ITM Annual Report 2017

Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT 2017


2 ITM Annual report 2017

4 Foreword

8 ITM wheels in motion

10 Our institutional partners

12 ECTMIH2017

OUR CORE TASKS

14 Research

18 Education

30 ITM facts and figures

22 Medical Services

26 Development Cooperation


Excellence & Relevance

Tropical diseases, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and inadequate health care influence the lives of billions of people worldwide. The Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium, pro-

For us, scientific excellence and societal impact are two sides

motes the advancement of science and health for all, through

of the same coin.

innovative research, advanced education, professional services and capacity building of partner institutions in the South.

OUR VISION

OUR MISSION

OUR CORE TASKS

Equal chances at a healthy life for all.

Scientific progress in tropical

Scientific research; higher education;

medicine and public health.

medical and scientific service provision.

OUR VALUES: Specificity

Efficiency

We pursue the highest possible quality

We focus our activities on our scientific

We engage our resources in an optimal

in our research, education and service

niche, and seek for the unique added

and sustainable way in function of our

programmes.

values that are complementary to that of

objectives.

other knowledge institutes. Integrity Ethical standards, academic freedom,

Respect

scientific creativity and critical sense are

We respect human equality, diversity,

integrated in all our activities.

solidarity, welfare and self-development.

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ITM Annual report 2017

Excellence


4 ITM Annual report 2017

Foreword

Interview with Cathy Berx and Bruno Gryseels 2017 – a fresh year for a key event, additional research funding and laying new governance foundations – discover the year with two of ITM’s prominent figures. Cathy Berx

2017 held a lot of firsts for ITM – can

with our other activities has made 2017

Governor of the Province of Antwerp

you please outline them?

an extremely active and motivating year.

Chair of the Board of Governors of ITM

Cathy Berx: “Firstly the Institute set up its

Along with this top-down work we had: a

new governance structure implementing

world-class congress with ECTMIH 2017

Prof. Dr. Bruno Gryseels

it in January 2018. A General Council

in Antwerp; the start of a new quintennial

Director

of stakeholders has been constituted as

partnership programme funded by the

Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp

a high-level supervisory body with the

Belgian Development Cooperation, includ-

overarching role of keeping ITM faithful

ing training fellowships and institutional

to its vision, mission and values. This

collaborations in 10 countries; a substantial

General Council appoints a smaller and

extension of our Flemish science funding for

independent Board of Governors in which

the development of an outbreak research

the members offer a balanced distribution

team, all while sustaining our focus on

of competencies.”

scientific excellence and state-of-the-art educational programmes that translate

Bruno Gryseels: “Yes, this fundamental

our research into invaluable and relevant

change in our bylaws is a real milestone,

knowledge for our multicultural student

whose impact will gradually become clear

body - as well as the provision of reference

as the governing bodies come closer to the

medical services in our clinic in Antwerp.”

work floor. Putting this in place along


“The General Council is a structural answer that allows for participatory management with adjusted checks and balances.” CATHY BERX

decisions. It also determines the profiles

At our first official meeting we started

elaborate on the new governance struc-

of the Board of Governors, now counting

the selection process of Board members.

ture and what it holds for 2018?

eight to 12 members, and ensures that the

This sets the stage for all constituencies

Cathy Berx: “Of course – our 2016 gov-

competencies of the Board’s constituents

to really stake their claim in the future

ernance review brought up questions on

reflect the diversity of ITM’s fields of ex-

of the Institute, providing clear roles and

possible conflicts of interest and the equal

pertise accurately. This allows the Board

responsibilities and adjusted checks and

participation and decisiveness of the large

of Governors to focus on monitoring the

balances. This fundamental change will well

board of 21 members. Also it remarked on

performance of the Institute’s management

equip the Institute to face the changes and

the underrepresentation of vital stakeholders

and on providing a challenging sounding

challenges that lay ahead while remaining

such as staff, students and alumni, and

board to the management committee in

aligned with our stakeholders.”

partner institutions.

their decision making processes. Thank you Cathy. Bruno, would you

By instating the statutory General Council,

Gratefully, we fulfilled all legal require-

like to tell us more about the challenges

ITM has found a structural answer that

ments in 2017. Representatives from staff,

and changes that Cathy is referring to?

looks towards participatory management

students and alumni were elected and

Bruno Gryseels: “Yes, one of the key points

with adjusted checks and balances. At the

partner institution representatives were

here is that we’re facing many shifts at sev-

highest level, the General Council makes

put forward to become full voting members

eral levels – in global power relations, in our

sure ITM stays true to its mission, vision and

of the General Council. The new structure

relationships with our partners worldwide,

values and provides guidance on strategic

became operational on 31 January 2018.

in a competitive academic environment and →

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ITM Annual report 2017

A busy year indeed – Cathy, could you


6 ITM Annual report 2017

“2017 brought a new multi-year framework programme with a total budget of nearly €75 million, provided by the Belgian Development Cooperation. It enables us to continue our work of individual and institutional capacity building with hundreds of graduate students and 10 institutional partners in the South under the motto of ‘Switching the Poles’.” in the regional, federal and international

doctoral training programmes. Flanders

funding landscapes.

also provides core funding for research and, with a new grant, for epidemic outbreak

2017 brought a new multi-year framework

response. We will build up a dedicated

programme with a total budget of nearly €75

team working on various research lines to

million, provided by the Belgian Develop-

address local and global epidemics such

ment Cooperation. It enables us to continue

as the current outbreak of cholera in the

our work of individual and institutional

Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC),

capacity building with hundreds of graduate

the continuous threat of viral outbreaks and

students and 10 institutional partners in

the mounting challenge of antimicrobial

the South under the motto of ‘Switching

resistance. Within Belgium, we also monitor

the Poles’. Our approach recognises that

the spread of exotic mosquitoes and other

partner institutes need to own, lead and

risk factors associated with the infiltration

be held accountable for the partnerships.

of tropical diseases.

For us it is paramount to move from classic development relations towards a focus on

Another challenge for the Institute is the

scientific collaboration and excellence. ITM’s

wave of retirements that are coming our

role is to enable scientists and institutes in

way – including my own, in 2019. Over

the South to conduct the research that is

the next five years half of our professors

needed to advance health in their countries.

will be retiring. Aligning this generational

A special feature of the programme is an

shift in the strategic vision for the future of

ambitious project, equally co-funded by

ITM is probably the single most important

the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to

task of the new governance structure. An

eliminate sleeping sickness in the Democratic

important first step was the recruitment

Republic of Congo.

of Marianne van der Sande as new head of the Department of Public Health, and

With the core and programme support

I wish her the very best of luck.

from the regional Flemish government we continue to expand our educational

This said, I look forward to another chal-

and doctoral programmes, especially by

lenging year at ITM and to continuing on

developing new short expert courses that

the lines of excellence and relevance in a

can be integrated in modular master or

changing and sometimes volatile world.” ■


ITM’s new governance structure – an overview

General Council

Board of Governors

Management Committee

Key responsibilities:

Key responsibilities:

Key responsibilities:

• Ensuring that the policy, administra-

• Monitoring management performance

• To support the Director in the day-

tion and management of the Institute are in accordance with its purpose, identity and integrity

of the Institute • Work as an independent decision-making body providing strategic direction

• Providing advice on strategic decisions

according to performance of day-to-day

• E lecting members of the Board of

management and external influences

according to instructions from the Board of Governors How it works: Meets:

Governors and evaluating their performance as a body and per individual

to-day management of the Institute

How it works:

• At least once a month

Meets: How it works:

• Minimum 4 times per year

• Minimum twice per year

Members: • Made up of the Director, the General

Meets: Members: • Are voted for by the General Council

Manager and the Heads of Department • For meeting decisions to be valid, the

Members:

• Four-year renewable mandate

Director and at least two Heads of De-

• Are elected individuals from specified

• Are voting and non-voting:

partment (this can include the General

governmental, educational and ITM organisational bodies (staff, students, alumni) • Four-year renewable mandate • Are voting and non-voting: o 20-25 voting members

o Minimum three, maximum twelve

Manager) have to be present

voting members o ITM Executive Director is automatically official member • Chair and vice-Chair are elected by the Board of Governors

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included as non-voting members • Chair and vice-Chair are elected by the General Council

ITM Annual report 2017

o Board of Governors automatically


8 ITM Annual report 2017

Res e

a rc

h

ITM wheels in motion

286

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

total no. articles published in journals

Pathogens, Patients, Populations = P3 Our three scientific departments focus on Pathogens, Patients and Populations (P3) and all contribute to our four core tasks of research, education, medical services and development cooperation. Supporting Services ensures optimal all-round functioning of the Institute.


Me

dic

al

patient consultations

rv

Se

35,719 i ce

s

DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL SCIENCES

Ed

uc a ti

615 total students

on

DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

*F OR A FULL DESCRIPTION OF THE DEPARTMENTS - THE HEADS OF DEPARTMENT AND THEIR MISSIONS PLEASE SEE PAGE 30

20 partner countries

ITM Annual report 2017

Dev ion t a r elopm ent Coope

9


10 ITM Annual report 2017

LATIN AMERICA • Bolivia • Cuba • Ecuador • Peru

Our institutional partners


ASIA

• Benin • Burkina Faso • DRC • Ethiopia • Guinea • Ivory Coast

• Morocco • Mozambique • Senegal • South Africa • Uganda

Institutional capacity building supported by Belgian Development Cooperation Institutional capacity building supported by Flanders Alliance of education and exchange

FOR A FULL LIST OF OUR PARTNER ORGANISATIONS PLEASE REFER TO PAGE 31

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ITM Annual report 2017

AFRICA

• Cambodia • India • Indonesia • Nepal • Vietnam


12 ITM Annual report 2017

1480 ECTMIH2017 participants

BIENNIAL CONGRESS BRINGS TROPICAL WARMTH TO ANTWERP

For the first time, ITM and partners were proud to host the European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health (ECTMIH2017) in Antwerp. In the words of Bruno Gryseels, ITM Director and Conference Chair “It was an astounding success”.

87

nationalities

AKU KWAMIE OF GHANA, ONE OF ECTMIH’S EMERGING VOICES ON INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, HELPED OPEN THE CONGRESS

CONOR MEEHAN FROM ITM SPOKE OF HIS DREAMS FOR A TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED FUTURE AT THE CONGRESS OPENING

A BIENNIAL EVENT, THIS 10 TH EDITION TOOK PLACE IN THE FLANDERS MEETING AND CONVENTION CENTRE NEXT TO THE ANTWERP ZOO

5 days

THE STRUGGLE AGAINST NEGLECTED DISEASES RESOUNDED IN DALILA MARTINEZ’S OPENING ADDRESS

ECTMIH2017 BEGAN WITH MOZART’S LE NOZZE DI FIGARO

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH AND PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY IN INDIA WERE PART OF VIJAYASHREE YELLAPPA’S OPENING SPEECH


300 presentations

JUST ONE AMONG THE 300 PRESENTATIONS ON TRANSLATING SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS INTO SOCIETAL IMPACT

ITM’S ANNE BUVÉ, CHAIR OF THE SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE, SHARES HER VIEWS

ACTIVE DISCUSSIONS WERE PART OF CONGRESS LIFE AT PARTNER BOOTHS

PETER PIOT DISCUSSES HIS FILM ‘THE HEART OF THE MATTER’ FOCUSING ON HIS RESEARCH IN TROPICAL HEALTH

INFORMAL MOMENTS MADE FRIENDSHIPS AND ALLIANCES GROW

108 sessions

EACH CONFERENCE DAY WAS ACCOMPANIED BY VIDEO WRAP-UPS WITH INTERVIEWS AND DAILY COMMENTARY

108 SESSIONS BROUGHT LIVELY AND PROFOUND AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION

30%

from the global South STRONG PARTICIPATION FROM ACROSS THE WORLD AND DISCIPLINES MADE THE CONGRESS RICH IN ITS DIVERSITY OF THOUGHT AND KNOWLEDGE

THE MAIN HALL WAS PERFECT FOR MEETINGS AND INTRODUCTIONS AMONG THE 1480 PARTICIPANTS

SCIENTISTS AND JOURNALISTS HAD AN OPEN AND LIVELY DEBATE ON THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GLOBAL HEALTH LANDSCAPE

ITM DIRECTOR AND CONGRESS CHAIR, BRUNO GRYSEELS CLOSES THE EVENT WITH WORDS OF THANKS

TAMAR GHOSH, CHIEF EXECUTIVE, ROYAL SOCIETY OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE IS HAPPY TO TAKE THE TORCH FOR ECTMIH2019 IN LIVERPOOL AT THE CLOSING SESSION

ITM Annual report 2017

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14 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

107

PhD research projects supported

Research

With excellence as its yardstick, ITM aims at progressing the science of tropical medicine and international health to support relevant societal, medical and knowledge evolutions in the global South and at home. Research leads the way in the Institute’s academic triad of research, education and clinical service provision. In 2017 our researchers delivered exciting results in focalised scientific projects in the laboratory, in the field and with patients.

€50 million In the fight against sleeping sickness

ITM’s scientific expertise makes Belgium internationally regarded as a pioneer in the fight against the disease.


€2,5 million

Flemish support for outbreak research

DO YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT RESEARCH AT ITM? WWW.ITG.BE/RESEARCH

2017 brought advances across the board for ITM research. Our researchers were recognised with accolades and research grants, they diligently continued their academic research publishing 286 papers in key journals throughout the year, they taught our 615 multicultural pupils

what drives transmission and spread

Three interconnected ITM teams are now

on internationally relevant topics and

of outbreak-prone diseases, design and

at work on research projects on bacterial

supported 107 PhD students along their

evaluate methods and models for the

bloodstream infections in the tropics.

way with 19 defending doctoral theses.

early detection of outbreaks, as well as

In 2017 the researchers reported about

develop outbreak prevention and control

worrying levels of antibiotic resistance

intervention strategies.

in Salmonella bacteria in the Democratic

to excellence they founded, participated in

Republic of the Congo. Other output in

and pushed forward key projects such as:

Through the generous help of the Flemish

2017 included high-ranking publications,

the formation of an integrated outbreak

Ministry of Economy, Sciences and Inno-

diagnostic and clinical improvements and

research team; the multidisciplinary fight

vation (EWI) ITM is concentrating on this

strong international network building.

against antimicrobial resistance and the

vital area of research receiving €850,000

leading of an international consortium in

per year over the next three years making

the fight to eliminate sleeping sickness.

us, and the world, better equipped in the

Outbreak research teams – leading a defined collaborative approach to epidemics

face of epidemics.

Eliminating sleeping sickness in Africa – ITM leads the way Thanks to progress in the areas of diagnosis,

ITM has always responded to acute out-

Tackling antimicrobial resistance with the Bacterial Infections in the Tropics project

breaks of new or known pathogens. This

Antimicrobial resistance is an acute global

pertise, Belgium is internationally regarded

has been shown in the recent cholera

health threat that is compromising the way

as a pioneer in the fight against the disease.

outbreak in the DRC as well as the Zika

we treat bacterial infections and many

and Ebola outbreaks of past years. In a

other aspects of modern medicine. ITM

ITM will coordinate the international

highly interconnected world it is vital

is helping to understand and solve its

support and elimination efforts of its

that the Institute continues to develop

root causes in the South via its Bacterial

Congolese partner organisations.

its outbreak research capacity.

Infections in the Tropics (BIT) project. The

As an institute dealing with tropical illness,

five-year project, which is supported by the Our interdisciplinary outbreak research-

Baillet Latour Fund through the funding

ers will enhance the understanding of

of three research chairs, started in 2015.

treatment, digitalisation and control of the tsetse fly that transmits sleeping sickness in Africa, it is now possible to give this disease the deathblow. Because of ITM’s scientific ex-

Find out more on the project on page 26.

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ITM Annual report 2017

Along with this day-to-day commitment


16 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

RESEARCH

Who won what,

FROM WHOM IN 2017?

RECOGNISING SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH EXCELLENCE IN 2017 Who? Lynn Meurs - Medical Helmin-

research in hard to reach contexts: from

What? Laureate diploma for his study

thology and Raquel Inocencio Da Luz

leishmaniasis in HIV patients to Ebola”

“Unveiling the evolutionary history &

- Epidemiology and Control of Neglected

From Whom? The Doctor Albert

molecular epidemiology of Mycobac-

Tropical Diseases

Dubois Foundation

terium ulcerans”

What? Seal of Excellence for Horizon

From Whom? Koninklijke Academie

2020 Proposals

Who? Séverine Thys - Epidemiology and

voor Overzeese Wetenschappen (Royal

From Whom? Marie Sklodowska-Cu-

Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases

Academy for Overseas Sciences)

rie Actions

What? Dubois-Brigué Award and Scholarship for completing PhD work

Who? Janneke Cox, ITM Alumna and

Who? Koen Peeters - Medical An-

on “Perception of neglected zoonotic

former ITM staff member

thropology

diseases among livestock owners in the

What? ‘Prijs van de Academie voor

What? Medal for People’s Health

tropics: The added value of Anthropol-

klinisch wetenschappelijk onderzoek in

From Whom? Vietnamese Ministry

ogy to the One Health approach for

de geneeskunde 2017’ (Prize from the

of Health

integrated control”

Academy for clinical scientific research

From Whom? The Doctor Albert

in Medicine 2017) for her doctorate

Dubois Foundation

“HIV and Mortality: Autopsy Studies

Who? Johan van Griensven – HIV and Neglected Tropical Diseases

from Uganda”

What? Dubois-Brigué Award and

Who? Koen Vandelannoote - Myco-

From Whom? Belgian Royal Academy

Scholarship for proposal “Clinical

bacteriology

of Medicine


Journal Highlights ITM researchers published 286 papers in 2017. Here some highlights

Unique Antwerp data set uncovers the mystery of neglected disease _ A parasitic disease, Leishmaniasis af-

fects two million people a year in nearly 100 countries, resulting in around 50,000

until experts at ITM and the Wellcome

Super-resistant Salmonella Typhi causes concern _

set with genome analyses of patient sam-

countries. Antibiotics are key for treatment and over the past decades, rising anti-

adapts to humans and the few medicines

available to combat it. Little was known about how the parasite gains resistance, Sanger Institute developed a unique data

Typhoid fever – caused by Salmonella Typhi – is a major health threat in low-income

ples, which resulted in a range of scientific

biotic resistance has limited treatment availability. ITM researchers and colleagues

publications, including a paper on how the parasite goes into hibernation.

→ J ARA M, BERG M, CALJON G, DE MUYLDER G, CUYPERS

B, CASTILLO D, MAES I, OROZCO MDC, VANAERSCHOT M, DUJARDIN JC, AREVALO J. MACROMOLECULAR BIOSYNTHETIC PARAMETERS AND METABOLIC PROFILE IN DIFFERENT LIFE STAGES OF LEISHMANIA BRAZILIENSIS: AMASTIGOTES AS A FUNCTIONALLY LESS ACTIVE STAGE. PLOS ONE 2017; 12(7): E0180532.

at partner organisation INRB isolated a super drug resistant Salmonella Typhi strain

in the Democratic Republic of Congo. They say, should the drug resistant strain spread, it could have a deadly impact.

→ P HOBA MF, BARBE B, LUNGUYA O, MASENDU L, LULENGWA D, DOUGAN G, WONG VK, BERTRAND S, CEYSSENS PJ, JACOBS J, VAN PUYVELDE S, DEBORGGRAEVE S. SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR TYPHO PRODUCING CTX-M-15 EXTENDED SPECTRUM BETA-LACTAMASE IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO. CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES 2017 OCT 1; 65(7): 1229-1231.

Maternal and child health post-Ebola _

The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa cost more than 11.000 lives. In a retrospective study on women and children at public health facilities for antenatal care, child

birth, and immunisation services, PhD student Alexandre Delamou and colleagues saw a strong negative trend in service use during the outbreak that was not yet

re-established after outbreak end in 2016. The same trend was observed for most vaccinations. The researchers say targeted interventions are needed to get maternal and child health services back on track.

→ D ELAMOU A, AYADI AM, SIDIBE S, DELVAUX T, CAMARA BS, SANDOUNO SD, BEAVOGUI AH, RUTHERFORD GW, OKUMU-

RA J, ZHANG WH, DE BROUWERE V. EFFECT OF EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE ON MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH SERVICES IN GUINEA: A RETROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL COHORT STUDY. LANCET GLOB HEALTH 2017 APR;5(4): E448-E457.

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ITM Annual report 2017

deaths. The Leishmania parasite is smart - it


18 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

615

students in 2017

Education

With its objective of acquiring, sharing and applying knowledge, ITM continued to provide academic excellence in 2017. Our flexible modular programmes met the needs of students in a technology-driven, globalised world. This included consolidating an alliance approach. One that broadens the research and knowledge base, strengthens connections with partners and reflects the multidisciplinary, international reality of conducting tropical medicine research and applying it to health service provision in the tropics and beyond.

174

short course students

exchange and learn in scientific master

Alliances – delivering international, multidisciplinary education for the real world

degrees, short courses, doctoral (PhD)

In education, ITM is focusing on broad

research programmes and internships. 54

alliances that focus on going beyond

of these followed our Master of Science in

pure capacity strengthening to develop

Public Health choosing from one of the three

programmes that are win-win for both

options of Health Systems Management and

ITM and its partners. This includes the

Policy, Disease Control or International

involvement of our Southern partners

Health. Another 15 chose the Master of

in alliance initiatives with the support of

Science in Tropical Animal Health. 174

the Belgian Development Cooperation as

students successfully undertook our short

well as collaborations with the Erasmus+

courses and 19 defended their PhD theses.

and other global higher education insti-

All joining the thousands of alumni who

tutions. The initial focus of the alliances

count ITM as their academic home.

is on strengthening the research skills of

In 2017 ITM welcomed 615 students through its doors in Antwerp to discover,


69

Master’s students enrolled in the academic year 2016-2017

Flexible and modular two words that describe our courses for today’s world

ABDOULAYE AG ZAKARIA AND FANNY BASTOGNE PROUDLY POSE AT THE GRADUATION CEREMONY AFTER RECEIVING THEIR MASTER’S DEGREES

its second edition in 2017, the Master’s

as well as organising staff exchange and

focuses on One Health - the interface

jointly developing curricula. This gives

between humans, animals and the en-

ITM’s educational offering greater rele-

vironment - and is a blend of e-learning

vance, bringing students closer to the field

and face-to-face modules. The training

and exposing them to a wider variety of

programme draws on the complementary

multicultural knowledge and perspectives.

research expertise between Pretoria and Antwerp providing high quality pertinent

Concrete examples in 2017 of programmes with Belgian support include a workshop

training modules across continents.

Our alliance approach gives ITM’s offering greater relevance, bringing students closer to the field and exposing them to a wider variety of multicultural knowledge and perspectives. first, the Trans Global Health programme

joint eLearning initiatives involving in-

Joining forces for PhDs – giving greater access and wider perspectives

stitutional partners in Ecuador, Guinea,

Examples of joint European programmes

Mundus Joint Doctorate Programme. This

India and South Africa. Another prime

are the Erasmus Mundus Trans Global

transdisciplinary programme enables PhD

example is our MSc Tropical Animal

Health programme and EUROLEISH.

students to get a double degree, from two

Health jointly run with the Department

NET. Both PhD programmes offer students

different partner institutes in two different

of Veterinary Tropical Diseases of the

unique access to the best academic knowl-

European countries. In 2017, seven ITM

University of Pretoria, South Africa. In

edge from a variety of institutions. The

students took part in this programme with

bringing ITM staff and Southern partners together. Here they developed five new

19

is part of the highly competitive Erasmus ITM Annual report 2017

students, developing distance education,


20 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

15

Students followed our MSc Tropical Animal Health in 2017

EDUCATION

In education, ITM is focusing on broad alliances that go beyond pure capacity strengthening to make programmes that are winwin for both ITM and its partners.

BRUNO GRYSEELS, ITM DIRECTOR, ADDRESSES STUDENTS AND THEIR FAMILY AT THE 2017 GRADUATION CEREMONY

STUDENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES ENJOY THE GRADUATION CEREMONY IN THE GARDEN OF CAMPUS ROCHUS IN ANTWERP

A CLASSROOM TRAINING TAKES PLACE IN PRETORIA AS A PART OF OUR JOINT MSC IN TROPICAL ANIMAL HEALTH

STUDENTS ON THE FIELD IN SOUTH AFRICA. THE JOINT MASTERS PROVIDES GREATER RELEVANCE ACROSS CONTINENTS

A.S.M. Shahabuddin being the first ITM

tribution is ITM’s membership in tropEd

hospital based interventions to contain

based PhD student to defend his thesis

- an international network of institutions

antibiotic resistance; applied molecular

in November. Similarly, ITM is hosting

for higher education in global health from

epidemiology of infectious diseases and

a further seven students from partner

Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and Latin

our Qualitative and Mixed Methods in

institutes as a part of this programme.

America. ITM hosted the tropEd general

International Research (QMM) course.

assembly in October 2017. During the The second, EUROLEISH.NET, is funded

session the organisation reaccredited

Our QMM course, started in 2010, has

by the European Commission’s Horizon

ITM’s short courses on control of tropical

proven so successful that it has its own

2020 project and is a part of the Marie

diseases and on reproductive health –

spin-off. The course is based on using

Sklodowska-Curie – Innovative Train-

both part of the Master in Public Health

qualitative research to access unquan-

ing Network. It is a group of academic

– and the short course on drug-resistant

tifiable facts. This is in the belief that

and private institutions across the world

tuberculosis. This is along with five courses

they offer in-depth understanding of the

that hosts 15 PhD students. They receive

also already accredited by the network.

socio-cultural setting of international

training in disciplines ranging from parepidemiology and strategic interventions.

Strength in expert short courses

ITM is home to three of these students

ITM’s ability to offer fit-to-purpose edu-

who are completing the multi-discipli-

cation is an important strong point seen

nary programme that bridges basic and

in our expert short courses. They offer

applied research.

students intensive training on specif-

asitology to molecular science, genetics,

Quality first for global health - international network accredits excellence Another binding factor to our global con-

health. In January 2017 this formula was replicated at the Pedro Kourí Institute of Tropical Medicine in Havana, Cuba, one of ITM’s partner institutions.

ic issues in tropical medicine allowing them to return to work and apply and practice learnings immediately. Examples of such courses include: addressing drug resistant tuberculosis and its treatment;

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR EDUCATION? WWW.ITG.BE/EDUCATION


A FEW INSIGHTS INTO ITM STUDENT LIFE - IN THE LABORATORY, THE LECTURE THEATRE AND GROUP TUTORIALS

OUR SHORT COURSE ON MULTIDRUG RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS for treatment initiation and in the monitoring and adequate

mended a combination therapy developed by ITM’s Dr.

and timely clinical decision making for drug resistant tu-

Armand Van Deun as standard treatment for multidrug

berculosis. In the course, context is provided for generic

resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Thanks to decades of

guidelines making them applicable to local settings.

pioneering work by Dr. Van Deun, clinical bacteriologist,

Designed as an interdisciplinary and interactive training,

MDR-TB has become a curable disease reducing treatment

students discover the clinical aspects of diagnosis and

to nine months instead of the 20+ months recommended

care. This includes molecular diagnostic tests that flag

previously by the WHO.

resistance - reducing time to diagnosis and allowing earlier treatment start. Students learn about the shorter WHO

MDR-TB treatment is complex and putting such a new

recommended treatment regimen of nine months, and

regime into practice requires doctors to be trained. In

individualised regimens with newly approved drugs and

response to this need ITM began its short course in drug

their use under defined conditions. The new short course is

resistant tuberculosis in 2017 and has already trained 18

blended: students undertake eight weeks of online training

medics to help some of the world’s most vulnerable people.

followed by two weeks of face-to-face learning in Antwerp.

The course aims to help clinicians make informed choices

21

ITM Annual report 2017

In 2016 the World Health Organization (WHO) recom-


22 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

In total, ITM is involved in more than

4 out of 5 Belgian malaria cases.

Medical Services

ITM’s medical services are accredited points of reference in their niche of tropical medicine, nationally and internationally. Its polyclinic, probably the most renowned part of ITM’s work in Belgium, has thousands of travellers, migrants and people with HIV or other sexually transmitted infections (STI’s) passing through its doors every year. The medical services are a part of the Department of Clinical Sciences that include academic units, medical units and reference laboratories. These laboratories are highly specialised with experts working to support direct patient care and diagnostics in Belgium and abroad.


Top 5

vaccinations 1. Yellow fever 53% 2. Hepatitis A 53% 3. Polio 32% 4. Tetanus & diphteria 31% 5. Typhoid fever 23%

68% OF ITM’S 35,719 PATIENTS CAME FOR CONSULTATIONS REGARDING TRAVEL HEALTH OR VACCINATIONS IN 2017

Expanded reference responsibilities to include rabies

tations – 68% of these for travel health

In 2016 ITM counted 15 of its medical

and vaccinations, 18% for HIV and 6%

and research laboratories as national or

for STIs. Along with its day-to-day ac-

international reference centres, 3 of which

tivities of offering patient services; run-

being WHO collaborating centres and one

ning ITM’s accredited national reference

WHO testing laboratory. In 2017 ITM

laboratories; developing and validating

added another such activity to its arsenal.

diagnostic tests and implementing clinical

In July the Institute became Belgium’s ex-

trials, highlights shone. These included

pert centre for the treatment of rabies and

increasing its role as a reference partner

the only reference partner of the Belgian

in Belgium in rabies, expanding its HIV

health authorities for the treatment of

care and prevention, contributing to a

rabies using post-exposure prophylaxis

multicentric Médecins Sans Frontières

(PEP) with immunoglobulins against

DO YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR MEDICAL SERVICES?

study on HIV testing algorithms and

rabies in patients potentially exposed

investigating anonymous partner alert

to the disease. This is in collaboration

WWW.ITG.BE/MEDICAL-SERVICES

services after STI diagnosis.

with the Antwerp University Hospital

In 2017 ITM became Belgium’s expert centre for the treatment of rabies.

23

ITM Annual report 2017

35,719 patients came to ITM for consul-

2017 was another busy year in the clinic.


24 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

MEDICAL SERVICES

Evaluating HIV test accuracy

after contracting HIV or another STI.

Along with their day-to-day contributions

find it difficult to inform sexual partners

to various clinical drug and vaccine trials

about their diagnosis. Partner notification

ITM’s HIV reference laboratory also no-

is recommended by the World Health

tably supported Médecins Sans Frontières

Organization and the European Centre

ITM praised the Belgian government’s

in its study to evaluate the accuracy of

for Disease Prevention and Control as

decision to reimburse TRUVADA® as

HIV tests in five sub-Saharan African

a key preventative tool in the control of

preventive medication for people who

countries. The study was conducted in

HIV and STIs.

run a high risk of getting HIV-infected

collaboration with ITM, and co-investi-

as of July 2017. In 2015, the Institute

gators from the respective Ministries of

Diagnosed patients receive a code that

started a demonstration study on the use

Health. It confirmed the need to carefully

allows them to inform their sexual partners

of preventive HIV medication among

select multiple HIV rapid diagnostic tests

via www.partneralert.be anonymously.

gay men (www.be-prep-ared.be). The

in an algorithm/sequence for making an

In a first phase, anonymous partner no-

preliminary study results, along with

HIV diagnosis. The study was published

tification for HIV and STIs is happening

extensive consultation with Belgium’s 11

in the Journal of the International AIDS

exclusively via the Belgian AIDS Reference

AIDS Reference Centres of which ITM is

Society in March 2017.

Centres. Should the new tool indeed

(UZA) in order to allow 24/7 access to the immunoglobins.

ITM study contributes to prophylactic HIV drug access

one, laid the basis for the decision of the prescription of the drug goes exclusively

Testing anonymous partner notification

via the AIDS Reference Centres, which

As a part of its work to contain the spread

have the necessary expertise and offer

of HIV and other STIs, ITM is currently

guidance in the process.

investigating whether more people will

Minister of Health Maggie De Block. The

inform their sexual partners through an anonymous platform called Partneralert

Our clinicians are often told that people

meet an important need, other healthcare providers can join.

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR MEDICAL SERVICES? WWW.ITG.BE/MEDICAL-SERVICES


Reaching the 40 births quota

A MEETING WITH JONI AND TIFFANY IN OUR TRAVEL CLINIC We’re happy to introduce you to Joni and Tiffany. They’re

their contact with people in a health care setting, Joni and

preparing for a trip to Rwanda and Zanzibar – not on a short

Tiffany have to be vaccinated against yellow fever, typhoid

holiday but for three long months to discover what it’s like

fever, polio, hepatitis A and rabies. They are also equipped

to bring babies into the world in Africa. And not because

with pills in case of traveller’s diarrhoea and antimalarials.

they’re pregnant but because they’re midwifery students

On the day of their visit they were having their first of three

from the Thomas More University at the Lier Campus in

rabies shots – the next one is in a week followed by the third

Belgium. Before they graduate each of them needs to have

after 21 days. They leave the clinic smiling with a plaster

counted 40 births to their repertoire. Joni still needs 25 and

on their arms and the second and third rabies vaccination

Tiffany 17, which they hope to accrue in their three-month

vials in their hands - their local doctor will administer

visit to Africa. Here, they will also experience the less tech-

these for them.

nologically well-equipped births that the Kabutare District Did it hurt? “No, we’re used to having to do this to other

last week where they will enjoy the beach and a “chic hotel”

people,” answers Joni laughing.

before returning to their studies in Lier. As with all our travellers, we wish them safe travels and This is a tiny taste of the visitors ITM welcomes to its travel

especially for Joni and Tiffany the very best of luck with

clinic in Antwerp where our medical staff administered 38,446

their next (African) births knowing they leave well prepared

vaccinations in 2017. Because of where they’re going and

and protected.

25

ITM Annual report 2017

Hospital in Butare, Rwanda has to offer. Zanzibar is for the


26 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

19

Partner institutions

Development Cooperation

ITM maintained fruitful partnerships on sustainable scientific, medical and veterinary capacity building in 10 countries in the South, with support from the Belgian Development Cooperation and the Flemish government. With the start of a new multi-year framework programme between the Belgian Development Cooperation and ITM, the Institute continued to follow its motto “Switching the Poles”, with partners taking charge of developing their own scientific and medical expertise, as they own, lead and are held accountable for their role in the partnerships.

20

2017 saw many exciting advances on the

in status to supranational reference lab of

ITM development cooperation front. A

our partner in Benin, to welcoming four

major milestone being the beginning of

journalists in residence to ECTMIH2017,

the new quinquennial framework agree-

through to our work in rebuilding a shat-

ment of nearly €70 million over a five year

tered health system in Guinea-Conakry

period between the Belgian Development

post-Ebola. Development cooperation

Cooperation and ITM. Under the auspices

projects outside the framework included

of this framework many projects shone

strengthening the evidence base of public

DO YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION?

through. These ranged from our contri-

health in Mozambique with the support

bution to the international consortium on

of the Flemish government.

SWITCHINGTHEPOLES.ITG.BE

eliminating sleeping sickness, to the rise

Countries where we have global alliances


ITM aims for elimination of sleeping sickness in the DRC Bruno Gryseels, ITM Director, met Bill Gates as pictured during a summit on neglected tropical diseases in Geneva in April 2017. There ITM officially joined hands with the Belgian government and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to eliminate sleeping sickness. Thanks to progress in the areas of diagnosis, treatment, digitalisation and control of the tsetse fly that transmits the disease the time was considered ripe to give this long standing disease the deathblow.

“ The Institute has been doing an excellent job for a long time [...] It has found the right way to reach even the most remote places.” BILL GATES ON THE INSTITUTE OF TROPICAL MEDICINE ANTWERP

On the initiative of Minister Alexander De Croo, the Belgian Development Cooperation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will invest nearly €50 million in the fight against the disease in the DRC, where around 85% of cases occur, over a nine year period. ITM is coordinating the international support to the Congolese elimination efforts.

ITM partner in Benin provides tuberculosis support to other African countries Over the past 10 years, with support of the Belgian Development Cooperation, ITM has contributed to scientific capacity building at Laboratoire de Référence des Mycobactéries (LRM) in Cotonou. partnership, as the scientific growth of

THE TEAM OUTSIDE THE LABORATOIRE DE RÉFÉRENCE DES MYCOBACTÉRIES (LRM) IN COTONOU, BENIN - NOW A SUPRANATIONAL REFERENCE LABORATORY

LRM and its staff was rewarded with its entrance to the WHO Tuberculosis (TB)

ITM has programmes working to build the institutional capacity of 19 partner

Supranational Reference Laboratory (SRL)

organisations in Benin, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cuba, Democratic Republic of

Network of which ITM is also a coordinat-

the Congo, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Peru, South Africa and Vietnam. Thematically

ing centre. As the third SRL in the WHO

the programmes focus on HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and Neglected Tropical

African Region it will support other TB

Diseases, as well as on the organisation of health care with specific attention to

laboratories in the continent where most

reproductive health, fragile contexts and social-anthropological determinants.

of the 10 million yearly TB cases occur.

27

ITM Annual report 2017

2017 marked a moment of pride for the


28 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR CORE TASKS

DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION

Four Journalists in Residence bring ECTMIH2017 congress into media focus 2017 marked the fourth edition of the ITM’s Journalist-in-Residence programme, a part of ITM’s capacity building programme in developing countries, financed by the Belgian Development Cooperation. It offers journalists from Africa, Asia and Latin America the opportunity to deepen their understanding of topical issues in tropical medicine and global health. Out of an impressive 130 candidates, four candidates were invited to Antwerp for a stay coinciding with ECTMIH2017. ITM’S FOUR JOURNALISTS IN RESIDENCE - SERUSHA GOVENDER OF SOUTH AFRICA (MIDDLE FRONT), CAMEROON NATIONAL MOHAMADOU HOUMFA (MIDDLE BACK), DAWOOD TAREEN SHAH OF PAKISTAN (LEFT) AND ZIMBABWEAN ANDREW MAMBONDIYANI (RIGHT) AT ECTMIH2017

Injecting scientific excellence in the rebuilding of Guinea’s health system

Santé Rurale’ and the NGO ‘Fraternité

Guinea’s already weak health system was

they can provide quality care for the rural

reduced to shackles after the Ebola epi-

population. In May 2017, the partners

demic as it took the lives of many health

developed e-learning modules during

professionals along with their patients. As

best-practice workshops in Antwerp.

part of its health sector recovery strategy,

Research into the Guinean health sector

the Guinean government is recruiting

recovery is also on the agenda as this

over 2000 new health workers. ITM, its

partnership became the only institutional

Guinean institutional partner ‘Centre

country programme to be added to the

National de Recherche et Formation en

framework programme in 2017.

Médicale Guinée’ are training young professionals via an e-learning course so

On the eve of the international conference She Decides in Brussels, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Development Cooperation Alexander De Croo, pictured below, launched Body & Rights, a bilingual (French/ Dutch) website with an e-tutorial on sexual and reproductive health and rights. ITM, Be-Cause Health and Sensoa created the e-tutorial.


INS Director Ilesh Janil (left) with the Flemish Prime Minister Geert Bourgeois on the Prime Minister’s August visit to INS in Maputo

Partnership in Mozambique MAKES A DIFFERENCE An atypical project in development cooperation, financed

courses and through exchange of expertise on specific topics

by Flanders and facilitated by ITM, is strengthening the

like the functioning of the ethics committee and strengthening

evidence base of public health in Mozambique. The project

institutional research coordination.

Nacional de Saúde (INS), with full ownership on the side of the Mozambican national health institute. INS and ITM are now looking to take a science-based approach to the

ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE - RESEARCH AND SURVEILLANCE PRIORITY

Since 2012, the Flemish government has supported the

containment of antibiotic resistance, a major threat to public

institutional cooperation between INS in Maputo and ITM

health and patient safety in Mozambique.

in Antwerp. Because of the progress the INS made since, it

RESULTS OF FIVE YEARS OF INS-ITM PARTNERSHIP

is now possible for them to put further emphasis on health priorities, and antibiotic resistance is at the top of the list. In Mozambique, bacterial infections are a major cause of

During the past five years, several INS staff members followed

illness and death. One of the causes of growing resistance is

scientific and technical trainings at post-graduate level and the

over-prescription of antibiotics. But doctors in the field do

governance and management of the institute were improved.

not always have effective laboratory support to determine the

Three Mozambican researchers worked on their doctoral

causes of disease. “Tackling antibiotic resistance begins with

research in the context of the BICMINS-project throughout

correct information, but a shortage of effective surveillance

2017 (Building Institutional Capacity at the Mozambique

gets in the way of a proper response,” said professor Jan

INS) and two more have joined their ranks in 2018.

Jacobs of ITM. “With better data we can implement improved treatment guidelines and take preventive measures against

ITM’s role in the project is to provide its expertise in response to needs identified by INS. Researchers from Antwerp support their colleagues in Maputo, among others by teaching short

hospital infections.”

29

ITM Annual report 2017

builds the research capacity and management of the Instituto


30 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR KEY FACTS - AN OVERVIEW

Our leaders

Director

Supporting Services

Bruno Gryseels

General Manager: Jean-Christophe Donck MISSION: to provide optimal support to the departments and governing bodies, to partner constructively with our stakeholders, to contribute to ITM’s scientific excellence and relevance, to safeguard compliance, sustainability and transparency, to promote staff satisfaction and well-being.

Pathogens – Department of Biomedical Sciences

Patients – Department of Clinical Sciences

Populations – Department of Public Health

Head of Department: Prof. Dr. Jean-

Head of Department: Prof. Dr. Lut Lynen

Head of Department: Prof. Dr. Marianne

Claude Dujardin

MISSION: to generate and disseminate

van der Sande

MISSION: to generate, disseminate and

clinical knowledge and to improve patient

MISSION: to generate, disseminate and

apply scientific knowledge on pathogens

care by research, training and reference

manage scientific knowledge relevant to

and vectors of tropical infectious diseases,

services in the field of tropical and global

public health in developing countries

and to develop tools for their diagnosis,

infectious diseases.

through research, postgraduate education

surveillance and control.

and service delivery. SPEAR POINTS:

SPEAR POINTS: • Pathogen diversity, using different ‘omic’ approaches • Molecular basis of pathogen adaptation and evolution strategies • Tools for diagnosis, surveillance and control of disease

• Febrile illnesses in the tropics and in travellers • Neglected tropical diseases • Emerging and epidemic infectious diseases

SPEAR POINTS: • Evaluation of complex and integrative health interventions • Evaluate and improve interventions for the control of tropical diseases

• Tropical bacterial infections

• Reproductive health, including HIV

• Antibiotic resistance and stewardship

• Non-communicable diseases

• Dynamics of pathogen transmission

• Sexually transmitted infections

• Health policies and health financing

• Ecological basis for sustainable

• HIV & co-infections (tuberculosis,

control or elimination of diseases

leishmaniasis, hepatitis C)


Our institutional partners and global alliances • Institutional capacity building supported by Belgian Development Cooperation • Institutional capacity building supported by Flanders • Alliance of education and exchange

LATIN AMERICA 1

Post-Graduate Medical School, Universidad Mayor de San Simon (UMSS), Cochabamba, Bolivia

3

Instituto Pedro Kourí (IPK), Havana, Cuba

2 4 5

Instituto Nacional de Higiene, Epidemiologia y Microbiologia (INHEM), Havana, Cuba

Institute of Public Health, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador (PUCE), Quito, Ecuador

Instituto de Medicina Tropical “Alexander von Humboldt” (IMTAvH), Universidad Cayetano Herredia, Lima, Peru

AFRICA 6

Laboratoire de Référence des Mycobactéries (LRM), Cotonou, Benin

8

Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale (INRB), Ministère de la Santé Publique, Kinshasa, DRC

9

10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20

Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN), including Centre Muraz, Burkina Faso

Programme National de Lutte contre la Trypanosomiase Humaine (PNLTHA), Kinshasa, DRC École de Santé Publique (ESP), Université de Lubumbashi, Lubumbashi, DRC Centre de Recherche Sanitaire de Kimpese (CRS), Kimpese, DRC

College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Centre National de Formation et Recherche de Maferinyah, Guinea

École Nationale Supérieure de Statistique et de Economie Appliquée (ENSEA), Abidjan, Ivory Coast École Nationale de Santé Publique (ENSP) Rabat, Morocco Instituto Nacional de Saúde (INS), Maputo, Mozambique

Laboratoires de Virologie, Bactériologie et Parasitologie, Université de Dakar, Dakar, Senegal School of Public Health, University of Western Cape (UWC), Cape Town, South Africa

Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases (DVRD), University of Pretoria (DVTD), Pretoria, South Africa

School of Public Health (SPH - MUCHS), Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda

ASIA 22

Sihanouk Hospital Center of HOPE (SHCH), Phnom Penh, Cambodia

24

National Centre for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria Control (NMC), Phnom Penh, Cambodia

23 25 26 27 28 29

31

National Centre for HIV/Aids, Dermatology and STD’s (NCHADS), Phnom Penh, Cambodia National Institute of Public Health (NIPH), Phnom Penh, Cambodia Institute of Public Health (IPH), Bangalore, India

Center for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Dharan, Nepal

National Institute of Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology (NIMPE), Hanoi, Vietnam

ITM Annual report 2017

7


32 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR KEY FACTS - AN OVERVIEW

Our reference laboratories 1. National Reference Centre for Arboviruses

2. National Reference Centre for Sexually Transmitted Diseases (Treponema pallidum, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium) 3. National Reference Centre for Rickettsia and Anaplasma (consortium with Koningin Astrid Militair Hospitaal – Queen Astrid Military Hospital) 4. National Reference Centre for Coxiella burnetti and Bartonella (consortium with UCL Saint-Luc et CODA) 5. National AIDS Reference Laboratory 6. WHO Testing Laboratory 7. WHO Collaborating Centre for HIV/AIDS Diagnostics and Laboratory Support 8. National Reference Laboratory for Infectious and Tropical Diseases 9. WHO Collaborating Centre for the Diagnosis and Surveillance of Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection 10. Supranational Reference Laboratory (SRL) for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis 11. World Organization for Animal Health Reference Laboratory for Surra 12. WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training of Sleeping Sickness Diagnosis 13. National Reference Laboratory for Trichinellosis, Echinococcosis, Sarcosporidiosis and Anisakiasis 14. FAO Reference Centre for Livestock Trypanosomiasis 15. OIE-Reference Centre for Theileriosis


Our key facts in numbers 2017

2016

2015

19

24

24

Diagnostic tests sent across the world

2.038.500

2.345.330

2.110.160

Academic, scientific and medical staff

174

169

175

Institutional partners

Reference laboratories STAFF AT ITM

Administrative and technical staff

15

433

259

14

448 279

12

435 260

Male/female (M/F) ratio (%)

35/65

35/65

36/64

M/F ratio academic, scientific and medical staff (%)

34/66

41/59

35/65

M/F ratio executive academic, scientific and medical staff (%) M/F ratio administrative and technical staff (%) RESEARCH

Scientific excellence and impact Papers in scientific journals

New international research projects

International research consortia led by ITM

Innovative research projects running with the support of Flanders

67/33 31/69

68/32 32/68

67/33 31/69

286

304

332

6

6

7

40

31

28

16

17

15

Master students

69

64

57

Master students tropical animal health

15

19

16

Clinical trials coordinated by ITM EDUCATION Master

Master students public health Nationalities Belgian

Other EU countries

Non-EU countries

16

54

1

1

16

45

5

0

8

41

0

4

67

59

53

145

121

122

71

71

65

74

50

57

Belgian

80

79

75

Non-EU countries

36

6

19

Postgraduate

Postgraduate students

Postgraduate Tropical Medicine for Bachelors in Nursing and Midwifery Postgraduate Certificate in Tropical Medicine and International Health Nationalities

Other EU countries

Short courses

44

36

28

Short course students

174

210

128

Belgian

51

40

11

Non-EU countries

110

149

104

Nationalities

Other EU countries

13

21

15

33

ITM Annual report 2017

ITM IN THE WORLD


34 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR KEY FACTS IN NUMBERS

PhD students

On-going PhD’s at ITM (31/12/2017)

107

110

110

Belgian

17

20

20

Non-EU countries

72

73

76

Nationalities

Other EU countries

19

PhD dissertations in 2017

19

Interns and master thesis students* Interns

17 17

14 21

119

122

84

Belgian

54

45

37

Non-EU countries

46

63

31

Nationalities Other EU countries

19 10

Master thesis students* Nationalities Belgian

4

Other EU countries

5

Non-EU countries

1

* UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WHO HAVE WRITTEN THEIR MASTER THESIS AT ITM

14 9

8

0

1

16 14 3

5

6

STUDENTS

Nationalities 207 Belgian

101 Other EU countries

332 Non-EU countries


MEDICAL SERVICES Consultations in 2017 HIV (%)

STD (%)

35.719

35.563

34.446

6%

7%

7%

18%

17%

19%

Pre-travel (%)

51%

50%

50%

Post travel, pediatrics (%)

17%

20%

19%

592.681 analyses for 40.393 patients*

527.024 analyses for 38.193 patients

546.942 analyses for 32.841 patients

131.305

133.529

125.837

363

315

349

18.304

17.823

17.085

1. Yellow fever 53% 2. Hepatitis A 53% 3. Polio 32% 4. Tetanus & diphteria 31% 5. Typhoid fever 23%

1. Yellow fever 53% 2. Hepatitis A 53% 3. Polio 33% 4. Typhoid 32% 5. Tetanus & diphteria 29%

1. Yellow fever 53% 2. Hepatitis A 52% 3. Polio 39% 4. Typhoid 37% 5. Tetanus & diphteria 29%“

6.057

7.131

6.687

1. Diarrhoea 22% 2. Skin lesions 17% 3. Malaria 8% 4. Schistosomiasis 5% 5.Dengue/ chikungunya/zika 3%

1. Diarrhoea 24% 2. Skin lesions 15% 3. Malaria 8% 4. Respiratory tract infection 8% 5. Dengue 4%

1. Diarrhoea 21 % 2. Malaria 11% 3. Respiratory infection 5% 4. Dengue and chikungunya 6% 5. Schistosomiasis 4%

Helpcenter (%)

Patient samples Analyses

*ONLY 2017 FIGURES INCLUDE HIV/STD SAMPLES

Analyses as National Reference Centre for the diagnosis of infectious and tropical diseases (CLCB) Newly diagnosed HIV infections in the national HIV/STD reference laboratory

Travel medicine

Visitors and patients for travel advice and vaccinations Administered vaccinations

Top 5 diseases for which visitors got vaccinated (%)

People returning from the South who came to our clinic with medical symptoms

The most common diseases

Number of diagnostic tests for Zika Confirmed cases of Zika

Page views on travel medicine website Calls to the travel phone

Infectious Diseases ward at UZA

Patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Ward

6%

38.446

6%

36.049

5%

34.711

4.126

2.956

319.999

226.567

247.313

241

195

228

41

11.000

130

9.500

35

7.300

ITM Annual report 2017

Consultations


36 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR KEY FACTS IN NUMBERS

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) AIDS reference centre Patients in follow-up Average age

Nationality (%) Gender ratio (M/F %)

Number newly registered HIV patients

2.912

2.862

2.725

Europe & North America 71% Asia 4% Africa 22% Latin America 4%

Europe & North America 71% Asia 4% Africa 22% Latin America 4%

Europe & North America 70% Asia 3% Africa 23% Latin America 3%

193

201

223

47

75-25

46

75-25

46

74-26

Helpcenter - Low-threshold centre Visitors Priority target groups HIV tests performed

Newly diagnosed HIV infections

1.686

1.665

1.428

MSM: 717 SAM: 657 People younger than 25: 445

MSM: 985 SAM: 407 People younger than 25: 404

MSM: 503 SAM: 192 People younger than 25: 346

13

13

16

2.053

2.440

1.137

Swab2Know outreach programme Collected oral fluid tests

Newly diagnosed HIV infections

910 7

1.180 9

1.187 9


OUR FINANCIALS 1,5 MILLION Tuition fees

2,8 MILLION Flemish Ministry of Sciences 4,0 MILLION Patient fees

11,6 MILLION Federal Ministry Development Cooperation

6,8 MILLION Federal Ministry of Health

INCOME 2017

6,0 MILLION Research Project funding

7,3 MILLION Other funding (including Ministry of Welfare)

5,6 MILLION Federal Ministry of Finance

37

→

ITM Annual report 2017

10,7 MILLION Flemish Ministry of Education

56 million


38 ITM Annual report 2017

OUR FINANCIALS

Balance Sheet ASSETS

2017

2016

2015

FIXED ASSETS

31.481.166

31.849.200

33.164.688

Tangible fixed assets

31.481.166

31.849.200

33.164.688

93.210

81.058

143.362

Intangible fixed assets Land and buildings

Plants, machinery and equipment Furniture and motor vehicles Leasing

Assets in course of construction and payments on account

Financial fixed assets CURRENT ASSETS Inventories

Inventories

Work and contracts in progress

Receivables due and payable within one year Accounts receivables Other receivables

Financial investments

0

29.306.021

0

30.101.488

0

30.931.174

1.448.071

1.420.986

1.919.107

633.864

245.667

171.044

31.335.416

30.110.453

26.377.636

380.518

374.653

0

0

1.567.790 1.187.272

1.859.434 1.859.434 0

2.480.371

0

0

2.186.609 1.811.956

1.201.763 1.201.763 0

2.480.371

0

0

1.864.329 309.882

1.554.447

1.830.259 1.822.569 7.690

7.481.071

Cash and bank balances

23.304.573

22.450.062

13.610.119

TOTAL ASSETS

62.816.582

61.959.653

59.542.324

EQUITY

21.910.614

20.430.456

21.504.406

Revaluation reserves

11.891.000

11.891.000

11.891.000

Profit (loss) brought forward

5.160.042

3.828.490

4.980.131

Prepayments an accrued income

LIABILITIES Capital

Reserves

Capital investment subsidies PROVISIONS Provisions

DEBTS

Provisions for pensions and similar obligations Other provisions

Creditors due and payable after more than one year Financial debts

Creditors due in one year or less

Creditors becoming due within one year Accounts Payable

Received advanced payments on orders (project funding) Debt related to taxes, salaries and social contributions Other debt

Accruals and deferred income TOTAL LIABILITIES

2.123.248

345.712

3.217.382

1.296.479

8.874.731

1.791.647

345.712

3.217.382

1.147.872 9.625.338

1.591.858

345.712

3.088.297

1.199.266

10.289.578

8.874.731

9.625.338

10.289.578

7.436.537

8.401.420

8.197.091

1.438.194

32.031.237

1.223.918

31.903.860

2.092.488

27.748.340

10.415.725

11.112.880

11.789.280

19.424.506

18.288.557

13.933.777

2.789.749

2.346.503

1.368.805

4.492.547

3.219.444

10.415.725 697.155

11.112.880 691.417

11.502.681

10.548.613

121.302

209.477

4.313.619

2.191.006

62.816.582

2.502.423

61.959.653

11.789.280 656.350

8.410.305 278.873

2.025.282

59.542.324


Profit & Loss Account OPERATING INCOME (+) Turnover

Work and services in progress (additions +, withdrawals -)

2017

2016

2015

54.703.021

56.615.771

55.806.391

-407.985

-1.566.530

3.021.214

7.004.858

7.818.954

7.946.088

Member fees, funds, legacies and subsidies

30.520.672

35.188.961

28.721.063

OPERATING EXPENSES (-)

54.651.876

57.675.740

55.499.310

4.961.720

4.622.284

4.131.402

Other operating income

(Cost of) goods for resale & raw materials Purchases

Stock (withdrawal +, addition -)

(Cost of) goods and services Staff expenses

Depreciation of and impairments on formation expenses, tangible and intangible assets Impairments on inventories, contracts in progress, and trade receivables

Other operating expenses

OPERATING PROFIT (LOSS)

17.585.476 4.955.856 -5.864

1.758.350

1.607.205

31.764.684 -179.586

Other financial expenses

PROFIT (LOSS) FROM REGULAR COMPANY ACTIVITIES Extraordinary income (+)

Write-back of amortisations and depreciations on intangible and tangible fixed assets

30.734.150 1.649.623

-1.059.969

307.081

3.627

5.295

41.499

42.566

447.218 441.923

76.842

622.757 4.957

617.800

444.734

410.347

425.281

0

700

-4.593

350.406

94.328

374.390

35.257

400.763

29.111

-251.729

-1.023.098

504.557

0

0

0

0

542

1.583.281

EXTRAORDINARY EXPENSES (-) PROFIT (LOSS) OF THE FINANCIAL YEAR

63.457

16.652.904

51.145

Other extraordinary income

Other extraordinary expenses

4.194.859

2.190.932

138.233

Impairment on current assets, other than inventories, contracts in progress, and trade receivables (additions +, withdrawals -)

32.575.173

16.118.026

-658.614

Other financial revenue Costs of debts

-64.772

19.551.898

141.860

Financial expenses (-)

4.557.512

16.311.073

Financial income (+)

Revenue from current assets

15.174.386

0

0

1.331.552

542

1.032

1.032

0

30.474

-1.022.556

475.115

0

30.474

ITM Annual report 2017

39

PLEASE FIND THE SIGNED AUDITORS LETTER CONFIRMING THESE RESULTS ON OUR ANNUAL REPORT WEBSITE: 2017.ITG.BE


Responsible publisher: Bruno Gryseels Editor-in-chief: Roeland Scholtalbers Texts: Catie Young, Roeland Scholtalbers Photography: Jessica Hilltout, Stefan De Pauw, Roeland Scholtalbers, Nico Van Aerde Design & Web development: Comfi Contact: R oeland Scholtalbers Head of Communications rscholtalbers@itg.be ■ +32 3 247 07 29 The Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp Foundation of Public Utility (N. 0410.057.701) Nationalestraat 155, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium T: +32 3 247 66 66 ■ F: +32 3 216 14 31 ■ communicatie@itg.be

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Disclaimer The entire content of this report is protected by copyright, full details of which are available from ITM. Images in this report were taken with the full understanding, participation and permission of the subjects. The images truthfully represent the depicted situation both in its immediate and in its wider context and do so in order to improve public understanding of our work, as well as the realities and complexities of poverty-related diseases and health care.