Page 1

“They appear more human and alive than if they had been represented in all their details.”

“Frozen fat doesn’t hold up as well as fresh fat.”

“Straight and narrow, just like the record.”

22

29

24

THE KIDS AREN’ T ALL RIGHT T E E N

V I O L E N C E

I N

E S C A M B I A

Independent News | September 29, 2011 | Volume 12 | Number 38 | inweekly.net

C O U N T Y

-

PAG E

9

FREE ▶


15 444-4444 PENSACOLA

www.kerrigan.com 22

KE0195 IN 1/8 horiz.indd 1

publisher & editor Rick Outzen production manager Joani Delezen art director Samantha Crooke sales director Jennifer Passeretti contributing writers Bradley “B.J.” Davis, Jr., Joani Delezen, Hana Frenette, Ashley Hardaway, Rob “Bubbs” Harris, Brett Hutchins, Chelsa Jillard, Sarah McCartan, Jennie McKeon, Jeremy Morrison, Kate Peterson, Scott Satterwhite, Chuck Shepherd

INJURY ATTORNEYS 12/3/09 3:13:45 PM

inweekly.net


September 29, 2011

3


winners & losers Dysport® is a prescription injection for temporary improvement in the look of moderate to severe frown lines between the eyebrows (glabellar lines) in adults less than 65 years of age.

Get Dysport® treatment and save

Former Botox® Cosmetic patients save an extra

If you receive a Dysport® treatment from July 15 – Sept. 30, 2011 send in your receipt and save

Also, include receipt for a Botox cosmetic treatment received 3-12 months prior to a Dysport® treatment and save

50

50

$

$

up to

100

$

total savings

Kevin Welch, M.D. 8333 N. Davis Hwy Pensacola, FL | 850.474.8386

2874 Gulf Breeze Pkwy Gulf Breeze, FL | 850.916.9969

KevinWelchMD.com Board Certified Dermatologist * Voted Best of the Coast Skin Care – 2010

Michelle Bachman

Herman Cain

winners A.A. DIXON CHARTER SCHOOL FOR EXCELLENCE The parents, teachers and

students of the second-year charter school got the miracle for which they prayed. For the first time in his tenure, Superintendent of Schools Malcolm Thomas changed his mind on an issue involving the AfricanAmerican community. The school will be allowed to operate for another year.

DENIS MCKINNON The chairman of the

Escambia County Tourist Development Commission refused to bow to pressure from the daily newspaper’s editorial board, which was calling for his resignation. The issue was the hotel owners meeting with McKinnon over bed taxes and the governance of the Convention and Visitors Bureau. Tapes of prior TDC meetings in May and March, transcriptions of which were posted on ricksblog.biz, show the chairman had informed the board of the meetings.

HERMAN CAIN The former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza scored an upset victory in the recent GOP straw poll held at the Presidency 5 conference in Orlando. Cain beat handily both Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. This is a big victory for a candidate who, up to now, has drawn little media attention and placed fifth or sixth in many national polls.

losers JEFF BERGOSH The Escambia School

Board member says he supports charter schools, just not A.A. Dixon. Bergosh didn’t care that the students had been low performers in his schools before they enrolled in Dixon. He refused to acknowledge that the school had completely changed leadership and that locals had taken over the governance of the school that was started by Ronald Renna of Clearwater, Fla. What he didn’t count on was the white community, many of them Republicans, supporting the school getting a second chance.

VEOLIA TRANSPORTATION The French company manages Escambia County Area Transit. Its workers staged a one-day strike over working conditions and unfair labor practices. Local union officials said that their members have filed a record number of grievances this past year that range from trying to fire workers on maternity leave to not paying for holidays. Escambia County isn’t the only trouble spot for Veolia. Workers in Phoenix are reportedly headed for a strike after 15 months of negotiations failed to yield a new contract with the union. MICHELLE BACHMANN Florida Repub-

licans aren’t impressed by pretty faces. How else can you explain the election of Gov. Rick Scott? Bachmann barely registered in the Florida straw poll held in Orlando.

Chicken Fingerz, Wings, Zalads® and more. Kids Night Tuesdays and Thursdays

1451 Tiger Park Lane • Gulf Breeze 850.932.7289 2640 Creighton Rd. • Pensacola 850.477.0025 © 2008 Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc. “Zaxby’s” and “Zalads” are registered trademarks of Zaxby’s Franchising, Inc.

44

inweekly.net


921 N PALAFOX ST N, PENSACOLA, FL

outtakes

by Rick Outzen

SIDING WITH LOCALS The Independent News may have been the only newspaper in the country that refused to take any BP ads concerning the oil spill and its version of the facts. The decision cost us somewhere between $40,000–$60,000, not an insignificant amount for a small paper like ours. We made the decision because we wanted to show our support for the community we love. My fellow publishers didn’t take so kindly to our stand, arguing that the British oil giant had the right to get its viewpoint in the paper. Had our paper been the only print medium in this market, I might have relented, but fortunately, for BP, there is a Gannett-owned daily newspaper in Pensacola, too. We want to always be clear that we stand with you. Our politics and views may not always agree, but the IN is very much a local paper. Our reporting reflects that. We wrote about A.A. Dixon because we believed that the community was getting a one-sided view of a school that is trying to tackle education in the inner-city, something which the Escambia Public School District has failed to do consistently. The impression by the District was one of a failing school that was poorly run. We saw dedicated teachers, a new leadership team committed to turning around the

school and students who had improved, but still were below grade levels. On Sept. 19, the charter school was on the brink of being closed. Superintendent Malcolm Thomas reversed his recommendation and the school was given a reprieve to operate another year. We believe the IN played a part by building support for Dixon. Last month, Quint Studer was caught up in a controversy about whether he had pledged $2 million or $4 million towards the Maritime Park. Both the News Journal and the Independent News had access to much of the same information. The daily believed that there were two pledges. We saw it as one. Recently the daily newspaper demanded Denis McKinnon, Jr. resign as chairman of the Tourist Development Commission because of meetings held with hotel owners regarding the control of tourism. We found McKinnon had done nothing but try to surface issues that the county had avoided for years. We supported Studer and McKinnon because the facts warranted it, and we knew the character of the men. Both had given unselfishly to this community for years. Being a local paper, we understood that. They deserved better treatment. We always look at facts and pick our editorial stances carefully. If we err, we want to err on your side. {in} rick@inweekly.net

We always look at facts and pick our editorial stances carefully. If we err, we want to err on your side.

Downtown Pensacola with onsite parking approx 9 spaces -North Hill just North of Cervantes and Palafox - Corner location has approx. 3000 sqft w/7 private offices, kitchen, work area, break room and 3 baths. Full service lease includes water, electric, sewer, gas, janitorial including lawn service.Parking included. Completely renovated in 2008 to include paverstone parking. Beautiful hardwood floors, high ceilings, park view. Nice floor plan with lots of original woodwork and fireplaces. Historical features have been preserved. MLS#: 411739 • Rate: $675,000

Cheryl Young Cell (850) 712-4742 www.cherylyoung.com cayoungrealtor@aol.com

Licensed in Florida & Alabama

Practicing Since 1974 INJURED? (ALL TYPES OF ACCIDENTS)

ARRESTED? (ALL FEDERAL & STATE COURTS)

WHITE COLLAR CRIMES (HEALTH-CARE FRAUD • DRUG OFFENSES & D.U.I.s)

FREE CONSULTATION ON INJURY / DEATH CASES & CRIMINAL CASES Joint Commission Accredited

Call (850) 607-7293 * 321 East Nine Mile Rd. *Physician Referral Required*

www.sleepeasygulfcoast.com September 29, 2011

NO RECOVERY - NO FEE / COST ON PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH CASES

24 HOUR SERVICE

433-9922

304 E. GOVERNMENT STREET 5


WAITING FOR THE BUS

news

photo by Samantha Crooke

Inside the ECAT Strike By Jeremy Morrison Busses are currently rolling their routes through Escambia County, but who knows for how long. If the county and its private management firm, Veolia Transportation, can’t reach an agreement with employees sometime soon the public transit system, Escambia County Area Transit (ECAT), could grind to a halt. “Employees are ready to walk out the door again today,” said Michael Lowery, head of the local transit union, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1395. Drivers and other transportation employees went on strike for one day last week before returning to wait out another round of negotiations. Only, Lowery doesn’t think that Veolia, a Frenchbased company the county contracts with to operate ECAT, has any intention of negotiating. “It’s a one-sided negotiation right now,” he said. Lowery said he believes that Veolia purports to come to the table publicly, with no real intentions of entering into give-andtake conversations. 66

“They put up a wall,” the union official said. “They’re also doing it in Phoenix, Arizona.” Veolia operates transit systems in multiple markets. Currently, the company is involved in contract negotiations in Arizona and elsewhere. Mike Ake, the company’s regional vice president, disagrees. “We always come to the table to negotiate in good faith,” he said, adding that the Arizona negotiations are simply snagged on financial differences. “The dollar issues are what the hold is right now.” Lowery said the parties are set to return to the table Oct. 4 to see if they can restart the conversation. That’s news to Ake. He said he hasn’t gotten confirmation from the union on the date, and wonders if it’s actually going to happen. “Frankly, I think it’s a big ‘if,’” Ake said. Employees have raised issue over both pay and treatment. Lowery said, at this point, they’re becoming more concerned about the treatment issue, about the work environment.

“It’s a very, very bad situation as far as morale,” he said. “It’s so bad that 90 percent of the work force walked off the job. That tells you something right there.” Lowery said employees have complained of being stiffed on vacation and maternity pay, as well as an overall tense work environment. Ake disagrees. “I keep seeing something referred to as ‘mistreatment of employees.’ I’m not sure what they mean by that,” Ake said. “I think it’s all a dollar issue, myself.” As for Escambia County, officials are hoping for a happy ending. Kenneth Gordon, general manager for ECAT, said he’s just waiting for next week’s negotiations. “I have no expectations,” Gordon said. “I hope the mediator can help us.” Union officials believe the county has not been involved enough in the process. Because the issue is one of public service — a publicly provided transit system — they think Escambia officials should take more of a role. inweekly.net


“The county,” Lowery said, “has been so hands off.” There have also been some more sinister accusations flying about town. Being that the area is ultra conservative, politically speaking, and assumedly anti-union, some have suggested that Veolia is floating a trial balloon of stone-walling the union; the thinking being, if that works here, try it elsewhere. “We feel that’s true,” Lowery said, adding that anti-union sentiment is building in general nationwide. “There’s been a whole movement — Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, even here in Florida.” Ake is appalled. The Veolia official said the company earnestly wants to reach an agreement. “Absolutely, not true,” Ake said. Another accusation is based on Veolia’s multi-national nature. There are concerns that the company forgoes employees’ gains in favor of socking revenue away in France. “The story about all the money that we’re shipping back to France is absolutely crazy,” Ake said, adding that while the company is based overseas, many of its employees are local. “Can I say one more thing about the French-thing, because that just keeps coming up,” he said. “My regional office is in Pensacola. I live here in Pensacola.” One thing the two sides apparently agree on is the need for a dedicated funding source to help ease operating cost. Currently, the county relies on money from property taxes. “I think that a dedicated funding source is needed here in Escambia County,” said Gordon. “A dedicated funding source is a good idea.” Lowery couldn’t agree more. He cites other transit systems in metropolitan areas that rely on such tax-based source. He went on to say that the union would fund a campaign to educate voters on the issue if it were placed on the ballot. “The county has done a poor job communicating to the public that we need a dedicated funding source,” he said. As for upcoming negotiations, it doesn’t look too good on the dollar front. Ake said the union has “unrealistic expectations.” That’s too bad. Lowery said his union members truly do need an increase in pay. He said that while company officials paint employees as “being greedy,” they are having difficulty keeping their heads above water. “Right now,” he said, “we have some members that are saying they are borderline foreclosure on their homes.” And as for the treatment issue, one side of the table isn’t even sure there is one. “I believe that’s the message that the union would like to get out there, but that’s

from the blog September 29, 2011

TOO MUCH

buzz

}

POWELL GIVES UP JOB John Powell, a Republican candidate for Escambia County Sheriff, resigned on Sept. 14 from his position as the director of the Florida Division of Alcohol, Beverage & Tobacco after an investigation of a planned fundraiser disclosed that the event would involve lobbyists for the industries that ABT regulates. Scott Miller, whose company, Political Matrix, helps manage Powell’s campaign, denied on Rick’s Blog that his candidate’s resignation had anything to do with the fundraiser. “John Powell resigned because he cannot run an effective campaign and give his post as the head of the ABT the attention that it deserves,” wrote Miller. “There is no credible source that would say otherwise and you should know better.” The credible sources are the documents that Powell posted on his campaign website, JohnPowell4Sheriff.com. There is a “Point Paper” that shows, in August, Powell was approached by two lobbyist — Nick Iarossi and Scott Ross — who offered to host a fundraiser for Powell in Tallahassee on Sept. 14. Iarossi lobbies for several clients, including the casino Las Vegas Sands Corp. Ross also lobbies for Las Vegas Sands. Powell told the investigator that he and his campaign manager had no oversight over the invitation list. He said Iarossi and Ross were told of the restrictions prohibiting him from accepting any contributions from individuals, companies or businesses regulated by his division. The email invitation included the disclosure. Powell met with senior leadership on Sept. 7 to request additional guidance. The upcoming fundraiser was discussed but no specifics given about the invitees. “Powell was advised to err on the side of caution and consider perceptions when making

not necessarily true,” Gordon said. Ake said that working conditions were dictated by previous union-negotiated contracts. Nothing has changed. “These conditions have not changed,” Ake maintained. “The are exactly what the union negotiated. I have no idea what they are talking about.”

“Please get the soldiers the help they deserve!”—Cindy Knoch

}

all the political news and gossip fit to print

campaign decisions,” wrote the investigator. The fundraiser was cancelled on Sept. 13. No contributions were accepted in conjunction with the event. “Subsequent research indicates the organizers of the fundraiser are registered to lobby for at least one tobacco company, one alcohol beverage company, one casino company and an association that runs multiple internet sweepstakes cafes throughout the state.” The Department of Business & Professional Regulations had three options: retain Powell as director; demote him for the duration of the campaign or permanently; or resign from the Department. Powell resigned. PAIR MADE THE DIFFERENCE Governor Rick Scott, Enterprise Florida and the Pensacola Bay Area Chamber of Commerce announce the expansion of Ascend Performance Materials, LLC. Ascend plans to add 102 employees over the course of 3 years and invest approximately $50 million in capital improvements. The Ascend expansion would have never happened, but for the work of then-Escambia County Commission Chairman Grover Robinson and Chamber Chairman Collier Merrill. Several Ascend executives came to the Chamber’s economic development recruitment event at the Hilton during the 2010 Blue Angels show. Collier and Grover helped get the project rolling during a private meeting with their executives that Friday morning. The state provided a Governor’s Closing Fund incentive and tax incentives for the project. Apparently the announcement of the expansion was delayed by the company for competitive reasons, according to my sources. {in}

Lowery said he’s not sure how it’ll turn out. “We could see a strike or we could see the employers lock us out,” he said, noting he had noticed ads in the Pensacola News Journal for employment within the company. “We don’t put it past them to do whatever they’re going to do.” {in}

“Now folks can tweet the twits at City Hall.”—Ames

TAILGATING TOUCHDOWNS? FIX IT. ...

NOT ENOUGH

BOOTCAMP PENSACOLA & PERDIDO FixedOnFitness.com

HYPNOSIS. CHANGE YOUR THOUGHTS, CHANGE YOUR

LIFE. A LUMINOUS LIFE HYPNOTHERAPY

SUSAN DUNLOP, MA, CHT

INTERNATIONALLY CERTIFIED HYPNOTHERAPIST

850-346-7865 EAST HILL www.luminouslifehypnotherapy.com

Cornerstone Visiting Angels Services, LLC Non-Medical Home Care You Can Afford We Offer 3 Categories of Care: Companion/Sitter, Homemake & Respite Care

Housekeeping, transportation services, laundry, running errands, shopping trips are just a few of services we provide. Services are given by highly trained, trustworthy, compassionate and friendly aides that we call Visiting Angels. Contact us today to see why we are the provider of choice in the Pensacola and surrounding areas. We are a helping hand when you need it most at a price we guarantee you will be able to afford! Call Us Today For Our Low Hourly Rates!! 850-456-3008 e-mail: info@cornerstonevisitingagnels.com www.cornerstonevisitingangels.com

“Rick, you have shattered my soul.”—Hat McKenzie

Rick’s Blog has been quoted in the New York Times, Newsweek and on dozens of websites, including The Daily Beast. Read it to find out the real story behind the news. Visit ricksblog.biz.

Gulf Breeze Publix Shopping Center 7


Photo courtesy of Katie King

H O USE DE

C

FI

SH

K

THE

BAR

OF

THE

R

FICIAL BEE OF

PENSACOLA BEACH SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL THREE NIGHTS OF LIVE PERFORMANCES ON THE DECK: SEPTEMBER 29, 30, & OCT. 1 This weekend, The Deck Bar stage will host a select group of legendary songwriters as part of the Pensacola Beach Songwriters Festival. We’re 1 of only 2 downtown Pensacola venues participating in this year’s Songwriters Festival, so if you want to hear your favorite music performed the way it was written, make plans to hit The Deck this weekend! Visit our website for a list of artists and schedules.

FISH HOUSE: (850) 470-0003, OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. · ATLAS: (850) 437-1961, MON.–SAT. 5 P.M., SUN. 11 A.M. · DOWNTOWN 600 S. BARRACKS ST. · CREDIT CARDS OK · WWW.GOODGRITS.COM 88

inweekly.net


THE KIDS AREN’T ALL RIGHT

Teen Violence in Escambia County By Jeremy Morrison This is not Columbia . This is not the battlefield of Mexico’s drug cartels. It’s not a backwards, third-world, over-there speck on the map. This is Escambia County, Florida. This is where 18-year-old Sergio Moorer reportedly made an old man drink gasoline, then set him on fire. September 29, 2011

“Lit him up!” shrieks a little girl in braids. The kids at Eress Park off of Massachusetts Avenue know all about it. The Aug. 21 homicide happened a block away. It’s unsettling to hear children casually describe a fruit vendor being burned alive. “He killed that watermelon man,” says another girl, as a group of kids gathered around the picnic table. “He sat him on fire.”

feature story

They can’t say why this happened, can’t explain why Deiante Elijah Graham, 17, got blown away earlier this month as he sat in a car, or why a baby got shot and killed in July. “Teenagers around here don’t have nothing better to do,” a slightly older boy searches for a possible reason for the increasingly grim landscape. The little girl’s aunt, a 27-year-old who prefers not to give her name, says it hasn’t always been like this. She blames teenagers quick to resort to violence.

“Every year it’s worse. It’s never been like this before.”

Deputy David Brown, ESCO Gang Unit

9


They call him ‘Money.’ After being named the primary suspect in a July shooting that resulted in the death of a 19-month-old toddler, Dwayne Cordell Pinestraw is presumed to have fled to Louisiana. / photo courtesy of Pensacola Police Department

“They’re outrageous,” the woman says. She talks about dark streets ruled by armed youth. She talks about her niece’s father getting murdered. “This neighborhood is not safe,” she says. “I do not even like coming outside at night.” Like the children, this woman doesn’t know why things seem to be getting so scary. She laughs nervously in lieu of an answer. “They fight to fight. Drugs. Money.” She throws out possibilities. “Everybody is broke, so they’re killing.” Escambia County Sherif f David Morgan thinks he knows why. He attributes the uptick in youth violence to a “societal breakdown”. “I’ve taken to apologizing to young people when I talk to them,” Morgan says. “Kids deserve an apology.”

THE MAN FROM UTOPIA

He barely looks old enough to drive. There’s a hint of innocence behind his heavy-lidded eyes. It’s easy enough to imagine Dwayne Cordell Pinestraw, 19, enjoying some ice cream. In the photo released by police, Pinestraw—also known as ‘Money’—is flashing a sheepish grin. Gleaming from his mouth is a goldplated grill, shining like a pair of knock-off

When the police fingered him as the triggerman in the shooting, Internet message boards lit up. Someone suggested melting down the gold to pay for the baby’s funeral. “I say it’s time to string people up again in the middle of town and make an example out of all these pieces of crap and quit with all the poor baby didn’t have a good childhood,” reads one post. “Who cares about your childhood you just took one from an innocent kid.” Sheriff Morgan said he wasn’t too concerned with the upbringing of teensturned-thugs, either. “Don’t know, don’t care,” the Sheriff said. “From a strict law enforcement perspective, I don’t care.” Morgan can effortlessly shed his emotions. Like a stone in winter, or John Wayne and Clint Eastwood sipping sarsaparilla in silence. But just minutes earlier, the Sherif f had theorized at length— approaching the warmness of a guidance counselor—about why some youth stray so far from humanit y ’s norms. He had referenced child-rearing guru Dr. Benjamin Spock ; albeit, Morgan was sug gesting the doctor ’s landmark book itself be used as a disciplinar y tool. “There is just this myriad of factors that interplay with this one issue,” the Sheriff had begun. “Everybody wants a sound bite answer.” Morgan’s office is spacious and tidy. The decor suggests a man with a stern, perhaps harsh, sense of humor. Settling into his chair, the Sheriff explained how he believed a general breakdown in society was playing out into the streets in the form of senseless violence. Morgan painted a picture of his youth that made Norman Rockwell look like Salvador Dali. He recalled family, faith and national sacrifice. He talked about “decent society”. Like most stories that cast post-war America as a Golden Age, Morgan’s version places utopia’s unraveling squarely at the feet of the 1960s.

“Any hint of gangs—we deal with that pronto.” Deputy Superintendent Norm Ross

Sergio Moorer, 18, is accused of stealing John Hall’s Kia Sorento, then forcing the 68-yearold man to drink gasoline before setting him ablaze. State prosecutors intend to seek the death penalty for the Aug. 21 homicide. / photo courtesy of Escambia County Sheriff’s Office

010 1

Rolexes with two different readings. Authorities have identified Pinestraw as the main suspect in a July 15 shooting at the Pensacola Village Apartments. In the middle of the afternoon, gunmen apparently fired into the window of apartment O-2 following a drug deal gone awry. Bullets wounded Vincent Dennis, 23, and killed Ty’Quarius Moultrie, 19 months old. Within days of the incident, Shaquill J. Besst, 18, also wanted in connection to the shooting, was taken into custody in Hammond, La. His mother turned him in. Pinestraw has yet to be found; he’s thought to be in Louisiana, as well.

“We have defined deviance down,” Morgan said. The Sheriff described how sex education in the school system was a big step over the edge. He said the cohabitation of unmarried people was a further sign of an erosion of values. Over the course of a couple of generations, humanity has slipped a long way from Ozzie and Harriet’s black-and-white paradise. Commercial acceptance of a song like “Cop Killer” is tough for a man like Morgan to stomach—and that 20-year-old tune now seems innocently antiquated.

“These kids, they don’t see the bad anymore. They’re so used to violence, they’re so quick to amp things up.” Lt. Robby Martin, ESCO School Resource Officer “Today, we glamorize the thug culture,” the Sheriff said. “So children think that’s normal.” And while he feels the world today fosters immoral and indecent behavior, Morgan said the ultimate responsibility of raising children lies with parents. After all, there are plenty of parents out there overcoming whatever obstacles they encounter to raise perfectly peachy kids. Without proper guidance, though, children are left to their own devices. They are raised by Hollywood or rappers or video games. Maybe they start to think girls really are bitches and hoes. Or pretend their joystick is a Glock as they shoot up a virtual world from the comfort of their couch. Or have “Scarface” playing on a constant wallpaper loop. “Kids grow up with this,” Morgan said. “The killing is normal.” The Sheriff argued that years of desensitization causes kids to make brutal decisions while wearing blinders to the consequences.

inweekly.net


“They’re going to sleep all day and stay up all night and play ‘Call of Duty’ or ‘Grand Theft Auto’ or whatever they do.” Lt. Martin “The Army uses these techniques, they desensitize,” he said, explaining that extreme violence requires some mental conditioning. “Taking someone’s life is an unnatural act.” It doesn’t take long for the Sheriff to tire of theorizing. It’s not the line of work he’s in. “The thrust of this whole sociological treatise, I guess, is that children are raising themselves with popular culture,” the Sheriff said, wrapping up his synopsis. “And popular culture is in the toilet.”

THUG LIFE

It’s a catchy little ditty. A little monotonous, but you can dance to it. Singing a sort of ode to the Pensacola area, a young man peers out into the world of YouTube. A message tattooed across his throat sets the mood: “Fuck’em All.” With the recurring, rhythmic chant of “Trez Up! Hoes down!”, it’s doubtful the Chamber of Commerce is going to be using the tune in one of its tourism ads. Perhaps they could choose another selection from the local artist—maybe “Thug For Life” or “I Forgive U Momma”. This is the kind of music the Escambia County Sheriff ’s Office’s Gang Unit likes to listen to. They don’t dance. They don’t sing along. “This is my Trez Up folder,” said Deputy David Brown, digging a thick binder out from behind his desk and mentioning that the unit attributes eight homicides in the past year—be it the killed or the killer—to Trez Up. The county’s gang unit is tucked away within a pale maze of governmental offices. It’s large and open and decorated with the mug shots of alleged gang members. There’s the Trez Up wall, the Shanty Town Posse wall, the Garnet Circle Boys wall and so on. “Every year it’s worse,” Brown said. “It’s never been like this before.” On a formulaic television cop drama, Brown would play the tough, ex-Navy diver that would reluctantly crack a joke at the end of each episode to make sure viewers knew he had a soft spot under the gristle. Riding his desk chair in a pair of faded jeans and cowboy boots, he motioned up to the collage of mugs on the wall. Noting that he used to run with some rough crowds, he explained that he knew some of these guys’ older brothers. “There was a street crime unit back in the day,” Brown said. “They targeted a September 29, 2011

Simmi Taylor

Licensed Skin Therapist

at 10th Avenue Sheriff David Morgan / photo by Samantha Crooke

Hair Design

Pevonia Botanica Spa Care group of Latin Kings back in the 90s, but it really wasn’t a problem.” In recent years, however, he pointed to a rise in youth crime and specifically gang activity. For legal purposes, a gang is defined as three or more people associating

high-school age and their early 20s. But he says they’re constantly getting younger. “Juvenile crime is most definitely on the rise,” he said. “Nowadays to catch a 16-year-old kid with a pocket full of crack or coke, that’s not uncommon.” Brown also contends that younger kids are getting more violent. In addition to actual arrests, the sheriff ’s office assumes many of their unresolved reports of gunfire are stemming from this youth community. “A lot of these shootings go unsolved,” Brown said. “But the word on the street is that ‘Lil’ so-and-so did this one, Lil’ so-and-so did that one.’” Out on the street, the deputy said he encounters older criminals who want nothing to do with the younger generation. They don’t play by the rules, even street rules. “They tell us, ‘these young JITS, they have no control, they’ll shoot anything,’” Brown said, explaining the acronym as juveniles-in-trouble. “At the end of the day they don’t care about anybody but themselves. They’ll shoot randomly.”

“We’ll save some. There’ll be small glimmers of hope, but very few. And I find that very sad.” Sheriff Morgan and regularly engaging in criminal activity. “When Sheriff Morgan came in, he recognized there was a serious problem, whereas others would not,” Brown said. The deputy swivels his chair around and dives into a computer. Flipping through a series of social media sites purportedly espousing local gang culture, he pulls up photos of kids flashing cash and guns and bragging about incomes in excess of $250,000. The people Brown deals with are usually somewhere between

Replenish YOUR skin from this Summer!

The Luminous “C” & “Sea” Facial A radical facial treatment for dull and dehydrated skin. This facial combines the high potency of Vitamin “C” with a stim- ulating Freeze-Dried Seaweed rendering skin firmer, brighter, more rejuvenated, and velvetysoft. An excellent treatment for smokers, sunbathers and sun-damaged skin. Soft lift-off mask. (60 min)

1000 East Cervantes

850-433-5207

unique & affordable

Join us for Wine Tastings Thursdays 5-7 p.m. 27 S. 9th Ave.

433-WINE or 433-9463

www.aragonwinemarket.com 11


Brown attributes this to a lack of guidance. “They’re either not being taught the right way, or they’re being taught the wrong way,” the deputy said, going on to describe an online video in which a young local mother teaches her toddler to throw signs while saying “Trez Up, hoes down”. Brown said he also sees a whole new generation coming up that views the gangster culture—or, more accurately, “gangsta”—as normal. “They think it’s cool, they’re mimicking it,” he said. “But they don’t get that they could get shot because they’re wearing a shirt or a hat.”

ARISTOTLE’S DILEMMA

On Sept. 9, Deiante Graham was riding in a car with two others. He never made it to his destination. A gunman fired shots into the vehicle at Royal Crest Apartments, wounding a female passenger and killing 17-year-old Graham. The outpouring of emotion from the community was intense. Memorial Facebook pages logged the grief. Graham’s old teammates on the Escambia High School football team held a carwash in an effort to defray his funeral costs. The sorrow will last much longer than the shots that split those early Sunday morning hours wide open.

“When someone pulls a trigger on a gun it’s over pretty quick,” said Sgt. Chris Huffman, of the Pensacola Police Department. As head of the department’s school resource officer program, Huffman deals with kids every day. He’s about to begin traversing the road toward retirement, but his post seems to be keeping him young. “We’re always gonna have our youth,” Huffman said, paraphrasing a woeful tirade about the younger generation. “—it went on about the youth being unruly. It was Aristotle!” The officer shied away from terms like “epidemic” or notions of a lost generation. But even in his glass-half-full view, Huffman said there were issues. “ We don’t see an epidemic,” he said. “But what we do see is there’s more violence.” Huffman has been on the force for quite some time, and a bulk of his career

today’s youth crime is considerably louder and tends to carry deathly consequences. “We did not have the shooting, the gun-related violence that we’re experiencing right now,” he said. And while the street may at times light up with the spark of gunfire, the schools so far have remained a relatively safe haven. “The biggest fear we all have is having a school shooting,” said Lt. Robby Martin, who works in the sheriff ’s resource officer program. Martin said that while schools have remained relatively safe, he worries that street violence could seep into the halls of academia. After all, it’s the same kids, just different hours of the day. “You have to think about where these kids are—or where are they supposed to be—five days a week,” Martin said. “Could that leak over to school stuff? Yeah, it can.” Escambia County School District Deputy Superintendent Norm Ross said

“I don’t know if you know anything about racing, but we got all these kids walking around here wearing these STP jackets—they don’t know anything about Richard Petty.” Lt. Robby Martin, ECSO

An online video shows a young local mother teaches her toddler to throw signs while saying “Trez Up, hoes down”. has been spent in the schools. He said that while there has always been youthrelated violence—he recalls a girl getting stabbed on the school bus, a kid beating a homeless man with a skateboard and the spree of cat mutilations in the late 1980s—

Bald is beautiful. Introducing Manscapes at Still Waters...

Many jokes followed the “40 year old virgin” concerning men and waxing but the fact is that more and more men are becoming “swimmer smooth”. Our staff at Still Waters provides a comfortable private waxing experienceof all body areas for men and women, Now also offering “the Guy-zilian”.

850-432-6772 20 North Tarragona St. stillwatersmedspa.com MM17509 (massage) EP604 (electrolysis) 212 1

there’s a reason the schools are safe. The kids know better. “Kids know if you act up on campus you’re going to be dealt with. Swiftly,”

Ross said, adding that the District also seeks to squash anything interpreted as gang-related. “We’ve taken a harsh stance against that as well. Gangs are not tolerated. Any hint of gangs—we deal with that pronto.” Once students leave campus—or school-related events, such as a ballgame—Ross admits the District has little control to curb delinquent behavior. Additional homework assignments probably won’t do much to curtail drive-bys. “ There’s not ver y many things that are gonna start at that ballgame,” he said. “Now, a couple of blocks away, a mile away? ”

The Law Office of

JOHN F.

ASMAR,

P.A.

The Next Generation of Legal Representation

www.AsmarLawFirm.com 1306 E. Cervantes St. 850.432.3864

The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience. inweekly.net


THE NASCAR GANG

Cruising slowly through the neighborhood streets, Lt. Martin spies a pair of cats wrestling in Saturday’s sun. “Cat fight,” he says casually, firing a quick blast from his siren to scare them off the street. “See you later.” Martin’s participating in one of the department’s Operation Clean Sweeps. Before he started working with schools, the officer worked the street. He’s given considerable thought to why today’s kids seem to lack the inner steering mechanism that guides most people, criminal or otherwise. “It comes from the kids being desensitized,” Martin says. “These kids, they don’t see the bad anymore. They’re so used to violence, they’re so quick to amp things up.” For years, the officer worked to curb the activities of the Garnett Circle Boys gang. He decides to take a drive through their old neighborhood. En route, he discusses how most of the community remains oblivious to the gang culture. “I don’t know if you know anything about racing,” Martin says, explaining a Shanty Town Posse fashion trend, “but we got all these kids walking around here wearing these STP jackets—they don’t know anything about Richard Petty.” With an AR-15 assault rifle resting securely beside him, he describes the stereotypical gang member as a teen “with just no aim in life”. “They’re going to sleep all day and stay up all night and play ‘Call of Duty’ or ‘Grand Theft Auto’ or whatever they do,” Martin says. Swinging the car onto a side street, Martin weaves through a collection of boarded up town homes. This is where he worked the streets, where he “lived and breathed”. “I knew everybody,” he says. “I knew their mamas.” Cold, suspicious stares are cast from front porches. The officer says there is a culture of opposition to authority, particularly law enforcement. He doesn’t know why. “It’s society,” Martin concludes. “There’s a deep-seeded hatred for us. We could go on and on about this. It’s society.”

LET GO MY EGO

Back in the Gang Unit office, Brown described local groups of neighborhood kids as “hybrid gangs”. It’s not the Bloods or the Crips or the Hells Angels. There is no multimillion dollar illegal trade to protect. These gangs are based primarily on geography, with a neighborhood locality being the unifying factor. Brown pointed to FBI statistics, which attribute 80 percent of overall crime to such hybrid gangs. There’s an argument that connects this demographic’s increased violence with the greater availability of guns. Sheriff Morgan doesn’t buy into that argument. There have always been guns, but drivebys are a more recent phenomenon. “We knew the value of life and we knew the value of death,” Morgan said, recalling how all his classmates would bring their firearms to school to hunt during recess. “You’d give your gun and ammunition to Mr. Reynolds. You’d see a 410 and a couple of 22s...there was never a thought of shooting a teacher or shooting another student.” Sgt. Huffman has another theory. “It seems more and more that it’s based on personalities,” said Sgt. Huffman. Brown agrees. He described a community of thugs consumed with ego for ego’s sake. He recalled a conversation with an older inmate who told him this generation was lost, told him to start working on the 5-year-olds. “I think, sadly, that’s probably true,” conceded Sheriff Morgan. “We’ll save some. There’ll be small glimmers of hope, but very few. And I find that very sad.” The Sheriff said that despite the attimes disheartening landscape, he remains guardedly optimistic. “I’m not a fatalist in that I think all is lost,” he said. “That’s why I do what I do. If I thought the fight was lost, why would I care?” Back at the park, the kids just hope somebody cares. One of them points to an older uncle, says he’s there because of there have been reports of a “kid raper”. A guy walking past the park finishes up his cell phone conversation. He’s 23 years old and prefers to remain anonymous. He says it’s getting worse and doesn’t know why. “A lot of crazy shit happens, man,” he says. “I dunno.” {in}

Experience Our Difference.

“When someone pulls a trigger on a gun it’s over pretty quick.” Sgt. Chris Huffman, PPD

“We don’t see an epidemic, but what we do see is there’s more violence.” Sgt. Huffman

“I’m not a fatalist in that I think all is lost. That’s why I do what I do. If I thought the fight was lost, why would I care?” Sheriff Morgan

September 29, 2011

The Area’s Only Accredited

Chest Pain Center West Florida Hospital is the only hospital in the region to earn Chest Pain Center accreditation by the prestigious Society of Chest Pain Centers, an international professional organization focused on improving care for patients with acute coronary symptoms and other related conditions. The accreditation followed a stringent and comprehensive review of the expertise of our operating systems and the compassionate care we provide our chest pain patients. As an Accredited Chest Pain Center, West Florida Hospital ensures that patients who come to our Emergency Room complaining of chest pain or discomfort are given the immediate treatment necessary to avoid as much heart damage as possible. Protocol-based procedures developed by leading experts in cardiac care to reduce time to treatment in the critical early stages of a heart attack are part of our overall cardiac care service. And, should you need to be admitted, West Florida Hospital is the only hospital in the area that can guarantee your own private room during your stay.

As the area’s only Accredited Chest Pain Center, the ER at West Florida can provide: • Reduced time to treatment during the critical stages of a heart attack • A systematic approach to cardiac care that improves outcomes • Timely accurate diagnoses of all patients presenting with signs and symptoms of heart disease that help reduce unnecessary admissions • Recognizable symbol of trust that helps patients and EMS make decisions at highly stressful times

Quality Care for All Major & Minor Emergencies Accredited Chest Pain Center • Certified Stroke Center

A free informational service of West Florida Hospital:

Our ER Wait Time at Your Fingertips... n Text ER to 23000 on your mobile phone to

|

8383 North Davis Highway 850-494-3212 www.WestFloridaHospital.com

receive a message displaying the average wait time to see a medical provider. n Go to www.WestFloridaHospital.com to find our average wait time, updated every thirty minutes. 13


414 1

inweekly.net


15

September 15, 2011

health & wellness Special Adver tising Section September 2 011

New Therapy Zaps the Blues by Jeremy Morrison

At first glance, it looks a lot like a dental chair. Then you notice the part of the machine that’s dangling overhead. That’s the apparatus that sends magnetic fields into the frontal lobe of your brain. “It’s basically going to depolarize the neurons in the brain in the prefrontal cortex,” says Kelli Walker, MS, a mental health worker with The Anchor Clinic in downtown Pensacola. “It’s really awesome.” On the clinic’s third floor office complex, sits the sleek, clinical chair that Walker calls her “baby.” The device, a NeuroStar TMS Therapy System, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2008. It’s used for the treatment of depression. The acronym TMS is probably not a familiar one, as the technology has just recently gained visibility. It stands for transcranial magnetic stimulation, and it’s exactly what it sounds like. According to Neuronetics, the company that makes the NeuroStar system, the process involves sending tiny electrical currents into the brain in hopes that it will increase the levels of neurotransmitters and thus relieve symptoms of depression. The treatment is approved for adults who are not having success with one or more antidepressant medications. It sounds strange. Something from the future or outer space. Walker assures that the concept of using electromagnetic stimulation on the brain has been around for decades, but only recently been approved for use to treat depression.

Walker said that, at first glance, the idea of zapping your brain may seem “sci-fi, or weird,” but that people who have found no relief for their depression to date may want to take a second look. “If you’ve been depressed for 20 years, if you’ve been taking medications for 20 years,” she proffers, “why not try something else?” In the simplest terms, doctors currently believe that depression is caused by an imbalance of certain chemicals in the brain. Attempts to alleviate the symptoms of depression are essentially attempts to balance out those chemicals. “Medication does attempt to do that,” said Walker. “More often than not, poorly.” Seated behind an office desk, Anchor’s TMS Coordinator takes out a binder. From within the binder, she pulls out a flow chart and places it on the desk. Walker points to the chart and runs her finger down a list of antidepressant medications. There are plenty of them. Celexa, Lexapro and Prozac. And Luvox, Paxil or Zoloft. How about Wellbutrin? Maybe some Cymbalta, Effexor, Pristiq, Edronax, Remeron or Trazadone? “And the medications may or may not work,” Walker warns, before moving her finger over to another long list.

To the side of the flow chart is a list of possible side effects from antidepressants. It reads like a smorgasbord of things to avoid, things that could be quite depressing themselves. Possible side effects from the myriad of antidepressant medications include diarrhea, nausea, insomnia and constipation. Also nervousness and anxiety, abnormal ejaculation, impotence and decreased sexual interest. Or you could experience weight gain, and increased or decreased appetite. Medications could also cause weakness and fatigue, dry mouth or dizziness, and possibly sweating or tremors. Walker said that TMS therapy does not have any side effects, except for some reports of a mild headache. She didn’t expect the pharmaceutical companies to be too keen on the practice once it caught on. “They’re going to hate it,” Walker said about the pharmaceutical companies. “They’re goning start losing money like crazy on medication. That’s their problem.” Currently, TMS therapy is not a realistic option for many patients. The service, which cost upwards of $10,000 for a sixweek treatment, is not covered by most insurance companies.

“If you can handle being thumped on the head for six weeks and come out a different person, it’s totally worth it.” Kelli Walker, MS

Ihatejoezarzaur.com .....or so his last trial opponent may think.

“We would have people lined up around the street if their insurance would cover it,” Walker said, adding that she suspected the practice would soon be covered. “As soon as insurance kicks in we’re probably going to have to buy five machines.” In addition to lacking side effects and being relatively affordable (in comparison to years on medications), the NeuroStar treatment reportedly works. According to Walker, patients experiencing no success with medications have seen improvements after undergoing magnetic-wave sessions. But what is considered a successful run in the TMS chair? Cured? “That’s patient-specific,” says Walker, explaining that she has seen people fully recover and drop all their meds, and she’s seen patients simply reach a coping point, but feels the therapy has been overall useful in treating depression within the clinic. With the machines being somewhat of a novelty, a few doctors in the clinic gave them a spin to see what the ride was like. No one sat through a full session, just a small taste. “I wanted to know how it felt,” Walker says. “It didn’t hurt.” She compared the experience to being thumped in the head. The process is reportedly loud and “annoying.” She said men seemed more bothered by the transcranial magnetic stimulation than did women. “If you can handle being thumped on the head for six weeks and come out a different person,” Walker says, “it’s totally worth it.” {in}


| SPECIA L ADV 2010 | S pERTISING e c i a l A dSEC v e TION r t i s i n| gM A S RCH ectio n | September 2011 health & wellness

profile

Health Talk: Jason Burnett, Company Manager/Owner, Cornerstone Visiting Angels Services, LLC

After spending years abroad working for the government as a morale, welfare and recreation manager, Jason Burnett — a husband and father of two — decided to open his own business. Here, he talks about his experiences helping others abroad and his desire to help those right here in our own community. IN: How did you become interested in the home health care industry? BURNETT: I enjoy helping others and being a service to others. In today's society I think we need more people who are into helping others and being a service to others instead of the what's-in-it-for-me attitude. After seven years in the Middle East and traveling all over the world, meeting new people and learning new cultures, my wife and I began to think about a business we could open in the Pensacola area that would be a help to others and at the same time, like any other business, be profitable. We began to do research and found out that the popula-

preparations, errand running, with daily activities, especially the elderly, you medication reminders, comdecrease the chances of potential accidents panionship/sitter services, and such as falls, auto accidents, and forgetting to other activities of daily living take their meds, and you give peace of mind services. We make our services for the loved one that hired us to assist with affordable, especially with most their parents knowing that they have a trusted of our clients being on a fixed friend helping their loved ones. monthly income. Along with the affordable price we offer, it IN: What do you enjoy doing when you're includes all of the services we not overseeing your business? provide. We also send the same BURNETT: In my free time I like to spend it Pictured from left to right are Dr. Amanda Gottschalk, Visiting Visiting Angels to the client each with family and friends. I also like to go fishing Angel Supervisor and Chiropractor; Jason Burnett, Company time because we want to build a and love to travel. I've been blessed to be able Manager/Owner; and Tina House, Visiting Angel relationship with each of our clito travel all over the world and I love it! {in} ents, and it also provides tion of America is starting to age. Plus, the life consistency of services. expectancy is longer now than what it was a few decades ago. IN: What's the best part of your job? IN: What kinds of different services do you BURNETT: We are offering seroffer at Cornerstone Visiting Angels? vices to our clients at an afford456-3008 BURNETT: (Cornerstone Visiting Angels) is able price who normally may not cornerstonevisitingangels.com an in-home non-medical service that provides be able to afford such services. housekeeping, transportation services, meal When you can help someone

CORNERSTONE VISITING ANGELS SERVICES, LLC

www.GeneMitchellAttor ney.com

There is a way for you to support WUWF.

E r i c D. St e v e n s on Personal Injur y | Criminal Justice 919 N. 12th Avenue Pensacola, Florida 32501

O: (850) 434-3111 F: (850) 434-1188

Federal employees may now designate contributions to WUWF 88.1 FM (CFC# 33728). You will find WUWF listed as the University of West Florida Foundation, the 501(c)3 organization responsible for handling contributions to WUWF Public Media. Any questions? Call 850.474.2787 or visit wuwf.org. We appreciate your support!

davidle esellers.com • email: eric@davidle esellers.com 616 1

inweekly.net


family sports complex

September 29, 2011

17


| SPECIA L ADV |M | S pERTISING e c i a l A dSEC v eTION rtisin g ASRCH e c t i 2010 on | September 2011 health & wellness

featured h&w services

indoor pool, rubico tennis courts, a 10,000-squarefoot fitness center, and more. Club staff and members develop life-long relationships that support your progress toward health, wellness and a balanced lifestyle.

STILL WATERS DAY & MEDICAL SPA 20 N. Tarragona St., 432-6772, stillwatersmedspa.com Still Waters Day & Medical Spa offers world class spa treatments and medical aesthetic treatments to enhance the appearance of your skin and body. The spa menu includes a blend of medical aesthetic and laser, skin and body services designed to help you escape. Still Waters also offers spa gifts and home spa accessories.

FIXED ON FITNESS, INC. 554-1648, fi xedonfitness.com Fixed on Fitness boot camp provides an ideal combination of personal training, accountability, camaraderie and hard work, which results in a dynamic approach to total fitness. Throughout the six weeks of boot camp, you are introduced to a variety of workout techniques, exercises and challenges. Each workout is different, so campers experience 24 new workouts.

Day Spas

Eye Specialists

DR. GENE TERREZZA – TERREZZA OPTICAL 113 Palafox Place, 434-2060, terrezzaoptical.com The practice, which includes Dr. Gene Terrezza and Dr. Ruben E. Carlson, offers services in complete family eye care, including routine vision exams, glasses and contact lenses, therapeutic interventions, dry eyes and pre-operative and post-operative management of cataract and refractive surgery patients.

Health Care Organizations

BAPTIST HEALTH CARE 434-4071, ebaptisthealthcare.org Baptist Health Care is a community-owned, not-for-profit health care organization serving Northwest Florida and South Alabama. Baptist Health Care includes four hospitals, two medical parks, Baptist Manor, Baptist Home Health Care and Durable Medical Equipment, Baptist Leader-

ship Institute, Andrews Institute for Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine and Lakeview Center. SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM 416-7000, sacred-heart.org More than 600 primary and specialty physicians practice at Sacred Heart, a not-for-profit healthcare organization. Its main services include Sacred Heart Medical Group, a network of primary care physicians, a 24-hour Emergency Trauma Center, a Pediatric Trauma ReFerràl Center and centers of excellence specializing in women's health, cardiac care, orthopedics, cancer care and the care of children. WEST FLORIDA HEALTHCARE 494-3212, westfloridahospital.com West Florida Healthcare is proud to offer the only local hospital featuring all private rooms. The West Florida campus also offers the area’s only comprehensive rehabilitation hospital and a mental health facility. West Florida also provides services in cardiovascular surgery, oncology, neurosurgery, orthopedics, emergency care, behavioral health, obstetrics and many other medical specialties.

Health Clubs and Fitness

THE CLUB FAMILY SPORTS COMPLEX 1230 Crane Cove Blvd., Gulf Breeze, 916-7946, theclubfamilysports.com The Club offers something for everyone, including an Olympic-sized outdoor swimming pool, an

Hypnotherapy

LUMINOUS LIFE HYPNOTHERAPY 346-7865, luminouslifehypnotherapy.com Susan Dunlop, M.A., C.H.T., offers hypnosis as therapy for a variety of issues such as bereavement, relationship problems, divorce recovery, stress management, depression, phobias, negative habits, motivation, sleep problems, trauma, sports excellence, pain management and more. Dunlop is an internationally certified hypnotherapist trained in the United States by the American Academy of Hypnotherapy, the nation's foremost hypnotherapy institute.

Skin Care

DR. SCOTT MCMARTIN Medical Center Clinic, Dermatology and Laser Center, 8333 N. Davis Highway, 474-8386 Dr. Scott McMartin is a board certified dermatologist who practices general, surgical and cosmetic

dermatology. Areas of practice include skin cancer evaluation and treatment, light therapy for psoriasis and eczema, psoriasis laser therapy, laser tattoo removal, Botox therapy, and pulsed dye laser treatment for facial redness, blood vessels and inherited birthmarks. To schedule an appointment with Dr. McMartin, please call 474-8386. SIMMI TAYLOR, LICENSED SKIN THERAPIST 10th Avenue Hair Design, 1000 E. Cervantes St., 433-5207 Simmi Taylor offers a variety of pampering treatments, including facials, body treatments and body waxing. Taylor uses the Pevonia product line, which is a member of the organic trade association, as well as honey with vitamin E and organic soy wax. Gift certificates are available. DR. KEVIN WELCH Pensacola Office: Medical Center Clinic, Dermatology and Laser Center 8333 N. Davis Highway, 474-8386 Gulf Breeze Office: 2874 Gulf Breeze Parkway, 916-9969 kevinwelchmd.com Dr. Kevin Welch offers everything from skin creams to advanced laser and rejuvenation procedures. Popular treatments and services at the Dermatology and Laser Center include Thermage, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL), Photofacials, laser hair removal, Microdermabrasion and Silk Peels. The Skin Care Center offers high-end dermatology products, including Obagi products, Kinerase, Jane Iredale cosmetics, Tilley Hats and more. Services are also available at the Skin Care Center in Gulf Breeze.

Presented by Twisted Canyon Productions in conjunction with Concert Systems Production Group

KENFORD JACKIEMJOYNER

TICKETS

AVAILABLE NOW! TICKETMASTER.COM

PENSACOLA SAENGER BOX OFFICE 850-595-3880 VIP TICKETS LEMOX BOOK COMPANY 850-478-2081

SAENGER THEATRE DOWNTOWN PENSACOLA

SPONSORED BY

Thursday, November 10th 2011

Michael Johnson

Car City, Pensacola Florida 850-433-7671 www.vincewhibbs.com

Pensacola Airport/Cordova Mall

LIKE US PENSACOLA CULTURAL JAZZ SERIES 818 1

PENSACOLA

4 OF SERIES FridaySeptember 30th PART Cultural JESSY J, NATE NAJAR at JONATHAN FRITZEN JAZZ 7:30PM S E R I E S

WWW.PENSACOLACULTURALJAZZSERIES.COM DON’T MISS ANY OF THE SERIES IN 2011!

inweekly.net


A SALUTE TO DIFFERENCE MAKERS J. Collier Merrill is a difference maker locally, regionally and nationally. He recently ended his tenure as chairman of the Pensacola Bay Area Chamber of Commerce where his steady leadership guided that organization as it transitioned to a new management team and launched a five-year economic development initiative.

Collier is the president of Merrill Land Company, a real estate development company specializing in condominium development along the Northwestern Gulf Coast. He is the president of the Great Southern Restaurant Group, LLC, which owns and operates The Fish House and The Atlas Oyster House restaurants. He is also an owner of Jackson’s Steak House.

He is currently on the Board of Trustees for the University of West Florida, Community Maritime Park Associates and the Naval Aviation Museum Foundation. He served on the board of directors of the UWF Foundation, Wachovia Bank, the Pensacola Area Chamber of Commerce, Sacred Heart Health System and the West Florida Historic Preservation Board. He is chairman of the Community Maritime Park Associates and of the Tocqueville Society for United Way and a trustee emeritus of the Pensacola Museum of Art. Previously, Collier served as chairman of the UWF Board of Trustees, chairman of the Legislative Affairs Committee for the Florida Board of Regents, chairman of the Florida Arts Council, a member of the Northwest Florida Arts Council and president of the Pensacola Museum of Art. He has served as a member of the boards of the Pensacola Junior College Foundation, Catholic Social Services and the Pensacola chapter of the American Red Cross. He was a member of Leadership Florida/Florida Chamber of Commerce and Leadership Pensacola/Pensacola Area Chamber of Pensacola. He was past president and chairman of economic development for the Home Builders Association of Northwest Florida and served as a mentor for Big Brothers/Big Sisters. In 2000, Collier was named the University of West Florida’s Distinguished Alumni of the Year. He also has been named an Art Education Hero by the Florida Cultural Alliance; the Excellence Award Winner as a Community Leader, and the Emerging Leader Award Winner by the Pensacola Area Chamber of Commerce; an Outstanding Volunteer Fundraiser by the National Society of Fund Raising Volunteers; and a Paul Harris Fellow, Rotary International.

September 29, 2011

19


020 2

inweekly.net


21

September 29, 2011

arts + entertainment photo by Frank Bruesky

September

a r t , f i l m , m u s i c , s ta g e , b o o k s a n d o t h e r s i g n s o f c i v i l i z a t i o n . . .

And The Winner Is‌

The votes are in and tallied and we are finally ready to announce who's the best of the best around town. Tune in next week for our annual Best of the Coast issue.

Behind Open Doors

Gallery 88 is opening a new exhibit this week called "Doorways of the French Quarter" by photographer Frank Bruesky. Don't miss this chance to see one of America's oldest and most storied neighborhoods in a unique way. wuwf.org

photo by Frank Bruesky

Seriously Funny

Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogen are teaming up for 50/50— which despite being about guys' battle with cancer, actually looks pretty funny. And it's from the team that gave the world Superbad, so we're expecting lots of jokes about balls and medical marijuana.

Tick-Tock, Tick-Tock

Time is running out to get advance (a.k.a cheaper) tickets to the year's biggest beach party. Single Day Passes are officially on sale now too-so if that's what you've been waiting for, you better jump on it while the price is right ($75 per day plus fees). So buy 'em early while you still can and save yourself from the walk-up price. You're going to need that extra money for merch and beer anyway. delunafest.com


222 2

inweekly.net

art

by Kate Peterson

Miró Is So Surreal From now until Nov. 13, the Pensacola Museum of Art will display 40 or more of Joan Miró’s works, lithographs and etchings. The show is titled “Joan Miró: Order and Chaos.” “We are so excited to have such a high caliber show,” according to Pensacola Museum of Art Executive Director Sonya Davis. “We are very proud to carry on a tradition.” The show is part of a traveling exhibit presented by BlairMurrah Exhibitions, which offers many such traveling shows. This particular exhibit was a good fit for the museum. The Director of Blair-Murrah group — Elizabeth Morrow — is the former Executive Director of the Pensacola Museum of Art. She contacted Davis to host the show. The exhibit coincides with one of the museums biggest fundraising events of the year – Suite Soiree. Joan Miró i Ferrà was born in Barcelona, Spain in 1893, and lived until 1983. He is a Catalan painter, ceramist and sculptor who spent his childhood in Barcelona and later moved to Paris, France. Inspired by cubist and surrealist artists, such as Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Cezanne, he moved to Paris in 1920, still spending his summers in Catalonia. While studying art, and developing his unique style, he dismissed conventional painting because he felt it glorified bourgeois society views, by being so structured. Miró had his first show at the Dalmau Gallery in Barcelona, in 1918. His work was so highly criticized that it was both ridiculed and vandalized.

“My characters have undergone the same process of simplification as the colors,” the artist is quoted as saying. “Now that they have been simplified, they appear more human and alive than if they had been represented in all their details.” Miró worked with many young artists over his years in Spain and France. In 1926, he collaborated with Ma x Ernst, who with Miró’s help pioneered the technique of grattage, toweling pigment onto canvas. Mir´ ó’s work was elementary, and yet was a window into the thoughts, feelings and visions of a man who was very structured and controlled on the outside.

In 1937, Pierre Matisse, after opening the Pierre Matisse Gallery in New York City, introduced Miró to the United States for the very first time. Matisse regularly exhibited Miró’s work from that moment forward. Davis is excited to be able to bring this work to Pensacola. “We are so very pleased to be able to get an exhibit like this. It is such a dynamic show,” she noted. “The yearly fundraiser, Suite Soiree, always has a corresponding ‘big name’ exhibit, last year we had a quilt exhibit that included quilts from all over the

world. Suite Soiree really kicks off the cultural season, and we try to have an engaging exhibit.” Miró is one of the most influential ar tists of the modern ar t movement. Pensacola Museum of Art has so much to offer the community, not just this exhibit but also so much more. Running concurrently with the Miró show is an exhibit by illustrator Janeen Mason, called “Drawn to the Story”; she writes and illustrates award-winning children's picture books. The exhibit consists of 100 original picture book illustrations. Along with regular exhibits, the museum offers tours, openings for each show, Saturday workshops, after-school art programs, homeschool art school and summer camps. Additionally, they have a permanent collection, you can rent the facility for events and they have a store complete with jewelry, pottery, prints, books and children’s items. An upcoming exhibit, titled “Woven and Wrapped: Kimonos, Clothing and Culture of Early 20th Century Japan,” runs Nov. 11 through Dec. 12. {in}

“Joan Miró: Order and Chaos”

WHEN: Now through Nov. 13 WHERE: Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. COST: Members Free, Non-Members $5 DETAILS: pensacolamuseumofart.org


23

September 29, 2011

music

by Kate Peterson

Junior Boys Head South Junior Boys hail from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The duo’s music is categorized as electronica indie synth pop. Whatever you want to call them, they are cutting edge and much admired in the techno world. It is the background music to your space flight, or the backdrop to being entrenched in some heavy-duty creative process. Junior Boys formed in 1999, with original members Greenspan and Johnny Dark. Greenspan and Dark made some recordings, but it was not until 2002 that they caught the attention of KIN records, in the UK. It was then that Dark made his way out of the duo and Matthew Didemus stepped in. Didemus was the band’s engineer. In 2003, Greenspan and Didemus wrote and recorded the first album for the band, titled “Birthday/Last Exit.” It is a four-track EP, and one track features the Austrian guitarist Fennesz. IN talked to Greenspan at his home in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. “Johnny and I started together, but the majority of the years as a band have been under Matthew’s influence.” Greenspan says. “Our background as kids, teenagers coming up in the 90’s, was industrial-electronic music. We got into the Detroit techno scene. There was an underground music scene happening and all-ages rave parties. Dance music is infectious. It became our roots; we loved the music so much. We were into artists no one had heard of and are not household names like Robert Hood.” Touring is something this band does rarely. “We take really long breaks. We are not like a usual band, we have a strange life,” according to Greenspan. “Half of the time, we

are in isolation, in Hamilton, living a laid-back lifestyle. Then we decide to tour or make a record. We are kind of like musical reservists, called up to play music and create.” Junior Boys have traveled all over the United States, Canada and Europe. They have released four albums to date, and are constantly writing new material. In addition, the band has been very busy playing festivals like Pitchfork in Chicago and Coachella in Indio, California. “Yeah, it is great to play when we do,” Greenspan says. “It is normally three of us on stage: me on keyboards and signing, Matthew on synth and computerizing sounds, and Dale on an electronic drum kit. We keep it simple.” Greenspan also offered his take on the differences between American and Canadian music scenes.

cheapened, leaving the listeners disillusioned. Live music shows used to be about being really into the music, getting into it, listening and tuning in, now they have been reduced to being seen at the scene.” The music Greenspan is listening to now would surprise many, current R&B, Wiz Kahlifa, Lil’ Wayne, Detroit artists like Kyle Hall and an assortment of dance music, like Kelley Polar. Plans beyond tour remain unclear. “I don’t know,” Greenspan says. “We feel like we completed something when we come off tour. Also, I have been doing some producing.” Keep an eye out for their next adventure, coming down south to Pensacola’s own Vinyl Music Hall. The opening band for the Junior Boys at Vinyl is Egyptrixx. Like Junior Boys, Egyptrixx hails from Canada. Toronto, that is. In just over a year, his distinct sound has become an acclaimed presence in underground music. All of his recent recordings are in heavy rotation on BBC Radio 1 and Kiss FM, among others. His unique and energetic shows have been booked all over Europe and North America. {in}

“We both come at it from different perspectives,” he says. “What amazes me about the American music scene, is the variation of people, it is unbelievable. Although Canada is bigger, the variation of people, from area to area within the country, does not exist as it does in the United States. You can go from Philadelphia to Memphis and there is a gigantic difference in who shows up to hear our music. So for us it is not so much about playing in America, but more where are we playing.” WHEN: 9 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 1 Greenspan says this about WHERE: Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox St. the music scene today: “When COST: $10 - $12 you are thirty years or older DETAILS: vinylmusichall.com you listen to the music of your childhood. Seems that much of today’s music has become

JUNIOR BOYS WITH EGYPTRIXX

Tri it! They’ll like it!

Make the whole family happy with an incredible adventure aboard a world-class Condor 40 racing trimaran! It’s family fun — times three. PA L A FOX P I E R MA R I N A · D OW N TOWN PE N S ACOL A

CONDOR SAILING

Adventures

850.637.SAIL (7245) • www.condorsailingadventures.com


424 2

inweekly.net

music

by Hana Frenette

The War on Drugs Wages on as De Luna Fest Nears The War on Drugs sounds new and exciting, but it also sounds eerily familiar, like Bob Dylan singing over New Order. Or Bruce Springsteen playing with Animal Collective. Reviewers dubbed their first album, “Wagon Wheel Blues,” as “the perfect road trip music”. Frontman Adam Granduciel took time during an elevator ride in a Hyatt Hotel in Minneapolis to admit that it wasn’t on purpose. “I think that album just kind of turned out that way, and those songs have that spirit to them, which is cool,” Granduciel said. “Because when you are driving and you hear that perfect road song, it’s like, ‘turn that shit up!’ and it seems like the most awesome thing in the world.” The War on Drugs’ latest album, “Slave Ambient,” is accurately titled as it drifts away from the folk undertones of their earlier albums and arrives as something more experimental. “There was a lot of time spent on the tape machine, just zoning out,” Granduciel said. “We wanted to do something different and not so run-of-the-mill; lots of experimentation and evolving.” Another thing that’s been evolving on the records, besides the music itself, are the lyrics, and the process of arriving at the lyrics.

“When you are driving and you hear that perfect road song, it’s like, ‘turn that shit up!’ and it seems like the most awesome thing in the world.” Adam Granduciel

new music” and Rolling Stone gave it four stars. What to do now that everyone is raving about them? Daydream about a tour bus stocked with food. “We are riding around in a 15 passenger van now, but I’ve been inside those big tour buses before,” Granduciel said. “Sometimes I think about what I would do on a bus like that and I’d start by opening the fridge and seeing it full of vegetables. Then I’d maybe make a tofu scrambler.” Food is always a good ingredient in decadent dreams, but a practical one nonetheless. “I think if you can find a good breakfast place in whatever city you happen to be in, 80 percent of your problems are over,” Granduciel said. The War on Drugs has been informed of the tofu infused specialties at Sluggo’s, so it’s a possibility you might find them there the morning after their show at De Luna Fest, thankfully acknowledging the elimination of a good chunk of the day’s problems. {in} Adam Granduciel / photo courtesy of Secretly Canadian

“When I record in the moment, I try not to write it all out and perfect it,” Granduciel said. “I always have one or two improving lines, and it grows over time, and gets rearranged, reworked.” Granduciel finally records what’s been reworked in his head over several recording sessions, but when it comes to performing live the improving is no longer a factor in the sound.

“Lyrically, for the most part when we’re performing, what’s recorded stays pretty consistent,” Granduciel said. “Straight and narrow, just like the record.” “Slave Ambient” has been out for little more than a month and is already winning over some pretty-hard-to-win-over reviewers. Pitchfork called it “the best

Laine will perform and Belle will entertain the kids. Plaza de Luna, at the end of Palafox. 4351695 or cityofpensacola.com/cra.

paired by Amber Rushing. $40 per person. For reservations, call 384-4333. Lee House Pensacola, 400 Bayfront Parkway.

DOUG GILL, LYNN LANGHAM 6 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

HERB CLASS AT EVER’MAN 6 p.m. Thursdays. Free for members, $2 for non-members. Ever’man Natural Foods, 315 W. Garden St. 4380402 or everman.org.

PHINEAS PHOGGETTES 10 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 4346211 or sevillequarter.com.

LUCAS CRUTCHFIELD 6 p.m. Thursdays. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com.

VEGAN DINNER AT EOTL 6 p.m. Thursdays. End of the Line Café, 610 E. Wright St. 429-0336 or eotlcafe.com.

live music

JONMARK STONE 5 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com.

JOHN FRIDAY 6 p.m. Juana’s Pagodas, 1451 Navarre Beach Causeway. 939-2130 or juanaspagodas.com.

LOUIS ‘COWBOY’ JOHNSON 6 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com.

ED BEAVER, JOE STONE, JIM PASQUALE 7 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

THE WAR ON DRUGS

WHAT: The War on Drugs at DeLuna Fest with Weezer, The Shins, Ra Ra Riot, Big Boi and more WHEN: Oct. 14-16 WHERE: De Luna Fest COST: $189.95 DETAILS: delunafest.com

happenings THURSDAY 9.29

CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL 12 p.m. Chumuckla’s Farmers’ Opry, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road. 994-9219 or farmersopry.com. ‘IT’S 5 O’ CLOCK SOMEWHERE’ MARGARITA TASTING 2 p.m. Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com. WINE TASTING AT AWM 5 p.m. Thursdays. Aragon Wine Market, 27 S. Ninth Ave. 433-9463 or aragonwinemarket.com. SUNSETS AT PLAZA DE LUNA 5:30 p.m. Cary

WINE COCKTAILS AND GOURMET BUFFET AT LEE HOUSE 7 p.m. Thursdays. Chef Blake Rushing presents a gourmet buffet and wine cocktails


25

September 29, 2011

happenings ROB WOLF 7 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com. JOURDAN PACE 7 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s , 4 0 0 Quiet water Beach Road. 916- 9 8 8 8 or bamboowillies .com. MELISSA BRETHAUER 7 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via De Luna Drive. 916-2999.

DAN DEMAY, KEVIN DENNEY, DARYL BURGESS, GARY LOYD, KAREN LOYD 9 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com. LISA CARVER, CHELEY TACKETT, ANNIE MOSHER 9 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

RB STONE 7 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

RUSTY TABOR, TOMMY CONNORS, STEVEN DALE JONES 9 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

CJ WATSON AND LOTS OF FRIENDS 7 p.m. Hub Stacey’s Downtown, 312 E. Government St. 4691001 or hubstaceys.com.

DONNA SLATER, KIM CARSON 9 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 6779153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

CHARLIE & DANA BLACK 7 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com.

SHAWNA P & ADAM TYLER BROWN 9 p.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com.

RICK CARNES, JANIS CARNES 7 p.m. Lillo’s Tuscan Grille, 5 Via de Luna. 934-5456 or lillostuscangrille.com. JIM MCBRIDE, JERRY SALLEY, KAREN STALEY 7:30 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. KARAOKE WITH BECKY 7:30 p.m. Thursdays. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 9343141 or dalesbigdeck.com. KRISTIN LONG 7:30 p.m. Thursdays. 60 0 South Atrium, 60 0 S. Palafox. 432-525 4 or 60 0southpalafox.com. GREG CROWE, JIM FEMINO 8 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com. PHILLIP WHITE, AMBER WHITE, EARL BUD LEE 8 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com. TREVOR FINLAY, KEN MORTON 8 p.m. Lillo’s Tuscan Grille, 5 Via de Luna. 934-5456 or lillostuscangrille.com. RONNIE LEVINE, MICHAEL WHEELER 8 p.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com. MARC BLACK 8 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via De Luna Drive. 916-2999. BOBBY KEEL, KENNY BAGGETT 8 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 9322211 or sandshaker.com. RHONDA HART, ELAINE PETTY 8 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 6779153 or thegrandmarlin.com. TORE ANDERSON, OTTAR JOHANSEN 8 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com. DUELING PIANOS 8 p.m. Thursdays. Rosie O’Grady’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. DJ MR LAO 8 p.m. Thursdays. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. STEVE HALL 8 p.m. Juana’s Pagodas, 1451 Navarre Beach Causeway. 939-2130 or juanaspagodas.com.

COLLEGE DANCE NIGHT 9 p.m. Thursdays. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. LIVE MUSIC 9:30 p.m. Thursdays. Intermission, 214 S. Palafox. 433-6208. RUNAWAY HOME 10 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

FRIDAY 9.30

CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL 12 p.m. Chumuckla’s Farmers’ Opry, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road. 994-9219 or farmersopry.com. WINE TASTING AT DK 4:30 p.m. Fridays. Distinctive Kitchens, 29 S. Palafox. 438-4688 or dk4u.com. COLE BROS. CIRCUS 5 p.m. Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds, 6655 W. Mobile Highway. 944-4500. WINE TASTING AT SEVILLE QUARTER 5 p.m. Fridays. Palace Café at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. WINE TASTING AT CITY GROCERY 5:15 p.m. Fridays. City Grocery, 2050 N. 12th Ave. 469-8100. WINE TASTING AT EAST HILL MARKET 5:30 p.m. Fridays. 1216 N. Ninth Ave. ‘MOONLIGHT HARVEST’ GOURMET DINNER NIGHT 7 p.m. $35-$45 , reservations requested. Museum of Commerce, Historic Pensacola Village, 120 Church St. 469-04 45 or culinaryproductions.net. MITHRIL CONCERT 7:30 p.m. Ashmore Fine Arts Auditorium, 1000 College Blvd, Bldg. 8. 484-1847 or pensacolastate.edu/lyceum. PHINEAS PHOGGETTES 10 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 4346211 or sevillequarter.com.

live music

SONGWRITERS OPEN-MIC 3 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com. MELISSA BRETHAUER 5 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com. JOURDAN PACE 5 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.


626 2

inweekly.net

happenings STEVE & SANDRA YOUNGBLOOD 7 p.m. LandShark Landing, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel. com. CHARLIE BLACK, DANA HUNT BLACK 7 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via De Luna Drive. 916-2999.

DeLuna Fest Pub Crawl Are you still looking for a way to freeload DeLuna Fest tickets? This Saturday (Oct. 1) is

one of your last shots. The DeLuna Fest team is hosting a beach pub crawl and they’ll be giving away two tickets at every stop. The fun kicks off at Cap’t N Fun on the Boardwalk at 5 p.m. Here’s the full pub crawl schedule: Cap’t N Fun 5-6 p.m.   Castaways 6-7 p.m. The Break/The Islander/Paddy O’Leary’s  7-8:30 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge 8:30 p.m.

PUB CRAWL

WHAT: DeLuna Fest Pub Crawl on the beach WHEN: Oct. 1 WHERE: Pensacola Beach DETAILS: delunafest.com

KEITH GLASS, JOHN EDD THOMPSON 5:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com. RB STONE 6 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com.

JOHN NANNI, KAREN PAPARELLI 7 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

TIM BUPPERT 8:30 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com. GREG CROWE, JIM FEMINO 8:30 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via De Luna Drive. 916-2999. BRICE LONG, KEN HART, ROB HATCH, LANCE MILLER 8:30 p.m. Lillo’s Tuscan Grille, 5 Via de Luna. 934-5456 or lillostuscangrille.com.

LISA CARVER, ANNIE MOSHER, CHELEY TACKETT 7:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

WALT ALDRIDGE 9 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com.

LOUIS ‘COWBOY’ JONHSON, JONMARK STONE 7:30 p.m. Lillo’s Tuscan Grille, 5 Via de Luna. 9345456 or lillostuscangrille.com.

MO JILES 9 p.m. Apple Annie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. ALVERADO ROAD SHOW 9 p.m. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

JEREMY GIBSON 7:30 p.m. Fridays. 600 South Atrium, 600 S. Palafox. 432-5254 or 600southpalafox.com.

LIVE MUSIC 9 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse. goodgrits.com.

GARY TALLEY, JAY BROWN, JOE WEST, TOM ROADY 7:30 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse. goodgrits.com.

JOHNNY BARBATO, RICK WHALEY 9 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

JIM MCBRIDE, JERRY SALLEY, KAREN STANLEY, OTTAR JOHANSEN, TORE ANDERSEN 8 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com. RHONDA HART, ELAINE PETTY 8 p.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com.

JOHN FRIDAY 6 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. ROBIN BLAKENEY, BUD RENEAU 6:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

BOBBY KEEL, KENNY BAGGETT, ED BEAVER 8 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com.

ALEX CALL, JANIS CARNES, RICK CARNES 7 p.m. StudioAmped, WSRE, 1000 College Blvd. wsre.org/studioamped.

SHAWNA P & ADAM TYLER BROWN 8 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 9322211 or sandshaker.com.

STEPHEN LEE VEAL 7 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com.

DANI CARROLL 8 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com.

COURTNEY YOVICH 7 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com.

DOUG CURL 8 p.m. Five Sisters Blues Café, 421 W. Belmont St. 912-4856 or fivesistersbluescafe.com.

ROB WOLF, MITCH EMMONS 7 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com.

HOLLY SHELTON AND DAVID SHELANDER 8 p.m. Fridays. Ragtyme Grille, 201 S. Jefferson St. 429-9655 or ragtyme.net.

MARC BLACK 7 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

DENNIS GROSSMAN, PAUL KILLOUGH, CHUCK HOWARD 8 p.m. LandShark Landing, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com.

RONNIE LEVINE, MIKE WHEELER 7 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

DJ MR LAO 8 p.m. Fridays. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

DESTIN ATKINSON 8 p.m. Fridays. The Leisure Club, 126 S. Palafox. 912-4229 or tlcdowntown.com. DUELING PIANOS 8 p.m. Fridays. Rosie O’Grady’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

DOUG GILL, LYNN LANGHAM 9 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com. DONNA SLATER, KIM CARSON 9 p.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com.

SATURDAY 10.1

BAYVIEW PARK SPRING FLEA MARKET 8 a.m. Bayview Park, 2000 E. Lloyd St. 436-5190 or playpensacola.com. PALAFOX MARKET 8 a.m. Saturdays, rain or shine, through Dec. 17. Martin Luther King Plaza on North Palafox Street between Chase and Garden streets. palafoxmarket.com. FIRE TRUCK PULL 9 a.m. In front of Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 477-2273 or rmhc-nwfl.org. MUSEUM DAY AT DESTINATION ARCHAEOLOGY 10 a.m. Florida Public Archaeology Network Coordinating Center, 207 E. Main St. 595-0050, ext. 107 or flpublicarchaeology.org/darc.php. COLE BROS. CIRCUS 11 a.m. Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds, 6655 W. Mobile Highway. 944-4500. PENSACOLA BEACH ART & WINE FESTIVAL 11 a.m. Pensacola Beach Boardwalk, 735 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-1500 or pensacolabeachchamber. com. STRONG STREET STUDIO PUMPKIN PARTY 12 p.m. Soiree, 196 N. Palafox. 417-8218 or strongstreetstudio.com. CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL 12 p.m. Chumuckla’s Farmers’ Opry, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road. 994-9219 or farmersopry.com. WINE TASTING AT WINE BAR 2 p.m. Saturdays. $5 goes toward rebate on featured wines. Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 476-3830 or chanswineworld.com. PHINEAS PHOGGETTES 10 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

live music

RUNAWAY HOME 9 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

OPEN-MIC FOR SONGWRITERS 1 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

JOHNNY BARBATO, RICK WHALEY 9 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

OPEN-MIC FOR SONGWRITERS 1 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 9322211 or sandshaker.com.

MILTON BROWN, STEVE DORFF, FLASH JORDAN 9:30 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

RICK WHALEY 2 p.m. Tiki Stage at the Pool, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com.

DAN DEMAY, GARY LOYD, KAYLEN LOYD, DARYL BURGESS, KEVIN DENNY 9:30 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com.

NSAI SONG CONTEST 3 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

LIVE MUSIC 9:30 p.m. Fridays. Intermission, 214 S. Palafox. 433-6208. PETTY CASH 9:30 p.m. Free. Hopjacks Pizza Kitchen & Taproom, 10 S. Palafox. 497-6073 or hopjacks.com. TREVOR FINLAY, KEN MORTON 10 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com. CJ WATSON, DONNA BRITTON, COURTNEY YOVICH, DANI CARROLL, SHEREE SPOLTORE, DAVID NORRIS 10 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

OTTAR JOHANSEN, TORE ANDERSEN 3 p.m. Tiki Stage at the Pool, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com. RICK MCNULTY 3 p.m. LandShark Landing, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com. WOODY BRADSHAW 4 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. RONNIE LEVINE, MIKE WHEELER 4 p.m. LandShark Landing, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com. JOE STONE, JIM PASQUALE 5 p.m. LandShark Landing, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pick-


27

September 29, 2011

happenings ens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com. ROB WOLF 5 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com. JOURDAN PACE 5 p.m. Quietwater Shell on the Boardwalk, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 6354803 or visitpensacolabeach.com. MATT HOGGETT 5 p.m. The Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com. STEVE & SANDRA YOUNGBLOOD 5:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com. DONNA SLATER, KIM CARSON, RHONDA HART, ELAINE PETTY 6 p.m. Quietwater Shell on the Boardwalk, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 635-4803 or visitpensacolabeach.com. WEB DALTON 6 p.m. Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com. JOE WEST, JAY BROWN 6 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. JOHN FRIDAY 6 p.m. LandShark Landing, Margaritaville Beach Hotel, 165 Fort Pickens Road. 916-9755 or margaritavillehotel.com.

Atrium, 600 S. Palafox. 432-5254 or 600southpalafox.com. RICH FAGAN 7:30 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com. RICK CARNES, JANIS CARNES, ALEX CALL 7:30 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. CHELEY TACKETT, NICOLE WITT, LISA CARVER 7:30 p.m. Lillo’s Tuscan Grille, 5 Via de Luna. 934-5456 or lillostuscangrille.com.

JERRY VANDIVER, TIM BUPPERT 2 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com.

STEPHEN LEE VEAL, JOHN EDD THOMPSON, JERRY POWELL 8 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com.

TROPICAL PERSUASION JAM 10:15 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 6779153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

ROCK & JANIS CARNES 2 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

JUNIOR BOYS, EGYPTRIXX 8 p.m. Doors open. $10-$12. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. 607-6758 or vinylmusichall.com.

SUNDAY 10.2

AMBER & PHILLIP WHITE, EARL BUD LEE 2:30 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

OTTAR JOHANSEN, TORE ANDERSEN 8 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 9321417 or thesurfburger.com.

DJ MR LAO 8 p.m. Saturdays. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

KEN MORTON 7 p.m. Wine Bar, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 607-2089 or chanswine.com.

BRICE LONG, KEN HART, LANCE MILLER, ROB HATCH 8:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

JERRY SALLEY, JIM MCBRIDE, KAREN STALEY 7 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via de Luna Drive. 916-2999. KRAZY GEORGE KARAOKE 7 p.m. Saturdays. Hub Stacey’s Downtown, 312 E. Government St. 469-1001 or hubstaceys.com. RONNIE MILLER 7 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com. KARAOKE WITH MARK ESKEW 7 p.m. Saturdays. Hub Stacey’s at the Point, 5851 Galvez Road. 497-0071 or hubstaceys.com. KARIN PAPARELLI 7 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com. GREG CROWE, JIM FEMINO 7:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com. JEREMY GIBSON 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. 600 South

RUSTY TABOR, TOMMY CONNORS, STEVEN DALE JONES 1 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

DEBORAH ALLEN 9:45 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

TIM BUPPERT, BUFFY LAWSON, JERRY VANDIVER, ROBIN BLAKENEY, BUD RENEAU 8 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

JOHNNY BARBATO 6:30 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

DAN DEMAY, GARY & KAYLAN LOYD, KEVIN DENNEY 7 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com.

LIVE MUSIC 9:30 p.m. Saturdays. Intermission, 214 S. Palafox. 433-6208.

DONNIE MILLS 1 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

GARY TALLEY, JOE WEST, JAY BROWN 2 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

DUELING PIANOS 8 p.m. Saturdays. Rosie O’Grady’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

SHAWNA P & ADAM TYLER BROWN 7 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

STEVE DORFF, MILTON BROWN, FLASH JORDAN 9:30 p.m. Lillo’s Tuscan Grille, 5 Via de Luna Drive. 934-5456 or lillostuscangrille.com.

COURTNEY YOVICH, DANI CARROLL 1 p.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com.

KNEE DEEP 9:30 p.m. Hopjacks Pizza Kitchen & Taproom, 10 S. Palafox. 497-6073 or hopjacks.com.

RB STONE 6 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

DOUG GILL, LYNN LANGHAM, MARC BLACK 7 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

DANA HUNT BLACK, CHARLIE BLACK, WALT ALDRIDGE, JIM ‘MOOSE’ BROWN 9:30 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com.

GREG BARNHILL, DARYL BURGESS 8:45 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com. GARY TALLEY BAND 9 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. CJ WATSON, DONNA BRITTON, COURTNEY YOVICH, DANI CARROLL, DAVID NORRIS 9 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 9343141 or dalesbigdeck.com. RUNAWAY HOME 9 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via De Luna Drive. 916-2999. COWBOY JOHNSON, JONMARK STONE 9 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

PENSACOLA BEACH ART & WINE FESTIVAL 11 a.m. Pensacola Beach Boardwalk, 735 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-1500 or pensacolabeachchamber.com. COLE BROS. CIRCUS 11 a.m. Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds, 6655 W. Mobile Highway. 944-4500. CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL 12 p.m. Chumuckla’s Farmers’ Opry, 8897 Byrom Campbell Road. 994-9219 or farmersopry.com. STRONG STREET STUDIO PUMPKIN PARTY 12 p.m. Soiree, 196 N. Palafox. 417-8218 or strongstreetstudio.com.

live music

JOHN NANNI, KARIN PAPARELLI 11 a.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 916-5087 or paradisebar-grill.com. KEN MORTON 11 a.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via de Luna Drive. 916-2999. JOURDAN PACE 11 a.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com. STEVE & SANDRA YOUNGBLOOD 11 a.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com. OTTAR JOHNANSEN, TORE ANDERSEN 12 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com. TREVOR FINLAY 12 p.m. Hilton Pensacola Beach Gulfside, 12 Via de Luna Drive. 916-2999.

MO JILES 9 p.m. Apple Annie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

MELISSA BRETHAUER 12 p.m. Laguna’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 934-5999 or lagunasonthebeach.com.

ALVERADO ROAD SHOW 9 p.m. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

MATT HOGGETT 12 p.m. Bamboo Willie’s, 400 Quietwater Beach Road. 916-9888 or bamboowillies.com.

LIVE MUSIC 9 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse. goodgrits.com.

BOBBY KEEL, KENNY BAGGETT 1 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com.

TREVOR FINLAY 9:15 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com.

DENNIS GOSSMAN, PAUL KILLOUGH 1 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna Drive. 9165087 or paradisebar-grill.com.

JOHNNY BARBATO & FRIENDS 3 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com. DAVE POSEY & WAYNE HALL 5 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com. BROOKS HUBBERT 9 p.m. Sundays. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

MONDAY 10.3

VEGAN COOKING CLASS AT EOTL 6 p.m. First and third Monday of each month. Comes with tapas plate, instructional lecture and demonstration, and Q&A. Sign up by calling End of the Line Cafe, 610 E. Wright St. 429-0336 or eotlcafe.com. BURGERS & BEER NIGHT AT SURF BURGER 6 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Road. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com. JAZZ JAM SESSION 6:30 p.m. Unique Café, 51 Gulf Breeze Parkway. 433-8382 or jazzpensacola.com. GOURMET DINNER NIGHT AT LEE HOUSE 6:30 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays. Enjoy a four-course dinner prepared by Chef Blake Rushing and wines paired by Amber Rushing. $65 per person. For reservations, call 384-4333. Lee House Pensacola, 400 Bayfront Parkway. UWF SINGERS AND MADRIGALS 7:30 p.m. University of West Florida Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Blvd., Bldg. 82. 474-3247 or uwf.edu. GAMER’S NIGHT 8 p.m. Mondays. Fast Eddie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. SKEE BALL LEAGUE 9 p.m. Mondays. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 200. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com.

for more listings visit inweekly.net


828 2

inweekly.net


29

September 29, 2011

news of the weird RISKY BUSINESS MODELS: (1) Orlandoarea cosmetic surgeon Jeff rey Hartog inaugurated Liquid Gold, a storehouse for patients’ frozen liposuctioned fat, charging $900 to safekeep a coffee-cup-sized portion and $200 per year storage (in case the fat is needed later, as for smoothing facial wrinkles). A Massachusetts General Hospital physician shook his head, telling the Orlando Sentinel, “(F)rozen fat doesn’t hold up as well as fresh fat.” (2) German biochemist Peer Bork told the journal Nature in September that he and his partners built the not-forprofit MyMicrobes.com social network so that people with similar stomach bacteria can commiserate over diet and gastrointestinal woes. The $2,100 signup fee includes a full gut-bacteria sequencing. THE CONTINUING CRISIS Wild Things: Motorist Clyde White of Corbin, Ky., was charged with attempted murder in August after police finally collared him following a road-rage chase that reached speeds of over 100 mph. White, who had repeatedly rammed his two siblings in their vehicle, is 78 years old, and in that other vehicle were his brother, 82, and his sister, 83. • According to a recent report from Britain’s Office of National Statistics, there are 297,000 households in the country in which no adult has ever held any kind of job. The number of individuals who thus may never have developed the “habit of work,” and who instead have grown accustomed to the country’s generous welfare payments, might total 700,000. (In an example cited by the Daily Mail, one such couple in their late 30s, and their children, “earn” the equivalent of almost $1,100 per week in income support and disability payments.) • Chicago massage therapist Liudmyla Ksenych, testifying for the prosecution in August in a sex-trafficking trial, happened to notice from the witness stand that the defense lawyer, Douglas Rathe, was formerly a client of hers. The judge immediately declared a mistrial. Rathe later said he visited Ksenych four times in 2009 but that “nothing inappropriate” happened. FINE POINTS OF THE LAW (1) What Year Is This? In August in Lubbock, Texas, Carl Wade Curry, 44, was sentenced to 99 years in prison for cattle rustling. (Said one of the victims, Curry tried to be a smooth-talking, handshake-dealing cattle seller, but “he wasn’t capable.”) (2) In Jackson, Minn., in March, Andrew Espey was sentenced to 90 days in jail for improperly shingling the roof of his house. Complained Espey, “(A) drunk can drive down the highway and get a lot less (of a sentence).” (He had affi xed new shingles without first removing the old ones.)

by Chuck Shepherd

OOPS! Larry Stone, jailed on property crimes in Tavares, Fla., because he could not make the $1,250 bail, posted the bond in July by earning $1,300 in telephone-company money after discovering a management error that credited his jail account $46 for every international call he pretended to make. (The company figured out the problem a day later and recovered all the payouts from the accounts of Stone and 250 other prisoners who had learned of the glitch. Stone’s bond was revoked, of course, and he was returned to lockup.) NEWS OF THE SELF-INDULGENT While too many children in Third World countries die from starvation or lack of basic medicines, the preschoolers of the TLC TV channel’s “Outrageous Kid Parties” reality show celebrate birthdays and “graduation” (from or to kindergarten) with spectacular events that may cost their parents $30,000 or more. Typical features, according to an August ABC News report, included a Ferris wheel, a roller coaster, a dunking booth, animal rides and a cotton candy machine, as well as the obligatory live music and limo or horseback (for grand entrances). BRIGHT IDEAS Strategies: (1) Alicia Bouchard, 41, was arrested in Jackson County, Fla., in August, accused of hatching a plot with her husband to impregnate a 12-year-old girl for the purpose of producing a baby that would eventually earn an additional welfare check. (2) In August, the Japanese construction firm Maeda Corp. ordered its 2,700 employees to adopt standard, short hairstyles (a “bob” for women with a longer fringe that could be swept to the side, and a routine short-backand-sides cut for men with a slightly longer cut on top). Maeda said it was responding to the government’s plea to reduce energy usage (less water, less hair dryer time). REDNECK CHRONICLES (1) Lon Groves, 40, was arrested in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., after a brief standoff with police in July following an incident in which he allegedly held a handgun to the head of his wife in an argument over which of their granddaughters was the wife’s favorite. (2) Pastor Daryl Riley of the New Welcome Baptist Church in St. Elmo, Ala., was tased, allegedly by the church’s music minister, whom Riley had just fired in August (which led another parishioner to pull a knife and begin stabbing wildly in a melee). Said the music minister’s mother, “He done cut (me) before anything started.”

From Universal Press Syndicate Chuck Shepherd’s News Of The Weird © 2011 Chuck Shepherd

Send your weird news to Chuck Shepherd, P.O. Box 18737, Tampa, Fla., 33679 or weirdnews@earthlink.net, or go to newsoftheweird.com.

On Sale Now! Sat. Oct. 15 • 8pm

ticketmaster.com 800.745.3000 Groups of 20 or more - call 850.595.3880

Pensacola First Upscale Chinese Fusion Restaurant

Where you can have a great meal and a great time Featuring a Full Bar & a New Martini Menu

Specials:

Tuesday Lady’s Night: after 8 pm $4 cocktail and $4 wine 4-5-6 Menu: From 4 pm til 6 pm Choice of wine, cocktail, appetizer for $5 $6.99 Lunch Special: comes with an egg roll, a krab rangoon, and soup or rice choice Mon thru Wed: 2 for $20 Meal * Comes with an appetizer, a choice of soup or rice for the entree and a dessert

Live Music at Shark Fin every Tuesday Night with Jones & Company Ste C, 5912 North Davis Highway (behind Rooms to Go) * (850) 912-8669 Monday-Thursday: 11am - 10pm | Friday-Saturday: 11am - 11pm | Sunday: 11am - 9pm


030 3

inweekly.net


31

September 29, 2011

October 8 at 8pm Saenger Theatre

my pensacola Dovennie Day Day Job: Salon Owner, Style Downtown Pensacola Resident Since: 1978

Good Eats:

My favorite couples’ restaurant is Jackson’s Steakhouse. My husband and I love breaking away from the homestead and bellying up to the bar for Jacksons and Jacksons— two glasses of wine and an appetizer for $20—can’t beat that. It seems Global Grill is my go-to girls night out dinner spot. I love getting tapas any place I can get ‘em!

Pensacola Symphony Orchestra Peter Rubardt, Music Director with Zuill Bailey, cello

featuring Chabrier’s España Dvořák’s Cello Concerto Rozsa’s Parade of the Charioteers from Ben Hur Respighi’s Pines of Rome

Retail Therapy:

I can shop for hours at The Linen Shop. Not only do I love Cheryl Hart, I love house goodies, ornaments, clothing and refreshing complimentary drinks.

Watering Holes :

Global Grill’s Bay Shrimp, Scallion and Cream Cheese Fried Wontons with Asian Dipping Sauce

My main watering hole is and has been The Fish House—we’re there every Wednesday for our Manager Meetings. My other fave would have to be Wine Bar...I wouldn’t be a good Southern girl if I didn’t like a good wine bar.

now and surfing, so dropping into Innerlight to get some wax is no longer rare.

Arts & Culture:

My husband and I bonded through music, so Vinyl has been an amazing addition to downtown Pensacola. Drive By Truckers, Robert Randolph and Honey Island Swamp Band...doesn’t get better than that.

My husband and children love history and museums. Our two go-to museums are T.T. Wentworth and Pensacola Museum of Art (we did their Chagall for Children and it was a big hit!) My favorite is the Historic Pensacola Red Light District tour—my garden club, Ivy League, does it every year!

Outdoors:

Never Miss Events/Festivals:

Nightlife:

I love to be outdoors. Beaches are my heart and home, so luckily we have some really fantastic white sand beaches to sink my toes into. My boys are getting older

We really live in a fantastic city filled with traditions—Fiesta, Blue Angels, Winterfest Trolley Tours...the list can go on for days!

Drive By Truckers Do you want to tell us how you see our city? Email Joani at joani@inweekly.net for all of the details.

Call now for tickets!

850.435.2533

www.pensacolasymphony.com


Independent News | September 29, 2011 | inweekly.net

Sept. 29th Issue  

Sept. 29th Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you