Issuu on Google+

“He was on a mission to protect his legacy"

“I wouldn’t argue if Daniel or Bradley got the gold man"

“Nothing gets a Friday night moving quite like a little bit of hip-hop"

5

15

20

GR APPLING WITH AMERICA’S OBSESSION

Independent News | February 21 | Volume 14 | Number 8 | inweekly.net

FREE ▶


publisher & editor Rick Outzen production manager Joani Delezen art director Samantha Crooke staff writer Jeremy Morrison contributing writers Joani Delezen, Hana Frenette, Brett Hutchins, Sarah McCartan, Kate Peterson, Chuck Shepherd contact us 438.8115

GET READY FOR THE ACADEMY AWARDS page 15

22

inweekly.net


winners & losers Carnival Triumph

Saenger Theatre

winners

SAENGER THEATRE The SMG-Managed Pensacola theatre was listed as a #4 Top Spot Nationwide by Venues Today, an international trade magazine. The ranking was based on concert and event grosses for venues with a 2,000 or fewer capacity for the period of Dec. 16, 2012 through Jan. 15, 2013. Shows that appeared at the Saenger Theatre during the period included Ballet Pensacola’s “Nutcracker,” Pensacola Symphony’s “Celebrate The New Year” concert, Broadway in Pensacola’s “West Side Story” and B.B. King in concert. COMBINED ROTARY CLUBS OF PENSACOLA Rotarians from Escambia and

Santa Rosa counties will join together with MANNA Food Pantries on Saturday, Feb. 23 to fight hunger in Northwest Florida. The Rotary Against Hunger service project involves all 13 Rotary Clubs that committed financial support and volunteer participation to create over 16,000 food packets for those in need. Approximately 100,000 meals have been donated to MANNA for distribution to over 17 partner pantries in the two-county area.

ESCAMBIA COUNTY SCHOOLS Oak-

crest Elementary, Warrington Elementary, Blue Angels Elementary and Washington High have earned distinction from the Florida Positive Behavior Support (PBS) Project for their efforts last school year. Some of the characteristics of PBS Model Schools include utilizing data to better serve students and staff, teaching PBS to students throughout the school year, and developing creative and engaging reward systems.

losers

CARNIVAL TRIUMPH Passengers on the

luxury liner were stranded for days in the Gulf of Mexico after an engine fire crippled the ship. The vessel was eventually towed to the Port of Mobile. Instead of putting the more than 4,000 people on board in hotels in the Mobile, Ala. area, Carnival treated them to a two-hour bus ride to hotels in New Orleans, where the company had booked 1,500 rooms.

GULF COAST TREATMENT CENTER

The Fort Walton Beach-based company that ran the Milton Girls Juvenile Residential Facility lost its $21 million contract with the Department of Juvenile Justice following allegations of abuse and wrongdoing at the facility that housed teenage delinquents. On Feb. 11, a former mental health technician was arrested on charges of sexually molesting at least six detainees. Another employee was charged late last year with child abuse after a video showed her slamming a teen into the wall and onto the ground.

OKALOOSA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL Several current

and former TDC members failed to attend the Feb. 11 hearing by the state’s Joint Legislative Auditing Committee, earning them subpoenas to testify on the mishandling of bed tax revenues and BP marketing funds after the 2010 oil spill. They believe they are being unfairly blamed for the misuse of public money under former executive director Mark Bellinger.

11 East Romana Street w w w. a t t o r n e y g e n e m i t c h e l l . c o m February 21, 2013

3


921 N PALAFOX ST N, PENSACOLA, FL

outtakes

by Rick Outzen

NEW LIONS ARISE REDUCED Downtown Pensacola with onsite parking approx 9 spaces -North Hill just North of Cervantes and Palafox - Corner location has approx. 3000 sqft w/7 private offices, kitchen, work area, break room and 3 baths. Full service lease includes water, electric, sewer, gas, janitorial including lawn service.Parking included. Completely renovated in 2008 to include paverstone parking. Beautiful hardwood floors, high ceilings, park view. Nice floor plan with lots of original woodwork and fireplaces. Historical features have been preserved. MLS#: 411739 • Rate: $625,000

Cheryl Young Cell (850) 712-4742 www.cherylyoung.com cayoungrealtor@aol.com

Licensed in Florida & Alabama

Practicing Since 1974 INJURED? (ALL TYPES OF ACCIDENTS)

ARRESTED? (ALL FEDERAL & STATE COURTS)

A hundred African-American men walked on Friday, Feb. 15 the streets of the Montclair neighborhood picking up trash and letting residents know that they aren’t alone. The walk was the idea of Rev. Lonnie Wesley, III, pastor of Greater Little Rock Baptist Church and Escambia County Commissioner Lumon May in response to the increasing violence in the black neighborhoods across Escambia County. On Jan. 10, a shooting in the Montclair neighborhood left one person dead and two others hospitalized. Last summer, 19-yearold Matthew Cox was gunned down in front of his mother's house on Deauville Way near Montclair Elementary School. Unfortunately, murders, gunshots and drugs have become commonplace in that part of Escambia County. Operation Clean Sweeps and town hall meetings have failed to have any lasting impact. This event was different. Commissioner May, Pastor Wesley and their friends, Dr. Joseph L. Marshall of St. John Divine Missionary Baptist Church, Dr. Tyler V. Hardeman of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church and the Rev. LuTimothy May of Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, wanted to make a statement—not alone, but with 100 men from their churches. As Commissioner May told me in the days leading up to the demonstration, “It’s time to wake the sleeping lion.”

A week earlier, I talked with Rev. H.K. Matthews, a Pensacola hero of the civil rights era, about leadership. “So many people call themselves leaders,” he said. “It’s my contention that leaders are not made, they are born.” He pointed out too many self-proclaimed leaders love to hear praises of their leadership, but don’t speak out on injustice. “They aren’t prone to exercise abilities that they don’t have,” said Rev. Matthews. “Leadership has to come from the inside. You have to have passion for people.” Matthews would be proud of the passion of Wesley, Marshall, Hardeman, the May brothers and their friends. “This is not politics,” Commissioner May told the crowd at Montclair. “We must come together. Each one must reach one. Our greatest investment should be in human capital.” Pastor Wesley simplified the message even further. “We’re here because we love Pensacola,” he said. He, his fellow pastors and Commissioner May plan to repeat these walks in other parts of the community. Each time they will get a little better organized—maybe even Mayor Ashton Hayward, Superintendent Malcolm Thomas and the other county commissioners will join them. If the politicians choose not to do so, it won’t matter. These lions aren’t waiting for them to act any longer. {in} rick@ inweekly.net

"We’re here because we love Pensacola.”

—Creative Organic Vegan Cuisine, Coffee & Catering—

WHITE COLLAR CRIMES (HEALTH-CARE FRAUD • DRUG OFFENSES & D.U.I.s)

FREE CONSULTATION ON INJURY / DEATH CASES & CRIMINAL CASES NO RECOVERY - NO FEE / COST ON PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH CASES

24 HOUR SERVICE

433-9922

304 E. GOVERNMENT STREET 44

Vegan Cooking Classes twice a month — Sunday Brunch with champagne specials Thursday 3 Course Gourmet Dinner—Menu changes weekly. Plus Daily Specials

610 E. Wright St. | 429-0336 | eotlcafe.com inweekly.net


PASSION FOR PEOPLE

Rev. H.K. Matthews / photo courtesy of The Pensacola Historical Society

Interview with Rev. H. K. Matthews by Rick Outzen Rev. H.K. Matthews walked into the Independent News to set the record straight. Dressed in black slacks, a grey dress shirt with a white collar and a purple tie, one of the most celebrated civil rights leaders in Escambia County history carried a battered folder of clippings of newspaper and magazine articles. He was on a mission to protect his legacy. In its coverage of the MLK parade, the daily newspaper had misreported another as the founder of the Pensacola chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). When he tried to get the newspaper to correct the error, he was sent away to settle the matter with those who gave the publication the incorrect information. When an African-American can’t get justice, where does he go? The Independent News. “I wanted to set the record straight as to what my role has been,” Rev. Matthews, 85, said as he handed over article after article, several from SCLC publications, that showed the former pastor of St. Paul Zion AME Church in Cantonment as the founder and president of the Escambia County SCLC chapter. “There never was a Pensacola chapter,” he said. “I wanted it to be an Escambia County chapter so that we could cover a broad spectrum of people.” Shaking his head, he added, “I can’t see why anybody would let himself take credit for bringing SCLC here. [The newspaper] would February 21, 2013

rather perpetrate a lie than correct it and tell the truth.”

POLITICAL PRISONER

Rev. Matthews’ legacy is well known. He was arrested after a 1975 demonstration protesting the killing of a young black male by an Escambia County deputy. On the night of Dec. 20, 1974, Sheriff 's Deputy Doug Raines pulled over 23-year-old Wendel Sylvester Blackwell after a highspeed chase. Blackwell didn't comply when first ordered by Raines. However, after Raines bumped his car, Blackwell was forced onto the grass on Highway 29. Raines ordered Blackwell out of the car, and while Blackwell's hands were on his head, Raines claimed he saw something shiny in the young man's hand. In an act that Deputy Raines insisted was selfdefense, he shot Blackwell in the head with his .357 magnum, killing him. The day after the shooting, Deborah Jones spoke with Rev. Matthews and Rev. B. J. Brooks of the NAACP. She claimed that she was in the car with Blackwell and the shooting was because of an affair she had had with Raines. Jones said that Blackwell was not armed. Before the ministers could get her to the authorities, Jones was found strangled to death under an overpass. A grand jury cleared Deputy Raines and stated that the officer acted in "a reasonably prudent manner; he reasonably believed himself in imminent danger of death or bodily harm created by the said Wendel Sylvester Blackwell who was armed." For three weeks protests were held outside the Escambia County Sheriff 's headquarters asking for the firing of Deputy Raines. Their chant was "Two,

four, six, eight, who shall we incarcerate? Untreiner, Raines, the whole damn bunch!" On Feb. 24, 1975, Sheriff Royal Untreiner ordered the group of several hundred protesters to disperse. When they refused, he sent approximately 70 deputies armed with clubs into the crowd. The total number of arrests was confirmed with 34 adults and 13 juveniles who were ultimately charged with unlawful assembly and malicious trespass. Three days later, Rev. Matthews and Rev. Brooks were also charged with felony extortion. The extortion charges were drawn from the same misconception that the leaders had encouraged "assassination" instead of "incarceration." The ministers were convicted and sentenced to fi ve years hard labor in state prison. In 1978, Andrew Young, then-executive director of the national SCLC, declared Rev. Matthews the number one political prisoner in the country. After serving 63 days, he was granted clemency, but had to move out of the Pensacola area when local employers blacklisted him. Gov. Reuben Askew granted Rev. Matthews a full pardon in 1979. In February 2007, Gov. Charlie Crist joined hundreds of civil rights activists and community leaders at Pensacola Junior College to celebrate the work of Rev. Matthews at the Reverend H.K. Matthews Commemorative Event. “I shouldn’t have to tell you or anyone what I’ve done,” Rev. Matthews told the Independent News. “It’s documented.” One scrapbook that he couldn’t provide to prove his point was the one that had photos of him with Dr. Martin L. King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, Rev. Fred Suttles and other civil rights leaders. “When I went into the state penitentiary, the correctional officers ripped it into shreds right in front of my face,” he said.

FOR HUMANITY

Rev. Matthews made it clear that publicity was never his goal. “I did it because I was genuinely interested in humanity,” he said. “I didn’t want to get arrested 35 times for demonstrations and get sent to the state penitentiary twice just so I could get my name into print.” He went on, “I wasn’t raring for my house to be shot into. I could have easily done without that [pausing to make his point]… but I felt a passion for people.” He was raised in South Alabama during the ‘30s and ‘40s. He often rode the Greyhound bus from Snow Hill, Ala. to Camden. He wasn’t allowed to sit, even though there were empty seats. Instead he stood, stretching to hold a strap so that he wouldn’t fall. “All that, I guess, embedded itself in my mind and in my heart, “ he said. “And I knew somewhere down the line that’s not the way we were supposed to live. “

He credits Rev. W.C. Dobbins for opening his eyes when he came to Pensacola. Dobbins led the effort to integrate lunch counters in downtown Pensacola and later founded the Pensacola Council of Ministers. “He helped lead me out of the wilderness of non-thinking,” said Rev. Matthews. “Following his leadership, all that built-up stuff started to surface.” Rev. Matthews said that he asked the SCLC to allow him to form a local chapter because of the limitations placed on him by the NAACP, under which he had earlier formed the Pensacola NAACP Youth Council. “There were certain words we couldn’t use, like boycott,” he said. “We couldn’t use that because the NAACP had its membership rolls subpoenaed some years back. They were very, very cautious.” Rev. Matthews believed that non-violent protests were needed to change Escambia County. He participated in the March Without Fear from Memphis, Tenn. to Jackson, Miss. after organizer James Meredith had been shot by a sniper. He had marched with John Lewis and others in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March protesting against the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson and the denial of voting rights. “I was beaten in that one. [Smiles] Poor me,” Rev. Matthews shared. “If I had known when I left here where I was working over on Jordan Street as a janitor what I was going to run into when I got to Selma, I think [laughing], I might have stayed home.” Though he and his members risked being beaten and the loss of jobs, Rev. Matthews saw the need for more direct action in the Pensacola area to bring about change. “Even though it was founded to be a non-violent organization and drilled into us that we had to be non-violent, the SCLC was a very assertive, aggressive organization,” he said. “We had more leeway to do direct action, such as boycotts, marches and demonstrations. Those things that got us to where we are today.” Joining Matthews were other Pensacola civic rights icons. F. L. Henderson chaired the Labor and Industry Committee that pushed for fair hiring. Rev. Otha Leverette, headed the Education Committee that dealt with public education. Dr. Nathaniel Woods spearheaded membership drives. “They all saw what I saw—the need for an organization that would be more direct in dealing with problems of discrimination in the schools, in the workplace and public facilities head on,” Rev. Matthews said. “That’s how the SCLC came to Northwest Florida.” With that Rev. H. K. Matthews placed his news clippings back in his weathered folder and stood up, “And that’s the story that I ask you set straight.” Yes, sir. {in} 5


‘THIS IS NOT COOL’ “I grew up just on the other side of those trees,” Wesley said, pointing across Westernmark Park. “I rode my bike up and down this street.” He motions up and down Erress Boulevard, waving to a driver searching for a place to park. The street is lined with cars. People have come for the barbecue and a glimpse of hope. “We’re like Jesus,” he would later joke. “We just want to use the food to get everyone to listen to what we have to say—it’s hard to listen when you’re hungry.” The pastor is concerned about his community. He’s concerned about the increase in violence and crime. Wesley came to the park off of Massachusetts Avenue on Feb. 15, along with other religious and governmental leaders, for the 100 Man Walk—to eat, to speak out, to pick up litter and to let Escambia County Commissioner Lumon May / photo by people “hear that somebody Jeremy Morrison cares, somebody loves them.” He elaborated later when speaking to the crowd gathered for the event. “I hope you all came to help get the word out, that our community is not sitting by passively while blood’s shed onto the streets of Pensacola and Escambia County. No, we are not okay with this,” Wesley said when he took to the microphone. “This is It was a beautiful day in the park. Barbenot cool. It’s not cool at all. And we’re not cued smoke spilled from large barrel grills going to stand for it.” and mixed with the gospel music coming The pastor’s comments followed a out of the PA system. A copy of the Bible series of speakers. Some of the more sunbathed on the hood of a Ram pickup heartbreaking words were offered up by truck. mothers. Pastor Lonnie Wesley, of Greater Little “I just wish someone would come up Rock Baptist Church, soaked it in. He reland tell me where my child is,” said Sharon ished the day, but not the reason.

A Community Cries Out for Relief by Jeremy Morrison

E r i c D. St e v e n s on

Gardner. “Michael, please come home to your mother.” Garner’s son, Michael Lawson, has not been seen since Jan. 24. His car was found still running in the parking lot of Grocery Outlet on Brent Lane. The 31-year-old Lawson has a criminal history—primarily drug convictions—and family members have voiced concern that his disappearance could be in retaliation for a drug-related shootout earlier in the month—for which his cousin has been arrested for—that left an 18-year-old dead. The Escambia County Sheriff ’s Offi ce is currently investigating the disappearance. “I feel like the system is failing me,” Garner told the crowd at Westernmark Park. Rosa “Mama Rose” Dukes also spoke. Her son, Broderick Johnson, was found lying in a Diego Circle driveway, shot to death in May 2011. The murder remains unsolved. “I never got over it,” Dukes said. “I never will.” Lisa Wiggins, co-founder of Parents Against Injustice & Negligence, or PAIN,

“I feel like the system is failing me." Sharon Gardner implored the community to help ease the pain of these women and other mothers who have lost—or will lose—their children to violence. She pleaded for anyone with information to come forward with it. “You better recognize you have a mother, too,” Wiggins said, “and you would not want your mother going through what Michael’s mother is going through.” Earlier, Pastor Wesley had talked about a community battling hopelessness. Leaning up against the Ram truck, he had described a landscape in decay, a horizon full of landfi lls

and vacant properties and diminished opportunities. “That’s not going to work in your psyche,” Wesley said. “All these play a part in your expectations.” He said other events similar to the 100 Man Walk would be planned for other areas—“this is going to be going on all over the city, all over the county”—and stressed the importance of addressing the crime and violence facing the community. “The community is not just sitting back quietly letting this happen,” Wesley said. “You have to start somewhere and maybe that’s in the community—let the community know that there’s hope.” Speaking to the crowd gathered off of Massachusetts Avenue, Escambia County Commissioner Lumon May, who grew up in the area, spoke about the need to change the “culture.” “Once they start pulling the trigger, it’s way too late to turn it around,” the commissioner said. “But we can change the culture.” May described a culture of rampant violence, a community in need of a better way. He described a culture that was harmful to self and society. “The prisons are filled with young African-Americans from Montclair and Morris Court,” May said. “It’s a shame.” The commissioner’s younger brother, Rev. LuTimothy May—who serves at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, and also as the city of Pensacola’s director of community outreach—had earlier said the area’s issues were not confined to one arena and impacted the entire community. “It’s not about a particular race, it’s not about a particular class,” the reverend said. “It’s about what we can do to make our community better.” The District 3 commissioner shared his brother’s view. “We say, by the grace of God it isn’t us,” May said. “But it is us, it’s all of us.” {in}

Blue Moon Cool Place—Cool Stuff Got Stuff?

Personal Injur y | Criminal Justice 919 N. 12th Avenue Pensacola, Florida 32501

O: (850) 434-3111 F: (850) 434-1188

mypensacolaattorney.com • email: eric@mypensacolaattorney.com 66

Sell it at the Best of the Coast Blue Moon Antique Mall Booth Space $1.25 to $1.00 per square foot while supplies last. Booths Start at $16 a month!

3721 W Navy Blvd. 455-7377 Tues – Sat 10-5 Sun 12-5 inweekly.net


Exquisite Edible Art

buzz

‘HOPELESSLY HUNG’ We promise you the most memorable meal Runner Up Best Japanese Cuisine & Best Sushi

Ichiban Japanese Restaurant 850-494-2227 5555 N. Davis Hwy www.ichibanpensacola.com

Robert Donson / photo courtesy of Escambia County Sheriff's Office In December 2011, Robert Donson was shot in the stomach by a Pensacola Police officer, and subsequently charged with possession of a gun, resisting arrest and assault on an officer. While still awaiting his date in federal court, the 26-year-old was found not guilty this month on the state assault charge, with the firearm and resist charges resulting in a hung jury. Donson was shot in the parking lot of Tom Ann Buddy’s on Cervantes Street two days before Christmas. According to the police report, he was approached by Sgt. John Austin, who had arrived on scene along with several other officers; they drove an unmarked van and wore masks. Austin, who wrote the report, recounted that Donson consented to a search. He described how the man began “violently thrashing about” after what was thought to be a gun was felt in his coat pocket. The parking lot scuffle came to involve another officer, Shawn Thompson. The scuffle ended when Thompson shot Donson. His actions later were determined to be justified. “Detective Thompson placed the muzzle of his duty pistol on Donson’s February 21, 2013

torso and fired one round,” Austin wrote in the report. “Donson immediately stopped fighting with me.” According to the report, the officer retrieved the gun and it was “later found to be fully loaded with a round in the chamber.” Witnesses spoken to at the scene a week after the incident expressed doubts about the gun—“they didn’t find no gun that night ... damn right, I think they planted it on him”—and said they thought Donson probably feared the masked men searching him. “He’s trying to shake loose, thinking he’s gonna rob him,” said a man who identified himself only as Lee. Following surgery, a number of charges were levied against Donson. He faced three charges in state court—resisting arrest, assault on an officer and carrying a concealed firearm—as well as an additional firearm charge—possession of a gun by a convicted felon—in federal court. On Feb. 14, an Escambia County circuit court jury delivered a not guilty verdict on the assault charge. A handwritten note on a piece of lined notebook paper relayed the jury’s message concerning the other two counts: “Hopelessly Hung.” Donson heads to federal court March 18. {in}

Pensacola’s

AUTOSPORT 2013 KIA SORENTO

189

$

PER MONTH

0

%

FOR 60 MONTHS

AVAILABLE ON SELECT KIAS

CREDIT EFFECTS TERMS. SELECT VEHICLES. LEASE 39 MONTHS, $4,999 DUE AT INCEPTION. SECURITY DEPOSIT WAIVED. PLUS TAX, TAG TITLE AND $400 DOC FEE. 12,000 MILES PER YEAR, .10 PER MILE FOR MILES IN EXCESS OF 12,000. ALL KMF REBATES TO DEALER. OFFERS DON’T COMBINE.

AUTOSPORT

6637 Pensacola Blvd., Pensacola, FL 32505

850 - 457-7772

TIRES FOR LIFE AND LIFETIME POWER TRAIN WARRANTY REQUIRE ALL FACTORY MAINTENANCE FOR AS LONG AS YOU OWN THE VEHICLE. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.

7


Does Pensacola really need new housing options for young professionals?

Is there a plan for vacant land downtown?

Why are some places nice while others are blighted?

The Urban Redevelopment Advisory Committee (URAC) is pleased to release their official report. www.cityofpensacola.com/boards/urac The Urban Redevelopment Advisory Committee (URAC) URAC was established to assist the Mayor, the City Council, the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and Community Maritime Park Associates (CMPA) in implementing the redevelopment of downtown Pensacola. The official URAC report has a wide variety of areas of focus. A sampling of these can be found below: West End Redevelopment Gateway Crescent Redevelopment Downtown Infill Development Tourism Housing and Neighborhood

Redevelopment Job Creation Central Palafox Commercial Core Mobility in Downtown Community Services

URAC Committee Members Brian Hooper, Chairman Emmanuel Sheppard & Condon Teresa Dos Santos, Business Interiors Dr. Ken Ford, IHMC John Myslak, West Coast Metal Roofing & Construction Shana Neuhaus, LEED-Certified Architect Stephanie Powell, Pensacola Apothecary Christian Wagley, Sustainable Town Concepts

Organization and Funding Downtown Progress Better Use of Vacant Property Leisure Activities

To better our community, we need your support. You can help by: • reviewing the full URAC report at www.cityofpensacola.com/boards/urac • getting involved with local charities and services • sharing your enthusiasm and concern with local elected officials Presented by Quint & Rishy Studer

88

QS0098 URAC Recommendations Full Page IN Ad.indd 1

inweekly.net

2/18/13 9:42 AM


feature story

Cover illustration by Crash! Landen

Grappling with America’s Obsession By Jeremy Morrison

February 21, 2013

As the rally wrapped up, two men lingered on the lawn in conversation. Talking about freedom, and fear. Talking about guns. “People are waking up,” said the man with the clipboard and petition. “They’re seeing that the federal government is going crazy.” The men were two of many that made their way to the Milton rally in support of Second Amendment rights. The gathering was in response to proposed gun legislation currently

on the table at the federal level. “This is a semi-automatic weapon,” said the man, throwing his clipboard onto the grass. “That thing’s not going to do anything to you. You’d have to be crazy, pick it up and start firing.” The clipboard is not a semi-automatic. It actually holds a petition urging Florida’s

“This is our first task as a society: keeping our children safe. This is how we will be judged. And their voices should compel us to change." President Barack Obama

9


their decades-long, decades-old gun control agenda: ban every gun they can, tax every gun sold and register every American gun owner.” Rep. Jeff Miller (R-Fla.) said he would be surprised if Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid even brought the proposed legislation up for a vote. “Senator Feinstein’s legislation has already had a trial run for 10 years, and it was proven a failure,” Miller referred to the previous assault-weapons ban that sunset in 2004. “I think her bill is a nonstarter in the House and probably in the Senate as well.” Like many conservatives, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) has Rep. Jeff Miller pumps up Pensacola Romney rally: "Here we are again, clinging to our guns and religion."/ photo by predicted “a flood of Jeremy Morrison gun legislation going nowhere.” He suggests the Second Amendment and gun legislastate legislators to pass a bill similar to better enforcing existing laws and focusing tion. In mid-January, Obama committed 2010’s failed HB 21—known as the Florida on issues such as mental illness. himself to the debate. Firearms Freedom Act—which basically “I’ve owned guns all my life. I own “Because while there is no law or set aimed to put state law above federal law an AR-15. I saw the movie ‘Django.’ I like of laws that can prevent every senseless when it came to guns. Quentin Tarantino,” Graham said at a act of violence completely, no piece of “I’m gonna present this to Greg Evers,” post-SOTU press conference. “But there legislation that will prevent every tragedy, the man said. “Sheriff Hall, I just got him to are many moving parts to this ... me owning every act of evil, if there’s even one thing sign it.” an AR-15 is not a threat to anyone because we can do to reduce this violence, if there’s Rumblings in the nation’s capital have I’m not going to abuse the right to own that even one life that can be saved, then we’ve made the Second Amendment crowd a gun.” got an obligation to try,” the president said. little jumpy. In Milton, the men on the lawn look at additional legislation and increased regulation as an overstep by the federal government. And they are freaking out about the possibilities. “A lot of us feel like this is the last straw,” the man with the clipboard said. “If this goes, it’s over.”

THIS TIME IS DIFFERENT

When President Barack Obama recently delivered the first State of the Union of his second term, the gallery was peppered with individuals impacted by gun violence. Many of them were from Newtown, Conn. “It has been two months since Newtown,” Obama said. “I know this is not the first time this country has debated how to reduce gun violence. But this time is different.” On Dec. 14, Adam Lanza entered Newtown’s Sandy Hook Elementary School. The 20-year-old carried a semi-automatic .223-caliber Bushmaster rifle, a 10mm Glock and 9mm SIG Sauer P226. He used the Bushmaster to kill 20 children and six adults, before shooting himself in the head with one of the handguns. Lanza had access to the legal firearms in his home. His mother—also shot and killed—was a gun enthusiast. The tragedy injected renewed passion into America’s national conversation about 010 1

“This is our first task as a society: keeping our children safe. This is how we will be judged. And their voices should compel us to change.” The president advocated for—among other measures—universal background checks and the reinstatement of the assault weapons ban. He also pushed for limited magazine capacity. Senator Diane Feinstein (D-CA) has proposed a bill doing the same. The National Rifle Association takes a different view. “It’s not about keeping the kids safe in school,” NRA Executive Vice President

GUN CULTURE CLUB

Guns have always been part of the American story. From Concord to Columbine, from the Wild West to the grassy knoll. “It’s part of our culture,” said Escambia County Sheriff David Morgan. America’s Founding Father’s saw fit to incorporate the ‘right to bear arms’ into the U.S. Constitution, making guns a pillar of the country’s very foundation. “Without the Second Amendment how can you protect the other amendments in the Constitution?” posed State Sen. Greg

“The Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States is an individual and sacred right, just like the right to freedom of speech and the right to religious expression.” Rep. Jeff Miller, (R-Fla.) Wayne LaPierre addressed the National Wild Turkey Federation convention in Nashville, Tenn. a couple of days after the State of the Union. “They only care about

Evers (R-Baker). “I think we need to protect it and hold it in the highest regard—an armed man or woman is a citizen, an unarmed man or woman is a subject.”

Former Santa Rosa County Commission chairman Byrd Mapoles attributes America’s relationship with firearms to the pivotal role they played in the country’s early days. “I think it goes back to the frontier days,” he said, “when you had a horse to ride on and a gun to kill your food.” Mapoles recalled how important guns were in his own family. He can still remember his grandmother’s shotgun resting by the front door of her house. “The maddest I ever saw her was when she realized her shotgun wasn’t by the front door,” he laughed. “She said, ‘Who got my shotgun? Put my shotgun back where it was.’” Morgan, too, recalled a loaded shotgun reliably in the corner at his grandparents’ house. In a bedside drawer was a loaded handgun. Guns were a part of everyday life. The sheriff got his first as a young boy. “You got your first rifle, it was usually a single-shot .22 rifle, or a 4-10 shotgun,” Morgan recalled, explaining how he and his friends would take their guns to school. “Guys would pass their guns around— ‘Wow, you got your first .22, or whatever.’ We never heard of gun violence.” When wrapping his head around modern tragedies like the Newtown killings—what the sheriff described as “every parent’s nightmare and, really, every community’s fear”—Morgan does not lay blame on guns. “I would say the core issue is emotional and mental problems,” the Sheriff said, suggesting the country take a “clinical,” unemotional approach to Second Amendment debates in the wake of such tragedies. Supporters of the Second Amendment tend to emphasis the inanimate nature of firearms. They stress the fact that guns are cold and lifeless tools at the mercy of humanity. “I think mental health plays a tremendous part of it. Guns are not the issue,” said Sen. Evers. “Guns do not kill people, it’s folks that use guns. But folks use knifes. Should we ban knifes? Folks use baseball bats. Should we ban baseball?” This camp bristles at the notion of further restrictions on guns. They don’t feel such measures would have the desired effect of curbing gun violence. “I certainly think it is appropriate to have the discussion about violence, but we need to address the causes of violence and the issue of access to mental health care,” Rep. Miller said. “Until we address the root issues and motivations behind violence, we are not going to see any marked reduction in gun crimes.” Locally, law enforcement officials take a similar view. They read currently proposed gun legislation as misguided. “You could outlaw all the guns and we’d still have gun violence,” said Pensacola Police Chief Chip Simmons. “If you’re a criminal, you don’t care about gun restrictions.” Simmons pointed out that the legislation’s biggest targets—assault weapons and magazine capacity—didn’t correlate to what he sees on the street. inweekly.net


We’re Driving our Rates Lower

so you can drive off in style.

Santa Rosa County Commissioner Bob 'Bronco' Cole displays his militia card. / photo by Jeremy Morrison “They make a big deal about the assault rifle,” the chief said. “We see handguns more than any other kind of gun.” Morgan is more blunt in his assessment of further restrictions on guns. “The argument is so fallacious on its face that I’m surprised we can say it with a straight face,” the sheriff said. The nut of this tact is this: society can’t be safeguarded against criminals and crazies, and law-biding citizens shouldn’t have to suffer as a consequence of the attempt of such. “To rush out here and pass more restrictive laws that will only be followed by law-abiding citizens is not the solution,” Morgan said. “You’re working the wrong end of this problem.” The sheriff stresses the importance of maintaining the Second Amendment’s integrity. “An armed citizenry is a good thing,” Morgan said. “Not a bad thing.”

GUN LOVE

In late January, a man walked into the Cobb Community Center. He promptly dropped a gun onto the floor. “It was not secured properly and it fell out,” said Pensacola City Councilwoman Jewel Cannada-Wynn. “I was also informed that when that weapon fell out, other people went and got their weapons and brought them into the facility.” The councilwoman wanted to know if guns were allowed in the community center. She was told that state law prohibited local governments from enacting rules pertaining to firearms. A few years back, the Santa Rosa County Commission sited a noise ordinance and shut down Dr. William Howe’s firing range. The doctor enjoyed guns and had set up a firing range—complete with a steel-plate February 21, 2013

backstop—on his Gulf Breeze property. State legislators—namely Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fort Walton Beach)—responded with H.B. 45, which made it unlawful for cities and counties to set their own rules governing guns. Facing the threat of millions of dollars in fines, the commission relented and Howe was allowed to keep using his gun range. Florida is considered one of the more accommodating, gun-friendly states. In addition to H.B. 45, state lawmakers also passed legislation in 2005 that sanctions using a gun if a person feels threatened—known as the Stand Your Ground law, or Castle Doctrine—and a law in 2011 forbidding physicians from inquiring about firearms in the home. Florida legislators are not shy about their fondness of guns. Last year, outgoing House Speaker Dean Cannon was given a Berettta 686 shotgun as a parting gift. Sen. Evers is one of the gun-rights camp’s most faithful supporters. He’s signed on to his share of pro-gun legislation, and was a co-sponsor of Stand Your Ground. “I think here in Florida, our gun laws are adequate, they’re up to speed,” Evers said. “If it’s not broke don’t fix it.” Other Florida lawmakers disagree. A bill being pushed by Rep. Bobby Powell (DRivera Beach) allows local government to forbid guns in publicly sanctioned or sponsored events and public buildings, such as libraries and community centers. In South Florida, a collective of municipalities have filed suit in an effort to see local governments more empowered to enact regional regulations. In Tallahassee, Rep. Jim Waldman (D-Coconut Creek) and Sen. Jeremy Ring (D-Margate) are drafting bills that would overturn H.B. 45. “I’m hopeful,” Waldman said, conceding that such notions face uphill battles

**Rates as low as 2.13% APR for 60 months on used car purchases and refinance 2006 model year and newer. Rates for well-qualified borrowers. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Federally insured by NCUA.

WUWF is an important source of local news and information about our community—past and present. From Rick Harper’s reports on our regional economy, to the light Jocelyn Evans frequently sheds on local and national politics, or Enid Sisskin’s Eco Minute, UWF experts are helping to keep our community informed on 88.1 FM—and don’t forget Unearthing Florida! Educating our community is one important reason why I pledge my support.

WUWF 88.1 is My Public Radio and I Make it Possible.

Dr. Judy Bense

Listener, Member and Contributor 11


in the Sunshine State. “This is my seventh year in the legislature, so I don’t get optimistic about a lot of things—I just get hopeful.”

GOD’S GUNS

The gun rally in Milton opened with a prayer. A prayer to “heal our land.” Later on, Santa Rosa County Commissioner Bob Cole read Joel 3:10—“beat your plowshares into swords...” “It doesn’t sound like our Lord wants us to lay down our arms either,” said Cole. This got an approving applause. But it paled in comparison to the crowd’s response to Santa Rosa County Sheriff Wendell Hall’s reading of a recent proclamation of the Florida Sheriff’s Association in support of the Second Amendment. The proclamation notes that sheriff’s are sworn to uphold the U.S. Constitution and affirms the group’s support of the Second Amendment, the right to bear arms. A key line is as follows: “Florida Sheriff’s affirm they will not assist, support, or condone any unconstitutional infringement of that right.” The National Sheriff’s Association passed a similar, but strikingly different. proclamation. That proclamation recognizes the Second Amendment and “further recognizes the ultimate authority of the courts in interpreting the scope of those constitutional rights.” Morgan breaks down the difference. “They kinda wimped out,” the sheriff said, noting the defining line.

The in-state proclamation was a direct response to proposals being considered at the national level. Florida authorities don’t seem keen on following-through on the possible federal regulations. It’s not the first time the state has

snubbed its nose at Washington. In response to the 1994 assault weapons ban, a number of Panhandle counties passed symbolic resolutions enlisting every citizen into the regional militia. “I’m pro-gun, 100 percent,” said former

Santa Rosa commission chairman Mapoles. In 1994, Mapoles led the Panhandle militia charge. The measure passed unanimously in Santa Rosa, and was quickly picked up by the commissions in Escambia and Okaloosa. “Most folks in this part of the country are not willing to give up their guns,” Mapoles told the New York Times in 1994. In Escambia, former commissioner W.A. Buck Lee was instrumental in seeing a militia resolution adopted. On his office wall at his current Santa Rosa Island Authority post, hangs a cartoon by Earl Bowden memorializing the era. It features Lee and Mapoles at a Second Amendment rally at the Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds. “It says, ‘The Republic’s safe now, right Gen. Mapoles?’” Lee read the cartoon. “He says ‘Yeah, Buck, east of Escambia Bay.’”

CLINGING IN THE DIVIDE

Jan Wheelis enjoys the Milton gun rally. / photo by Jeremy Morrison

When Rep. Miller hit Pensacola last November as part of the home-stretch of GOP candidate Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, the hometown boy brought the house down when he opened his remarks by dropping a droll, one-liner bomb aimed squarely at the philosophical, social and political divides running throughout America’s debate over firearms. “Here we are again,” Miller told the crowd, pausing to bask in the moment’s heat, “clinging to our guns and religion.” It was a dig at a comment Obama had earlier made on the campaign trail and it shot straight to the heart of the national divide on guns. There are those that feel the Second

Every table. Every bar. Every day. (From 4 to 6 p.m.)

$2 $3 $4 $2 All Draft Beers · $3 All Well Drinks · $4 House Wines

FI SH HO USE: (850) 470-0003, O PE N DA ILY AT 11 A.M. · AT LA S OY S TE R H O U S E: (850) 437-1961, O P E N M O N.– S AT. 5 P.M., S U N. 11 A.M. · 600 S. BA R RAC K S S T. · C REDIT CARDS OK · WWW.GOODGRITS.COM 212 1

inweekly.net


Amendment can be better defined to address concerns of the day, and there are those that take it as gospel. “The Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States is an individual and sacred right, just like the right to freedom of speech and the right to religious expression,” Miller relayed following the recent State of the Union address. It’s a right that local officials are standing firmly behind. The gun rally in Milton came on the heels of the Santa Rosa County Commission re-upping its commitment to the 1994 symbolic militia resolution. “If we don’t stand firm, it makes it easier for them to roll over it,” said Commissioner Cole at the rally. “Where does the line get drawn?” In Escambia, Commissioner Wilson Robertson is planning on putting a similar re-up-resolution in front of his board. “I’m doing it to state that Escambia County—if I can get the votes—wants to take a stand that we oppose further restrictions of any kind,” Robertson said. The commissioner will also be speaking at a Second Amendment Santa Rosa County Sheriff Wendell Hall addresses rally slated for Feb. 23 in downtown a Second Amendment rally in Milton / photo by Pensacola. Jeremy Morrison “I’m gonna try to tell the federal gun regulation are seizing upon the newest government and state and anybody who will nightmare of Newtown to further an antilisten,” Robertson said. “—tell the federal gun agenda. government, don’t change anything that our “People are so obsessed with Honey Founding Fathers put in the Constitution.” Boo Boo and sports and all the crap that’s The elected officials are in friendly on TV, they don’t understand what’s going territory. In light of federal conversations, on around them,” said the man with the Panhandle law enforcement officials appear clipboard. “If that guy had taken a car and to be staking out their Second Amendment gone and driven through a bunch of kids ground. playing on the playground, it’d be on the “If the government determined that the news one night, but those kids would still Thirteenth Amendment is wrong, would you be dead.” expect sheriffs to go out and start arresting In the waning light of sunset, the men, African-Americans because they need to be both veterans, explained that they had re-enslaved?” posed Morgan. grown to fear their own government. They The sheriff believes citizens need an pointed to an ever-tighter society, pointed unfettered Second Amendment in order to to the Patriot Act and National Defense protect their property and their families. He’s Authorization Act. also invested in the notion of the populous “They can, right now, come and say, having the wherewithal to rise up against an ‘You are a terrorist,’ and take you away,” the oppressive government. man said. “That’s part of who we are,” Morgan This strain of thought resides in a said. “Revolution is in our genes. Look at the paranoid landscape. It’s at home alongside people that settled this country, they weren’t Alex Jones and discussions concerning red milk-toast.” list-blue list and 29 Palms-litmus tests. These men are what Morgan might refer to as “clearly, wild-eyed conspiracy How serious is the divide between those theorists.” But the sheriff has his own fears. who fervently champion the Second Amend- He doesn’t view these fears—of a national ment and those who would like to reassess gun registry, or of gun confiscations—as its parameters? What might happen if new paranoid, but rather realistic. regulations are hammered out and handed “What we need to fear as a country is down to a country born and bred on gun becoming the very thing that we fought culture. against,” Morgan said. “Hmmm,” Morgan considered the quesThese are fears the men at the Milton tion. “Revolutionary. I think it’s that much of rally understand, too. They know a lot of a hot-button issue. Citizens will not tolerate other people who feel the same way. an encroachment on our Second Amend“I will never give up my weapons. I will ment rights. It’s so much of who we are as not register them. I will not turn them over,” Americans.” the man with the clipboard said. “And I The sheriff’s sentiments seem to dovetail guarantee you most of the people here with the men with no names at the Milton won’t and 90 percent of the people in this gun rally. They feel as though proponents of country wouldn’t. That’s the straw.” {in}

LAST STRAW

February 21, 2013

BP Oil Spill

Settlement Announced THE PLAINTIFFS’ STEERING COMMITTEE (PSC) SPEARHEADING THE LITIGATION SURROUNDING THE 2010 BP GULF OIL SPILL ANNOUNCED THAT A SETTLEMENT IN PRINCIPLE HAS BEEN REACHED WITH BP THAT WILL FULLY COMPENSATE HUNDREDS OFTHOUSANDS OF VICTIMS OF THE TRAGEDY. THE SETTLEMENT IS TO BE FULLY FUNDED BY BP, WITH NO CAP ON THE AMOUNT BP WILL PAY. BP IS OBLIGATED TO FULLY SATISFY ALL ELIGIBLE CLAIMS UNDER THE TERMS OF THE COURT SUPERVISED SETTLEMENT, IRRESPECTIVE OF THE FUNDS PREVIOUSLY SET ASIDE. PLEASE CONSULT WITH OUR FIRM ABOUT POSSIBLE CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION.

Contact our law firm if you own a business South of I-10 and had decreased revenue in 2010.

WE CHARGE NO FEES OR COSTS UNLESS YOU COLLECT! WWW.LEVINLAW.COM 24 Hour Access | 7 Days A Week

435.7000 316 SOUTH BAYLEN STREET SUITE 400 | 850.435.7000 The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience. 13


414 1

inweekly.net

Chef Frank Taylor has ‘refreshed’ the global menu with exciting new offerings in every category including a new selection of global martinis.

Make your reservations today and discover a new favorite!

Tues - Thurs - 5pm thru 9pm • Fri & Sat - 5pm thru 10pm

27 South Palafox Place • 850.469.9966


15

February 21, 2013

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 21-27

Arts & Entertainment art , f ilm, music, stage, books and other signs of civilization...

Get Ready for the Academy Awards by Jennie McKeon

MY PICK : I

Award season is big, but nothing is bigger than the Oscars. The clothes, the mass amount of celebrities jampacked into one place, the censored swear words—gotta love live television. Maybe you flip channels, waiting for the “big” awards to be called, or maybe you just wait to see the list of winners the next morning. But for those of you who love movies and feel like you have a vested interest in the awards show, here’s your own Oscar ballot. Tear out, circle your predictions and match them up throughout the show. And as an added bonus, I’ve included my picks in the categories I actually had an opinion on. I have no credentials except that I love movies, so feel free to disagree.

BEST PICTURE

Amour Argo Beasts of the Southern Wild Django Unchained Les Miserables Life of Pi Lincoln Silver Linings Playbook Zero Dark Thirty MY PICK: To me, this was a pretty hard year to choose a favorite, but I’m sticking with the first movie I saw of the bunch, “Lincoln.” It’s an obvious choice, I mean come on it is Steven Spielberg, but it’s also a great story about a great historical figure.

BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

Bradley Cooper, Silver Linings Playbook Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln Hugh Jackman, Les Miserables Joaquin Phoenix, The Master Denzel Washington, Flight

wouldn’t argue if Daniel or Bradley got the gold man, (I haven’t yet seen “The Master” or “Flight”). However, Day-Lewis already has two Oscars and I don’t think Cooper will ever get another chance to shine like he did in “Silver Linings Playbook.” Give him an award now before he signs up for another “Hangover” movie.

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook Emmanuelle Riva, Amour Quvenzhane Wallis, Beasts of the Southern Wild Naomi Watts, The Impossible MY PICK: Quvenzhane Wallis hands down. You cannot take your eyes off that little girl. She could be mute and still display all of the emotions of her character, “Hushpuppy.”

Helen Hunt, The Sessions Jacki Weaver, Silver Linings Playbook MY PICK: Anne Hathaway. She was a double threat in “Les Mis” by singing and acting and nailing both. Her role, while small in the realm of the three-hour film, haunts you throughout.

Alan Arkin, Argo Robert De Niro, Silver Linings Playbook Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained MY PICK: Tommy Lee Jones. You can argue that he was just playing himself, but his role as Thaddeus Stevens was just plain fun to watch.

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Amy Adams, The Master Sally Field, Lincoln Anne Hathaway, Les Miserables

MUSIC, ORIGINAL SCORE

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

Brave Frankenweenie ParaNorman The Pirates! Band of Misfits Wreck-It Ralph MY PICK: I’m going with the only one I saw in this category: “Wreck-It Ralph.” It was really cute, any video gamer will appreciate the references.

SHORT FILM, ANIMATED

Adam and Dog Fresh Guacamole Head over Heels Maggie Simpson in "The Longest Daycare" Paperman John Kahrs MY PICK: Again, the only one I saw was “Paperman.” It was before “Wreck-It Ralph.” But it truly was such a beautiful short. The music and the adorable ending moved me so much I forgot that I was essentially watching a cartoon.

"Give Bradley Cooper an award now before he signs up for another Hangover movie."

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

loses. Unless Beyonce sang something for “Lincoln,” there’s really no competition.

MUSIC, ORIGINAL SONG

Anna Karenina, Dario Marianelli Argo, Alexandre Desplat Life of Pi, Mychael Danna Lincoln, John Williams Skyfall, Thomas Newman MY PICK: John Williams. This is the man who came up with the catchy “Star Wars” theme song. I think any music nerd would agree he’s an easy choice.

COSTUME DESIGN

Anna Karenina, Jacqueline Durran  Les Miserables, Paco Delgado Lincoln, Joanna Johnston Mirror Mirror, Eiko Ishioka Snow White and the Huntsman, Colleen Atwood MY PICK: I’ve seen all of the above movies except for “Anna Karenina”—but you can tell just from the trailers that these period costumes were gorgeous. My favorite was “Mirror Mirror.” The costumes were whimsical and the swan number worn by Lily Collins, was exceptionally beautiful.

DIRECTING

Amour, Michael Haneke Beasts of the Southern Wild, Benh Zeitlin Life of Pi, Ang Lee Lincoln, Steven Spielberg Silver Linings Playbook, David O. Russell MY PICK: I bet you thought I’d say Spielberg. While I wouldn’t disagree with him winning, I‘m rooting for David O. Russell. I think for actors to tap into their “crazy” side, they need a director whom they trust. Whatever Russell did to get his actors to give such great performances, worked.

"Before My Time" from Chasing Ice, Music and Lyric by J. Ralph "Everybody Needs A Best Friend" from For a complete list of award categories and Ted, Music by Walter Murphy; Lyric by Seth nominees, visit oscar.go.com/nominees {in} MacFarlane "Pi's Lullaby" from Life of Pi, Music by Mychael Danna; Lyric by Bombay Jayashri "Skyfall" from Skyfall, Music and Lyric by Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth "Suddenly" from Les Misérables, WHEN: Airing live at 7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24 Music by Claude-Michel Schönon ABC berg; Lyric by Herbert Kretzmer DETAILS: oscar.go.com and Alain Boublil MY PICK: “Skyfall.” Adele never

THE 85TH ACADEMY AWARDS


616 1

inweekly.net

The YMCA Board of Directors is excited to share their vision for a

Maritime YMCA downtown. The YMCA Board of Directors has unanimously approved the pursuit of a long-term ground sublease of Parcel 8 of the Community Maritime Park on which the YMCA would build a modern full service family YMCA facility. Upon entering into an agreement with the City of Pensacola, the YMCA will: • Pay fair value ground rent and common area/ infrastructure use maintenance fees to the Park as agreed upon by the YMCA and the City of Pensacola. • Construct a modern full service family YMCA facility upon the Parcel, including health and wellness amenities offered by modern urban family YMCAs.

Our Mission is to create a safe, inclusive, family-oriented YMCA at the Maritime Park. A new Family Y would not only help the YMCA expand its health, wellness, and after-school programs, but would also create new jobs and guarantee public access to the waterfront.

A word from our President, Steve Williams

Thoughts from our CEO, Michael Bodenhausen

Our YMCA Board of Directors and the entire community is blessed to have visionaries step forward to help us make the dream of a new downtown family YMCA come true. As Board Chairman finding words to express the thanks and excitement are very difficult. Our Board of Directors support the new Family YMCA located at the Community Maritime Park. We hope that you will join us in making this dream come true.

A new downtown YMCA is much more than a building. In my 27 years at the YMCA, I have seen the impact that a strong downtown YMCA can have in a community. The greatest impact is in the expansion of the programs, the ability to serve everyone by breaking down barriers. We need the support and input of all the community and hope we can count on you.

YMCA Board of Directors Meri Asmar Cindi Bonner Jewel Cannada-Wynn John Daniel Alison Davenport Don Haferkamp Jon Kagan, Vice-Chair Alan Moore Alan Nickelsen, Treasurer Phil Phillips

John Porter, Secretary Dr. Obie Powell Tom Owens Victor Rodriguez Tony Tampary Aaron Watson David Williams Steve Williams, Chair Bill Phillips, Special Advisor

To learn more, visit MaritimeY.org

QS0093 Y IN BOD ad.indd 1

Paid For by Friends of the Y

2/18/13 9:32 AM


17

February 21, 2013

happenings

THURSDAY 2.21

‘MEDITATIONS IN MOTION’ 8 a.m. through Mar. 1. Gallery 88, inside WUWF 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2787 or wuwf.org. ‘ANNUAL YOUTH ART FOCUS’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘THE STEWART COLLECTION OF AFRICAN ART’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘FLORIDA: A CELEBRATION OF 500 YEARS’ JURIED ART SHOW 10 a.m. through Mar 1. Artel Gallery, 223 S. Palafox. 432-3080 or artelgallery.org. ‘EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX EDIT’ 10 a.m. TAG Gallery at University of West Florida, 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2696 or tag82uwf.wordpress.com. ‘A ROADTRIP THROUGH FLORIDA ARCHAEOLOGY’ 10 a.m. DARC, 207 E. Main St. 595-0050, ext. 107 or flpublicarchaeology.org/darc.php. HISTORIC PENSACOLA TROLLEY TOUR 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. Pensacola Visitor Center, 1401 E. Gregory St. 941-2876 or beachbumtrolley.com. ‘THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS’ 2:30 p.m. $10-$16 University of West Florida, Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Pkwy. 4742696 or uwf.edu. PLAY HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. WINE TASTING AT AWM 5 p.m. Aragon Wine Market, 27 S. Ninth Ave. 433-9463 or aragonwinemarket.com. VEGAN DINNER AT EOTL 6 p.m. End of the Line Café, 610 E. Wright St. 429-0336 or eotlcafe.com. AFRICAN DRUMMING CLASSES 6:30 p.m. $2-$5. Gull Point Community Center, 7000 Spanish Trail. For more information contact, 291-2718, 324-4928 or hurreyupstageandfilmworks.com. WSRE STUDIO AMPED: HOTEL OSCAR 6 p.m. doors open, 7 p.m. concert. StudioAmped is WSRE’s concert series featuring regional bands performing their original material. All concerts are taped in high-definition. Beginning April 4, WSRE will televise each concert on Thursdays from 9-10 p.m. with a repeat on the following Wednesdays from 10-11 p.m. WSRE Jean & Paul Amos Performance Studio, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. wsre. org/StudioAmped or Facebook.com/StudioAmped. SHORT ATTENTION SPAN THEATRE 8 p.m. $25. Pensacola Little Theatre, 400 S. Jefferson St. 4322042 or pensacolalittletheatre.com.

live music

THE BREAK CATS 6 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna, Pensacola Beach. paradisebar-grill.com. J. HAWKINS & JAMES DANIEL 7 p.m., JOHNNY BARBATO 9 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com. THE DAVENPORTS 6 p.m. The Leisure Club, 126 S. Palafox. 912-4229 or tlcdowntown.com. LUCAS CRUTCHFIELD 6 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. ALAN PARSONS LIVE PROJECT 7 p.m. $35-$40. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox, vinylmusichall.com. JAMES & FRIENDS 7:30 p.m. Hub Stacey’s Downtown, 312 E. Government St. 469-1001 or hubstaceys.com. BRAD BARNES OPEN COLLEGE JAM 7:30 p.m. Goat Lips Beer Garden, 2811 Copter Rd. 474-1919. KARAOKE WITH BECKY 7:30 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd., Pensacola Beach. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com. TIM SPENCER 8 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. Pensacola Beach. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. DUELLING PIANOS 8 p.m. Rosie O’Grady’s at

Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. THE TOASTERS, MRS SKANATTO, SLAPSHOT HEROES 9 p.m. The Handlebar, 319 N. Tarragona St. 434-9060 or pensacolahandlebar.com. BLACKWATER 9 p.m. Chan’s Nightclub, 610 E. Nine Mile Rd. 477-9961 or chanspensacola.com. COLLEGE DANCE NIGHT: DJ TONYC 9 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. BIG JIM BROWN 9 p.m. End O’ The Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. CORNBREAD 9 p.m. Apple Annie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. EXTREME KARAOKE WITH G.C.P.C 10 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or gulfcoastpartycrew.com.

FRIDAY 2.22

‘MEDITATIONS IN MOTION’ 8 a.m. through Mar. 1. Gallery 88, inside WUWF 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2787 or wuwf.org. TAI CHI AT FLORIDA BLUE 8:30 a.m. Free. Florida Blue, 1680 Airport Blvd. For information, call 2024188. 2013 REGIONAL HOUSING FORUM: ‘AGING IN PLACE’ 9 a.m.-2:45 p.m. The Florida Department of Elder Affairs and the University of West Florida Center on Aging have put together an outstanding slate of speakers who will provide insight and information about aging in place from a number of perspectives. Please register at tinyurl.com/ FDOEA-UWF. UWF Commons Conference Center, 11000 University Pkwy. Building 22. 474-2406. ‘ANNUAL YOUTH ART FOCUS’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘THE STEWART COLLECTION OF AFRICAN ART’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘FLORIDA: A CELEBRATION OF 500 YEARS’ JURIED ART SHOW 10 a.m. through Mar 1. Artel Gallery, 223 S. Palafox. 432-3080 or artelgallery.org. ‘EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX EDIT’ 10 a.m. TAG Gallery at University of West Florida, 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2696 or tag82uwf.wordpress.com. PLAY HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. WINE TASTING AT SEVILLE QUARTER 5 p.m. Palace Café at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. WINE TASTING AT CITY GROCERY 5:15 p.m. City Grocery, 2050 N. 12th Ave. 469-8100. WINE TASTING AT EAST HILL MARKET 5:30 p.m. 1216 N. Ninth Ave. Meter Rentals $5. T.T. Wentworth Museum, 330 S. Jefferson. 5955985 ext 111. INTIMATE EVENING WITH NASHVILLE HIT SONGWRITERS 7 p.m. Meet & Greet, 8 p.m. show. $50. Four of Nashville’s most prolific songwriters Steve and Terri Williams and Will and Holly Hefner Nance join forces for this fundraiser for Ronald McDonald House Charities of NWFL. Imogene Theatre, 6831 Oak St. Milton. 477-2273 or rmhcnwfl.org. RHYTHM OF THE DANCE 7:30 p.m. $28-$58. This two-hour dance and music extravaganza contains a wealth of Irish talent. The show is an inspiring epic, reliving the journey of the Irish Celts throughout history. Using modern art forms of dance and music, this richly costumed show marries the contemporary and the ancient. Rhythm of the Dance has heralded a new era in Irish entertainment, internationally rated as one of the most popular and busiest Irish step dance shows in the


818 1

inweekly.net

happenings

world. Saenger Theatre, 118 S. Palafox. 595-3882 or pensacolasaenger.com. ‘RABBIT HOLE’ 7:30 p.m. $7-$11 Excluding a few minor theatrical touches, not much happens in “Rabbit Hole” in the way of big events. In an age where the meta-theatrical rules, David LindsayAbaire’s wrenching play tells a simple yet rich story about a family overcoming the death of their child. Significant events do happen in the play of course, but Lindsay-Abaire’s presentation is so subtle that the audience does not see the shifts until they have already occurred. Ashmore Auditorium, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. pensacolastate.edu/Lyceum SHORT ATTENTION SPAN THEATRE 7:30 p.m. $10-$17. Pensacola Little Theatre, 400 S. Jefferson St. 432-2042 or pensacolalittletheatre.com. DAUGHTRY AND 3 DOORS DOWN 7:30 p.m. $28.50-$65. Pensacola Bay Center, 201 East Gregory St. pensacolaciviccenter.com. 3 GAME SPECIAL 8:30 p.m. $12, includes shoes. DeLuna Lanes, 590 E. 9 Mile Road. 478-9522 or delunalanes.com. SWING DANCING 8:30 p.m. American Legion, 1401 Intendencia St. $5. 437-5465 or pensacolaswing.com. ‘STAND UP COMEDY SHOW’ 9:30 p.m. Big Easy Tavern, 710 N. Palafox. bigeasytavern.com or 208-5976. COSMIC BOWLING 11 p.m. DeLuna Lanes, 590 E. 9 Mile Road. 478-9522 or delunalanes.com.

live music

LUCAS CRUTCHFIELD 5 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. JEFF STRAHAN 6 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via

de Luna, Pensacola Beach. paradisebar-grill.com. DOWNTOWN BIG BAND 6:30 p.m. Gregory Street Assembly Hall, 501 E. Gregory St. 307-8633. FISH SANDWICH 7 p.m. Hub Stacey’s at the Point, 5851 Galvez Rd. 497-0071. THE BLENDERS 7:30 p.m. Hub Stacey’s Downtown, 312 E. Government St. 469-1001 or hubstaceys.com. KARAOKE WITH BECKY 7:30 p.m. Sabine Sandbar, 715 Pensacola Beach Blvd., Pensacola Beach. 934-3141 or dalesbigdeck.com. MIKE BOCCIA 7:45 p.m. Goat Lips Beer Garden, 2811 Copter Road. 474-1919. SCOTT KOEHN 8 p.m. The Grand Marlin, 400 Pensacola Beach Blvd. Pensacola Beach. 677-9153 or thegrandmarlin.com. JAMES ADKINS 8:30 p.m. Tin Cow, 102 S. Palafox. For more information, call 466-2103. THE AIR I BREATHE, SIRENS & SAILORS 9 p.m. The Handlebar, 319 N. Tarragona St. 434-9060 or pensacolahandlebar.com. BUZZCUTT 9 p.m. The Sandshaker, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. Pensacola Beach. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com BLACKWATER, BROOKE WOODS 9 p.m. Chan’s Nightclub, 610 E. Nine Mile Rd. 477-9961 or chanspensacola.com. PETTY CASH 9 p.m. Hopjacks Pizza Kitchen & Taproom, 20 S. Palafox. hopjacks.com. DJ MR. LAO 9 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter. com. FATTY WATERS 9 p.m. Apple Annie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. KATAGORY 5 9 p.m. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

Pensacola Opera presents

Giacomo Puccini

March 15 and 17, 2013 at the historic Saenger Theatre

TICKETS START AT $30 Call (850) 433-6737 www.pensacolaopera.com

BIG JIM BROWN 9 p.m. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. NEWBURY JAM 9 p.m., TURBO CRAB 10 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com.

SATURDAY 2.23

UWF REVERSE SPRINT TRIATHLON 7:30 a.m. The race will start with a 5k run, that will take participants from the HLS Facility to the East entrance of campus and back. The bike portion of the race is a 15k, which will take racers on every inch of the campus roads. The race will end with a 400M swim in the UWF Aquatic Center. UWF Pensacola Campus - Health, Leisure and Sports Facility, 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2586. PALAFOX MARKET 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Martin Luther King Jr. Plaza, N. Palafox St. palafoxmarket.com. GRAFFITI CLEAN-UP 9 a.m. Help clean up downtown Pensacola. Bring rubber gloves, fiberglass scouring pad, spray bottle with water, paper towels, Goo-B Gone aerosol can and metal paint scrapper. For more information, email dib@downtownpensacola.com. PETSMART CHARITIES NATIONAL ADOPTION WEEKEND 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Save a pet’s life and enrich your own with the pure joy that only a tail wag can bring. Whether your type is a cat or dog, puppy or kitten, purebred or mixed breed, you’re bound to find the perfect match. Your pet adoption will benefit these local shelters and rescue agencies, including the Humane Society of Pensacola, which will receive $35 in adoption-reward grants from PetSmart Charities for every pet adopted in stores during this event. PetSmart, 6251 N. Davis Hwy. To

learn about the adoption center’s fees and guidelines, visit PetSmartCharities.org/adoption or call 877-473-8762. 11TH ANNUAL EMERALD COAST METAPHYSICAL FESTIVAL 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Adults $10, Children (3-11) $5. This is rare opportunity to sample the largest gathering of psychics, mystics and metaphysical vendors on the Emerald Coast. Enjoy guest speakers and more than 75 vendors, psychics, readers and healers. Presented by Unlimited Horizons of the Emerald Coast, a non-profit group sharing knowledge in search of Universal Truth. Crown Plaza Grand Hotel, 200 East Gregory St. More information at UnlimitedHorizons.org, Facebook.com/ UnlimitedHorizons or call 610-0919. 1ST ANNUAL BARK TO REMEMBER EVENT 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free dog friendly event to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s. Dog contests, demonstrations, health care awareness, Bloodmobile, Bone Marrow Drive, local vendors, City of Pensacola fire truck, food and drinks available. Parking is free, so come out and bring your chair, dog and enjoy the park. Admission: Free Admission and Parking. Pensacola Community Maritime Park, 301 W Main St. 4300100. ‘FLORIDA: A CELEBRATION OF 500 YEARS’ JURIED ART SHOW 10 a.m. through Mar 1. Artel Gallery, 223 S. Palafox. 432-3080 or artelgallery.org. ‘ANNUAL YOUTH ART FOCUS’ 12 p.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘THE STEWART COLLECTION OF AFRICAN ART’ 12 p.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. 2013 FIESTA FILIPINO 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Adults $5, Children $2.50. Join the Filipino American Associa-


19

February 21, 2013

happenings

tion of Pensacola, Inc. for a full day of family fun, Filipino food, cultural show, singing contest, exhibits and more. Live concert and comedy hour from 7 p.m.-9 p.m., featuring Bernardo Bernardo and Patricia Javier. Concert tickets are available for $25. Premium tickets are available for $50 and include a private meet-and-greet with the celebrities at the FilAm Community Center on Friday, Feb. 22, at 7 p.m. Pensacola Interstate Fairgrounds, 6685 Mobile Hwy. 292-6009 or filampensacola.com. ‘EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX EDIT’ 12 p.m. TAG Gallery at University of West Florida, 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2696 or tag82uwf.wordpress.com. PLAY HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. 615448-5094. PENSACOLA ICE FLYERS 7:05 p.m. Pensacola Bay Center, 201 E. Gregory St. pensacolaiceflyers.com. ‘RABBIT HOLE’ 7:30 p.m. $7-$11 Ashmore Auditorium, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. pensacolastate.edu/Lyceum SHORT ATTENTION SPAN THEATRE 7:30 p.m. $10-$17. Pensacola Little Theatre, 400 S. Jefferson St. 432-2042 or pensacolalittletheatre.com. GHOST HUNT 8 p.m. Is the Pensacola Lighthouse haunted? The Travel Channel and SciFi’s Ghost Hunters (TAPS) think so. Join the ghost hunt in the historic 1869 Keeper’s Quarters and see if our ghosts are willing to meet you. Bring your own equipment or share ours (some items available for purchase in the Gift Shop before tours commence.) Tours are two hours in duration. This tour does include a trip to the top of the Lighthouse for a look across Pensacola Bay, weather permitting. Per Coast Guard Safety Regulations backless/open toed shoes are not permitted to climb the tower stairs. We recommend this tour

for children 12 and over only. Pensacola Lighthouse, 2081 Radford Blvd. 393-1561 or pensacolalighthouse.org. COSMIC BOWLING 11 p.m. DeLuna Lanes, 590 E. 9 Mile Road. 478-9522 or delunalanes.com.

live music

JOE OCCHIPINTI SMALL GROUP JAZZ 10 a.m. The Drowsy Poet Coffee Company, 86 Brent Lane. 434-7638. PAUL KILLOUGH 6 p.m. Crabs We Got ‘Em, 6 Casino Beach. 932-0700 or crabswegotem.com. JEFF STRAHAN 6 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna, Pensacola Beach. paradisebar-grill.com. NICK WING 7 p.m. Hub Stacey’s at the Point, 5851 Galvez Rd. 497-0071. DUELLING PIANOS 8 p.m. Rosie O’Grady’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. PHIL PROCTOR 8:30 p.m. Tin Cow, 102 S. Palafox. For more information, call 466-2103. KNEE DEEP BAND 9 p.m. Hopjacks Pizza Kitchen & Taproom, 20 S. Palafox. Hopjacks.com. MIDWAYER, CARRIER 9 p.m. The Handlebar, 319 N. Tarragona St. 434-9060 or pensacolahandlebar.com. PETER B’S KARAOKE WITH DJ CHRIS UPTON 9 p.m. DeLuna Lanes, 590 E. 9 Mile Road. 4789522 or delunalanes.com. BUZZCUTT 9 p.m. The Sandshaker, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. Pensacola Beach. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com ROLLIN’ IN THE HAY 9 p.m., CORNBREAD 10 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com. BLACKWATER, ULTRAVIOLET 9 p.m. Chan’s

Nightclub, 610 E. Nine Mile Rd. 477-9961 or chanspensacola.com. DJ MR. LAO 9 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. HOTEL OSCAR 9 p.m. Apple Annie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. KATAGORY 5 9 p.m. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. BIG JIM BROWN 9 p.m. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. KRAZY GEORGE KARAOKE 9 p.m. Hub Stacey’s Downtown, 312 E. Government St. 469-1001 or hubstaceys.com.

SUNDAY 2.24

11TH ANNUAL EMERALD COAST METAPHYSICAL FESTIVAL 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Adults $10, Children (3-11) $5. Crown Plaza Grand Hotel, 200 East Gregory St. More information at UnlimitedHorizons.org, Facebook.com/UnlimitedHorizons or call 610-0919. ‘RABBIT HOLE’ 2:30 p.m. $7-$11 Ashmore Auditorium, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. pensacolastate.edu/Lyceum PENSACOLA CHILDREN’S CHORUS: ‘THE ANGELS SING’ 2:30 p.m. $14-$20. This year’s concert features guest conductor, Henry Leck who is the Founding Artistic Director of the Indianapolis Children’s Choir, one of the largest children’s choir programs in the world, and the Indianapolis Youth Chorale. Saenger Theatre, 118 S Palafox. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or charge by phone by calling

800-745-3000. For more information 434-7760 or pensacolachildrenschorus.com. PENSACOLA ICE FLYERS 3:05 p.m. Pensacola Bay Center, 201 E. Gregory St. pensacolaiceflyers. com. PLAY HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. JOHN JOYNER 4 p.m. Hub Stacey’s at the Point, 5851 Galvez Rd. 497-0071.

live music

JEFF STRAHAN 3 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna, Pensacola Beach. paradisebar-grill.com. RON WILLIAMSON OPEN MIC JAM 6 p.m. Goat Lips Beer Garden, 2811 Copter Road. 474-1919. CROSSTOWN 4 p.m. The Sandshaker, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. Pensacola Beach. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. WES LOPER 7 p.m., REID LIGHTFOOT 8:30 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com. MUSIC AND KARAOKE 9 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd., Pensacola Beach. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. HOTEL OSCAR 9 p.m. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. SWANK SINATRA, BREAST MILK, THE LOWER CASES 9 p.m. The Handlebar, 319 N. Tarragona St. 434-9060 or pensacolahandlebar.com.

MONDAY 2.25

‘MEDITATIONS IN MOTION’ 8 a.m. Gallery 88, inside WUWF 11000 University Pkwy. Through Mar. 1. 474-2787 or wuwf.org.

Saturday, March 2 at 8:00 p.m. Saenger Theatre Pensacola Symphony Orchestra Peter Rubardt, Conductor with Philippe Quint, Violin featuring

Haydn Symphony No. 96 Dvořák Violin Concerto Sibelius Finlandia Sibelius Symphony No. 7

CALL NOW FOR TICKETS! 850.435.2533 www.pensacolasymphony.com


020 2

inweekly.net

unique & affordable

Join us for Wine Tastings Thursdays 5-7 p.m. 27 S. 9th Ave.

433-WINE or 433-9463

www.aragonwinemarket.com

‘A ROADTRIP THROUGH FLORIDA ARCHAEOLOGY’ 10 a.m. DARC, 207 E. Main St. 595-0050, ext. 107 or flpublicarchaeology.org/darc.php. CLAY GLAZING WORKSHOP 10 a.m. $35, class is limited to 16 students. First City Art Center, 1060 N. Guillemard St., Building 3. 429-1222 or firstcityart.org. BODACIOUS LEARNING LUNCHES 11:30-12:30 p.m. $20. The Bodacious Olive, 407-D S. Palafox. 433-6505 or bodaciousolive.com. PLAY HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. SEVILLE QUARTER MILERS CLUB 5 p.m. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. OYSTER NIGHT AT ATLAS 5 p.m. First dozen are 25 cents apiece and $2 Budweiser, Bud Light and Michelob Ultra drafts until close. Atlas, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or atlas.goodgrits.com. HALF-PRICE BEER 5-10 p.m. All Craft Beers & Domestic Beers are Half Price All Night. The Leisure Club, 126 S. Palafox. 912-4229 or tlcdowntown.com. TAI CHI AT FLORIDA BLUE 6 p.m. Free. Florida Blue, 1680 Airport Blue. For information, call 2024188. WSRE STUDIO AMPED: HONEYGUN 6 p.m. doors open, 7 p.m. concert. StudioAmped is WSRE’s concert series featuring regional bands performing their original material. All concerts are taped in high-definition by WSRE’s award-winning production team. Beginning April 4, WSRE will televise each concert on Thursdays from 9-10 p.m. with a repeat on the following Wednesdays from 10-11 p.m. WSRE Jean & Paul Amos Performance Studio, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. wsre. org/StudioAmped or Facebook.com/StudioAmped. BURGERS & BEER NIGHT AT SURF BURGER 6 p.m. Surf Burger, 500 Quietwater Beach Rd., Pensacola Beach. 932-1417 or thesurfburger.com. UWF MAYGARDEN DISTINGUISHED LECTURER, DEBORAH BASSETT 7 p.m. The University of West Florida Department of Communication Arts presents the 2012-2013 Jerry Maygarden Distinguished Lecturer, Deborah Bassett. The lecture, “Beyond Pocahontas: How Social Media is Changing the Face of Contemporary Native America,” is free and open to the public. UWF Pensacola Campus, Music Hall of the Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Pkwy. TEXAS HOLD’EM 4 FUN 7 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. Pensacola Beach. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. GAMER’S NIGHT 8 p.m. Fast Eddie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. EXTREME TRIVIA 9 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com.

live music

FOREVER DIETING? TIME TO CHANGE THE WAY YOU THINK ABOUT FOOD. A LUMINOUS LIFE HYPNOTHERAPY

SUSAN DUNLOP, MA, CHT

INTERNATIONALLY CERTIFIED HYPNOTHERAPIST

850-346-7865 EAST HILL www.luminouslifehypnotherapy.com

OPEN MIC WITH CATHY PACE 5 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com. PAUL KILLOUGH 6 p.m. Crabs We Got ‘Em, 6 Casino Beach. 932-0700 or crabswegotem.com. JSOP’S BLUE MONDAY FEATURING DIXIE STEW 6:30 p.m. $5-$10. Five Sister’s Blues Café, 421 W. Belmont St. 433-8282 or jazzpensacola.com. DADA 7 p.m. $15. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox,vinylmusichall.com. MONDAY NIGHT BLUES 8 p.m. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. KARAOKE WITH GIACAMO 8 p.m. Helen Back, 22 Palafox. 912-8644 or helenbackcafe.com/pensacola/. LISA ZANGHI 9 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com. BRIAN SHORT DUO 9 p.m. End O’ the Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

TUESDAY 2.26

‘MEDITATIONS IN MOTION’ 8 a.m. Gallery 88,

Hip-Hop Night at Sluggo’s By Sarah McCartan

Nothing gets a Friday night moving quite like a little bit of hip-hop. Although Sluggo’s Vegetarian Restaurant is no stranger to hip-hop nights and has been serving as a host for these events for several years, Friday’s event will be the first hip-hop night they can call their very own. Paul the P-Funk Fresh will be joined by several other local and regional Florida-based acts for the evening.  {in} WHEN: 9:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22 WHERE: Sluggo’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 101 S. Jefferson St. COST: $5 DETAILS: 791-6501

inside WUWF 11000 University Pkwy. Through Mar. 1. 474-2787 or wuwf.org. BREAKFAST AND A MOVIE 8 a.m. doors, 9 a.m. movie. $8. IMAX Theatre-Naval Aviation Museum, 1750 Radford Blvd. navalaviationmuseum.org ‘ANNUAL YOUTH ART FOCUS’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘THE STEWART COLLECTION OF AFRICAN ART’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org. ‘FLORIDA: A CELEBRATION OF 500 YEARS’ JURIED ART SHOW 10 a.m. through Mar 1. Artel Gallery, 223 S. Palafox. 432-3080 or artelgallery.org. ‘EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX EDIT’ 10 a.m. TAG Gallery at University of West Florida, 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2696 or tag82uwf.wordpress.com. ‘A ROADTRIP THROUGH FLORIDA ARCHAEOLOGY’ 10 a.m. DARC, 207 E. Main St. 595-0050, ext. 107 or fl publicarchaeology.org/darc.php. HISTORIC PENSACOLA TROLLEY TOUR 10 & 2 p.m. Pensacola Visitor Center, 1401 E. Gregory St. 941-2876 or beachbumtrolley.com. TWO DOLLAR TUESDAYS 10 a.m. $2, snacks and games all day. DeLuna Lanes, 590 E. 9 Mile Road. 478-9522 or delunalanes.com. PLAY HAPPY HOUR 4 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. HALF-PRICE SUSHI 5 p.m. Atlas, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or atlas.goodgrits.com. TWO FOR ONE 5-10 p.m. 2 for 1 Tuesday Nights features 2 for 1 House Wines, 2 for 1 Domestic Beers and 2 for 1 Ice Cream Scoops All Night. The Leisure Club, 126 S. Palafox. 912-4229 or tlcdowntown.com. PRIME TIME TUESDAYS 5:30 p.m. Jackson’s, 400 S. Palafox. 469-9898 or jacksons.goodgrits.com. WSRE STUDIO AMPED: SUGARCANE JANE 6 p.m. doors open, 7 p.m. concert. StudioAmped is WSRE’s concert series featuring regional bands performing their original material. All concerts are taped in high-definition by WSRE’s award-winning production team. Beginning April 4, WSRE will televise each concert on Thursdays from 9-10 p.m. with a repeat on the following Wednesdays from 10-11 p.m. WSRE Jean & Paul Amos Performance Studio, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. wsre.org/StudioAmped or Facebook. com/StudioAmped. YOGA AT EVER’MAN 6 p.m. $2 for non-members. Ever’man Natural Foods, 315 W. Garden St. 4380402 or everman.org. ANCHOR STEPS SWING NIGHT 7 p.m. $3-$5. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

UWF SYMPHONIC BAND 7:30 p.m. The concert will feature music written originally for the band, including three works by Joseph Spaniola, UWF Music Department Chair. These works include “Earth Fanfare” and “Escapade,” which won the 2001 National Band Association/William D. Revelli Memorial Composition award. UWF Center for Fine and Performing Arts Mainstage Theatre, Building 82, 11000 University Pkwy. Free. Reservations are recommended, but not required. 857-6285. TOSH TUESDAY 8 p.m. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

live music

LIVE JAZZ W/ KITT & FRIENDS 5 p.m. opens for drinks and dinner, 6 p.m. show. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E.  Government St. 4346211 or sevillequarter.com. LUCAS CRUTCHFIELD 6 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. KARAOKE WITH BECKY 8 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. 932-2211 or sandshaker.com. TUESDAY JAM NIGHT 8 p.m. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. BALLYHOO 9 p.m. 7:30 p.m. $8-10. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox, vinylmusichall.com. CLEPTO, GUNS TO FIRE 9 p.m. The Handlebar, 319 N. Tarragona St. 434-9060 or pensacolahandlebar.com. MIKE QUINN 9 p.m. End O’ The Alley at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. KARAOKE WITH GEORGE 9 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 200. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. KARAOKE AT PADDY O’LEARY’S 9 p.m. Paddy O’ Leary’s Irish Pub, 49 Via de Luna, Pensacola Beach. 916-9808 or paddyolearysirishpub.com. TROY BRANNON 9:30 p.m. Florabama, 17401 Perdido Key Dr. 492-0611 or florabama.com.

WEDNESDAY 2.27

‘MEDITATIONS IN MOTION’ 8 a.m. through Mar. 1. Gallery 88, inside WUWF 11000 University Pkwy. 474-2787 or wuwf.org. YOGA CLASS AT FLORIDA BLUE 8 a.m. Free. Bring your own mat. Florida Blue, 1680 Airport Blue. For information, call 202-4188. ‘ANNUAL YOUTH ART FOCUS’ 10 a.m. through Mar 2. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.org.


21

February 21, 2013

Have you experienced IRON yet?

Everyone is talking about Pensacola’s newest eatery. IRON at Marcus Pointe features delicious culinary creations. IRON is open Monday-Saturday for lunch and for dinner Wednesday-Saturday evenings Call 850-476-7776 for more information or to place your dinner reservation today


222 2

inweekly.net

Leadership Pensacola Explores Regional Economics Jennifer Allen McFarren, Program Director Leadership Pensacola Pensacola is poised for growth. The Leadership Pensacola (LeaP) Class of 2013 spent a full day exploring our local economy at Navy Federal Credit Union’s state-of-the-art campus. The day began with an objective overview of our local economy by Dr. Rick Harper from the University of West Florida’s Office of Economic Development and Engagement. Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward and Escambia County Commissioner Grover Robinson also provided fascinating insight on the flow of BP more attractive for relocating corporations and grant money, and specifically, the RESTORE Act. information about our local workforce. Larry Sassano, President of Florida’s Great Northwest, closed the day with an overview of our regional economic development efforts.

What Kind of Leader are You? Nominate yourself or someone you know for the Leadership Pensacola (LeaP) Class 2014!

“Programs like LeaP are crucial to the continual development of our region and help prepare members of our community for future roles of even greater leadership.” - Jim Hizer, President/CEO Greater Pensacola Chamber

www.LeaPNominations.com

The day was chaired by Leadership Pensacola alumni Frank White, Stacy Keller, Perry Palmer, Wendy Simon and Patrick Rooney.

More Information

For more information on Leadership Pensacola, please contact Jennifer Allen McFarren at 850.438.4081 or visit Pensacolachamber.com/LeaP. The three-legged stool of our local economy, as explained to the class, consists of defense, tourism and basic industry. A well represented panel of experts addressed the class and shared their expertise and insight on doing business in Pensacola. Moderated by Chamber staff, the panel was comprised of Julian MacQueen of Innisfree Hotels;Terri Ramos of Global Business Solutions, Inc.; Tad Ihns of Avalex Technologies; ADM Robert Kelly, Vice Chairman of Armed Services for the Chamber; and Julie Sheppard of the Institute of Human and Machine Cognition. The class was enlightened on why companies do business in Pensacola, what could make Pensacola

LeaP Class of 2013 Barrie Arnold, Nikki Morette Bell, Robert Bender, Johan C. Boelig IV, Geoff Brodersen, Mark Everett Canada, Donya C. Charles, Nina Clark, Theresa Cserep, Matthew Davis, Gregory P. Fayard, Keith Fell, Richard Fulford, Thomas Greek, Tristan K. Harper, Jennifer Harrison, Danial Hemme, Chip Henderson, Jon Hill, Laura Hill, Emily Homan, Michelle James, Doug Jolly, Steve Kalkman, Stephanie E. Knight, Stacey Kostevicki, Kevin Krieger, Liz Kuehn, Robin Larrieu, Brooke Layton, Leon Ledbetter, Kim McDaniel, Jonathan B. Minchin, Will Nelson, Sharon Nobles, CDR Sean O’Brien, John O’Connor, Liz Pelt, Chris Phillips, Kelly Reeser, William H. Reynolds, Christa G. Ruber, Reid Rushing, Natasha Sluder, Natalie Smith, Kevin F. Spellman, Jonathan E. Thompson, Ryan Tilley and JoAnn Vanfleteren


23

February 21, 2013

news of the weird NOT EVEN A PIN DROP Officials at England’s 12th-century St. Peter’s Church in Seaford, East Sussex, which is renowned for its eerie quiet, created a 30-minute CD recently of near-total silence, first as a small-scale fundraising project, but later for general sales (since word-of-mouth had attracted orders from as far away as Ghana). Those who have heard it said they could make out only the occasional squeaking of footsteps on the wooden floor (and the very distant hum of passing cars). Said one admiring parishioner, “People sometimes like to sit down and just have a bit of peace and quiet.” GOVERNMENT IN ACTION France has seen its wolf population gradually increase from near-extinction in the 1930s, but still classifies the predator as a “protected” species. However, sheep farmers increasingly complain that wolves’ attacks are reducing their herds. Therefore, in a recently proposed “National Wolf Plan,” the government boldly gave headline-writers around the world material for rejoicing: a national program to “educate” the wolves. Individual wolves known to have attacked sheep would be caught, marked and briefly detained, with the hope that they would learn their lesson from that trauma and from then on, pass up sheep and turn instead to rabbits, boar and deer. (Said one critic, “You might as well try to educate a shark.”) UPDATES: The Treasury Department’s inspector general for tax administration revealed in January that twice as many fraudulent income tax refunds were paid to inmates in 2011 (173,000) as for the tax year 2010. However, the IRS claimed that the fraudulent returns it did manage to stop totaled $2.5 billion (almost half of which was disingenuously claimed by two inmates). Also, the Department of Health and Human Service’s inspector general revealed in January that Medicare was illegally billed for $120 million from 2009

by Chuck Shepherd

to 2011 for services used by inmates and illegal immigrants—neither category of which is authorized to use Medicare. RECURRING THEME: As of January, New York City music teacher Aryeh Eller, 46, has almost reached a milestone in his battle with the Board of Education. Soon, he will have earned a million dollars in salary and benefits since the board removed him from the classroom 13 years ago and dispatched him to a light-duty “rubber room” after complaints of fondling and sexual harassment in the one year that he actually taught. An arbitrator had found insufficient evidence for his termination, but the board refuses to let him back in the classroom, fearing he is a danger to students. GREAT ART! Not Expected to Fly Off the Shelf: Iceland’s menswear designer Sruli Recht’s autumn/winter 2013 collection, debuting in Paris in January, included a ring made from a four-inch slice of his own skin (removed during recent abdomen surgery, then salted and tanned to give it sturdiness). The ring (called “Forget Me Knot”) carries a price tag of $500,000—considering that the rest of the ring is 24k gold. •In Russia’s coldest region (the Siberian republic of Yakutia), artist Mikhail Bopposov created a massive, nearly 900-pound cobra statue (honoring the Chinese Year of the Snake)— made entirely of cow dung. Though at this time of the year the sculpture freezes, Bopposov plans to sell it when it melts, since fertilizer is a valuable commodity during the region’s short summers. (Actually, this is Bopposov’s second foray into dung art, after last year’s winged serpent he created for the Chinese Year of the Dragon.) {in}

(850) 912-8669 Ste C, 5912 North Davis Highway (behind Rooms to Go)

From Universal Press Syndicate Chuck Shepherd’s News Of The Weird © 2013 Chuck Shepherd

Send your weird news to Chuck Shepherd, P.O. Box 18737, Tampa, Fla., 33679 or weirdnews@earthlink.net, or go to newsoftheweird.com

Monday-Thursday: 11am - 10pm Friday-Saturday: 11am - 11pm Sunday: 11am - 9pm $3 Cocktails Tuesday & Wednesday $2 Well Drinks Wednesday 5 pm-close Live Music at Shark Fin every Tuesday Night with Jones & Company


Independent News | February 21, 2013 | inweekly.net


Feb 21, 2013 issue