compassion to this wonderful community we call home, The Woodlands! Bruce Cunningham Bruce Cunningham and his wife, Mary, moved to The Woodlands in 1986. They have four children and six grandchildren. They have played a significant role in raising two granddaughters, Carolina and Anna, whose father passed away. He founded Aging in Place – The Woodlands, a nonprofit organization to help residents remain in their homes as they age. Cunningham has been in the Grogan’s Mill Village Association since 2000, has served in numerous capacities including President for seven terms and currently as Vice President. He is also a founding committee member of The Woodlands Farmers Market. He served as President for three terms for The Woodlands Cycling Club and is a founder of Bike The Woodlands Coalition, which partners with The Woodlands Township to obtain Bicycle Friendly Community designation. Cunningham shared, “There are several types of giving. One is financial which is what we do. But, more importantly, for my own enjoyment is the type of giving where you give your time and energy to do the things that improve the community.”

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Bob Hibbetts Bob Hibbetts and his wife, Pam, have two sons, one daughter, and five grandchildren. Hibbetts moved to The Woodlands in February 1974 to help set up the master planned community’s first water district. He was the third resident, volunteering his time to help create The Woodlands as we know it today! In addition to the water district, Hibbetts also helped start the first volunteer fire department in The Woodlands. As an Eagle Scout, Hibbetts served as both a Cub Scout and a Boy Scout leader for troops in The Woodlands. He is a former Member of The Woodlands Community Association Board. He is also an Officer of The Woodlands Community Facilities Development Corporation, which develops the parks and pathways in The Woodlands. He gives countless tours of The Woodlands. Hibbetts is now Controller of Residential Accounting for The Woodlands Development Company, recently celebrating his 45th anniversary with the organization. He is The Woodlands’ longest-serving employee. Hibbetts shared, “Everyone should be involved in the community. In the beginning, I was one of the first residents and most special to me is the ability to work and live here and participate in the development of The Woodlands.” Kelly Hull Kelly Hull and her husband, Brady, have been residents of The Woodlands for 30 years. They have three grown children – two sons and one daughter. Hull worked for Conroe ISD initially as a 22-year-old, teaching biology at McCullough High School. She has given selflessly to education including serving on the Board of Directors for David Elementary and Collins Elementary. Hull is a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor which allows her to help guide others at no charge. Hull volunteers with the Montgomery County Women’s Center in various roles including being a member of the Board of Directors and a Crisis Hotline Advocate. She volunteers with Interfaith Community Clinic as a guest speaker on the topic of Substance Abuse and serves on the Women Empowering Women committee. She is also a member of the Development Committee for Interfaith of The Woodlands. Hull is a founding member and still volunteers for Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Hospital In the Pink of Health. She is a founding donor for Canopy. She is a past President of the Bluebonnet NCL chapter. She is also a philanthropist helping many charities including Habitat for Humanity, Montgomery County Food Bank, Montgomery County Heart Association, New Danville, and more. Hull shared, “In the act of giving, you get back and feel better about yourself and feel good about the world. I am more myself when I am connected with people in the different factions of the community in the capacity of volunteering and doing for others.” Debbie Sukin Debbie Sukin and her husband, Dr. Steven Sukin, have lived in The Woodlands for 14 years, raising two sons here. As Regional Senior Vice President and CEO of Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital, Sukin gives her time and resources both in her field of expertise and beyond. Sukin shares her experience and knowledge with many local nonprofit organizations. She often speaks on panels as an expert in the medical industry, both as a CEO and as a female role model in the community. Over the years, she has served as Heart Ball Chair and Heart Walk Chair for the Montgomery Heart Association, Light the Night Walk Chair for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and Interfaith Five Who Share Luncheon Chair. Sukin is most passionate about the Angelman Syndrome Foundation and has served as the Houston Walk Chair for the past 11 years raising more than $750,000 for research. Her 14-year-old son, Jacob, was diagnosed with Angelman Syndrome at 14 months, and she and her husband are committed to the organization. Sukin serves as the Chairman of the Board of Directors for The Woodlands Area Economic Development Partnership and is on The Woodlands Area Chamber of Commerce Board and the Lone Star Foundation Board. Sukin will serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors for Interfaith of The Woodlands and Interfaith Community Clinic in 2017. Sukin shared, “What motivates me to give is that I have been very fortunate that I have had incredible role models in my parents and the value of giving more than others think might be necessary has always been a part of my life.” She also said, “The community is all about giving. The fact is this community really believes that if there is a problem or need, we solve it!” STRIKE STRIKE, a leading North American provider of pipeline, facilities, fabrication, maintenance and integrity services, was founded in 2003. The company moved to Hughes Landing in The Woodlands in early 2014. STRIKE partners with local, regional, and national charities and has started Campaign for Change, a community advocacy initiative. STRIKE Employees have given more than 35,000 hours of their time and resources to the local community through Campaign for Change. STRIKE has supported nonprofit organizations like Habitat for Humanity, Pregnancy Assistance Center North, the American Cancer Society, Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy, the Wounded Warrior Project, and Interfaith of The Woodlands to name a few. The company has been a Presenting Sponsor and Sponsor for the March of Dimes annual March for Babies for several years. In 2015, STRIKE was the top fundraiser for the March of Dimes fundraiser with Steve Pate, CEO of STRIKE, serving as Chair for the organization. Ky Bishop, Chaplain at STRIKE, shared, “Each one of the leaders from CEO on down have a real heart for giving back to the community.”

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Bites SWEET

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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S

maller desserts are on trend. Whether it’s the convenience of eating on-the-go, pleasing your pint-sized companion, or the awareness of waistlines, people are flocking to all kinds of handheld treats. Everything in moderation may be the key to living life to its fullest…enjoying sweetness one bite at a time. Macarons and More Petit fours, translated literally to “small oven,” began in France as tiny cakes including macarons, tartlets, small eclairs and other delectable tiny confectioneries. Though bite-sized macarons have recently gained popularity, they got their start in the 1500s as a small meringue-based confection, later to be stacked and filled with ganache or buttercream. Hughes Landing offers a chic place to grab a bite of sugar. Macaron by Patisse, a European boutique of sweets, has a colorful palate of macarons which are naturally gluten-free and low on calorie count. At Levure Bakery & Patisserie in Creekside Park Village Center, Owner Manuel Rubiralta, speaks about the popularity of petite desserts such as tarts, macarons, brownies and cookies, “I think they give people the opportunity to try something really decadent but in a small package, so there’s not so much guilt.” The process at Levure, even among the smallest of treats, is not rushed just as you would find at traditional French bakeries, “It’s easy to see the amount love and care that goes into each and every single one of these pastries,” he says.

Kathy Croom

Beignets and Churros With a taste of New Orleans right here in The Woodlands, beignets are a more refined way of eating the ever-popular, handheld doughnut. When a bakery can offer a sweet taste on a smaller scale, the spectrum of customers expands. Casual and portable, “Beignet bites are a great way for friends to gather to enjoy a sweet treat, share stories and create memories,” says Liz Townsend, Owner of Lou Lou’s Beignets in Alden Bridge Village Center. She describes them as light and fluffy, an attractive element of the handheld dessert. Kathy Croom, local resident and former chef educated at Texas Tech and in culinary arts at the Art Institute of Houston, comments about the appeal of these types of sweets, “Churros, eclairs and donuts are all having their moment to shine like cupcakes and macarons have had…easy to be made bite-sized with a variety of toppings.” Churros, originally from Spain and Latin America, have made their way as popular street food known for their spiral, fried perfection sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. Cookies and Cupcakes Cookies and cupcakes began the trend of mini desserts and the delight of eating without the nuisance of utensils. They may be the old standby, but they are no less popular - and no less delicious. “Who can resist having a bite-sized cake just for yourself?” Gloria Lavara, Owner of Frost Bake Shoppe in Indian Springs Village Center, says about the consistent demand for cupcakes, “The convenience the small dessert also offers is variety in taste.” She sees this on a regular basis where everyone is happy to choose their own favorite flavor - yet another reason to enjoy a miniature, one-serving sweet. Gigi’s Cupcakes and Crave Cupcakes provide the same opportunity for a cupcake fix in The Woodlands, where they both offer mini cupcakes, in addition to the regular-sized ones.

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C U L I N A RY | Sweet Bites

Made fresh from the oven, Tiff ’s Treats can deliver cookies directly to you offering the utmost convenience in handheld sweets. They keep their menu small and simple with the favorites always in mind. Chocolate chip cookies steal the show at Nestle Toll House Café by Chip found in Waterway Square. They even have mini cookies which satisfy the sweet tooth with just a couple of bites. There will always be a place for more formal desserts, but the smaller, easy-to-eat treats seem to be the perfect sweet addition for today’s lifestyle.

CHURROS

Recipe Courtesy of Kathy Croom

1 cup water 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup flour 2 cups vegetable oil for frying

Bring water to a boil and add 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, sugar, salt and flour. Stir until a ball is formed. Continue to stir for several minutes to cook out the flour taste. Remove from heat. Place in a pastry bag with a tip. Bring 2 cups vegetable oil to just below boiling point. Pipe out dough directly into the oil for bite size or larger pieces. Fry until golden brown. Put directly in either cinnamon sugar, granulated sugar or sprinkle with powdered sugar. You can also fill with chocolate, mousse or Nutella. Anything you can dream up!

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WITH ELVIRA CAUTHEN OF FASHIONROWE.COM Photography: Jen McDonald

Every new season brings a change of weather along with a multitude of new fashion trends. From bright statement furs to embroidered everything, I have narrowed down a few of my favorites. Two words to describe fashion this season: 80s and 90s. Trends are destined to repeat themselves in the fashion world, and I am particularly fond of this resurgence since it proves my childhood might actually have some style credibility after all. Living in The Woodlands can be hard when the calendar says “It’s fall,” but the weather has not gotten the memo. Transitional pieces of clothing are always perfect for times like this - a sleeveless jacket, a blazer paired with shorts, or a simple t-shirt under the spaghetti strap top or dress. I love the tee-under-a-top look, because you can carry a summer piece into the next season while still looking effortless and chic. A long-sleeved top or turtleneck layered underneath can also help you pull off this look - the possibilities are endless!

FEATURED THIS ISSUE

-Layering for Fall -Block Heels -Bold Shoulders -Florals -Athleisure Trend

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Tank - Tibi Jeans - Zara Shoes - Zara Tote - Louis Vuitton


Bold shoulders are continuing into the fall. For The Book The Woodlands Spring/Summer edition, I featured off-the-shoulder trends. These tops dominated retail space. But for the cooler weather, this trend is easily being transitioned to the strong one shoulder or sleeveless turtleneck. This turtleneck dress by Autumn Cashmere lends a flirty look by exposing the shoulders while also embracing the red trend. All shades of red are being seen on the runway from pink to maroon. I call it the new neutral. So have fun mixing the different shades, or be bold with a true red blouse and pants. Stuart Weitzman has done it again with these booties! The soft suede and grey tone make this ankle boot a great neutral shoe. Since the ankle boot has been around for years and it’s not going anywhere, this makes it a great investment piece. But what I love the most is the tie behind the ankle, a great detail to make anyone take notice. The handbag trends are continuing with gorgeous, plush velvet. Velvet is having its moment from shoes to dresses and is definitely the texture of the season. It is sumptuous, rich-in-tone and perfect for fall. This Jimmy Choo handbag will make any outfit stand out with the luxe fabric and gold chain strap! It is versatile as a crossbody and a clutch. Either way - a showstopper! Dress, bootie and clutch are available at Nordstrom The Woodlands.

Dress - Autumn Cashmere/Nordstrom The Woodlands Handbag - Jimmy Choo/Nordstrom The Woodlands Booties - Stuart Weitzman/Nordstrom The Woodlands

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FA S H I O N | Fa l l / W i n te r Fall florals are being seen by many designers from skirts to blouses to jackets. It is romantic and feminine, and against a dark background, the flowers stand out beautifully. This stunning ball gown available at Couture House has large red blooming flowers against the navy background. I love the high/low bottom so your beautiful evening shoes can be seen and not hidden from sight. The way the flowers move while walking is eye-catching! Of course, every beautiful gown deserves to be accentuated with beautiful jewelry. Thomas Markle is the official jeweler in Houston for Hearts on Fire diamonds. This stunning ring, bracelet, necklace and earrings are part of the Hearts on Fire collection and can be purchased at any of their three locations: Houston, Kingwood and The Woodlands. A little fun fact: Rihanna wore this 3-pronged diamond choker at the 2016 MTV Video Music Awards! ...Continued on page 48

Gown - Couture House Rentals Jewelry - Hearts on Fire/Thomas Markle The Woodlands

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Professional Experts Guiding You to Real Estate Success

HALEY GARCIA

PHILIP THOMAS

Broker Associate

Realtor Associate

281.701.6174

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FA S H I O N | Fa l l / W i n te r

The athleisure trend has been embraced by all and has been very influential throughout the fashion scene. Sporty, chic and comfortable pieces are all the rage, and designers are taking notice. Gym clothes can be found with netting, geometric designs and soft fabrics. I love how Trina Turk did it all with this jacket and pants. The geometric design is strategically placed and therefore, flattering. Take notice of this fun tote that is perfect for running errands and carrying all of our essentials! ...Continued on page 50

Jacket/pants/tote -Trina Turk The Woodlands Shoes - Adidas

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A sensible heel rules the fashion scene, and your feet will thank you for it! Courtesy of the 70s block heel, we can find them in square, round, short or high. No matter, they are comfortable and you may find yourself in them all day! These Zara shoes are a beautiful, budget-friendly version of a Chanel favorite. Paired with jeans, skirts or slacks, it lends a classic appeal to any outfit.

Have fun this fashion season! Express your own individuality by adding a bit of your own style with the options above. Be playful by mixing prints and patterns, bold with bright colors, or add a little drama with a striking accessory. Fall/Winter 2016 is a myriad of possibilities. Be sure to follow FashionRowe.com for daily fashion inspiration! SPECIAL THANKS TO: Market Street The Woodlands, Hyatt Centric The Woodlands, Thomas Markle Jewelers, Nordstrom, Couture House, and Trina Turk

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Modern MINDING YOUR

MANNERS

Article by: Carey Scasserra | Photography: Andrea Custer Photography

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ood manners provide us with structure in a world filled with unpredictability. We often think of manners and etiquette guides as a thing of the past, but today it is just as relevant even though the rules of the game are rapidly changing. Let’s face it - we live in a world where technology is here to stay, and we are more connected globally than ever. Different cultures have unique customs which makes it so important to teach our children how to show mutual respect through good manners. According to the Post family, the well-known authors of numerous etiquette guides, “Being considerate, respectful, and honest is more important than knowing which fork to use. Whether it’s a handshake or a fist bump, it’s the underlying sincerity and good intentions of the action that matter most.” While we can’t keep up with the rapid pace of social media, we can certainly keep up with teaching our children the basics to help guide them through life’s sticky situations. Jena McCrann and Madeline McCrann are two sisters-in-law who are Directors of The Woodlands Proper Chapter of National League of Junior Cotillions and Natalie Moon is Director of the Greater Creekside

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Chapter of National League of Junior Cotillions. This is a national etiquette course whose mission is: To act and learn to treat others with honor, dignity, and respect for better relationships with family, friends, and business associates later in life, and to learn and practice ballroom dance. They work with children who are in fifth through ninth grades to help teach them the tools to confidently navigate through some everyday situations. Below, we discussed with the McCranns some common modern day and traditional questions. Q: We have mastered the elbow off the table and the napkin on the lap, now what do we do with cell phones at the dinner table? What are some basic cell phone etiquette rules that children can remember when eating at home or out with friends? A: As soon as your party arrives, turn your phone on silent or vibrate. It’s tempting to keep checking it if it’s within view, so place your phone in your pocket or purse and never leave it on the table facing outward. Never play with your phone at the table. We also suggest that while in the home, do the same. It may seem obvious, but mom and dad should also follow these rules to teach children to respect family time just as much as friend time. Should it be absolutely necessary to take a phone call at the table, say “excuse me” to the group that you are with, and take your phone call away from the table, either outside the restaurant or in a quiet hallway. Do not disturb other diners with a phone conversation. Q: Today’s children are somewhat picky eaters, what do I tell my child if they are eating at a friend’s or relative’s house and they do not like their meal? A: If you do not like what is being served, take a small portion but don’t find yourself with absolutely nothing on your plate. If you do, your host/hostess may be offended or say something to you about the empty plate and perhaps put you on the spot in an embarrassing situation. Q: What if my child has allergies, how do we tell the host/hostess of these preferences? A: We suggest letting your host/hostess know of any allergies and offer to bring a dish. Do not expect the meal to be catered to your specific needs so be kind and politely decline a dish if they forget. If you have a dietary preference, like low carb or dairy free, that is a different story. Peggy Post always says to make due with what is available if it is a large group; if it is a small gathering, then again, offer to make something so your host doesn’t feel offended or waste time making a meal you can’t eat.

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L I F E S T Y L E S | Minding Your Modern Manners Q: Is it ok to write a thank you note as an email or text? A: Know your audience. If he/she commonly communicates through email or text and it is not a wedding or formal thank you, then it is ok. If your note is going to an older family member, perhaps they would prefer good old-fashioned paper and pen. We think writing a letter and mailing it is best and a good habit to get into at a young age. Thank you notes should be at minimum three sentences long. Tell the person you are thanking why you love the gift and how you will use it. If you are writing a thank you note from a party or overnight stay, tell the host/hostess something you particularly enjoyed about the event and how you hope to get together with them again soon. Again, thank you notes should be brief and to the point, and sometimes email enables people to create different paragraphs off subject, so send more than one email if you have more to write than a thank you. Q: Speaking of email, what are some guidelines to follow when replying to emails? A: Respond as soon as possible to the email messages you receive, and change the subject line to the subject of your reply. If the other person has spent a long time writing the email, then respond with more than a one-liner response or it may look unappreciated. Never respond quickly to an email that upsets you. If you feel annoyed or angry, wait at least one day to reply. When you receive a group message, don’t reply all unless your reply applies to the group. Q: Many electronic games have children (and grown-ups!) looking down at their phones as they walk around playing - what are some back-to-the-basic rules for walking down the street? A: This is tricky - it is really never ok to walk down the street looking down. First of all, it’s not safe. We should all be aware of our surroundings at all times. We should also make eye contact and greet those walking down the streets. This gets back to the basic societal rules that keep us grounded. We need to acknowledge each other and help others when needed. Opening doors for others is something that will never go unappreciated. While technology seems to be the way of the world, let’s not forget that a first impression can leave a lasting impression and a good ol’ handshake and eye contact speak volumes.

Want to wow your family? With the holidays approaching, here is a quick reference guide for setting the table properly adopted from The Post Guide. BASIC PLACE SETTING

Picture the word “FORKS.” The order, left to right, is: F for Fork, O for the Plate (the shape!), K for Knives and S for Spoons. (Okay, you have to forget the R, but you get the idea!) -Emily Post Holding your hands in front of you, touch the tips of your thumbs to the tips of your forefingers to make a lowercase ‘b’ with your left hand and a lowercase ‘d’ with your right hand. This reminds you that “bread and butter” go to the left of the place setting and “drinks” go on the right.

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Design INTERIOR

TRENDS Article by: Carey Scasserra

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s a new year approaches and the weather begins to change, so does our desire to renew our homes with some fresh stylish statements. As a Design Trend Analyst, I scouted the international design markets and spoke with some local designers in The Woodlands and surrounding area to get a heads up on some strong themes we will be seeing in 2017. Carey Scasserra recently moved to The Woodlands to be closer to family. She met her husband, an architect, while designing corporate interiors for Gensler Architecture in Washington DC. She was also a studio professor at George Washington University, teaching candidates of Masters of Interior Architecture- Design Thinking and Trend Analysis. She loves writing about design features for “The Book The Woodlands� because she gets to research and uncover local design stories while raising her two little girls.

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ASPEN DREAMS

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scapism is a big theme for interior design in 2017. Analysts say because we have technology consistently at our fingertips, there is a strong desire to now surround ourselves with environments that not only take us elsewhere but have a soothing and calming effect. Last spring and summer, we saw the tropical theme dominate everything from palm leaf fabrics and pillows to flamingo and pineapple accessories. As we shift seasons, we head north to the winter wonderlands and see the cooler climates influence everything in the form of warm textured whites, aged bronze, and natural wood and leather accessories. According to Sue Burgess, Interior Designer and co-owner at Raffia Home Furnishings & Interior Design, “Our clients are requesting areas within the home to decompress, so we are selecting luxurious mineral-toned velvet fabrics, petrified wood accessories and art to help create the atmosphere of a sanctuary.”

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7. 8. 11. 9. 1O. 1. Fur Decorative Pillow | Available At Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams 2. White Ceramic Stag Wall Mount 3. Roark 50” Modular Ring Chandelier By Ralph Lauren Home | Available At Circa Lighting 4. Paul Boudoir Sham | Taupe By Biscuit Home 5. Huntley Ice Bucket By Ralph Lauren Home | Available At Raffia Home 6. Tree Ring Art | Available On Etsy 7. 100% Merino Wool Plaid Throw By Faribault Woole Mill Co. | Available At Raffia Home 8. Simply White Color Chip By Benjamin Moore 9. Lance Rug By Kyle Bunting 10. Perez Cocktail Table By Bernhardt | Available At Raffia Home 11. Larchmont Chair By Kelly Wearstler | Available At Raffia Home 62


ARTISAN FARMHOUSE

L I F E S T Y L E S | Interior Design Trends

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he Artisan Farmhouse trend is the perfect marriage of low fuss and high design. It embodies a desire to live simply but with style and a story. Luckily, we don’t have to go too far to look for inspiration. Chip and Joanna Gaines opened Magnolia Market in Waco after the overwhelming popularity of their HGTV show Fixer Upper proved there is a national market for this type of classic, fresh look. The key to obtaining a sophisticated farmhouse look is to keep a neutral color palette and layer in mixed metals with natural stone materials that are both matte and polished. Materials that are eco-friendly, durable, and in classic black and white perfectly complement this theme. We will also see a lot of “rescued” objects and one-of-a-kind handmade artisanal objects. Melanie King of Melanie King Designs attended La Cienega Design Quarter’s famous LEGENDS summit in Los Angeles this spring and noted seeing natural metal finishes along with handpainted wallpaper treatments as well as the continued use of natural pigment handprint-blocked fabrics. “I love the look, texture and durability of using Encaustic (cement) tiles. They come in a variety of sizes that can add subtle or high impact style to any backsplash or floor.” Melanie King Designs

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1. Wire Storage Basket | Available At Magnolia Market 2. Agnes Large Pendant By Aerin | Available At Circa Lighting 3. Galbraith and Paul Fabric and Wallpaper 4. Shiplap Paint Color | Available At Magnolia Market 5. Signature Magnolia Wreath | Available At Magnolia Market 6. Cement Tile Handcrafted By Cle Tile 7. Grey Cerused Oak Chairs | All Items In Photo Available At Melanie King Designs 8. Iroko Outdoor/Indoor Dining Table Handcrafted In South Africa For Nested Ny 63


GARDEN & GREENS

L I F E S T Y L E S | Interior Design Trends

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ixing bold florals with simple earthy undertones is an extension of the wallpaper trend that has had a resurgence the past few years, and it looks like it’s here to stay. We are now seeing large dramatic floral murals ready to buy and somewhat easy to install. Pantone Color Institute, the trusted color resource for companies in retail, fashion, and manufacturing, named “Florabundant” as a color category trend for 2017. “Just like its name implies, Florabundant is filled with the sumptuous beauty of rich floral hues. This palette offers a lot of drama from Pink Yarrow, Chrysanthemum, Red Dahlia and Baton Rouge and includes varying shades of green,” announced Laetrile Eiseman, Pantone Executive Director at the International Home + Housewares show. The International Housewares Association is the 78-year-old voice of the housewares industry, the not-for-profit, full-service association sponsors the world’s premier exposition of products for the home. It’s one of the go-to scouting destinations for designers and shops. What makes this trend current is pairing it with earthy undertones. The color green has been declared the new neutral for 2017, and I suspect we will see it show showing up everywhere. “My design philosophy is to introduce new and fresh pieces to a room you love, to put your signature on a space. I love that this classic, yet contemporary Kate Spade lamp does just that.” Donna Dorrell, Donna’s Home Furnishings

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1. Bloomsbury Rose Damson Throw Pillow Design By Designers Guild 2. Kate Spade Lamp | Available at Donna’s Home Furnishings 3. Florabundant 4. Pierre-Joseph Redoute Selections Coffee Table Book By Tashen 5. Paint Benjamin Moore Hunter Green 2041-10 6. Washed Velvet Pillow Cover By Pottery Barn 7. Velvet Rivona Chair By Anthropology Home 8. Flower Market Pitcher By Mackenzie-Childs 9. Dutch Love Wallpaper By Ashley Woodson Baily 64


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Heart Art from the

Article by: Karen Carroll Photography: Derrick Bryant

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hen Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands was searching for someone to design artwork for a feature wall in their newest hospital, set to open in spring 2017, their challenges were many. They needed an image to convey a sense of serenity, of warmth and welcome to the young patients and their parents. It needed to make them feel comfort, assurance, and hope in a slight of whimsy. And it had to be big – really big. They found all of that and so much more in the art, and in the heart, of The Woodlands Master Artist, Vickie McMillan. An artist from childhood, McMillan credits her parents, Bob and Mary Vosik of The Woodlands, for recognizing and supporting her talent early on. “Without them, I would never have been able to achieve the things I have,” McMillan says. As a teen, McMillan traveled to Africa for missionary work. There, she took time to paint the wildlife in its natural habitat. Fascinated by the beauty of these massive animals and alerted to their endangerment, McMillan began using her art to promote wildlife conservation. It was around this time that McMillan noticed trembling in her hands – a precursor, she knew, to Benign Tremors, the genetic neurological disorder that plagued her father. Undaunted, McMillan continued to paint, holding her painting hand still when finer strokes were needed. Ironically, that has factored into her unique and celebrated painting style – impressionistic, yet somewhat abstract, and highly textured with multiple layers of acrylic.

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The list of McMillan’s awards for wildlife painting and photography is extensive. Her work has appeared in dozens upon dozens of exhibitions. She is recognized and hailed by wildlife conservation organizations around the world for her efforts in furthering the cause. Fine art collectors around the world seek her original works. Here in The Woodlands, McMillan uses her art to serve the people around her by holding regular workshops for kids at risk, children and adults with special needs, the elderly, and students in schools with no art programs. “Art heals. Art erases disability,” McMillan says. “It’s a universal language that breaks down barriers when we can’t communicate.” When commissioned for the Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands project, McMillan did what she does best. She took art to the people. Called “The Spirit of the Woods,” McMillan created the design, featuring flora and fauna indigenous to this area and divided it into more than three thousand individual images. Each of those was given to one person, along with a canvas on which to paint. Participants included high school art students, senior citizens, children, churches, and even The Woodlands Mounted Patrol. When each canvas was complete, McMillan scanned, digitized, and incorporated the images back into the design and added the fine brushstrokes that made the entire piece cohesive. Working closely with a graphic designer, the piece will soon be installed and unveiled. And it will be big – over 130 feet in length. When asked about the inspiration for her art, McMillan doesn’t beat around the bush. “It’s all from God,” she says. “I am passionately in love with the Lord who gives me the zeal and the power to do what I do.”

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Fitness

Article by: Karen Carroll | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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TRENDS

nterest in personal health and fitness is at an all-time high. Recent years have seen a surge in demand for unique and varied exercise experiences, atmosphere, convenience and connection. These demographic challenges set boutique fitness studios on a high-speed sprint across the U.S. They’re popping up in every village of The Woodlands - small, method-specific gyms where creating community is as important as building biceps. We decided to try a few of these boutique studios. Ever au courant, The Woodlands has a fitness studio for everyone. Panther Creek Tucked away in a loft space off West Panther Creek, The Woodlands Pilates Studio was a bit ahead of the curve. “After relocating here in 2005, I saw the need for a private environment with high-caliber Pilates equipment and certified instructors working individually with clients,” says Cindy Byer, “I wanted clients to enter my studio and feel at home, like part of our family.” Inside this sun-drenched studio, Cindy and her skillful staff offer both private and class instruction in all of the Pilates basics – mat, reformer, tower, and cadillac. Yoga and barre classes are big here, too. There’s even a regular yoga class for children.

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But perhaps one of the most significant offerings here is Cindy’s expert training with pain management and rehab. Even athletes retrain their bodies here for proper alignment and improved performance. Their Aerial Pilates class, designed to improve strength, balance, and core mindfulness by working against one’s own body weight, intrigued me. Being suspended off the ground in circus-act silks sounded exotic and fun, and it was. Market Street You’ll find Studio A Pilates on the second floor of the offices in Market Street. Again, this studio has a complete array of Pilates classes, in addition to TRX. The latter being a strap resistance workout developed by a former Navy Seal that utilizes gravity and the user’s body weight for all-over strengthening, balance, and flexibility. The primary goal with TRX is core stability, as necessary for bending over to tie our shoes as it is for climbing up the side of enemy ships. Hughes Landing Lift. Tone. Burn. That’s Pure Barre, a ballet barre fitness studio now open at Hughes Landing. Classes here perfect the physique with small, targeted movements and various props. This may sound easy, but it’s a total body workout that burns fat and leaves

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L I F E S T Y L E S | Fitness Trends

muscles literally shaking with fatigue. Intervals of stretching promote long, lean muscle. Classes are filled with regulars who’ve become friends, adding fun to this fast and effective workout. For fitness fanatics more interested in an intense cardio ritual, RIDE Indoor Cycling awaits two doors down from Pure Barre. We walked into this sleek, chic studio taken by the affable welcome of those gathered in spirited clusters. Then the cycle room doors opened, and 28 top-of-the-line Schwinn sport bikes glistened under artisanal lighting waiting for us like wild, metallic mustangs. We locked our shoes into the pedals just before the doors shut, and the lights went down – way down. Our spirited instructor mounted her ride, and we took off on a 45-minute, no-holds-barred ride. We hustled to keep pace with the music; we could, at times, feel it in our bones. Lighting went from dim to dusky to something like the inside of a submarine, which somehow intensified our focus and we peddled even faster. We finished feeling light, nimble, and gratified at the major calorie burn. Cochran’s Crossing Tucked on the far end of the Cochran’s Crossing shopping center is DEFINE body & mind. Well worth the search, this studio is beautiful in a clean and vibrant way. The staff is gracious and attentive. Class offerings here cover all the bases. DEFINE Revolution is a derriere-kicking cycle experience. DEFINE Body is a mat-based class that combines yoga, Pilates, and barre movements. We tried the DEFINE Bounce class, drawn to its unique, amusing hook – an entire workout on and around a mini-trampoline. Ten seconds into this class, we realized we had seriously underestimated the experience. This workout is fat-burning and heart-pumping. It nearly did us in. Class camaraderie and the expert attention of our rock-solid fit instructor were keys to our successful finish. This class will get and keep anyone in shape.

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Indian Springs Indian Springs is home to the recently opened Yoga Pod. The schedule here features Pod Barre classes, as well as Pod Tone, a strength and cardio hybrid class. But as the name suggests, the focus here is Vinyasa Yoga, in many class presentations. There’s Sunrise Yoga, a wake-you-up strength and flexibility treat, featuring cool peppermint cloths. Pod Gentle is a class of slower movements with a focus on proper alignment and technique. Pod Hot is Vinyasa Yoga in a heated room, which enhances flexibility and adds a detoxifying sweat. Pod Restore is a class of more soothing postures, poetic contemplation and metaphor. This studio is cozy and inviting. The staff is warm and passionate about helping each person achieve their wellness goals. And the sofa at the front entrance is not a bad place to sit with a class friend and watch The Woodlands go by. Creekside Village At Creekside Park’s Village Green, Studio A Pilates has a second location, and the indoor cycling studio CycleBar is soon to open. Alden Bridge The Village of Alden Bridge is home to another Pure Barre studio, and also Koko Fit Club. The latter being a serene studio with a humble absence of mirrors, loud music, and body builders. The star here is the Koko Smartrainer. Developed by a team of MIT engineers, software designers, and exercise physiologists, this strength-training machine builds each workout based on the individual’s stats and goals. Workouts are programmed and tracked on a small drive, digitally analyzed, and available on preferred devices. Koko Fit Club’s significant web community and staff trainers are a great source of encouragement and support. Grogan’s Mill For those more interested in a workout of pure grit and sweat, 9Round Kickbox is where you’ll find it. Husband and wife team, Kelly and Cheramlee Wiltshire, recently opened two Woodlands locations - the Grogan’s Mill Village Center and the corner of Kuykendahl and FM 1488 in Alden Bridge. A series of nine, high-intensity, three-minute kickbox-type circuits are the crux of 9Round. At each circuit station, a trainer impels you to a strong finish for a complete, full body workout - in only thirty minutes! There are no class times. You begin when you get there. Online nutritional consulting is part of the program, as well as heart rate technology that lights up to help keep your workout in an optimal fat-burning cardio zone. There’s never been a better or more convenient time to make a commitment and renew your passion for fitness. And now, there’s a place and a method for every body in The Woodlands.

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Yoga Pod’s Tayler Guyg The Woodlands Yoga Pod manager, Tayler Gyug, was an accomplished dancer until a tragic car accident in 2014 left her with a shattered pelvis, a broken tailbone, sternum, wrist, ribs, and most frighteningly, a torn aorta. Remarkably, Tayler survived. After months of hospitalizations, surgeries, and physical therapy she was walking again, but the range of motion she had known as a dancer seemed gone for good. At the suggestion of a friend, Tayler tried yoga. Within weeks she had not only recaptured her range of motion, but exceeded it. She had also found her passion. Now, as a certified Yogi, Tayler brings a unique compassion and physical consciousness to her students and clients.


Designing your new home...

ralph lauren lexington

kelly wearstler bernhardt

kate spade drexal

32309 FM 2978 Rd. | Magnolia, TX 77354 | 281-789-4180


Canopy T

Article by: Karen Carroll | Photography: Derrick Bryant

he ancient wisdom of Aeschylus has never been truer than for the small group of Woodlands women, who in 2000 organized a fundraising event for a friend who had recently been diagnosed with breast cancer. Seventeen years later, In the Pink of Health has become one of The Woodlands’ most anticipated fall events. Millions of dollars have been raised, and all of it put back into The Woodlands in the form of education, free mammograms for those in need, and the latest in diagnostic technology. In 2013, the In the Pink of Health committee realized another need - a serene, centralized place for cancer patients and their families to go for information, support, and community. A year of research and study found only three such centers in the entire country. With the same determination as those who pioneered In the Pink, the committee designed the parameters of this gathering place, and gifted seed money for the project. In July 2017, Canopy opened its doors. “It is a first of its kind center in the Greater Houston area - envisioned and championed by our friends at Memorial Hermann In the Pink of Health,” said Josh Urban, Senior VP and CEO of Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Hospital. “Canopy is free of charge and available to patients with any type of cancer, men and women, any age, regardless of where they receive or received their treatment.” Located in The Woodlands at 1120 Medical Plaza Drive, Canopy is a bright, beautiful place designed to look and feel like home, complete with thick, cushy sofas and a showpiece kitchen. Canopy’s many programs were developed to complete the physical, emotional and social needs of cancer patients and their families, to empower them with positivity, productivity, and unity.

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There is an in treatment support group that meets here regularly, a pediatric cancer support group, as well as one for caregivers. There’s a knitting group, a book club, art and massage therapy, Pilates, yoga, dance lessons, cooking demonstrations, and nutritional counseling. There’s even bingo and a poker night for men.


In the salon, trained fitters assist patients with bras and, wigs and silk scarves – even head shaving parties. Young patients or children of patients delight in Canopy’s cheerful playroom. There’s a quiet resource library with computers equipped with the UT Health database for visitor research purposes. Perhaps, Canopy’s greatest asset is its meticulously appointed staff. Facility Coordinator Amanda Poole expertly manages the nuance of patient need. Oncology Nurse Navigator Carolyn Allsen is specially trained to lead patients through the complexities of their cancer diagnosis, treatment and experience. Most of Canopy’s visitors at this point are doctor referrals, but word is getting out about this amazing facility. Cancer patients are learning you don’t need a referral. You can just stop by. “Some patients wait for doctor appointments here at Canopy and some visitors come here to have coffee and wait while a family member or friend is having a treatment,” said Amanda Poole. “We’re as prepared to take care of a gentleman who comes to us directly from a doctor’s office after being diagnosed with prostate cancer as we are the children of cancer survivors here for a book club discussion,” said Poole. Memorial Hermann surgeon and breast care activist, Dr. Alan Hubbard, has already referred several patients to Canopy. “Cancer can be a terrifying diagnosis,” he said, “I am blessed to have Canopy – a place I can send my patients, knowing their physical, social, emotional, and spiritual needs will be met,” shared Hubbard. At Canopy, a mighty trunk is indeed growing; one that will continue to stretch its verdant branches, elevating life above cancer.

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Growth THROUGH SERVICE

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Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Chelsey Wright

elebrating 35 years of service in our community, the Cypress-Woodlands Junior Forum (CWJF) began in 1981 when Peggy Jo Coker, Founding Member of the local chapter, desired a place closer to home to give back to the community in fellowship with other women. As a member of the Houston Junior Forum and a resident of Champions, Coker says, “At that time, there were no service groups in the entire area. I invited eleven friends to a meeting in town and afterwards, we met with the organization’s leadership and secured the support.” In one of their first decisions, the north Houston group decided to include a brand new community to the north called The Woodlands. The Woodlands is a key part of the success of this chapter as Coker expresses, “Today, The Woodlands is the backbone of Junior Forum and the area has provided many of our leaders, including several presidents.” As a new chapter in the 1980s, the first task was to identify the needs within their suburban community, so they contacted local pastors in order to determine what programs to initiate. CWJF established their services based on the needs in the area, and the mission statement remains: dedication to making a difference in the lives of children, families and the elderly. To celebrate their 35th anniversary, CWJF hosted a gala luncheon in October featuring one of their most treasured performance programs with the goal of fundraising, Petticoats and Parasols. “It is a fashion show featuring authentic, antique clothing gathered over a period of many years,” Coker explains. This signature program been showcased for many organizations and conventions looking for unique and interesting entertainment to provide for their guests. With nearly 400 active and sustaining members, CWJF continues to passionately support the community with their service programs, scholarships and fundraising aimed at supporting children, families and seniors. Current President and member of CWJF for ten years, Chris Rigamonti, is encouraged by the service they have provided for years, but she says they strive to grow in membership to expand their mission of serving others. Interfaith of The Woodlands’ Hand Me Up Shop is supported consistently by CWJF through hands-on volunteers as well as donations. “Our members are eager to assist in these programs knowing how so many people’s lives are made better because of them,” says Rigamonti. Growth through Service continues to be the motto of CWJF, and Rigamonti adds, “The heart of Cypress-Woodlands Junior Forum is in its members. These ladies bring joy to many while serving in our community throughout the year.”

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Larry and Mari Harvey and sons

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with

LINDY JOHNSON

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itnessing the outpouring of love in our community the last few months has been a reminder of the many reasons I love The Woodlands. As always, it has influenced my home, my faith and my intentions. My husband and I are blessed with two incredible teenage sons who are both hitting major milestones. Both have experienced firsthand the heart of our community. Business professionals, teachers, community leaders, and administrators have taken the time to encourage, mentor, and lead, not only my boys, but also many other students. From saving Will to serving our seniors, these professionals along with caring parents in our community are providing kids with meaningful volunteer opportunities. I am so thankful to live among such selfless people who intentionally schedule time to volunteer and support events that change lives. The events in the next few pages show just a handful of those individuals “giving back.” People coming together to make a difference, save a life, provide assistance and most importantly, give HOPE.

FEATURED THIS ISSUE • Chairman’s Ball • Children’s Safe Harbor • Denim & Diamonds Gala • Junior League of The Woodlands • Go Red For Women Luncheon • Habitat for Humanity Gala

• HOPE Under The Stars • MCYS Ladies Night Out • StarGala Lone Star College Foundation • The Woodlands Celebration of Excellence Gala • Women Empowering Women

Interested in being featured? Email ljohnson@woodlandsinterfaith.org

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Celebrating Excellence! A perfect description for The Woodlands Celebration of Excellence Gala. The celebration 1 honored this year’s Hometown Heroes, Debbie Sukin, Bob Hibbetts, Kelly Hull, Bruce Cunningham, and Strike for their contributions and years of dedication to The Woodlands. The festivities kicked off at a VIP reception at Truluck’s in Hughes Landing. Truluck’s rolled out the red carpet for over 150 guests consisting of this year’s heroes, past heroes and top sponsors. The celebration continued with a luncheon at The 3 Woodlands Country Club. This year’s honorees were highlighted in videos showcasing their unwavering service and volunteerism in our community. Topping off the week, Honorary cochairs, Dr. Stephen & Linda Head, along with event chairs, Mary-Kathryn D’Agostino and Jenny Coyle, welcomed guests to “A Night in the Orient” themed gala. Presented by Woodfor6 est National Bank, guests were treated to an elaborate display of “The Orient” featuring entertainment by J & D Entertainment. The unique performers and gorgeous decorations set a beautiful backdrop to raise funds for Interfaith of The Woodlands programs and services. Many families and seniors will be impacted by the generosity of those who attended this annual tradition.

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1. Carey and Raffael Scasserra, Jena and Justin McCrann 2. Missy Herndon, Ray Sanders, Dr. Stephen and Linda Head 3. Ally and Mike Seder 4. Bob and Pam Hibbetts 5. Lynne and Tom Pickett 6. Frank Victor-McCawley, Steve Pate, Michele Kooken, Helen Doran, Cheri Villarreal, Anita Votsmier, Amy Harris, Mark Gandy 7. Will Sessions, Katy Murray, Kayla Kelley, Sam Iacoponelli, Mackenzie O’Connor, Chloe Brivic, AJ Brivic 8. Tom Boak, Gay and Terry Brown, Barbara Holland 9. Brady and Kelly Hull, Paige Hull, Weston Hull, William Hull 10 Mary-Kathryn D’Agostino, Melanie King, Debbie Sukin, Jenny Coyle 11. Ky Bishop, Bruce Cunningham, Elizabeth Cunningham, Mary Cunningham 86 12. Bruce Tough, Coulson Tough, Debbie Sukin, Alex Sutton, Missy Herndon


PHI L A N T HROPY

The Woodlands Celebration of Excellence Gala

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1. Congressman Kevin Brady, Mario M. Coll, Bruce Cunningham, Bob Hibbetts, Kelly Hull, Debbie Sukin, Steve Pate, Missy Herndon 2. Dr. Stephen and Linda Head, Sharon and Alex Sutton 3. Mary-Kathryn D’Agostino, Missy Herndon, Meagan Jamaluddin, Jenny Coyle 4. Bill and Sharon Leigh 5. Wes and Jenny Coyle, Meagan and Shan Jamaluddin 6. Kelley and Dr. Jeffrey Lind 7. Nancy Decker Lent, Rob and Christine Johnson 8. Dr. Ann Snyder, Sarah Coll, Elvira Cauthen, Nicole Murphy, Vicki Richmond 9. Steven and Debbie Sukin, Chris and Mary-Kathryn D’Agostino 10. Zach Richmond, Rachel Mulkey, Vicki and Michael Richmond 11. Scott and Amy Young, Audrey and Brent Shook 12. Jocelyn and Jonathan Durfield 13. Noemi and Ricardo Gonzalez 87 14. Reverend Don Gebert, Missy Herndon, Barbara Gebert 15. Cindy and Craig Heiser, Kent and Aimee Willett


PHI L A N T HROPY

Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch hosted its 8th annual Denim & Diamonds Gala themed “Picnic in the Pasture.” Guests arrived in their finest denim, diamonds, and boots in support of the ranch’s mission to partner horses with people to transform lives and help them reach their highest ability. Children and young adults with special needs come to the ranch for equine therapeutic riding and activities. The evening included a gourmet dinner, live entertainment, and a live auction featuring a collaborative painting with local artist, Vicki McMillan. Another highlight during the event included two mothers who shared their journeys from diagnosis to treatment, emphasizing how the Ranch positively impacted the lives of their families. Hats off to Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch for a wonderful event!

1. MG Tindall, Michelle Little, Debbie Packer 2. Kathy Tabor, Martin Evans, Holly and Ryan Gruy 3. Bret and Angela Strong 4. Ian Swanbeck and Vicki McMillan 5. Richard Wright and Sheila Greaver 6. Kristi Marimon, Macy Woodward, George Lindahl, Margaret Marino, Elaine Turner, Sheila Greaver 7. Connie Goers, Jim Bailey, Donna Daniels 8. Erin Pickle, Beth Ketrick, Mary Pickle 9. Beverly Haak, Jean Wright, Heather Barnes, Laura Wright 10. Holly and Tom Mayer 11. Amy and Randy Hairr 12. Gary and Debbie Packer

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“There comes a time to stop focusing on what you don’t have and focus on what you do have,” said renowned author and motivational speaker, Liz Murray. That was a snippet from her incredible speech at the “Women Empowering Women” luncheon benefiting Interfaith Community Clinic. Murray, author of Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard, spoke to an enthusiastic crowd at The Westin at The Woodlands about being accepted into Harvard University despite being homeless in her high school years. Her captivating message of hope, positivity and encouragement had the audience laughing and crying. Her call to action was prefaced by her own realization that “No one gets to where they are going alone.” The event raised over $85,000 to support Interfaith Community Clinic’s efforts to provide quality basic medical and dental care, counseling and patient services to the uninsured in the community.

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1. Liz Murray, Nelda Luce Blair 2. Susie Shipley, Darin Mittelstaedt, Meagan Jamaluddin, Anita Phillips, Missy Herndon, Dr. Emma Sims, Kelly Hull, Christen Argueta 3. David Argueta, Bev Earl, Debra Staley 4. Dr. Rebecca Riley, Dr. Ann Snyder, Linda Head 5. Missy Herndon, Crescenciana Hernandez, Anita Phillips, Elizabeth Izaguirre 6. Renee Bouck, Janine Jones, Haley Garcia, Darin Mittelstaedt 7. Diane Freeman, Stephanie Clements, Dr. Susan Fish, Cheryl Lear, Tracy Lopez, Dr. Emma Sims 8. Dr. Ann Snyder, Casey Cole, Dee Ann Anderson, Sondra Himmer, Kerrie Guerrero, Liz Murray, Suzanne Stovall 9. Maribeth Duggins, Melissa Young, Christine Thoms-Knox 10. Kellie Armstrong, Kelly Owens, Julie Ambler, Amy Young, Elvira Cauthen, Tania Bryngelson, Alison Veldekens 11. Jenna Everson, Tara Winkelmann, Jennifer Huebner, Katie Sullivan, Andrea Richter-Werning

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PHI L A N T HROPY

#SaveWill…The compelling message of the HOPE Under the Stars Gala. The 8th annual event, supporting The Will Herndon Research Fund, marked the most successful event in The Fund’s history raising over $650,000. The Fund at Beyond Batten Disease Foundation (HOPE) was established in honor of Will Herndon, who was diagnosed at the age of 6 with the rare genetic disease. He is now 13 and a shining example of HOPE. His parents, Missy & Wayne Herndon, shared with over 900 guests the latest in research and gave a glimpse into Will’s daily life with personal stories and a telling video. Touching, inspiring, and poignant are just a few words to describe their message to Save Will. It was Will, however, who stole the show when he joined his parents on stage carrying a puppy for the live auction. His evident love for animals, life, and emcee, Will Murphy, brought smiles to everyone and left all determined to help. The Gala, led by Angela Banzhaf, Noelle Jahncke, Nicole Murphy, and Founder, Missy Herndon, along with a committee of friends, was one filled with love and admiration for Will and his family. It was truly a night of HOPE!

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1. Missy and Wayne Herndon and son Will 2. Jennifer and John Bulovas 3. Wes and Jenny Coyle 4. Missy Herndon, Will Herndon, Will Murphy 5. Will and Nicole Murphy 6. Erin Doré, Wendy Judy, Lauren Hunter, Dr. Jerissa Belsha, Wendy Kemp, Courtney West 7. David Park and Jessica Kemp-Park, Mike and Shelley Powell 8. Missy Herndon, Angela Banzhaf, Nicole Murphy, Noelle Jahncke 9. Dana Hext, Kerri and Dr. Peter Bigler, Ben Hext 10. Dr. Carrie Muzny, Amy Young 11. Chris and Mary-Kathryn D’Agostino 12. Julie and Scott Lile 13. Brandi and Danny Watterson

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Go Red for Women Luncheon

PHI L A N THROPY

What an honor to be a part of an incredibly touching and motivating afternoon! The American Heart Association’s Montgomery County Go Red for Women Luncheon held its annual event at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott Hotel & Convention Center. The luncheon, graciously co-chaired by Diane Kink and Jo Anne Johnson, welcomed over 1,100 guests to raise awareness and funds for women’s fight against heart disease and stroke. The afternoon served to educate guests on the need to fund research geared towards education and legislative advocacy programs for women’s heart health, but it was Amy LeCrone who truly touched hearts. Amy shared her story of how she has overcome the grief of losing her husband, Dr. Vance LeCrone, to a heart attack and how she has become a beacon for CPR & AED education in The Woodlands. As her children joined her on the stage, the unmistakable message “Vance is why” filled the room. Congratulations on an incredible event that raised over $500,000 to fund lifesaving research and created an atmosphere of compassion. 1. Jo Anne Johnson, Amy LeCrone, Diane Kink 2. Darin Mittelstaedt, Kathy Rifaat, Lisa Baeckel 3. Shirley and Ralph Alexander 4. Julie Comeaux, Amy Torres, Shannon Mills, Jenny Hiser, Monica Binkley Gauntt, Michelle Riley-Brown 5. Amy LeCrone and Family 6. Kelly Milton, Dr. Carrie Muzny, Julia Dell, Amy LeCrone, Laurie Shults, Shawn Creswell, Alexa Currie, Stevi Venable, Amy Jones 7. Darla and Dean Burden 8. Nicole Murphy, Angela Banzhaf, Michelle Hewgley, Noelle Jahncke 9. Brenda Bannerman, Jade Strong, Shirelle Chimenti, Tracey O’Neal, Kami Field 10. Stacie Coleman and Mike Iacino 11. Brandi Melton, Judy Olson, Leigh Hays 12. Kristi Marimon, George Lindahl, Tara Walker, Luanne Bozeman, Tuula Carnahan, Christina Clark

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The Lone Star College Foundation StarGala set an all-time high fundraising mark. Held at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott Hotel & Convention Center, this year’s event raised over $1 million. 1 With over 700 guests in attendance, the themed event, Silver is the New Black, also celebrated the 25th anniversary of the Foundation. Attendees enjoyed an elaborate dinner, live auction and music provided by Grady Gaines and The Texas Upsetters. Highlighting the evening were inspiring LSC alumni who shared their stories of the impact Lone Star College has 4 had on their lives. Funds raised at this exceptional event will support the mission of Lone Star College Foundation to change lives through student scholarships and quality educational programs.

StarGala Lone Star College Foundation

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1. J.J. and Amy Hollie 2. Dr. Stephen and Linda Head 3. Lee Ann and Jim Nutt 4. Steve and Rhonda O’Brien, Juli Frank, Lexi O’Brien, Dr. Linda and Ed Stegall 5. Ron and Susie Roberson, Jim and Mary Black 6. Lauren Madison, Otis and Iyana Jones, Samar and Fred Dally, Will and Maisha Turner 7. Amos and Jen McDonald, Wayne and Missy Herndon, David and Christen Argueta 8. Gil and Debra Staley 9. Tom and Kim Carter 10. C.C. and Jim Sutphen 11. Todd and Carol Durkee 12. Sherry and Bob Young

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Figurative art is truly timeless but is currently experiencing a tremendous resurgence in today’s art world. By nature, it is universally appealing – figurative art provides a mirror for our individual selves while leading us into a sense of connection to the universally shared human experience. Focusing on internationally established artists, Glade Gallery intends to bring the finest global expressions of contemporary figurative art to The Woodlands and Houston area.

24 Waterway Avenue The Woodlands, TX 77380 832-557-8781 Dragos Tapu Owner

www.gladegallery.com


PHI L A N THROPY

“Betting on Courage” was the theme for Children’s Safe Harbor’s 10th annual dinner fundraiser. Over 500 guests came out in support of their mission to protect and enhance the life of every child who has the courage to battle sexual or severe physical abuse. The casino themed event was held at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott Hotel & Convention Center and featured touching stories, casino, dinner, dancing and an architectural rendering of Children’s Safe Harbor’s future home. Event chairs, Mary Neskora and Sally Toppe, graciously hosted the outstanding event raising over $450,000. With the help of their committee and Board of Directors, they were able to shine a light on the need for healing and justice for abused and traumatized children and their families. Funds raised put Children’s Safe Harbor a step closer to building a much needed larger facility. Congratulations on a job well done!

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1. John Howard, Amy Reaves, Tammy and Danny Schroder 2. Mary Neskora, Sally Toppe 3. Alison and Rich Henderson 4. Jaimee Myers and Heather Robertson 5. Sabrina Militello and Gelena Scally 6. Mary Neskora, Susan Becker, Cliff McAden 7. Royce and Lisa Brooks 8. Bryan Frenchak and Marina Silver 9. Ali and Randy May, Kim Richardson 10. Amy and Rodney Anderson 11. Jim and Sharon Wade, Molly and Edgar Carlson

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Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County hosted its 5th annual gala. Cochairs, Susan Hayes and Suzanne Millet, hosted an exceptional evening appropriately themed “License to Build� for 450 guests. Inspired by the James Bond film, 1 License to Kill, the elegant affair raised over $450,000 to provide hard-working families with decent, affordable housing in Montgomery County. Guests listened firsthand how lives and families were changed through the power of home ownership. A unique and interesting aspect of the evening was the auctioning of donated, gently used furniture. The pieces came from Habitat for Humanity ReStore 4 which is a nonprofit home improvement store and donation center. Local artisans selected pieces from the store and transformed them into beautiful works of art. What a great reflection of minds, personalities and talents coming together to change the lives of families and generations to come. 1. Suzanne Millet and Susan Hayes 2. Gary and Cindy Lensing 3. Brad and Lisa Strong 4. Robert Teague, Vickey Piccirillo, Allison Piccirillo, Bryant Lach, Amy Lach, Karen and Gary Lach 5. Shawn and Cynthia Mandel, Nicole and Joe Shine 6. Donn and Becky Bolliger, Dan and Kelli Williams, Gary and Pam Whitlock, John and Cindy Hageman, Mike and Susan Carlson 7. Barbara Cargill, Lourdes Adame, Susan Hayes 8. Bill and Jo Breetz, James and Mary McLin 9. Edson and Janine Jones, Leslie and Byron Ellis, Julie and Keith Verville 10. Galen and Kim Neill 11. Anthony and Amanda Lopez 12. Refurbished furniture from the ReStore ReStyle project

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“Havana Nights, An evening in the Islands” was the theme for this year’s Chairman’s Ball presented by The Woodlands Area Chamber of Commerce. The elaborately decorated event honored outgoing Chairman, Keaton McDaniel, and his commitment to The Chamber over the past year. Celebrating with him were his wife, Carla, and both of their parents. Following a touching video portraying his year, McDaniel humbly thanked his family and mentors for their support and guidance. He then welcomed the 2016-2017 Chairman, Linda Leto Head. Head is the Associate Vice Chancellor of Workforce Education and Corporate Partnerships for Lone Star College System and has been involved with The Chamber for 20 years. The evening also featured the annual Table Top Decoration Awards. With over 680 in attendance and 140 businesses represented, many accepted the opportunity to decorate a table marketing their business or non-profit. Congratulations to The Chamber for a beautiful night and thank you for working tirelessly to connect businesses and people in our community!

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1. Keaton and Carla McDaniel 2. Dawn Candy, Randy Lovelace, Amy and JJ Hollie 3. Shannon and Jason Mills 4. Keaton and Carla McDaniel and their parents 5. Lupe Cuellar, Grant and Angela Cooper 6. Interfaith team - Best Non-Profit table decoration 7. Jerry and Ann Snyder 8. Barry Millenson, Cindy Corey-Millenson, Dr. Stephen and Linda Head 9. Justin and Kalyn McQuain, Mike Karlins, Sha and Bryan Valencia 10. Lori Noack, Kelli Beasley, Brittany Besong 11. Jason and Monica Enia 12. Gordy and Michelle Bunch, Heather and Constable Ryan Gable

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A rainbow of colors adorned The Woodlands Resort & Conference Center as Montgomery County Youth Services held its annual Ladies Night Out. The Carnaval themed evening drew over 400 elaborately dressed ladies in support of Montgomery County’s youth and families. This year’s event featured dancing to music provided by DJ Damon, hula hooping, musical chairs and a silent auction. Guests also received personal attention at one of the featured pampering stations. This fun-filled evening successfully raised over $120,000. These funds will be used to provide counseling service, crisis intervention, and shelter programs to strengthen families, keep the youth in school, and prepare them to be productive citizens. 1. Brittani Burress, Sharla Grayson, Gretchen Wright, Carmen Zimmerman, Sydney Sakellakis, Colleen King 2. Megan Mitchell, Michelle O’Rourke, Erin McDowell 3. Rachel Gentry, Chardelle Adelson, Marelize Hoylman, Kirsten Suttles 4. Lucy Gomez, Isabel Duque, Ashley Byers, Samantha Reiter, Andrea Wilson, Megan Mitchell, Natalie O’Leary, Angela Storseth-Cooper 5. Taryn Gordon, Sondra Himmer, Vicki Brundage, Michelle Little, Sheila Greaver, Debbie Packer, Wendy Jordan 6. Kerry Henson, April Raines, Tiffany Little, Lychelle Jomsky, Kristi Murphy 7. Amy Haymond, Joanna Marks, Hannah McNair, Alex Ochoa, Bria Wall 8. Melissa Conard, Tracy Hopkins, Sandi Jenkins, Erin McDowell, Stephanie Ellis 9. Ashley Byers, Laura Lea Palmer, Heidi Carney, Holly Gruy, Teresa Starr 10. Sandra Briseno, Carmen Smiley, Cyndi Alvardo, Carla McDaniel, Bethany Chrisley, Angela Storseth-Cooper, Lupe Cuellar, Jamie Crowder

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Junior League of The Woodlands (JLTW) is an organization of women committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. JLTW recently hosted two events at their new headquarters in The Woodlands. The first event featured The Woodlands Area Chamber of Commerce’s official welcome of JLTW to The Woodlands at a ribbon cutting ceremony! Chamber members for 10 years, JLTW gathered with The Chamber in celebration of their new headquarters. Another recent event was the unveiling of the 14th Annual Junior League Holiday Market’s theme, Shopping in a Winter Wonderland. Holiday Market shopping extravaganza is held each November. Funds raised at this event, as well as Giving Goes Glam and their award winning cookbook, Texas Tables, allow JLTW to fund programs like Literacy Carnival, H.A.P.P.Y., Kids in the Kitchen, IMPACT and ARROW. Over 500 members strong, JLTW positively impacts children and families in the community. 1. 2016 Holiday Market Committee 2. Brandi Sablatura, Jessica Huxel, Alison Endres 3. Jennie Shirley, Rene Romano 4. JLTW members along side Chamber members at The Woodlands Area Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting 5. Kimberly Willing, Alison Judge, Sarah Paul, Jennie Shirley, Rene Romano, Bobbi Jo Miller, Endira Hawkins, Julie Sanchez, Shannon Mills, Missy Herndon 6. Jen McDonald 7. Jennifer Bulovas, Shannon Mills, Bobbi Jo Miller, Ali May, Carol Durkee, and Audra Hoegemeyer 8. H.A.P.P.Y Backpack Program 9. Endira Hawkins, Alison Judge, Kathryne Pruitt, Kimberly Willing 10. JLTW members at Interfaith Community Clinic’s Healthy Kids Festival

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COMMUNITY EVENT SPOTLIGHT

INSPIRE FILM FESTIVAL

Spotlight by: Nickole Kerner Bobley

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uring the weekend of February 24, 2017, Market Street in The Woodlands will be filled with throngs of filmmakers and film enthusiasts who will be in attendance at The Woodlands’ inaugural Inspire Film Festival, InspireFest. InspireFest is the brainchild of Jane Minarovic, a cinefile, filmmaker and Woodlands resident, who is boldly marrying film with philanthropy at this unique, nonprofit film festival. InspireFest will present approximately 20-25 feature films, documentaries and short films from around the world. In partnership with Cinemark Theaters, Inc., 30 Degrees North and Wicked Publicity, the festival theme is “The Power of One,” and Minarovic is currently handpicking films with inspirational stories like: • The perseverance of one man changes the lives of children living near a Paraguayan garbage dump when they become members of The Recycled Orchestra using instruments constructed entirely out of trash. • A unique group of disabled and able-bodied adults learn from each other as they work together to create a film they hope to enter in a film festival. • Two Iraq war veterans trek 2,700 miles in an attempt to heal from their combat experience and draw attention to the many suffering from “Moral Injury.” Each film will culminate with a lively panel discussion featuring the filmmakers, actors or subject of the films as well as celebrate the local heroes and charities in our community—giving our festival attendees a chance to learn more about the altruism taking place in our area. InspireFest will be encouraging area students to produce 3-minute short films titled, “What Inspires You?” The film festival will also be offering meet and greets with special guests and hosting celebratory parties in and around the Market Street area. “My hope for InspireFest is to become a weekend where Woodlands residents of all ages will be entertained by a diverse slate of films and be inspired to go out and make a change, big or small—to make the world a better place,” said Minarovic. For information on festival passes, volunteering and sponsorship opportunities, visit InspireFilmFest.com.

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BUILDING A MORE LOVING AND CARING COMMUNITY Article by: Lucy Gomez | Photography: Jen McDonald and Chelsey Wright

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Through Service

he senior population in our community is prevalent because of established public housing for seniors on a fixed income and having high quality senior living retirement homes. In recent years, the senior population continues to steadily grow. As the baby boomer generation ages and national projections indicate a doubling of population for seniors in the next 20 years, our elderly neighbors will need their community’s support more than any other time in recent history. Interfaith Senior Services exists to improve the quality of life for seniors by promoting wellness and independent living. Through workshops, activities, day trips, music and worship services, caregiver conferences, transportation to medical appointments, food delivery, and much more, Interfaith makes an impact on the lives of our seniors every day with the help of congregations, community partners and volunteers. While Interfaith delivers monthly groceries on average to 175 homebound seniors monthly, provides over 600 holiday gifts to seniors, and helps over 60 seniors age in place through Serving Our Seniors; the two programs with most rapid growth over the past year have been Senior Activities and the Supplemental Transportation Programs. Mondays and Thursdays are busy days at the South County Community Center and are not to be taken lightly, a group of men are sitting at their morning routine, settling in for daily conversation on politics, reminiscing,

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and sharing of common challenges. More than 100 seniors fill the Center’s main meeting room in anticipation of Bingo Day. This activity is sometimes the one time during the day they can socialize with others while having the chance to win fun prizes. For the past three years, Interfaith has coordinated activities at the Center five days a week, an essential service for the mental, social, and emotional well-being of seniors living alone or on limited resources for entertainment. With the growth and development throughout Montgomery County, it is by no means an urban county and is still without public transportation in most areas. The Supplemental Transportation for Seniors provides volunteer-based demand response transportation to essential appointments such as medical, shopping, governmental agencies, and much-needed social activities. During a recent volunteer driver meeting, volunteers were encouraged to share their experiences with our senior neighbors. Volunteers relayed stories of veterans, teachers, husband and wives, cancer patients, and so forth; the common thread in every testimony was that the volunteer gained so much more than the client. Thank you letters from the senior clients were shared and one senior perfectly shared the value of this service as more than just a simple ride, “You are a big smile, a welcoming word, a friendly handshake, and sometimes even a hug. Thank you, sincere as it may be, is inadequate.” Last year, the Senior Services department made over 25,000 service contacts to our senior population. As you see this exchange of “service” to one another, whether staff to client, volunteer to neighbor, or senior to senior, one cannot help but think of it as transferring the legacy of our community on to the next generation.

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INT ERFAI T H OF T HE WO ODLANDS IS A FAI T H-BASED ORGANIZ AT ION, CREAT ED BY MR . GEORGE P. MI TCHELL, FO UNDER OF T HE WO ODLANDS, T HAT INT ERT WINES T HE SP IRI T UAL, BUSINESS AND CIVIC ENT I T IES OF T HE WO ODLANDS TO “BRING P EOP LE TO GET HER TO BUILD A MORE LOVING AND CARING COMMUNI T Y T HRO UGH SERVICE.” ALL PROCEEDS FROM THE BOOK THE WOODLANDS BENEFIT THE MANY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES OF INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS.

T HEBO OKT HEWO ODLANDS.COM 4242 INT ERFAI T H WAY T HE WO ODLANDS, T EXAS 77381 281 - 367-1230

The Book The Woodlands Fall/Winter 2016  
The Book The Woodlands Fall/Winter 2016