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LIFESTYLES / FAITH / PHILANTHROP Y / FASHION / COMMUNITY / FINE ARTS / CULINARY


Huntsman Cancer Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports the Huntsman Cancer Institute (www.huntsmancancer.org).


LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

Photography: Derrick Bryant

Welcome to The Book The Woodlands Fall/Winter Issue 2017! We hope you enjoy the beautiful display of culture, community, elegance and quality in this book. For 44 years, Interfaith of The Woodlands has existed to serve the community in which we live. This book was created with the intent to support Interfaith’s programs and services and help the many families in crisis that walk through Interfaith’s doors each day. When we sat down back in the spring to discuss this issue, we decided that our theme would be “coming together.” We had no idea how relevant and appropriate that theme would become. In late August, Hurricane Harvey hit our area and produced widespread devastation for many families in Montgomery County. What was apparent in the early days was a sense of community and willingness to give back and serve others. With the rain still falling, our staff at Interfaith immediately sprang into action communicating needs within the community, coordinating massive distribution and volunteer efforts and working with member congregations. Cars were lined up and down Interfaith Way with residents waiting to deliver supplies and offer their help. Week after week, thousands of volunteers came together just as “neighbors helping neighbors.” We have been astounded, inspired and humbled by the incredible generosity of so many people. Interfaith helps individuals and families rebuild after crisis with financial assistance for rent, mortgage, utilities, gasoline, prescription drug assistance, emergency shelter, food, clothing, counseling referrals and senior programs. We are grateful for our incredible ad partners for their dedication and support of Interfaith of The Woodlands and The Book The Woodlands. We will continue to further Interfaith’s mission of bringing people together to build a more loving and caring community through service.

Executive Editor

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Editor In Chief

Managing Editor


Table 6 12 14 16 21 26 34 38 48 54 58 60 62 66 68 82

SP RING/SUMME R 2 017

OF CONTENTS

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS PUBLICATION STAFF

INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS BOARD OF DIRECTORS/ADVISORS MEMBER CONGREGATIONS FAITH – SHOPPING WITH A PURPOSE LIFESTYLES - MATT BULLARD CULINARY - AMERIGO’S FASHION - FALL/WINTER COMMUNITY - BUILDING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY CULINARY - INTERNATIONAL DINING FAITH - REVEREND DON GEBERT FINE ARTS - THE GLADE ARTS FOUNDATION LIFESTYLES - DR. JOEL REED COMMUNITY - YOUR HOMETOWN VILLAGE ASSOCIATIONS PHILANTHROPY COMMUNITY - NEIGHBORS IN NEED


FALL/WINTER 2017, VOLUME II, ISSUE 2 A Community Publication Benefiting the Programs and Services of Interfaith of The Woodlands

INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS Presid en t & CEO: Missy He rndon

MISSION STATEMENT Th e Book T he Woodlands is a lifestyles pu blic ation a b out , fo r a nd of T he Wood lan d s, Texas. The in ten t is to h ighl i ght t he “soft wa re” o f our great area, the “good ” of th e people wh o l ive, work a nd pl ay he re an d th e “ valu es” th at make ou r area u n i q u e. Si m ply put , i t i s a beau tifu l d isplay of th e gen erosity of c u lt u re, lux ur y, e l e gan ce an d qu ality of Th e Wood lan d s area.

P UBLICA T ION S TAFF

WRITERS

E xec u tive Edi tor: Miss y He rndon E d i tor i n Chi e f : Sh an n on Mills Man agi n g/So ci a l Edi tor: L indy Johnson Fas h ion Edi tor: Elvira G ra ham Prod u c t i on Ma na ge r: G lenda We ndt

Karen Carroll Mindy Jones

Adve rt i si ng A ssoci a te : Mindy Jone s Adve rt i si ng A ssoci a te : A n n Ryde r Prod u c t i on A rt i st : Yan ess a Be rde c ia PR / Ma rke t i ng : Ch els ey Wright

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Nickole Kerner Bobley

C RE ATIVE C ON T RI B UTO RS Chief Photographer: Derrick Br yant Graphic Designer/Creative Director: Jen McDonald

E DITORIAL O FFI C E

The Book The Woodlands publication is published bi-annually with seasonal issues Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter by publisher, Interfaith of The Woodlands. The inclusion of advertising is considered a service to readers and is not an endorsement of products or concurrence with advertising claims. Copyright © 2018 by Interfaith of The Woodlands. No part of the contents of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the permission of Interfaith of The Woodlands. The publication is not responsible for the return of unsolicited materials provided for editorial consideration. POSTMASTER: If undeliverable, please send to: 4242 Interfaith Way The Woodlands, Texas 77381. The Book The Woodlands publication is edited to inform and entertain readers about The Woodlands, Texas and surrounding areas for their enjoyment. It reflects many viewpoints of contributing readers, writers, photographers and illustrators.

4242 Interfaith Way The Woodlands, Texas 77381 281.367.1230

NEXT ISSUE 2018 Contact thebookthewoodlands@woodlandsinterfaith.org if you are interested in being an Ad Partner.

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

Doug Whittle DiscPro Printing & Graphics Norm Pegram Premier IMS

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FALL/WINTER 2017, VOLUME II, ISSUE 2

INTERFAITH BOARD OF DIRECTORS Debbie Sukin – Chairman Rabbi Matthe w B e rge r Pastor Ste ve B radle y Dr. Roche Cole m an Fathe r Pat Garre tt Dr. Charle s T. Hankins Dr. Daniel T. Hannon Je ff Harde r Dr. Ste phe n C. He ad Br ynn Ballard Huntsm an Im ran Iqbal Robe rt W. Johnson Kate L aukie n Nanc y De cke r L e nt Patrick K. Mulle n Ste ve Pate Sallie Raine r Dr. E d Robb Fathe r Ge rald Se v ick Richard A. Shappard Ale x Sutton Ty Tillman Josh Urban Dr. B ruce Webb Mar y Anne Whitne y Ray Sande rs, E x- Offic io

INTERFAITH BOARD OF ADVISORS Pe te r Huntsman, Chairm an Jim Blair Arthur Bre dehoft Mario M. Coll Joel De re tchin Re ve re nd Don Gebe rt Dan Hause r CJ Hayne s Ge orge Lindahl Tim Welbe s

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INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS MEMBER CONGREGATIONS With a variety of organized religions participating in Interfaith’s daily activities, we truly are an “Interfaith” organization that promotes benevolence and compassion within the community.

Adventist Church of The Woodlands Alden Bridge Presbyterian Church Bahai Faith of The Woodlands Celebration Church of The Woodlands Central Church of Christ Christ Church United Methodist Community Baptist Church Community Christian Church Congregation Beth Shalom of The Woodlands Covenant United Methodist Church Crossroads Baptist Church Faith Bible Church Faith United Methodist Church First Church of Christ, Scientist Flask of Oil Church Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Grace Presbyterian Church HopePointe Anglican Church Impact Church of The Woodlands International Christ’s Fellowship Joyful Life Church Living Word Lutheran Church Lord of Life Lutheran Church, ELCA New Haven House of Prayer New Hope Christian Church Northstar Church Northway Church Northwoods Unitarian Universalist Church Spirit of Joy Lutheran Church, ELCA St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church

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St. Cyril of Jerusalem Orthodox Church StoneBridge Church Sts. Simon & Jude Catholic Parish The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints College Park Ward |Conroe 1st Ward | Conroe 2nd Ward Conroe 3rd Ward (Spanish) | Cypress Creek Ward Glen Loch Ward | Harmony Ward Imperial Falls Ward | Imperial Oaks Ward Lake Creek Ward | Legends Ward | Montgomery Ward Oak Ridge Ward | Sam Houston YSA 1st Ward Spring Ward | Spring Trails Ward Woodlands 1st Ward | Woodlands 2nd Ward The Crossing Church The Hilltop International Christian Center The Redeemed Christian Church of God (Tower of Refuge) The Shepherd’s House The Woodlands Christian Church The Woodlands Community Presbyterian Church The Woodlands First Baptist Church The Woodlands United Methodist Church Timber Lakes Baptist Church Trinity Episcopal Church Unity Circle of Light White Stone Faith Church Woodland Oaks Church of Christ Woodlands Church Woodlands Community Church Woodlands Islamic Center Woodlands Masjid


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Purpose

SHOPPING WITH A

Article by: Karen Carroll | Photography: Derrick Bryant

W

hen Houston natives Jackie and Christine Battle returned home following Jackie’s impressive eight-year career as a NFL running back, their career goals were two-fold. They wanted to operate a business of their own and, guided by their faith, they wanted to serve others.

During Jackie’s time with the Tennessee Titans, Christine fell in love with a small clothing and gift boutique in the historic Nashville suburb of Franklin. Aptly named Philanthropy, the shop is equal parts retail and ministry. The Battles approached the owners about a franchise and last spring, they opened the doors of their own Philanthropy at Market Street in The Woodlands. Simply walking inside, Philanthropy is a sensory delight. Artistic vintage-chic décor, textured with iron and wood and cotton, draws the eye up, down, and around. Candles scent the air. You hear a kind-hearted welcome. But there’s something else, something intangible. It’s a feeling, warm and serene. Cemented in his faith, Jackie doesn’t hesitate to identify that sense. “It’s love. It’s the presence of God,” he says. Indeed, sheltered under a moss-draped arbor in the heart of the store, a prayer wall is filled with cards bearing the hand-written wishes, hopes and meditations customers are invited to leave. Jackie and Christine begin and end every workday here, praying over the entire board. “It’s the most important feature in the entire store,” Jackie says. We would agree, but the clothing that lines the walls is also irresistible. Philanthropy’s dresses, tops, cardigans, shoes and handbags are classic but current, comfortable but bold. Home accessories range from kitschy measuring cups to designer chandeliers. “Just as many customers visit Philanthropy looking for gifts as they do shopping for themselves. Hostess gifts, birthday gifts, teacher gifts,” Christine says. Their expansive selection of jewelry, stationery, books and décor offers something for virtually everyone. It’s the everyone aspect of Philanthropy that the Battles feel most passionate about – the mission to serve.


FA I T H | Shopping with a Purpose

Jackie and Christine embrace the Philanthropy platform to make a difference, to serve each customer who enters the store and to extend that service outwardly with support, supplies, and information that not only provide relief but also empower those in need with love, hope and a sense of purpose. To that end, one hundred percent of online sales, and ten percent of in-store sales go directly to charity. All merchandise is either free trade or operates within those guidelines. Co-op craftwork is curated and stocked. Philanthropy also partners with local charities in a program called Wearable Compassion. T-shirts are designed uniquely for participating organizations and sold in the store. One hundred percent of each charity’s Wearable Compassion sales go directly to that organization. In The Woodlands, t-shirts sold for organizations such as Canopy – a Cancer Survivorship Center and the Will Herndon Foundation get as much shelf space as handbags and shoes. Perhaps Philanthropy’s best-selling item is the Blessing Bag. Designed to be kept in your car as a useful gift for the homeless, these waterproof backpacks are filled with personal care items, water bottles and a message to the recipient they are worthy, they are loved. With as much passion as Jackie used to run a football, he sums up he and Christine’s new venture, “We want people to leave Philanthropy different than when they came in – feeling compassionate and empowered. Most people want to serve in some way. They just don’t know how. We give our customers an active opportunity for service.”

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All studies, philosophy, rhetoric are for this one object, that we may know Christ and honor Him. This is the end of all learning and eloquence. - Desiderius Erasmus

The Woodlands Christian Academy Accredited, Christ-Centered, College Preparatory PreK - 12th Grade 936-273-2555 | TWCA.net


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Bullard

BASKETBALL CAMP

Article by: Karen Carroll | Photography: Derrick Bryant

O

ne look at The Woodlands’ skyline and anyone who has lived here is reminded of the remarkable change our community has seen in recent years. To the delight of thousands of Woodlands area boys and girls and their parents, however, one thing has remained the same for a very long time - Matt Bullard’s Basketball Camp. Even Matt, the much-revered 6’10” Houston Rockets power forward of the 90s, finds it difficult to believe the camp just completed its 25th season. Twenty-five years! Matt considers the math. “Two hundred to three hundred kids every year for twenty-five years. That’s a lot of young people we’ve had the privilege of coaching and encouraging and watching grow,” Bullard says. Though the camp bears his name, it is and has always been a group endeavor. He humbly reflects on the beginning. Bullard settled in The Woodlands at the start of his impressive decade-plus NBA run. Still single and with a bit of spare time on their hands, Matt and childhood friend, Chad Buchanan, high school teammate, Mike Born, college teammate, Scott Wilke, and friend, Rod Gold, imagined a summer camp with dual purposes – as a constructive way for them to continue hanging out playing the sport they loved and as a gift back to the community that so enthusiastically supported them. The camp was a success from the start. Open to boys and girls grades one through ten, the camp’s goals have always been to foster a passion for the game, to create confident, well-rounded players by developing fundamental skills, sportsmanship, teamwork, and discipline. Following those parameters, the Bullard camp has coached some of the area’s best players throughout their lower and high school years, two of those players being Matt and wife Paula’s children, Sarah and A.J.

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L I F E S T Y L E S | Matt Bullard

Two factors play equally into the camp’s longevity and success, Bullard says. One is the specific angle each coach brings to the court. He, for example, has the unique perspective of being a player. “I still think like a player,” Matt says, “and that helps me communicate action and strategy.” Second is the stalwart support of The John Cooper School. Bullard is proud to point out that the camp began in the The John Cooper School gymnasium and continues there still. “I’ve appreciated Cooper so much over the years,” he says, “It’s been a great relationship, and we’ve grown up together. As our camp grew, we watched The John Cooper School grow up around us. It’s been a great privilege to host all these kids in such a beautiful, state-of-the-art facility where the staff and volunteers are solid and capable. We definitely could not have done this without their support.”

Much has changed over the years. The Matt Bullard Basketball Camp has now come full circle with some former attendees returning with their own children as participants. The Bullard’s children are grown now. Sarah is settled nearby, and son A.J. recently set off as a scouted 6’9” freshman at Central Michigan University. Matt works as a Houston Rockets TV Color Analyst on RootSports Southwest, and he can be found alongside Bill Worrell on his weekly broadcast on Sports Talk 790. Paula contemplates joining her husband on the road again, like she did before kids. Chad Buchanan is now General Manager for the Indiana Pacers. Mike Born is a NBA scout for the Charlotte Hornets. Scott Wilke is a long-time teacher and coach in Colorado. Rod Gold is the Boys’ Basketball Varsity Head Coach at The John Cooper School and Dale Reed, Boys’ Basketball Varsity Head Coach at The Woodlands High School, has now joined the corecoaching group. But next summer, Matt and his closest pals will once again convene, hang out, play the sport they love, and give back to the community that so wholeheartedly supports them. Still, after all these years.

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Amerigos

Article by: Karen Carroll | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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A

merigo’s Grille and the owner-operator Kosh family are a study in culinary excellence and longevity. With a keen knack for the business and a penchant for Italian cuisine, Casey and Nancy Kosh recognized a need for true fine dining in The Woodlands. In 1989, with a newborn daughter, the Kosh family opened Amerigo’s. Twenty-nine years and three renovations later - the most recent being a sleek, elegant design with original abstract and still-life paintings that deck the walls - Amerigo’s is still going strong. Culinary and vintner excellence has surely been the key to their success. Casey’s well-honed collaboration with Amerigo’s long-time Executive Chef, Arturo Osorio, has consistently delivered inspiring, upscale Euro-Italian menus, innovative in flavor and technique. Cheese and pasta are flown in weekly from Italy, as are truffles unearthed in California. Seafood is chef-selected daily. These are the kind of details, worked over the decades into seamless composition that keep Amerigo’s on the esteemed list of Zagat winners year after year. Impeccably trained wait staff (including jovial, twenty-year troupers Louis and Ali) make it all look and feel effortless. A studied oenophile, Kosh has also forged friendships with vintners from around the world. “We do extensive research. We travel for tastings,” Kosh says of his process, “We’ve been fortunate to acquire some rare, hard-to-get wines - 1997 vintages from Opus, Hartwell, Shafer. We even have the privilege of sharing some over-the-top Vintage French Bordeaux with our diners.” Kosh’s expertise has earned Amerigo’s the prestigious Wine Spectator Award of Excellence for the past eight years. Aware of the need for corporate and private dining space, the Kosh family met that demand early on with sophisticated practicability. The entire second floor has been designated for large group events. Several other banquet spaces are designed for mid-size gatherings. There’s a sunny atrium, perfect for lunch with friends, and a fountained patio for al fresco moods. Amerigo’s smooth, elegant piano bar features award-winning craft cocktails, live music on Friday and Saturday evenings, and upscale Happy Hour offerings Monday through Friday from 4 pm to 7 pm. The delights at Amerigo’s are visual, too. “Several of the paintings here are pieces Casey and I have collected over the years while traveling,” Nancy says. But some are her own. “My mother and grandmother were both painters, so art has always been an ambition and source of joy for me,” she says. Recently, these visionaries, Casey and Nancy, were unable to resist the challenge posed by the burned remains of Wunsche Brothers Café and Saloon in Old Town Spring, the historic-hip train town six miles south of The Woodlands. So, they bought it. Now-owners of the building, the recipes and the stories, the Kosh family is hard at work restoring the historic 1902 hotel and saloon back to its most recent and beloved incarnation – a popular, fascinating and belly-filling Texas-American eatery and music venue. With their grown daughter Tina Goodson (degreed in hospitality management), it is a safe assumption that the Kosh family will be a guiding culinary force in The Woodlands for decades more.

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Fashion WITH ELVIRA GRAHAM OF FASHIONROWE.COM Photography: Katy Cox

S

ince February’s Fashion Week, all the fashionistas’ eyes were upon the Fall 2017 designs and counting down the months until the top fall trends from the catwalk hit the stores. It is officially fall and to get you excited and inspired, I have a few of my favorite trends and looks from the iconic Tory Burch brand. In August, Market Street welcomed our very own Tory Burch boutique, only one of three in the Houston area. Staying true to its distinctive look with signature brass finishes and green awnings, as soon as you walk in, you notice the residential feel and design inspired by Tory’s home. The Woodlands boutique carries a variety of the Tory Burch collection including ready-to-wear, handbags, shoes and accessories. Their personal stylists can assist with your casual wardrobe as well as any upcoming event.

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A P PA R E L

|

H A N D BA G S

S H O E S

|

J E W E L R Y

At Elaine Turner, we are dedicated to providing The Woodlands with attainable, luxurious products to empower women to feel beautiful inside and out.

Come Visit Us ELAINE TURNER MARKET STREET 9595 SIX PINES DRIVE THE WOODLANDS, TX 77380


Bomber jackets have been and still continue to be a must-have for fall. The Camilla Jacket ruled the runway with its beautiful ivory lamb’s fur and textured faux patent trim. Lined in satin, it makes layering easy while giving it a cozy feel. This winter white outfit is complete with the Vanner flat front pant. Made of stretch suiting cotton, it is comfortable and gives a flattering, sleek silhouette. And the cropped hem showcases the beautiful Addison flared heel. A pair of shoes can instantly transform a look from dressy to casual, and the gorgeous Marisa Bootie does just that! With its glossy, angled heel, gold dome buttons and flannel material, it is nothing less than beautiful with a casual feel. Fall florals are an absolute must! No longer saved for the spring, you can wear them year-round. The satin Vanessa Dress is in bloom with floral print inspired by Philadelphia’s landmark gardens. Metallic shimmer, tie necklines and voluminous sleeves exude vintage charm, a major trend this season. Pairing this dress with the Addison boot in plush suede gives it a true fall/ winter feel. Lined in leather with a soft leather sole, each boot is decorated with playful baubles and a tonal chain, embracing the embellished shoe trend. Feminine and romantic, the Colette Dress in silk Georgette is breathtaking with smocking at the wrists, flared cuffs, sheer airy sleeves and full midi skirt. High necklines continue this season, and the Victorian collar adds an extra touch of sophistication to your next event. Completing the outfit is the Josephine Pump. Simple jewelry up top, statement jewelry below. Dazzling embellishments on shoes are the rage, and these velvet pumps with a crystal studded bow on the back twinkle with every step.

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The Rosie Top is very sophisticated with the ascot necktie, lace, and buttoned cuffs. The Victorian inspired trend is having a lasting impact in fashion with high necklines, lace, corsets and full sleeves, but the trick is pairing the statement piece with something modern and streamlined like the Vanner Pant. This versatile blouse may also be worn without the necktie and teamed with a pair of jeans for a more casual approach. Either way, the Rosemont Pump is the perfect heel with its beautifully embroidered pansies throughout the shoe. And your feet will be happy stepping into the memory foam sole, a standard in most of Tory Burch’s shoe lines.

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For more ideas on how to freshen up your wardrobe and stay up-to-date, visit fashionrowe.com and Instagram @fashionrowe.com

“Dazzling embellishments on shoes are the rage.”

Art Benches: Top Left - Caetano’s Peace by Rollin Karg | Bottom Right - Ode to Joy by Den Skaggs

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Both worlds of fashion and art have been intertwined for years. Designers and artists have been known to collaborate together in fabric prints, museums, shows, and yes, even shoes. As Karl Lagerfeld said, “Art is Art. Fashion is Fashion. However, Andy Warhol proved that they can exist together.” Warhol, a legendary pop artist who created the iconic paintings of Campbell’s soup cans, created books on fashion as well as paintings with fashion. One of the many reasons I love The Woodlands is the abundance of art events and projects supported each year. Thanks to The Woodlands Arts Council whose mission is to promote art in the community, 14 art benches have been commissioned and installed in The Woodlands through a partnership with The Woodlands Township. Our very own resident, Brenda Gottlieb, is a founding member of The Woodlands Arts Council and proposed the idea of having an art bench collection along The Woodlands Waterway. Take a stroll from The Woodlands Mall to Town Green Park and enjoy these beautiful, one-of-a-kind benches designed by local, national and international artists. Six new benches are planned for 2018, four of which will be located at Hughes Landing and two on The Woodlands Waterway. The Woodlands Arts Council is always seeking new opportunities and partnering with new organizations to develop projects within the community. To learn more about the Art Bench Project, visit: thewoodlandsartscouncil.org/public-art.

Art Bench: Stardust by Elizabeth Akamatsu

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BUILDING A

Healthy

COMMUNITY

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Article by: Mindy Jones


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eople who were once accustomed to driving all the way to Houston for specialized medical care have no need to travel across town anymore – now, it’s right here with the utmost convenience. And just because it’s convenient doesn’t mean the patients have to sacrifice quality healthcare. The Woodlands hospitals are backed by distinguished and reputable names in healthcare that deliver complex medical care that rivals many medical centers in cities across the United States. One hospital was born Keeping in line with George Mitchell’s vision for families to live, work and play in his newfound community, healthcare became increasingly important in the late 1970s. The plans began in 1978 when there were around 5,000 residents, but some obstacles got in the way of making it happen immediately. The Woodlands Development Company held firm to the idea that they desired a hospital directly off I-45, on the exterior of the suburb, considering that it might better serve the community and beyond. The developers also wanted to maintain a relationship with the Texas Medical Center, because they realized that would give the hospital a better chance to thrive. Finally, in 1985 with The Woodlands’ population steadily growing to over 20,000, Houston Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center signed on to manage the first hospital here with the help of some officials from other major Houston hospitals. Methodist brought significant resources and talent to support the opening of the hospital that was not previously successful independently. Mitchell knew this needed to happen for his community, and he approved spending $500,000 for the design and legal work necessary for the application process for the loans they needed to begin operations. With Methodist behind the effort, the banks loaned the $20 million needed to get it off the ground. In the beginning, there were not enough patients and it was under-utilized by doctors – only a few were using it regularly compared with the 25 physicians with admitting privileges. Slowly, things improved. Roger Galatas, former President of The Woodlands Corporation and Board of Trustee Member of The Woodlands Medical Center, writes about what eventually helped the hospital’s success improve - recruiting more good doctors as well as the growth of the community itself. “We always had the anticipation it would grow,” says Galatas. A few years later in 1991, Memorial Hospital System became interested and bought The Woodlands Hospital for $21 million. For over 30 years, this hospital, which became Memorial Hermann in 1997, laid the foundation for the spread of outstanding healthcare in our neighborhood. Now, hospitals are providing healthcare to residents in The Woodlands and surrounding areas– healthcare that didn’t exist even a decade ago. Since Montgomery County has grown at such a rapid pace, the medical community has responded by opening two new hospitals just this year, enhancing current hospitals, and offering advanced technologies all of which are bringing patients to The Woodlands from more areas than ever before.

Photo provided by Memorial Hermann The Woodlands

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Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Medical Center Doubling in size since its original building, Josh Urban, Senior Vice President and CEO of Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Medical Center, says, “Growth is more than just the size of our hospital or the number of beds. It’s the breadth and depth of the complexity of services that Memorial Hermann provides – it’s pretty remarkable.” The hospital is hoping to receive a Level II Trauma Care designation which will be the highest level within the community. With the presence of the Memorial Hermann Life Flight® recently added and its helipad parked on top of the hospital, people from all over can see that emergency care is important to them. In addition, the strides they have made in stroke care and neuroscience, complete with subspecialists, are services mainly seen in academic medical centers. “We’ve been able to replicate that here,” Urban explains. “One of the greatest things for me is being able to serve as a leader for our wonderful hospital and represent all the great work that our clinicians and caregivers do in our hospital every day – I get the honor of being the face of that.” – Josh Urban, Senior Vice President and CEO, Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Medical Center

Photo provided by Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands

Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands opened in 2017 and it is also home to the first Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in the area, also the first Texas Children’s NICU outside the Texas Medical Center, so nearby families no longer have to travel long distances to find this specialized pediatric care. Additionally, it is also the first Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) in the area. “It has been exciting to be able to offer this for our families,” says Michelle Riley-Brown, President of Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands and Executive Vice President of Texas Children’s Hospital. Enhanced pediatric care is provided in the comprehensive care team, including subspecialists from over 20 specialties. “At Texas Children’s, we are not only committed to meeting the needs of patients and families we serve, but we are committed to doing that in a way that works for them. For so many, this means providing care close to home. I enjoy interacting with the families and patients and hearing the stories and positive impact we make in their lives on a daily basis.” – Michelle Riley-Brown, President, Texas Children’s Hospital The Woodlands and Executive Vice President, Texas Children’s Hospital

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CO M M U N I T Y | Building a Healthy Community Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital Opened earlier this year, Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital is the 8th hospital in the Houston Methodist system in the greater Houston area. Already planning for an expansion, they will open a second medical office building in 2018 along with a parking garage. Methodist is focused on the latest in medical technology combined with patient safety and comfort, such as their MRI-guided biopsy technology, which allows for less invasive cancer treatments. Debra Sukin, Regional Senior Vice President and CEO of Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital, explains that Houston Methodist has invested in a truly individualized, patientcentric service and care throughout the hospital. “We want our families to feel the Houston Methodist difference the moment they arrive on our campus,” Sukin says. “I am blessed because I have the privilege to work every day with the best of the best. I am surrounded by clinical and support staff who strive to be unparalleled and take on every task with purpose, passion and pride.” – Debra Sukin, CEO, Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital

Photo provided by Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital

CHI St. Luke’s Health The Woodlands Hospital As the second major hospital to open its doors in The Woodlands, CHI St. Luke’s Health The Woodlands Hospital has been bold in bringing medical advancements to The Woodlands from the beginning. The hospital was the first site of open heart surgery locally and created the initial comprehensive stroke program. “Bringing these types of services to The Woodlands allows our patients and their families to remain close to home for their care,” says Syed Raza, MD, Vice President of Medical Operations. Recently, the hospital has expanded its network of care in North Houston to integrate primary care with acute care services with the goal of caring for patients exactly where the need exists. “In The Woodlands, we’ve strategically positioned ourselves as a mini med-center where our residents don’t have to commute 30 miles downtown to receive the quality care they deserve.” – Rashard Johnson, Vice President of Operations “At the end of the day, our goal is to take care of patients wherever they need us, be it in a physician’s office, in an emergency room or in one of our hospitals.” – Syed Raza, MD, Vice President of Medical Operations.

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Dining

INTERNATIONAL

Article by: Karen Carroll | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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s the population of The Woodlands has become more international so, too, have our dining choices. While surrounded with the best of American fare, The Woodlands now hosts enough ethnic restaurants to satiate even the hungriest international gourmand.

Most plentiful, perhaps, are Latin-based eateries. Long-standing favorites Guadalajara Hacienda, Lupe Tortilla, Pappasito’s Cantina, Chuy’s, Mi Rancho Mexican Grill & Bar, and El Bosque Mexican Grill all dot I-45. Yucatan Taco Stand and Cyclone Anaya’s Mexican Kitchen serve up tamales and enchiladas at The Woodlands Waterway. At Hughes Landing, Escalante’s features fine Tex-Mex as well as lakeside dining. Herreras Mexican Kitchen & Bar, at 242 and College Park Drive, consistently gets great reviews for authenticity and overall convenience. Rico’s Hacienda at Alden Bridge is still going strong after more than ten years in that location. There’s Los Cucos Mexican Café in Panther Creek, La Cantina Mexican Grill at Indian Springs, La Cocina de Roberto on Sawdust, and Gringo’s at 30420 FM 2978. Near the corner of Woodlands Parkway and 2978, Caffe Di Fiori features truly authentic Mexican fare with creative twists on traditional regional favorites, such as Mahi Mahi a la Veracruzana and Tampico Carne Asada. Breakfast at Caffe Di Fiori is a delightful change of pace. Owners Arturo and Lucy Calderon built a morning menu that includes traditional Mexican egg dishes, machaca, migas, and the delightfully different chilaquiles. At Hughes Landing, Fogo de Chao brings a Brazilian twist to the Latin mix. Born of the churrasco techniques honed by long-ago Brazilian gauchos, or cowboys, Fogo de Chao slices manners of fire-roasted meat tableside. And they don’t stop until you’ve had enough. In recent months, an influx of French cuisine has given singular, and somewhat decadent joy to foodies in The Woodlands. La Madeleine is still going strong at Market Street. Gourmet Bakery Café near Terramont routinely draws early-bird gastronomes intent on securing an almond croissant or palmiere before they sell out, which they do on a regular basis. Crepes, paninis, and dense, fragrant fruit tarts additionally highlight the menu at this perky French patisserie and boulangerie, owned and operated by Parisian Chef Ifel Costa and his wife, Yasmen.

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Crepes rule at the recently opened Coco Crepes in Indian Springs. There are sweet crepes, as in s’mores, Nutella, and white chocolate raspberry. There are savory crepes, as in egg and sausage, ham and mozzarella, and roasted veggie. Soups, salads, and paninis round out the menu. And gelato is made fresh every morning. At Creekside’s Levure Bakery and Patisserie, bread is serious business. Owner Manuel Rubio’s insistence on the freshest ingredients, his careful attention to the effect our local climate has on yeast, and a decade-honed sourdough starter affectionately called “George the 7th” are keys to the European style breads and pastries created in this modish, comfy bread house. Patience is also a virtue here; the making of Levure’s colossal croissants (and we do mean colossal) is a three-day process. Caramel for their magnificently oversized sticky buns is cooked to a precise temperature so that it forms a crusty shell over the soft, chewy inside. Dough for the traditional French pastry Kouign (pronounced Queen) Amann is ingeniously, painstakingly pulled into the shape of a crown. And coffee here is King! Croque Monsieur/Madame is a breakfast mainstay at Levure. Fresh soups, salads, and tartines top the lunch menu. And you must check out Levure’s Sunday brunch with seasonal surprises like the recent blue corn sourdough molletes. For Mediterranean food, it’s hard to beat Olive Oil on Sawdust. Owned and operated by the genial Toula Huliaris and her husband, Ioannis, this unassuming Greek eaterie has been filling plates for a decade with impeccably prepared traditional dishes such as Moussaka, Spanakopita, Kokkinisto, and Souvlaki. On weekends, dinner guests are treated to another show of cultural flair – live entertainment. Accordion and bouzouki players accompany a belly dancer. Wait staff and even some adventurous diners perform energetic Zorba dances, complete with plate smashing and celebratory shouts of “Opa!” For Italian food, La Trattoria Tuscano at 4223 Research Forest has a well-established fan base, drawn to its creative menu and family-friendly atmosphere. Spaghetti, lasagna, pizza, it’s all here. With owner and chef Bob Ham’s original recipes, even traditional dishes take on unique flavor. Chef Bob’s Italian Gondola Pizza, for example, features a fig and cream cheese base, capicola, prosciutto, pear, carmelized onion, basil and parmesan cheese. Magnifico!

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C U L I N A RY | International Dining At Via Emilia in Indian Springs, the Orioli family continues a five-decade, three generation legacy of operating restaurants featuring authentic dishes from Italy’s northern Emilia-Romagna region. The antipasti menu here is rich in Northern Italy’s coastal favorites, including clams and mussels sautéed with garlic in white wine, shrimp and salsa rosa served in a pineapple shell. The Emilia region being known for producing masterful fresh pastas, the Orioli’s do not disappoint. Spaghetti, lasagna, gnocchi, squid ink fettuccini, all are created in-house every day and elegantly prepared with wine, broth and spices. It is, perhaps, the region’s meat and poultry that jumps off the Via Emilia menu-traditional entrees such as Filet Mignon, Osso Buco, Pork Shank, and Chicken alla Picatta, Parmigiana, and Marsala. The mouth-watering list goes on. If your palate predilections lean even further East, The Woodlands offers a plethora of restaurants where food prep becomes something of a meditative craft. In Hughes Landing, Sushi Chef Tian Lin brings his thirtyplus years of experience to The Blue Fish. Consistency in fish quality and freshness is the hallmark of Chef Lin’s sushi and sashimi. Creativity in flavor and presentation is a close second. That creativity shines in the 25 signature rolls on the menu at The Blue Fish, including: the Super Dragon Roll, served in the shape of an Asian dragon (right down to its octopus suctioncup eyes), and the Mango Jalapeno Roll, which features shrimp tempura, eel and crabstick topped with mango, jalapeno and cayenne pepper and served with eel sauce, spicy mayo and ginger dressing. Extraordinary! Since opening its doors at Market Street eleven years ago, Uni Sushi has maintained its solid reputation for fresh, sophisticated Asian-European cuisine. An assortment of hot and cold small plates will get you started here, like Tuna Carpaccio, Sirloin Yakitori, and Ginger Whole Fish Fry. All of the regular and several signature sushi rolls are on the menu in addition to extensive Sashimi offerings. Chilean Sea Bass, Uni’s ever-popular Rib Eye Beef Rolls, and several other European-influenced entrees balance out the menu. You cannot leave before indulging in the dessert menu here. If not tempted by a Tempura Oreo, seasonally flavored Mochi Ice Cream with an edible orchid will get you for sure. Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar Sakekawa remains a local favorite at both its Indian Springs and Cochran’s Crossing locations. The menu is extensive with appetizers, soups, salads, sashimi and sushi rolls, but dinner at the Hibachi grill is a standout here featuring Filet Mignon, Lobster, and Chateaubriand. And way back where The Woodlands ends, at 30420 FM 2978, the friendly and vivacious Chef Henry Zhu has opened Sopporo Japanese Bistro Sushi and Bar. Sopporo’s menu is true Asian Fusion with an impressive 35 signature sushi rolls, as well as bento boxes, hibachi and teriyaki entrees. Each is imagined and prepared with Chef Henry’s masterful talent and served with the spirit, or “chi,” that loyal patrons have come to love.

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Gebert

REVEREND DON

A LIFE OF GIVING

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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he theme of goodwill throughout The Woodlands began with one man leaving everything behind for a divine purpose. Reverend Don Gebert made Interfaith of The Woodlands what it is today. Without his perseverance and creativity, the vision of bringing together faith and goodwill for the community would not be fully realized. He calls it a miracle. Gebert’s father was a wealthy CEO of a large carpet company and, naturally, he expected his son to continue the legacy of the family business. So Gebert continued down that path and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business. He finally confessed to his father he was not going to follow in his footsteps. Instead, he forfeited the opportunity and decided to pursue a life in ministry. “Money is nice, but my bottom line is not money, it’s people,” he told him. George Mitchell, founder of The Woodlands, envisioned a place to create unity among varied faiths, establish houses of worship and provide for the human needs of the young suburban area – building a more loving and caring community through service. The Woodlands Development Company originally sought out Gebert, an ordained Lutheran minister, while he was working in inner-city Philadelphia helping the needy and improving their lives. Prior to this, he and his wife, Barbara, served as missionaries in remote South American villages. He had only visited Texas through television and movies. Upon arrival for his new job in an unknown place called The Woodlands in 1975, Gebert was shocked to learn that they no longer had funds to support neither the new position nor the department. “I had sold the house. I quit my job. We arrived and they said, You might as well go home. There is no job for you here,” Gebert recalls. Moving his wife and children to the new town was a sacrifice, but he was going to make it work. They came to an agreement, and Gebert stayed on with a $30,000 annual budget to pay himself and start the programs. There were around 100 residents living in The Woodlands at the time. With his upbringing and background of business education and service to others, Gebert was well prepared to lead Interfaith to immeasurable success. The first thing he did was change the name from The Woodlands Religious Community, Inc. to Interfaith of The Woodlands which he thought was a more descriptive, inviting name when he showed up at the doors of each home. He personally visited each family and even followed moving vans of new residents to greet them and ask them what their needs were. “Since I was a minister, they opened up to me,” he says. So, he took their personal information down on index cards, and as a result, he understood what Interfaith needed to provide for the growing community. “They called me the accidental genius, because I had no idea what I was doing and it turned into gold,” he recalls. George Mitchell could gain insight and important statistics from this information, and Gebert had just what he needed. From Gebert’s personable, yet determined approach, the well-known Interfaith directory was born as a 4-page document handdelivered on his bicycle. Not only could people now connect with one another, but also he was able to form the first congregations based on preference. Additionally, a spirit of togetherness was coming to life. “That is why Interfaith succeeded in all of its programs, because we only started programs people asked for. They were run by the people who were asking,” he says, “It was a beautiful thing to see those pioneers build their own programs and organizations!” One of the main requests was for childcare in the growing town. They had no space for a building. The developers had committed zero money. So, in a comical and creative attempt, Gebert instructed mothers of babies and toddlers to arrive with their hungry children at the President of The Woodlands Development Corporation’s office as they staged a “Cry-In.” The crying and screaming at the office that day led to opening what is now called Interfaith Child Development Center. Gebert personally visited over 1,200 homes in the first few years. By 1985, the population had grown to more than 20,000. The programs were solidified, and Gebert took on another role in regional ministry. Roger Galatas, who was President of The

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Woodlands Development Corporation during early growth, worked closely with Gebert, “He started and built the foundation of Interfaith and today, Interfaith is built on that foundation.” Not only was he involved in creating the largest nonprofit, but he was instrumental in The Villager, Montgomery County Youth Services, The Woodlands Hospital, and many more things that improved the quality of life here. “He was committed to a number of community-building activities. I know the community was better because he was here,” says Galatas. Recognized for their significant service and contribution, the Geberts earned the Drum Major Award in 2010 as part of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration in Montgomery County. Barbara reflects on her time here, “I have loved living in The Woodlands and watching all the changes. When we first moved here, there was nothing.” Interfaith of The Woodlands Community & Business Directory has grown to 55,000 copies – still hand-delivered just like the beginning, only with a few more hands. Interfaith Child Development Center teaches over 400 kids, and 63 member congregations come together to support the community. Senior Services help seniors remain independent. Interfaith Food Pantry provides for basic needs. Today, Gebert is 88 years old, and he has not given up his love for encouraging others. Don and Barbara personally visit each new resident who comes to live at their senior community. “They need a pat on the back. They need loving up,” he says. He also initiated an “Interfaith” church service held at their community building designed for those individuals who cannot get out and attend religious services on their own. Barbara has been by his side for as long as they can remember. They were only 14 and 19 when they first met. Married for 66 years, they have five children, eight grandchildren and one great grandchild. “We love people. We can’t stand seeing people suffer, and that’s the driving force in our lives,” he explains, “We never made much money, but it’s like we’re millionaires because we’re so happy.”

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The Glade

ARTS FOUNDATION Article by: Nickole Kerner Bobley

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his winter, Glade Gallery owner Dragos Tapu and his fiancé Lisa Fuller Harra will give The Woodlands the ultimate luxury holiday gift — the opening of the Glade Arts Foundation (GAF). “Our town is now complete. Let’s start calling Houston a suburb of The Woodlands,” laughs Andy Bauman, GAF’s Co-founding Board Member and Vice President of Marketing and Business Development. After renovating The Woodlands Information Center’s landmark building under GAF Vice President of Operations Roy Villareal Jr.’s command, GAF will debut its permanent collection of work by world-renowned and Huntsville-born artist David Adickes in its museum wing. As a foundation, GAF is more than a museum and will offer educational programs for students of all ages and abilities, fine art scholarships and grants, and dedicated exhibit halls for temporary exhibitions for both local and international artists. A gorgeous glass-walled room is filled with sculptures overlooking the lush backyard, pond and fountain area soon to be peppered with public art. “We have been passed the ‘arts torch’ that The Woodlands’ founder George Mitchell lit and many others have carried including The Woodlands Development Company, A Division of The Howard Hughes Corporation® with its generous commitment to public art, The Woodlands Arts Council’s annual production of the highly ranked and beloved Waterway Arts Festival and the world-class slate of concert offerings from The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion,” says Tapu. “Our goal is to also contribute to Montgomery County’s rich cultural and historical legacy,” he says. Fuller Harra, a Woodlands native hot off the heels of bringing Houston artist Taft McWhorter’s show to Glade Gallery, will serve as President. Cynthia Reid will serve as Education Director overseeing weekly art classes, workshops and several original lecture series. Joseph Staley, the Museum’s Curator, will work closely with Tapu overseeing painting, sculpture, photography, installation art, performance and multimedia art. The GAF board members are David Adickes, Jo Lynne Beverly, Tim Dunaway, Bob Milner and Bruce Tough. For more information about The Glade Arts Foundation and memberships, please visit www.gladeartsfoundation.org.

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Reed

DR. JOEL

A PRESCRIPTION FOR LIFE

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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oel E. Reed still goes in to work almost every day, although he claims he’s never worked a day in his life. For 22 years, his job has been treating patients as a volunteer physician at Interfaith Community Clinic in The Woodlands which provides medical, dental, and mental health services to the uninsured in Montgomery County. At 92 years old, he continues to travel through life with great purpose thanks to the blessing of good health and an unyielding passion for helping others. “I always wanted to be a doctor. I never thought I could, because we were poor,” says Reed who practiced Internal Medicine and Pulmonary Disease in the Texas Medical Center for nearly 40 years. As World War II began, most young men were enlisting in the military so he followed suit and joined the Naval College Reserve at 17 years old which helped him pay for his college education. Reed ultimately made his way to medical school at Northwestern University by way of the GI Bill as well as holding consistent jobs in order to earn enough money for tuition. During his final year of postgraduate school, he entered the Air Corps, now known as the Air Force, and served as a physician in the Philippines during the Korean War. “One of the great blessings in my life was getting the schooling I could never afford,” he remembers.

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L I F E S T Y L E S | Dr. Joel Reed During medical school in 1947, Reed recalls a college dance that his fraternity brothers begged him to attend. But because he was just scraping by with finances, he hesitated. Without a date, his friend set him up with a young nursing student named Jeanne, and he finally agreed to venture on a double date. “She blew me away from the first moment,” he says, “From that moment on, we dated every day.” He sold two pints of blood just to pay for that dance. Joel and Jeanne ultimately married later that year, and they were married for over 60 years until Jeanne died in 2008. “The delight of my life was meeting my wife,” he says. While Reed was in private practice in the medical center in downtown Houston, he never forgot the reason he entered the medical field. His partners as well as his staff strived for personal relationships between the doctors and the patients. He even kept his home phone number in the phone book just in case they needed to call him. “Patients were part of the family,” he says. The staff was instructed to answer phone calls by the second ring, and that policy was the theme that was carried throughout the practice – the patient came first. And that was just the way Reed wanted it. Even though he had a busy life with five children and a successful career, he forged ahead in giving back where he knew it would make a difference. One of his primary projects during the time he was President of the Harris County Medical Society included charitable work to offer patients health care free of charge. He was finally able to secure 1000 physicians, 300 pharmacies and 3 hospitals in the Houston area to be part of this coalition to help those who desperately needed health care and could not afford it. Across the nation, reporters were alerted, it hit the newspapers and this initiative became a big news story. In fact, President Reagan took notice and was so impressed by Reed that he was invited to be honored at a White House reception for his contributions. His journey overcoming polio as a young man as well as his own humble upbringing may have an impact on his continual desire to care for the most basic needs of others. At the ripe age of 70, Reed decided to retire from his private practice. He didn’t take time to relax before he began volunteering for Interfaith Community Clinic. He helped them raise the funds for a building in 1985 and then began seeing patients. “I love to take care of patients. That is why I’m still seeing patients now. I can’t give it up. It’s a disease,” he laughs. A resident of The Woodlands for more than 34 years, he continues to spend time on woodworking and has a shop on his property where he creates pieces for his family such as furniture for a great-grandchild’s nursery. He travels with some of his family which includes his five children, twelve grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. His third book was just released earlier this year. Sitting idle is not a part of who he is. On his 90th birthday just a couple of years ago, United States Congressman Kevin Brady awarded Joel Reed a commendation for his life’s work. When asked why he lives life the way he does, he simply says, “Faith has been the steering wheel for my life. It was all guided by God, by love.”

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Hometown

YOUR

VILLAGE ASSOCIATIONS

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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n the mid 1970s, neighbors new to The Woodlands decided to regularly get together to make connections with each other while trying to improve their growing suburb. They met in the Grogan’s Mill Village Center, because it was one of the only places to hold a meeting. Officially initiated as The Grogan’s Mill Village Association in 1975 with the purpose of providing for the general welfare of the local residents, the mission for the Village Associations remains the focus today.

Jan Price, a Municipal Utility District (MUD) Director, joined the Grogan’s Mill Village Association in 1988 out of curiosity after moving to the area, and that began her lengthy service in her community becoming President of the organization in 1992. “It was important, because it was the only place people could come together. We were out here in no man’s land in those days,” she says. The first of its kind locally, the Grogan’s Mill Village Association originated and continued as a non-profit, volunteer organization dedicated to community-building activities as well as acting as a liaison between residents and The Woodlands Community Association (WCA), the governing body at the time. During the early years, the Association was striving to increase interest and participation, so they creatively coordinated special speakers such as law enforcement, government officials and topics related to homeowners. The goal was achieved, and more people became invested in helping The Woodlands and their neighbors. “The village associations were the grass roots of the community. It was very effective,” Price says, “and it helped contribute to that hometown feeling.” As each village was built, a village association was formed. Today, the eight village associations within The Woodlands are completely independent, non-profit organizations with no authority for governing, however, they do have a communication relationship with the Township. Residents are encouraged to voice concerns and ask questions during their monthly meetings. Those subjects can then be raised to the Township Board of Directors through the Associations. As an advocate for residents, the elected, volunteer board members of each village association may have additional resources which can aid in solving issues. “It’s part of that community process where there is neighborhood networking that reinforces the things we do as a government,” says Don Norrell, President of The Woodlands Township. In addition, the Township gives each village association $10,000 for core expenses, including one annual Community Spirit Event and insurance costs.

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Bruce Cunningham has been involved in The Grogan’s Mill Village Association since 2000. As the current Vice President, he helps lead the largest village association, as far as funding goes, mainly due to their signature monthly event, The Woodlands Farmer’s Market at Grogan’s Mill. Fundraisers like this help raise money for good causes all over Grogan’s Mill and beyond like scholarships for students, public school gardening programs and Aging in Place among others. “I enjoy giving back to my community,” he says. Alden Bridge Village Association President, Steve Leakey, has been involved as a volunteer representative for the organization for 14 years. He says the Association always has very positive feedback regarding the fun, family-oriented event they hold annually, the Spring Festival, where close to 1,000 residents attend. Leakey comments that they are able to do great things for the community with the help of sponsors and fundraising, and it all goes back to help The Woodlands and its residents. “I work with great people, participate in the community and we’re able to make real contributions,” he says. The Village Associations collaborate on some events such as the 4th of July Parade and 3R Bazaar and occasionally hold joint meetings with special speakers. Norrell speaks about the purpose of working together to improve The Woodlands through communication, outreach and community-building events, “They’re part of our history. They’ve been around since the inception of The Woodlands.”

Alden Bridge aldenbridge.wixsite.com/aldenbridge Grogan’s Mill grogansmill.org Cochran’s Crossing cochranscrossing.com Indian Springs indianspringsvillage.com College Park villageofcollegepark.com Panther Creek panthercreekvillageassociation.org Creekside Park creeksideparkvillage.com Sterling Ridge sterling-ridge.org

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PHILANTHROPY with

LINDY JOHNSON

FEATURED THIS ISSUE • Angel Reach “Wings, Wheels & Heels” Gala • Celebration of Excellence Gala • Chairman’s Ball • Denim & Diamonds Gala • Go Red for Women Luncheon • Habitat for Humanity Gala • HOPE Under the Stars • In The Pink of Health • Montgomery County Youth Services • Women Empowering Women Luncheon

Denim & Diamonds Gala

Over 500 people attended the Denim & Diamonds Gala which shed light on Inspiration Ranch’s mission to partner horses with people to transform lives and help children and adults with physical, cognitive, emotional and social needs reach their highest ability.

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1. Gary & Debbie Packer 2. MG Tindall and Tom & Holly Mayer 3. Heather Olivarez 4. Donna Daniels & Jim Bailey 5. Matt Pickle and children 6. Jocelyn & Jonathan Durfield 7. Marty Saikowski and Natalie Goertz 8. Rhonda Redmond and Barb Salinas

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PH I L A N T H RO P Y | Celebration of Excellence Gala

Serving others was the resounding message of The Woodlands Celebration of Excellence Gala themed “Midnight in the Garden.” Over 750 guests attended in celebration of the 2017 Hometown Heroes and to raise essential funds for Interfaith of The Woodlands. Honorary Chairs and Presenting Sponsors of the 18th annual event were Mrs. Brynn Ballard Huntsman and Mr. Peter Huntsman of the Huntsman Corporation. Romantic lighting and lush green décor set a backdrop for the evening highlighting the heart of the community. The 2017 Hometown Heroes honored at the event were Amy Lecocq, Rob Johnson, Melissa Young, Bob Milner, The Woodlands Christian Academy, and Cassidy Joined for Hope. Co-chaired by Jenny Coyle and Jena McCrann, the evening also shed light on two families recently impacted by catastrophic events and the role Interfaith played in their efforts to rebuild. This year’s event surpassed all expectations raising $1.3 million for Interfaith’s programs and services. 1. Missy Herndon, Mrs. Brynn Ballard Huntsman, Mr. Peter Huntsman 2. Senator Brandon Creighton, Frank Robinson, Judge Craig & Amy Doyal, Congressman Kevin Brady 3. Jena McCrann, Jenny Coyle 4. Meagan Jamaluddin, Aisha Dubose 5. Noemi Gonzalez , Yvonne Valdez 6. Chris Childs, Cindy & John Hageman, Will Bonilla, Missy Herndon 7. Jud & Kim Hess, Julie Ambler, Bob Milner, Melissa Young, Rob Johnson, Amy Lecocq, Congressman Kevin Brady, Missy Herndon, Debbie Sukin 8. Jenny & George Taylor 9. Sharon & Alex Sutton 10. Ralph & Shirley Alexander 11. Hometown Heroes in attendance 12. Ky Bishop, Anita Votsmier, Steve Pate 13. Bob Williams, Vickie & Don Norrell, Debbie & John Powers, Roger Galatas

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PH I L A N T H RO P Y | HOPE Under the Stars

Walking into the 2017 HOPE Under the Stars, guests were immediately reminded that this is a community that truly loves Will Herndon. Screens were filled with images of children and families raising funds for the Will Herndon Research Fund and the table décor represented Will’s love for animals and dreams of becoming a zookeeper. Will was diagnosed with juvenile Batten disease in 2009. Since then his parents, family and friends have been on a mission to raise funds for research. Tears fell as parents, Wayne and Missy, shared their journey with their precious son, their day-to-day reality, the stages of juvenile Batten disease and the current research update. The message was clear – there is HOPE to save Will and the many other children afflicted with the disease. Will’s story is one of courage, determination and love, which were demonstrated at this year’s event. We will Save Will! 1. Missy & Wayne Herndon, Cathy & Congressman Kevin Brady 2. Michelle & Gordy Bunch, Lee & Ty Tillman, Ann & Jerry Snyder, Mike & Peggy Boyce 3. Amy & Scott Young 4. Victor & Carrie Muzny 5. Angela & Rob Banzhaf 6. Selena McDaniell, Carrie Muzny, Shannon Wing, Rebecca Johnson 7. Scott & Julie Lile 8. Bryan Frenchak, Marina Silver, Missy Herndon 9. Annabelle Glover, Jim Jacobsen 10. Stephen Dell, Brian Wing, Keith Johnson 11. Mike & Ally Seder 12. Jessica KempPark, Brandon Kemp, Missy Herndon 13. Mike & Shelley Powell 14. Nicole & Will Murphy 15. Lonny Soza, George Lindahl

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PH I L A N T H RO P Y | Habitat for Humanity Gala

Guests arrived in their finest hats and bow ties to the 6th annual Habitat for Humanity Gala themed “Run for the Roses Building Homes and Hope.” Funds raised enable Habitat to provide affordable homes to hardworking families in need. The hope Habitat gives families and the impact they make on future generations is an incredible contribution to the community.

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1. Don & Kim Lindley 2. Fred & Astrid Domenick 3. Eric & Denise Lipar 4. George & Kristi Lindahl 5. Adria & Chris Salas, Ken & Lucy Shanahan 6. Mario & Sarah Coll 7. Joan Wiernicki, Barbara Crain, Tracy Wilken, Janet Wong

Angel Reach “Wings, Wheels & Heels” Gala

This year’s Angel Reach “Wings, Wheels & Heels” Gala, co-chaired by Stephanie Milstead, Ally Seder, and Kena Cope, raised signifigant funds to help at-risk youth transition to better lives. They are committed to breaking the generational cycle of abuse, neglect, and homelessness so that the lives of current and former foster youth can be enhanced.

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1. Stephanie Milstead, George Lindahl, Ally Seder 2. Charles & Lori Maurice 3. Macy & Eddie Woodward 4. Michael & Vicki Richmond, Ed Robb, Linda & Mark Smith 5. Bradford & Beth Bryant, Stacei & John Bible 6. Debbie & Steven Sukin 7. Darcy Douglas, Carol and Phil Garner 8. Brenda Bannerman, Kena Cope


PH I L A N T H RO P Y | In The Pink of Health

The 2017 Memorial Hermann In the Pink of Health Luncheon was a day of encouragement, education, and inspiration. Guests were welcomed with heartfelt messages from co-chairs, Cheryl Brady and Tiffany McClung. Each shared their personal connections to the purpose of the luncheon – raising funds to reduce the incidence of breast and ovarian cancer and assist survivors in their journey. The testimonies of Mandi Roach and Good Morning America anchor, Amy Robach, that followed were filled with resounding messages of hope and love while encouraging everyone to be proactive in the fight against cancer. Their candid perspectives empowered attendees to schedule mammograms and diagnostic screenings, ultimately saving lives! Funds raised will stay in the Montgomery County area to fund technology, programs and services for patients and survivors including Canopy, a survivorship center at Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Medical Center, and Interfaith Community Clinic. Congratulations on an impactful event benefitting and empowering this community and generations to come. 1. Cheryl Brady, Josh Urban, Tiffany McClung 2. Jennifer Chamberlain, Stevi Venable, Julie Ambler, D’Anne Surber, Patty Bruha, Melissa Paris, Alana Franke, Kristin Buschemeyer 3. Amy Fry, Angela Strong 4. Melanie King, Lonny Soza, Elvira Graham 5. Ally Seder, Cheryle Sanderson 6. Lindy Johnson, Lynn Strahl, Ashley Hart, Shellie Divin, Wendy Gentile, Lauren Olson, Tamyra Comeaux, Jill Campbell, Serena King, Janet Amador 7. Kelsey Casey, Amanda Poole, Olimpia Petzold, Paola Gianotti 8. Monica Enia, Sarah Rhea 9. Jerissa Belsha, Amanda Greer 10. Jennie Hughes, Jill Harris, Mindy Edwards 11. Patricia Brown, Cindi Stewart, Carrie Lujan, Rebecca McDonald, Terry Visoski, Christin Allphin, Lori Christina, Carol Bunton 12. Thelma Marsh, Beth Ferester, Sherry Summers-Ball, Allison Hulett, Kathy Douglas, and Courtney Ferester O’Grady

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PH I L A N T H RO P Y | Montgomery County Youth Services

Montgomery County Youth Services welcomed guests with an array of colors and festive entertainment at their annual Ladies Night Out and their Yes to Youth Gala. Both events raised awareness and critical funds for the youth in our community. MCYS assists youth with issues related to family conflict, self-esteem, grief, anger, bullying, violence, suicide prevention and communication skills. They provide crisis counseling, shelter programs and prevention services to strengthen families, keep youth in school and give them hope for their future. A highlight of both nights was the beautiful voice of Marlies Ledbetter singing Amazing Grace while impactful images and statistics educated attendees. Congratulations on two entertaining evenings dedicated to serving the youth in our community. 1. Michelle O’Rourke, Kashay Mendes, Erin McDowell 2. Katrina Savage, Laura Everson, Julie Colwell, Fernanda Pelaez, Maria Ibarrola, Allison Carroll, Shari Rojas, Lindsey McKean, Amy Chevalier, Ashley Vanar 3. Tinja Shiery, Marlies Ledbetter, Erika Saunders 4. Michele Till, Lindy Johnson, Marina Silver 5. Erin Frietag, Courtney Miller 6. Lucian & Patti Rivela 7. Courtney Farmer, Amy Lampman, Sherry Smith, Mitzi Fox, Carol Drake 8. Beverly Hickman, Merideth Sirkel. Laura Everson, Patti Rivela, Jenna Everson, Kristin Young 9. Sara Davidson, Jennifer Balido, Judge Lisa Michalk, Yvonne Allen, Bronya Coleman 10. Meagan Jamaluddin, Monica Enia, Michelle O’Rourke, Sarah Rhea 11. Samantha Reiter, Lucy Gomez, Andrea Wilson, Megan Mitchell, Ashley Byers 12. Angela Storseth-Cooper, Lupe Cuellar, Cyndi Alvarado, Ellie Pfahl

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PH I L A N T H RO P Y | Chairman’s Ball

The Woodlands Area Chamber of Commerce hosted the 34th annual Chairman’s Ball “Celebrating the Heart of the Community” honoring Chairman, Linda Head. The event welcomed the incoming 2017-2018 Chairman, Frank Holmes. Keeping with tradition, chamber members promoted their business to other chamber members through unique tabletop decorations.

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1. Angela & Bret Strong 2. Cathy & Congressman Kevin Brady 3. Fran & Barry Blanton 4. Randy Lovelace, Dawn Candy 5. Dr. Stephen & Linda Head, Cynthia & Steve Head 6. Maria & Frank Holmes 7. James & Amanda Ketchum, Amy & JJ Hollie

Go Red for Women Luncheon

Montgomery County Go Red for Women Luncheon raised over $900,000 toward the American Heart Association’s movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Co-chaired by Ralph Alexander and Debbie Sukin, the event highlighted the need for CPR and AED awareness. The powerful testimonies of two courageous women emphasized the difference CPR training can make in saving lives.

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1. Ralph & Shirley Alexander, Alejandro & Albane Hernandez 2. Haley Garcia, Mandi Gerner 3. Tiffany MacPherson, Tiffany McClung, Leila Higham, Keridon McMahon, Jill Schweiker, Chrysti Osborne, Tiffiny Hayes, Ariana Flores 4. Kerrie Guerrero, Diane Kink, Leyla Mehdinasab, Debbie Sukin 5. Ron Mullins, Community CPR Ambassador 6. Jo Anne & Troy Johnson 7. Tony & Amy Torres, Amy & Scott Young

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PH I L A N T H RO P Y | Women Empowering Women

Over 225 guests attended the 4th annual Women Empowering Women luncheon benefiting Interfaith Community Clinic at The Westin at The Woodlands. The beautiful luncheon gave insight into the history of the clinic and the role our area hospitals have played in supporting its growth and development. The true message of the event came from guest speaker, Stephanie Decker, the Indiana mom who courageously shielded her children when 2 tornadoes devastated her home and community. Left without either of her legs, she had to rebuild her life. She credited mental toughness and lessons from her dad for her determination and newfound purpose. She shared one of her favorite quotes, “Storms in life are inevitable but letting them defeat you is optional.� The event raised over $127,000 for the clinic that provides quality basic medical and dental care, counseling, and patient services to the uninsured in the community. 1. Peggy & Dr. Jack Lesch 2. Stephanie Decker, Debbie Sukin, Missy Herndon 3. Darin Mittelstaedt, Dr. Ann Snyder 4. Missy Herndon, Emma Sims, Jessica KempPark, Christen Argueta, Darin Mittelstaedt, Stephanie Decker, Anita Phillips, Kathy Rifaat, Susie Shipley, Kelly Hull, Meagan Jamaluddin, Rachel Ray 5. Misty Twellman, Darcy Bass 6. Interfaith Community Clinic 7. Rosie Valadez, Lindsey Calfee, Jenny Hiser, Bobbie Jehle, Angie Pettigrew 8. Elvira Graham, Meagan Jamaluddin, Nancy Decker Lent 9. Janine Jones, Kelly Hull, Kelly Rogers 10. Amanda Sanders, Fila Fass, Stephanie Clements 11. Nancy Kretschmer, Debra Myers, Kelly Hull, Marian Spence 12. Tanya Urban, Stephanie Decker 13. Susie Shipley, Lisa Moncrief, Amy Kaszak

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Assisted Living and Memory Care


Neighbors IN NEED

Article by: Mindy Jones | Photography: Derrick Bryant

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olunteers by the thousands wanted to help in any way they could. Lines of people sought the goodwill humbly offered by their community. So many had suffered immensely, but Interfaith of The Woodlands did not want people to lose hope. After Hurricane Harvey came and went, the storm’s aftermath continued to reveal itself. The area had never seen so much rain. The flooding was unprecedented. Experts called it a “1,000-year flood.” Homes were devastated and belongings, both valuable and essential, were never to be recovered. Montgomery County Judge Craig Doyal, who acts as the county’s Emergency Management Coordinator during local disasters, says, “People were flooding and looking for shelter. There is a constant barrage of unexpected situations that arise.” Families needed the most basic of necessities – water, food, clothing and shelter. They needed encouragement in the midst of hardship.

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Interfaith of The Woodlands began fulfilling those needs immediately during the storm by collecting donations in the constant rain and distributing them to local Montgomery County shelters, but they quickly became overwhelmed by the influx of benevolent donations. Missy Herndon, President and CEO of Interfaith of The Woodlands, says, “People were so generous from the get-go. They were waiting in line for hours to give.” Donation sites were filling up, and they needed a plan to get the many supplies to those in need. On Tuesday, August 29th, Doyal from the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) of Montgomery County asked Herndon from Interfaith of The Woodlands to assume the primary management of the Montgomery County Distribution Center. They had done this before during the floods of 2016, however, on a much smaller scale. Interfaith confidently agreed and swiftly stepped into operating a huge 225,000 sq. ft. warehouse, donated by Falcon Steel America in Conroe, which was being stocked with massive amounts of water, food, clothing, linens, personal items and more.

After receiving and organizing for five days, Interfaith opened the warehouse doors to thousands affected by the hurricane. The organization was tasked with creating a flow where thousands of people could come through and get what they needed on a daily basis. Those affected by the flooding were able to personally shop for clothing, shoes, food, cleaning supplies, baby items, hygiene items and much more. The first day it opened to families on Saturday, September 2nd, 800 volunteers assisted 3,866 individuals and 669 families. Helene Gallaway, a volunteer at the distribution center, heard about the need and responded by helping on Labor Day and decided to volunteer regularly over the next two weeks in varied capacities. Volunteers sorted, organized, assisted clients in shopping and managed sections of the warehouse. “I honestly feel that the success of the distribution center lies squarely on the shoulders of the Interfaith staff that were working there every single day. Even when they were hot and tired, they never lost their sense of purpose. They treated every client with dignity, and they always expressed their appreciation for the volunteers. I felt like I was part of a team,” she says.

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If there were even a small way to help, the community was willing. Sign-ups for volunteers were filled. People just showed up. Mountains of donations were generously offered by individuals, 18-wheelers rolled in for deliveries, airplanes flew in to drop donations from out of state. A constant line of vehicles drove through the warehouse all day, every day. A team of police officers dropped in to help from Mississippi. The National Guard came to protect and relieve local officers. Children from Tennessee included handwritten notes in their boxes that read “Tennessee loves Texas.” The volunteers, staff and those in need could feel the support. People cared. “It was a whole team of people making it work. We have amazing staff and volunteers. They have a heart to serve. It was an outpouring of support from the community,” Herndon says. In addition to the main distribution center, Interfaith coordinated four additional distribution sites serving South Montgomery and North Harris Counties with the help of member congregations, including The Woodlands First Baptist, Lord of Life Lutheran, Northway Church, The Woodlands United Methodist Church, and The Woodlands Community Presbyterian Church. It acted as a command center coordinating requests from all over the county and continued to deliver supplies to other shelters providing many sites for people to find relief. Due to their resources and relationships, Interfaith was able to make the decision to extend their services to Magnolia and parts of Conroe during hurricane relief efforts due to the need in those areas. Strike, headquartered in The Woodlands, graciously provided fleet trucks in order to deliver massive amounts of supplies to other areas in Texas. “They had the skill and expertise to manage and organize it to a point that it flowed seamlessly and created a much more efficient operation. This county will forever be grateful,” Doyal says. The undertaking was supported at the state and federal level as well local leadership. Government officials included Congressman Kevin Brady, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick, Senator Brandon Creighton and others.

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CO M M U N I T Y | Neighbors in Need

Not only did families leave with a car-full of necessities, but they connected with volunteers within the community who genuinely cared about their well-being. With the help of member congregations and community volunteers, recipients of the generosity truly appreciated the gift of time, service and donations offered. A welcoming smile, an encouraging word, a hug – little things that showed Montgomery County’s big heart. Now that emergency needs have been met and the Distribution Centers closed on September 16th, Interfaith continues to focus on helping families in the recovery stage by assisting displaced families in their transition to safe housing and aiding them financially with rent, mortgage, utilities, furniture assistance, and other expenses. Interfaith also activated the county’s local long-term recovery gourd, MC-CARES (the Montgomery County Community Assistance Recovery Efforts Committee) with the help of their community partners, Office of Emergency Management and United Way in order to identify assistance agency hubs which are capable of aiding families with basic needs and providing disaster recovery support. MC-CARES also organizes clean-up efforts and implements long-term disaster recovery case management. Additionally, Interfaith Workforce Services offered Disaster Unemployment Assistance to displaced individuals around the Houston area. The Woodlands Celebration of Excellence Gala, Interfaith’s annual fundraising gala, will donate its proceeds to families in crisis and continue to support Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. From children collecting money from their piggy banks or bake sales outside of their neighborhoods to large financial donations from corporations, these gifts have all contributed in getting families back on their feet again. These funds will act as imperative resources for families to become self-sufficient as they move forward into 2018. Over the course of six weeks following the storm, more than 12,500 volunteers helped serve over 24,000 individuals and 5,000 families affected by Hurricane Harvey. Those numbers continue to rise as Interfaith of The Woodlands carries out its purpose. “I love that we have the same mission today as we did 44 years ago: bringing people together to build a more loving and caring community through service,” Herndon says, “It’s a blessing here. It’s an amazing place.”

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“R I S E A B OV E

the storm and you will F I N D

T H E S U N S H I N E.� -Mario Fernandez


INT ERFAI T H OF T HE WO ODLANDS IS A FAI T H-BASED ORGANIZ AT ION, CREAT ED BY MR . GEORGE P. MI TCHELL, FO UNDER OF T HE WO ODLANDS, T HAT INT ERT WINES T HE SP IRI T UAL, BUSINESS AND CIVIC ENT I T IES OF T HE WO ODLANDS TO “BRING P EOP LE TO GET HER TO BUILD A MORE LOVING AND CARING COMMUNI T Y T HRO UGH SERVICE.” ALL PROCEEDS FROM THE BOOK THE WOODLANDS BENEFIT THE MANY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES OF INTERFAITH OF THE WOODLANDS.

T HEBO OKT HEWO ODLANDS.COM 4242 INT ERFAI T H WAY T HE WO ODLANDS, T EXAS 77381 281 - 36 7-1230

The Book The Woodlands Fall Winter 2017  
The Book The Woodlands Fall Winter 2017