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NEW YORK MARCH 2017 ENTERTAINMENT SHOPPING DINING MUSEUMS GALLERIES MAPS

INNEWYORK.COM

NEIGHBORHOODS BUILT FOR THE TRAVELER ART FAIRS, ALL AROUND TOWN

JAKE GYLLENHAAL WE LOVE THAT HE’S BACK ON BROADWAY!


MARCH 2017

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SKYLINE Big happenings around town

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FOOTLIGHTS Theater news

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IN STORE What’s exciting in retail

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On the Cover

FLAVOR OF THE MONTH

What stage role would Jake Gyllenhaal

Hot trends in dining

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NIGHT SPOTS The after-dark scene

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love to play? See p. 16

OUT & ABOUT Events around the city with our favorite hotel people

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features 16

Jake of All Trades

Film and stage star Jake Gyllenhaal is back on Broadway—singing this time!—as the lead in “Sunday in the Park With George.”

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Finding Your Turf

Explore your passions, from history to the hipster lifestyle, in all five NYC neighborhoods.

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All’s Fair!

The fairs are coming to town! Art fairs, that is. Lots of them.

listings

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48 SHOPS+SERVICES | 52 MUSEUMS+ATTRACTIONS 56 GALLERIES+ANTIQUES | 58 TRANSPORTATION+TOURS

information 55 60 64

NEIGHBORHOODS NYC STREET MAP SNEAK PEEK: Special dates of note in April

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32 ENTERTAINMENT | 42 DINING+DRINKING


NEW

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YORK

PUBLISHER Adeline Tafuri Jurecka Lois Anzelowitz Levine

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

DESIGN DIRECTOR

Anna Ratman

EDITORIAL+ART EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Francis Lewis

Heather Chin, Daniel Fridman

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Stephen Archer

PHOTO EDITOR

Jill Fergus, Karen Tina Harrison, Joni Sweet, Terry Trucco

CONTRIBUTORS

ADVERTISING+CIRCULATION+MARKETING VICE PRESIDENT SALES DEVELOPMENT

Lauren Alperin Meirowitz, 212.716.2774 NATIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF CLIENT SERVICES

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Maria Pavlovets, 212.636.2759

CIRCULATION & SPECIAL EVENTS MANAGER

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CONCIERGE ADVISORY BOARD

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March skyline

HOT HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN by Francis Lewis

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What a way to celebrate the city and the advent of spring. Michael Trusnovec (left) strikes a pose on the Brooklyn Bridge in advance of Paul Taylor American Modern Dance’s season at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater. Paul Taylor dancers are renowned for their grace, physicality and daring onstage and, by the look of it, offstage as well. | ptamd.org, thru March 26

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


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PHOTOS: MICHAEL TRUSNOVEC OF PAUL TAYLOR AMERICAN MODERN DANCE, JORDAN MATTER; BRUCE WEBER, “GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, ABIQUIU, N.M.,” 1984, ©BRUCE WEBER; NEW YORK CITY FC TEAM CAPTAIN DAVID VILLA TACKS A CORNER KICK AT YANKEE STADIUM, NYCFC.COM

(ALSO MARCH 18) Yankee Stadium is not only home for baseball’s Bronx Bombers, it’s also where New York City FC plays its matches. The 2017 home season, led by team captain David Villa (below), kicks off this month with games against D.C. United and Montréal Impact. nycfc.com

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(THRU JULY 23) Minimalist in her art and minimalist in the way she dressed, Georgia O’Keeffe (above) was her own creation, as the exhibit “Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern” at the Brooklyn Museum reveals. brooklynmuseum.org

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Who can resist the skirl of the bagpipes as the St. Patrick’s Day Parade marches on Fifth Avenue, from 44th Street all the way up to 79th Street? nycstpatricks parade.org

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(THRU APRIL 9) The Flower Show at Macy’s Herald Square flagship location is a bloomin’ horticultural must-see. social.macys .com/flowershow


THEATER NEWS by Francis Lewis

Homecoming Whether by design or happenstance, the new production of “Miss Saigon,” a recent smash hit in London, opens this month at the same New York theater where the original production premiered on April 11, 1991: the Broadway Theatre. Then, the megamusical about the fall of Saigon at the end of the Vietnam War by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg, creators of “Les Misérables,” logged 4,092 performances. What’s the outlook for the new “Miss Saigon”? Eva Noblezada (right), for one, comes to NYC from the West End trailing clouds of glory as its star. “[She] gives a thrilling performance, with poise, power and a superb voice,” praised David Benedict in Variety. | “Miss Saigon,” Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, 212.239.6200

Grandes Dames Leading ladies lead the way on Broadway this month. • If Bette Midler looks like the cat that ate the canary in the photo below, she has good reason to. The Divine Miss M is about to open on Broadway in “Hello, Dolly!” as everyone’s favorite matchmaker, Mrs. Dolly Gallagher Levi. Not seen onstage in a triple-threat—acting/ singing/dancing—role since her Great White Way debut in

“Fiddler on the Roof” in the late1960s, Midler is finally, as the song says, back where she belongs. Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., 212.239.6200

Picking Up the Pieces The world was shattered on 9/11. But on Sept. 12, healing began. That’s the message of the Broadway musical “Come From Away,” and that’s the experience of one of its stars, Rodney Hicks (foreground, center). “I was in ‘Letters From ‘Nam’ at that time,” he recalls. “My character, a young medic in Vietnam, sang a song called ‘One Red Flower.’ ‘As death pours down around us,’ I sang, ‘there is hope for those to see in one red flower.’ ‘Come From Away’ is that one red flower for me: a testament to the indomitable human spirit.” | “Come From Away,” Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., 212.239.6200

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• Patti LuPone—unforgettable as Mama Rose in “Gypsy”—is diva enough for any musical. But cast her in the same musical with Christine Ebersole— equally unforgettable in “Grey Gardens”—and theatrical history will be made. Check out the Tony-winning actresses as cosmetics goddesses Helena Rubinstein and Elizabeth Arden, respectively, in “War Paint.” Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., 877.250.2929

PHOTOS: EVA NOBLEZADA IN “MISS SAIGON,” MICHAEL LE POER TRENCH AND MATTHEW MURPHY; BETTE MIDLER, JONATHAN PUSHNIK; THE CAST OF “COME FROM AWAY,” MATTHEW MURPHY

footlights


in store

THE RETAIL SCENE by Joni Sweet

Emoji Bling With Alison Lou’s collection of fine jewelry, emojis are no longer just for texting. The heart-eyed smiley, winky face and others go upscale as charms on necklaces, rings and bangles. Other designs, like Mr. Potato Head piece rings (pictured), prove that fine jewelry doesn’t have to be humorless. | 20 E. 69th St., 212.327.0900

Celebrating Stripes

Saint James takes its maritime heritage seriously. In the West Village store, adorned with life preservers, driftwood and vintage scuba gear, are Breton striped fishermen sweaters for men and women. But the brand’s reverence for its history goes deeper than nautical decor—Saint James has preserved the technique of supertight stitching that sailors’ wives used to create wind- and cold-resistant pullovers in the 19th century. | 319 Bleecker St., 212.741.7400

Menswear Mecca

The recently opened Todd Snyder flagship in NoMad is a superstore for stylish men. Shoppers can snap up one of the house brand’s signature suits, collared dress shirts in preppy colors (teal gingham, anyone?), sweats for the gym and fresh sneakers. Additionally, high-end accessories include Moscot sunglasses, Lotuff leather backpacks and Timex watches. And if the frenzy of trying everything on leaves you looking less than polished, the in-store Persons of Interest barbershop will clean you up then and there. | 25 E. 26th St., 917.242.3482

Bags by You

With its new shop-in-shop at Bloomingdale’s, Mon Purse is giving shoppers the chance to find the perfect bag—6 billion chances, in fact. That’s how many outcomes are possible with the Australian luxury handbag brand’s customization program, which allows shoppers to personalize every detail of a tote, bowler, pouch or clutch on iPad stations around the shop. Innovative software depicts the exact color and grain of the European leathers in realistic detail, so there won’t be any surprises when the bag arrives at your door four weeks later. Check out the handbags displayed around the store for inspiration—or instant gratification. | 1000 Third Ave., Level 2, 212.705.2000

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


Y D TA

PA NTS A P T

750 7th Ave, New York NY 10019 • Between 49th & 50th street 9AM - 9PM 7 Days a week • 212.262.7600 MartiniqueJewelers.com • Martiniquejewels@aol.com Jewelers in Times Square since 1963 Snake Chain Bracelet System (U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,507) • © 2016 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved


Above: The lower level at Avra Madison Estiatorio and a plate of its grilled octopus (below, left). Below, right: The almighty Salvation Burger.

Roasted duck salad at Chinese Tuxedo

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

WHAT’S TRENDING ON THE FOODIE SCENE by Lois Levine

“I love restaurants that decorate with this kind of silly fun,” I said to my friend as we were guided to our table at Salvation Burger (230 E. 51st St., 646.277.2900). And by silly, I mean a wall covered with rows of rubber mini-burgers; elevated booths with tables topped with monitors showing a continuous video of a gas fireplace; lampshades decorated with drawings of cows, designating different body parts as cuts of meat. The dishes, meanwhile, are anything but silly: Seriously good wood-roasted oysters were followed with the signature Salvation Burger, a thick circle of juicy beef, topped with caramelized onion and Taleggio, and then, an over-thetop finish—banana cream pie, with more iterations of banana than you ever dreamed possible. From silly to swanky: A week later, I found myself so dazzled by the interior of the bi-level Avra Madison Estiatorio (14 E. 60th St., 212.937.0100), it was hard to focus on the menu. Towering trees, a center skylight, painted logs on the ceiling, all in colors of cream and white and gold, made me feel like I was dining in a modern palace. The Greek menu, which included a light, stellar spanakopita starter and firm and fine artic char, was worthy of its regal environs. A few days later, I hit the foodie’s version of a hat trick when I found myself at SoHo’s new pescatarian eatery, Miss Paradis (47 Prince St., 646.329.6380). There is so much to note here—from the thoughtfully designed one-arm high-top chairs (for easy entry and exit) to the killer black bread made with activated charcoal to the almost-too-pretty-to-eat zucchini tempura with beets. Finally, Chinese Tuxedo (5 Doyers St., 646.895.9301) beckons with reinvented dishes from all regions of China, such as sweet and sour pork cheeks and steamed supreme mushroom custard with Jonah crab.

Black bread at Miss Paradis

PHOTOS: MISS PARADIS BLACK BREAD, MIACHEL BRETON; SALVATION BURGER, DANIELLE ADAMS; GRILLED OCTOPUS AT AVRA MADISON ESTIATORIO, ALAN BATTMAN; INTERIOR AT AVRA MADISON ESTIATORIO, WARREN JAGGER

flavor of the month


night spots

THE AFTER-DARK SCENE by Joni Sweet

Heart of Havana

Smooth Criminal Uptown After Dark

With his wine bar, cafés and markets, Eli Zabar has been a household name among New Yorkers for decades. In recent years, the famous grocer partnered with his 25-year-old son Oliver Zabar to appeal to a young generation with Eli’s Night Shift. The dimly lit bar serves complimentary Kettle chips on every table, cocktails and comfort foods (fish tacos, fried mac ’n’ cheese balls). Night Shift takes pride in its draft beer offerings—10 weekly changing selections from local breweries. | Eli’s Night Shift, 189 E. 79th St., 212.879.7160

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Garfunkel’s has something that other modern speakeasies crave— an authentic connection to the Jazz Age. It’s nestled on the second floor of a historic Lower East Side building, where fugitive bankers Max Garfunkel and Marcus Tauster ran a criminal financial scheme in the 1920s. A functional bank-vault door at the back of the downstairs burger joint (The Burgary) now leads guests to a cozy, covert cocktail den with tufted velvet sofas, Victorian decorative art, fresh flowers, antique mirrors and a wall of books. Bartenders garnish creative cocktails (like Butterflies: applejack, gin, lemon and pomegranate) with beautiful accents, like plump red berries skewered by swizzle sticks and sliced strawberries fanned with fresh mint on the rim of champagne flutes. | Garfunkel’s, 67 Clinton St., 212.529.6999

PHOTOS: LUCKY YOU COCKTAIL FROM ELI’S NIGHT SHIFT, MARGARITA MA GARCIA ACEVEDO; INTERIOR AT BLACKTAIL, BRENT HERRIG; BAR INTERIOR AT GARFUNKEL’S, GABRIEL DENHAM

Cuba has secured a top spot on many travelers’ lists this year, but you can get a taste of this previously off-limits destination right here in New York at BlackTail, a new cocktail bar at the Pier A Harbor House. With Prohibition-era Havana as its inspiration, BlackTail is every bit as lush as you’d expect, including leafy greenery and hanging vines, a stained-glass ceiling, statues of Cuban heroes and pillars decorated with vintage art and photos. The menu, meanwhile, is a literal book, with nearly 100 pages of vintage art and stories sprinkled with dozens of drink options. Once you finally make a choice (tip: the daiquiris are delicioso), bartenders donning Panama hats and tropical shirts will whip it up with a generous dose of showmanship. | 22 Battery Pl., 212.785.0153


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Jkae

OF ALL TRADES Actor Jake Gyllenhaal reinvents himself yet again, this time on Broadway in the musical “Sunday in the Park With George.” By Jill Fergus

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PHOTOS: GYLLENHAAL PORTRAIT, GARETH CATTERMOLE/GETTY IMAGES; SCENE FROM “SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE,” STEPHANIE BERGER

JAKE GYLLENHAAL is not one to rest on his laurels. Not content to just tackle drama on Broadway (2014’s “Constellations”), for which he was nominated for a Drama League Award, the 36year-old actor has now added a Broadway musical—New York City Center’s revival of “Sunday in the Park With George”—to his résumé. The Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine musical, which opened at the reborn Hudson Theatre on Feb. 23 and runs for 10 weeks, tells the story of 19th-century French painter Georges Seurat and how his masterpiece, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte,” came to be. Gyllenhaal plays not only the artist, whose single-minded focus affects his relationship with his muse, Dot (Annaleigh Ashford), but also, in the second act, Seurat’s great-grandson, a 1980s New York artist. Singing Sondheim alongside Tony Award winner Ashford in his first Broadway musical? Why not? California-born Gyllenhaal, who hails from Hollywood royals—his mother, Naomi, is a screenwriter; his father, Stephen, a director; and sister Maggie and brother-in-law, Peter Sarsgaard, are both accomplished actors—has never shied away from challenging roles, whether it be losing 30 pounds to play a voyeuristic loner in “Nightcrawler,” enduring grueling training as a boxer in “Southpaw” or conveying repressed sexuality as a rodeo cowboy in “Brokeback Mountain,” a performance that nabbed him an Oscar nomination. Though Gyllenhaal, who was raised in Los Angeles and is now based in New York, has reached the top of the Hollywood ladder, he has managed, for the most part, to remain under the radar—no doubt, in part, because he fiercely protects his privacy (you can ask where he likes to hang out, but it doesn’t mean he’ll tell you). He is also aware that one can hide in plain sight in a city like New York (he’s been seen taking the subway to get around town). When it comes to the work, however, he has no trepidation about stepping into the spotlight. How did you get involved with “Sunday in the Park With George”? [Composer] Jeanine Tesori. We did “Little Shop of Horrors” at City Center a few years ago and it was a ridiculous amount of fun. When “Sunday” came up, she didn’t even ask me—she just kind of insisted—and at this point, I’ll do whatever she says. Jeanine has an incredible instinct, and I trust her implicitly. In truth, I’ve always loved this musical, and the idea of doing it in a new, abstract way—much like Seurat would have enjoyed—drew me in.

whole life, but never quite like this. Plus, Sondheim is a real playwright, which makes his show a dream for actors who sing. What is it like working with Annaleigh Ashford? Annaleigh is just plain wonderful. Every time she walks into the room, I’m reminded that I have a heart! She shows everyone who works with her and anyone who sees her onstage how lovable a person can be. And she is precisely the kind of actor I want to work with: Someone who is better than me. Do you have any pre-theater rituals or superstitions? I usually take a short nap and then pray at the Mark Rylance altar I have in my dressing room. Is there a particular theater role you would just love to play? Tevye in “Fiddler on the Roof.” Obviously. What’s next for you? I have a few films coming out this year. “Stronger,” a love story about Jeff Bauman, who lost his legs in the Boston Marathon bombing and his now-wife; Joon-ho Bong’s “Okja;” “Life,” a film set in space; and “Wildlife,” a story about a young boy’s journey to manhood. I’m all over the map. What’s your favorite neighborhood to hang in when you’re in NYC? Midtown. I love Ripley’s Believe It or Not! What’s a typical day for you in New York when you’re not working? It’s usually some combination of throwing a ball for my dog, hanging with my nieces and eating smoked fish. You spend a lot of time on both coasts: Do you have a preference for one over the other? It’s a toss-up—New York has the culture, but California has the year-round produce.

Gyllenhaal in “Sunday in the Park With George.”

What drew you to the role of French painter Georges Seurat? Stephen and James have created two very distinctive characters in “George,” and it’s really that split that drew me to the show. It is about two different artists in two different generations, but their experiences are universal: They’re both struggling to connect, to find their voice, to understand the history of their family—how it holds us back and helps us move forward. What challenges did you find in portraying him? The beard. Maintenance can be a real nightmare—it’s given me a brand-new respect for hipsters. Did the prospect of singing on Broadway, especially songs from theater legend Stephen Sondheim, make you nervous? Of course it made me nervous—I have a pulse, after all—but why else do I do what I do? It’s certainly not to feel comfortable. I have sung my IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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FINDING YOUR TURF

by Karen Tina Harrison

Whatever your passion, you can indulge it in New York—especially if you know where to look. These five neighborhoods understand your obsession.

T IAL DISTRIC C N A IN F E TH

for History Hounds IN NEW YORK, the emphasis is on the new. But history surrounds you in the city’s birthplace, Manhattan Island’s southern tip. To see it all, look for the free, red Downtown Connection bus, with 38 stops. One must: the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House (1 Bowling Green, gsa.gov/ hamiltoncustomhouse), at the bottom of the island. Inside is the admission-free George Gustav Heye Center, part of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian—a fitting tribute to New York’s original residents, the Lenape people, who lived on the other side of the Dutchbuilt wall that became Wall St. The Stone Street Historic District, a time capsule one block long and two wide, preserves the scale of the 17th century. The pedestrian-only area is lined with cafés like Stone Street Tavern (52 Stone St., stonestreettavern.com). St. Paul’s Chapel (209 Broadway, trinitychurch.org), built in 1766, survived the Great Fire of 1776—and in 2001 withstood the destruction of the World Trade Center, one block away. Still a community hub, St. Paul’s often offers free classical concerts at lunchtime. For eats, dig into a steak at Delmonico’s (56 Beaver St., delmonicosrestaurant.com), America’s oldest, continuously operating restaurant. You’ll want to take a peek at The Beekman hotel (123 Nassau St., thompsonhotels .com), originally built in 1881 as offices for bankers and lawyers. One World Trade Center (285 Fulton St.) has a mesmerizing time-lapse elevator which whooshes you up to One World Observatory (oneworldobservatory.com). Another “FiDi” (Financial District) thrill is the Oculus, which houses a subway hub and Westfield World Trade Center (185 Greenwich St., westfield.com). Come hungry: This mall has Eataly, Épicerie Boulud, Shake Shack and more.

Just for fun, we added some trivia to see how much you know about each of these neighborhoods. Q=question A=answer

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1. What local saloon, founded in 1762 and still pulling pints, served as General George Washington’s war room during the Revolution, and hosted his farewell dinner with his troops after the British army finally left New York in 1783?

Q:

2. What Financial District street was given this name when it became, in 1658, the first paved street in Nieuw Amsterdam (the future New York)? 3. Which Ivy League university began life in 1754 as King’s College, with eight students and one professor in a schoolroom of Trinity Church, and later educated Alexander Hamilton and his four sons?

Clockwise from bottom left: Federal Hall National Memorial, where George Washington took his oath as president; a view through the Oculus at Westfield World Trade Center; the atrium at The Beekman hotel; Delmonico’s; bracelets from “Native Fashion Now,” at the National Museum of the American Indian; the Charging Bull statue at Bowling Green, which has come to symbolize Wall St.


PHOTO: BEEKMAN HOTEL, RICHARD BARNES

A:

1. Fraunces Tavern 2. Stone Street 3. Columbia University


for Broadway Buffs NEW YORK’S THEATER DISTRICT is more than theaters. It’s where the Broadway community lives and lounges. Remain calm if you spot a star browsing at The Drama Book Shop (250 W. 40th St., dramabookshop.com), a welcoming place with miles of books and scripts, free Wi-Fi, a kids’ theater and a live-in dog named Chester. Since 1965, Joe Allen (326 W. 46th St., joeallenrestaurant .com)has been serving Broadway stars and their fans. While visiting, take note of the Broadway posters on the wall: As the restaurant notes on its website, “everyone remembers the hits, but we revel in the flops.” Have you got what it takes? Get up after 9 pm and belt out a song at Don’t Tell Mama’s piano bar (343 W. 46th St., donttellmamanyc.com) on Restaurant Row. Hourglass Tavern’s threecourse pre-theater dinner costs $23.95 (373 W. 46th St., hourglasstavern.com), and its upstairs Bettibar pours for theater folk. Pick a piece of official Broadway merch from the Theatre Circle Shop (268 W. 44th St., theatrecircleshop.com). Triton Gallery (630 Ninth Ave., broadwayposters.com), set in the Mayan Art Deco-style Film Center, harbors a century’s worth of Broadway “window card” posters. Got a dramatic sweet tooth? Kee’s Chocolates (315 W. 39th St., keeschocolates.com) creates the champagne and passion-fruit bonbons messengered to Broadway stars’ dressing rooms.

A:

1. What is Broadway’s longest-running show? 2. What entertainment powerhouse was a child actor who starred as “Annie” in 1979? 3. What is the highest-grossing Broadway show of all time?

Clockwise from bottom left: Champagne at Don’t Tell Mama; The Drama Book Shop; display at Kee’s Chocolates; a wall of Broadway posters at Triton Gallery.

Q:

PHOTOS: CHAMPAGNE AT DON’T TELL MAMA, ANDY S. DRACHENBERG/DON’T TELL MAMA; DRAMA BOOK SHOP, ABIGAIL HARDIN, THE DRAMA BOOK SHOP, INC.; KEE’S CHOCOLATES, Y. KAMETANI; TRITON GALLERY, NICK VAN HOOGSTRATEN

DISTRICT 1. The Phantom of the Opera, since January 1988 2. Sarah Jessica Parker 3. “The Lion King,” opened in 1997, has roared to the tune of nearly a billion and a half bucks.

ER THE THEAT


A:

1. Central Park West 2. Monaco and Vatican City 3. The Beacon Theatre

PHOTOS: HALL OF AFRICAN MAMMALS, ©AMNH; WEBOP EVENT AT LINCOLN CENTER, COURTESY OF JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER/FRANK STEWART; BARBIE DOLL DISPLAY AT APTHORP CLEANERS, DEBRA KRAVET, APTHORP CLEANERS

UPPER WES

T SIDE

Clockwise from bottom left: The Hall of African Mammals at the American Museum of Natural History; a WeBop kids event at Lincoln Center; an ice-cream treat at Sugar and Plumm; a window display of Barbie dolls at Apthorp Cleaners.

for Family Fun NEW YORK FAMILIES CHERISH the Upper West Side for its rambling apartments and cultural landmarks. Lincoln Center (10 Lincoln Center Plz., lincolncenter.org) gives kids half-off ticket prices and runs family events galore, including the WeBop jazz classes for kids. The nabe’s big draw is the massive American Museum of Natural History (Central Park West, at W. 79th St., amnh.org). Major kiddie bait: a 122-foot Titanosaurus model; the dazzling Butterfly Conservatory; and the “Dark Universe” space show, at the museum’s Hayden Planetarium. Post-museum, kids burn off steam in Central Park (centralparknyc.org) at the Mariners’ Playground or Summit Rock (both near the W. 85th St. entrance). Ready to cruise the Upper West Side’s funnest street, Amsterdam Avenue? Not just girls love the Barbie doll windows done by the artist/owner of Apthorp Cleaners (383 Amsterdam Ave., apthorpcleaners.com). Jacob’s Pickles (509 Amsterdam Ave., jacobspickles.com) slings succulent home cooking morning till night. Known citywide for its marquee dish, The Meatball Shop (447 Amsterdam Ave., themeatballshop.com) serves a $7 “Ballers in Training” dinner. Sugar and Plumm (377 Amsterdam Ave., sugarandplumm.com) pleases with bistro classics, a kids’ menu and 50 desserts. Levain Bakery (167 W. 74th St. and 351 Amsterdam Ave., levain bakery.com) bakes the city’s most-loved squishy cookie. Your kid’s Levain Bakery treat won’t last, but an uncommon plaything from the old-school Stationery and Toy World will (125 W. 72nd St., stationeryandtoyworld.com).

1. Beloved movies, including “Ghostbusters,” “Rosemary’s Baby” and “Hannah and Her Sisters” (not to mention “Elf” and “3 Men and a Baby”), are set on which Upper West Side thoroughfare?

Q:

2. At one and a third square miles, Central Park is bigger than what two countries? 3. Last year, the Tony Awards were held in a theater on Broadway —Broadway and W. 74th St., on the Upper West Side. What’s its name?

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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for Hipsters

2. What three bridges do you see in a row spanning the East River close to your vantage point at Williamsburg’s Grand Ferry Park? 3. Before marrying a wealthy widow, this infamous privateer (a freelance pirate) lived in a boardinghouse on Bedford Ave. in Williamsburg. Who was he?

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A:

PHOTOS

Q:

1. A sugar refinery stood on the Williamsburg waterfront from 1859 to 2014, supplying roughly half the sugar used in the U.S. Its landmark 8,400-square-foot neon sign will be restored next year. What is this household name?

1. Domino Sugar 2. From north to south: the Williamsburg Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge and the Brooklyn Bridge 3. Captain (William) Kidd

IF YOU’RE NOT A HIPSTER yet, you will be after a deep dive into trendy Brooklyn’s hottest neighborhood. The hipster subway train, the L, whisks you to the epicenter of the Williamsburg scene, Bedford Avenue. Emerging from the station, you’ll catch the aroma of small-batch java at Toby’s Estate (125 N. 6th St., tobysestate.com), an archetypal Williamsburg café with Instagram-famous avocado toast. Walk toward the waterfront Grand Ferry Park for the iconic views (and selfie backdrop). Just north, on Wythe Avenue, Beam (420 Kent Ave., beambk.com), a home boutique, distills the urban-eco-chic Williamsburg aesthetic. The ’burg’s hippest souvenir could be the Brooklyn Collection, six bars of artisanal chocolates using strange and wonderful ingredients (Sicilian olive oil, smoked maple, toasted caraway), all from Mast (111 N. 3rd St., mastbrothers.com), one of Brooklyn’s breakout brands. Weekends rule for Williamsburg boutiquing and brunching. Everything at Artists & Fleas (weekends, 70 N. 7th St., artistsandfleas.com)—vintage duds, edgy jewelry, handicrafts—is one-of-a-kind. Across the street, the elegant Falcon Laundry (65 N. 7th St., falcon laundry1930.com), named for its former tenant (a laundromat), finesses weekend brunch, delectable dinner and rooftop cocktails. Every day is brunch day at critics’ darling, Sunday in Brooklyn (348 Wythe Ave., sundayinbrooklyn.com). Maison Premiere’s city-renowned oyster happy hour (298 Bedford Ave., maisonpremiere.com) happens on weekdays from 4 to 7 pm and weekends from 11 pm to 1 am. Hipster night owls roost at Videology Bar & Cinema (308 Bedford Ave., videologybarandcinema.com), a nest of cult movies and inexpensive food and drink. Pete’s Candy Store (700 Lorimer St., petescandystore.com), a hipster hootenanny with local bands and down-home bar, opens at 4 pm (weekends), 5 pm (weekdays) and entertains with music, trivia, readings, skits and more.

Clockwise from bottom left: Jungle Bird cocktail from Maison Premiere; Michael (left) and Rick Mast of Mast chocolates; interior of Falcon Laundry; view of the city from the Williamsburg waterfront; whole mackerel from Sunday in Brooklyn; interior shot at Artists & Fleas; display at Beam.

PHOTOS: THE MAST BROTHERS OF MAST, JESSIE WEBSTER; MACKEREL FROM SUNDAY IN BROOKLYN, EVAN SUNG; IMAGE FROM ARTISTS & FLEAS, ALEX AYER PHOTOGRAPHY

Y G, BROOKL R U B S M IA WILL


1. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, from Sara Delano Roosevelt. At 47-49 E. 65th St., the mansion is now the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College 2. The Silk Stocking District 3. The Bronx

PHOTOS: MACARONS FROM MACARON CAFÉ, CORBIN GURKIN PHOTOGRAPHY; ELEANOR AND FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, ASSOCIATED PRESS; LA MAISON DU CHOCOLAT’S TEAROOM, JOSEPH KITCHEN; BEMELMANS BAR, THE CARLYLE, A ROSEWOOD HOTEL

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MADISON AVENU

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for Luxe Lovers

Clockwise from bottom left: Rose-cut diamond bangles from Fred Leighton; pistachio and blackberry macarons at Macaron Cafe; Eleanor and Franklin Delano Roosevelt in front of Roosevelt House; the tearoom at La Maison du Chocolat; Sunset Frost earrings from De Beers; a cocktail at Bemelmans Bar; the Rhinelander Mansion, home to Ralph Lauren Men.

IF YOU WERE BORN FOR THE OPULENT LIFE, you’ll love Madison Avenue. Start with supersize treats (6 for $15) from the très chic Macaron Café (44 E. 59th St., macaron cafe.com). Or join the stylish set for designer pizza and pasta at Serafina (33 E. 61st St., serafinarestaurant.com). For latenight libations, a drink at The Carlyle’s storied Bemelmans Bar (35 E. 76th St., rosewoodhotels.com) is a must. When it’s time to shop, trend-surf accessories on the main floor of Barneys New York (660 Madison Ave., barneys.com). Expect a wallet workout in the next few blocks at the U.S. flagships of Europe’s fabled labels like Hermès New York Madison (691 Madison Ave., hermes.com) and Jimmy Choo (699 Madison Ave., jimmychoo.com). Keep walking for diamond heaven. De Beers (716 Madison Ave., debeers.com) sells eight-figure dazzlers as well as lovely, comfy “sleeper” earrings, made with wires or posts comfortable enough to sleep in (hence the name). Fred Leighton (773 Madison Ave., fredleighton.com) lends its exquisite vintage bijoux to redcarpeteers like Meryl Streep, Kerry Washington and Nicole Kidman. A vintage jewel of the architectural kind, the Rhinelander Mansion shelters Ralph Lauren Men’s Flagship (867 Madison Ave., global.ralphlauren.com). Starting to suffer from sticker shock? Stop in at La Boutique Resale (1045 Madison Ave., laboutiqueresale.com) for designer duds, most at least half off. Finally, your reward for mastering Madison: hot cocoa in La Maison du Chocolat’s cozy lounge (1018 Madison Ave., lamaisonduchocolat.com).

1. The mother of which of the seven presidents hailing from the Empire State gave him a wedding present of two connected brownstones?

Q:

2. Madison Avenue and its Upper East Side surroundings claim a longstanding nickname that channels this lingerie item. 3. Two of Madison Avenue’s retail superstars, Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren, grew up in the same borough of New York City. Which?

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In NYC, March is all about art fairs. Here are the highlights. BY TERRY TRUCCO ANYONE WHO LOVES ART FAIRS knows they tend to come in clusters. A big event pitches its tent at a hangar of a building like Pier 94, and within a blink a constellation of little fairs sprouts up, a taxi hop away. In a collector’s version of a perfect storm, several major fairs descend upon Manhattan this month, bringing more than 1,000 dealers and countless enthusiasts to town. Call it March Madness for fairgoers. The festivities unfurl March 1 through 5 with the eagerly awaited 29th edition of The Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory (643 Park Ave., artdealers.org) showcasing high-end 19th-, 20th- and 21st-century work from members of the Art Dealers Association of America. The 72 participants curate the contents around themes, styles and individual artists. The results can be spectacular. Art greats Édouard Vuillard, Josef Albers and Richard Die-

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benkorn have solo shows as do contemporary artists Chris Ofili and Huma Bhabha. Look for a triptych created specially for the show by multimedia artist Rodney Graham at 303 Gallery. As for thematic work, Pace/ MacGill Gallery explores light as a subject and medium in photographs by Ansel Adams, William Eggleston and Irving Penn. And if you find seldom-seen work irresistible, “The Clove,” a 1936 painted steel metal sculpture by Alexander Calder, is on public view for the first time since 1937. The Armory Show fills Piers 92 and 94 (711 12th Ave., thearmoryshow.com) March 2 through 5. Yes, you’ll see eye-catching gallery offerings like 11R’s all-female abstract exhibition featuring Marsha Cottrell, Aiko Hachisuka and Jackie Saccoccio, among others. But also look for site-specific installations curated by former Andy

PHOTOS: CYBÈLE YOUNG, “LATE IN THE SEASON (LOST-LAWN CHAIR),” COURTESY THE ARTIST AND FORUM GALLERY; YAYOI KUSAMA, “GUIDEPOST TO THE NEW WORLD,” COURTESY THE ARMORY SHOW

all’s fair


Facing page: Cybèle Young’s “Late in the Season (Lost-lawn chair)” on view at the Art on Paper fair. This page: Yayoi Kusama, “Guidepost to the New World,” on view at The Armory Show.


Above: Handbill for American Fete at Crystal Palace, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the American Constitution at the New York City Book and Ephemera Fair. Top right: “A European lady with fishbowl and hourglass,” from Alan Kennedy Asian Art, March 10-18 at the James Goodman Gallery in the Fuller Building. Right: Tomma Abts, “Untitled (big circle),” at The Art Show.

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PHOTOS: HANDBILL FOR AMERICAN FETE, PRESENTED BY GREAT BRITAIN DEALER VALERIE JACKSON HARRIS OF QUADRILLE EPHEMERA; “A EUROPEAN LADY WITH FISHBOWL AND HOURGLASS,” COURTESY ALAN KENNEDY ASIAN ART; “SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS,” COURTESY PAUL FOSTER, LONDON; RUSUDAN KHIZANISHVILI, “EL AMOR Y LA MUERTE CAMBIA TODO,” ©THE ARTIST AND CLIO ART FAIR; TOMMA ABTS, “UNTITLED,” COURTESY THE ARTIST AND CROWN POINT PRESS

Warhol Museum director Eric Shiner and large-scale paintings, performances and installations chosen by Los Angeles County Museum curator Jarrett Gregory. This year’s biggest innovation is the layout; instead of isolating 20th- and 21st-century art in separate piers, the two mix sociably throughout both buildings to alleviate crowding and fair fatigue. Also new: food from local restaurants to fuel all-day fairgoers. Besides work that’s approved by a board of curators, artists need an additional qualification to show at the Clio Art Fair March 2 through 5 (508 W. 26th St., clioart fair.com): They can’t be represented by a New York gallery. Now in its fourth year, the Anti-Fair for Independent Artists, as it’s also known, lets artists strut their stuff on a New York stage, presenting work in surroundings that resemble a museum or gallery. Among the highlights are art by satirical sculptor Maurizio Cattelan and abstract Italian painter Carla Accardi. Given their agreeable price point, works on paper are catnip for fledgling collectors. But as a stroll through the 75-plus galleries participating in Art on Paper at Pier 36 (299 South St., thepaperfair.com) March 2 through 5 reveals, paper is a lot more than a backdrop for pencil drawings. Consider “Late in the Season (Lost-lawn chair),” Cybèle Young’s fanciful woven Japanese paper construction that riffs on a ubiquitous element of summer. Works on paper encompass almost anything that’s paper-based—sculpture, collage, painting, photography as well as delicate watercolors by masters like Andrew Wyeth and classic studies for paintings and sculptures. For history buffs and readers, the ultimate works on paper are rare books. With its admirable track record for


Left: “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” signed by Walt Disney and his animators, at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair. Bottom, left: Rusudan Khizanishvili’s “El Amor Y La Muerte Cambia Todo,” from the Clio Art Fair.

attracting world-class dealers, the New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory (643 Park Ave., nyantiquarianbookfair.com) March 9 through 12 has immersed fairgoers in literary history for 57 years with illuminated manuscripts, maps and ephemera like a pointe shoe worn by Anna Pavlova to a 1937 copy of “The Complete Story of Walt Disney’s ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’” signed by Walt Disney and 51 of the film’s animators. “We had a leaf from the Gutenberg Bible one year: You can’t get rarer than that,” says the fair’s longtime organizer Sanford Smith, an avid bibliophile. Calling itself a satellite book fair, the New York City Book and Ephemera Fair sets up shop March 10 at Wallace Hall (980 Park Ave., bookandpaperfairs.com) and offers shuttle buses to the Antiquarian Book Fair a mile away. Yes, you’ll find rare books including a signed copy of Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s “Gift From the Sea” from the author’s personal library, but in recent years ephemera has muscled into the forefront, says fair producer Marvin Getman. “I think it has to do with millennials. Ephemera is priced a little lower than books and can be visually attractive.” Photo albums and even snapshots of anonymous people are in demand, he says. As befits the world’s largest continent, Asia scores its own 10-day festival of art and culture from March 9 through 18. Timed to coincide with the year’s paramount Asian art auctions, Asia Week (asiaweekny.com) is held under numerous roofs and encompasses five auction houses, galleries showcasing work from 50 topflight international dealers and shows at cultural institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Look for museum-quality work of all periods from India, the Himalayas, Southeast Asia, China, Japan and Korea. Fair Month wraps with The Photography Show, the 37th edition of American International Photography Art Dealers’ prestigious showpiece, March 30 through April 2 at Pier 94 (711 12th Ave., aipadshow.com). The world’s longest-running photography show is reveling in its spacious new digs with more than 100 dealers from Tokyo to Tehran. “The space allows us to do almost anything we can envision,” says fair director Catherine Edelman. Expect an enveloping experience with exhibitions by discerning collectors, an area dedicated to book dealers, lectures by photography experts and sit-down restaurants. The show embraces contemporary, modern and 19thcentury photography, from Weegee’s 1950 “Nude With Veil” to Adriana Marmorek’s 2016 dress on fire in “Relic # III — Wedding Gown 2.” So, grab your walking shoes, you lovers of all things art. The fairs are back in town. IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

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Out & About CONCIERGES MIXED & MINGLED AT SEVERAL POSH EVENTS AROUND NEW YORK CITY!

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN The renowned French footwear brand with the signature red soles held an event for concierges at its luxurious Madison Avenue boutique. Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse provided catering for the gathering.

Left, left to right: Robert Rozko, Loews Regency New York; Nicole Longchamp, 1 Hotel Central Park, and guest. Center, left to right: Lorena Ringoot, The Surrey; Caroline Trevelo-O’Neil, Christian Louboutin; Maria Pavlovets-Iellimo, Where IN New York; Johannes Schaafsma, Four Seasons Hotel New York. Right, left to right: Susanne Carter, The Ritz-Carlton New York, Central Park; Jeanie Voltsinis, Viceroy Central Park New York. Inset: Shoe display at Christian Louboutin.

CENTRAL CELLARS Grand Central Terminal’s newest wine and liquor shop hosted concierges (with catering by Murray’s Cheese) before they saw the a cappella Broadway musical, “In Transit.”

Left, left to right: Tetiana Harrison, The Quin, and guest. Center, left to right: Darren Sumner, The Bryant Park Hotel, and guest; James Schantz, Central Cellars. Right, from right: Carlos Leon, The Ritz-Carlton New York, Battery Park City, and guest.

THE 2016 SILVER PLUME AWARDS NOMINATION RECEPTION was held at Upstairs at The Kimberly, atop The Kimberly Hotel. Nominated concierges and general managers enjoyed the rooftop views in Midtown as they were awarded their plaques. Left, from right: Jackie Rosado, New York Hilton Midtown; Renaldo Moore, Gansevoort Park Avenue, and guest. Center: Waldo Hernandez, The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel. Right, left to right: Keoni Boyer, The Ritz-Carlton New York, Central Park; Peter Johnson, The Kimberly Hotel.

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entertainment

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/EDITORSBLOG

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1 Violinist Simone Lamsma makes her New York recital debut at this prestigious venue. | Carnegie Hall, p. 39 2 Comedian Tracy Morgan stands up for The Garden of Dreams Foundation at this benefit concert. | Madison Square Garden, p. 40 3 Time is running out for Verdi’s tragic heroine in “La Traviata.” | Metropolitan Opera, p. 40 4 Major Attaway is the new Genie in this hit Broadway musical. | “Aladdin,” p. 33 5 Trumpeter and composer Dave Douglas performs his new music live. | Jazz at Lincoln Center, p. 39 6 ZZ Top rocks the Upper West Side. | Beacon Theatre, p. 40

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BROADWAY OPENINGS Amélie Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. amelie broadway.com. (Previews begin March 9, opens April 3) Shy Amélie lives in her imagination until she meets a photographer and journeys into a real world of love. The new musical is based on the 2001 movie of the same name. H13 Anastasia Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200.

anastasiabroadway.com. (Previews begin March 23, opens April 24) (2 hrs 20 mins) Tony Award winners Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens (music and lyrics) and Terrence McNally (book) have crafted the new musical, inspired by two Twentieth Century Fox movies: the 1956 live-action feature and the 1997 animated feature. H14

Bandstand Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 242 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. bandstandbroadway.com.

PHOTOS: SIMONE LAMSMA, OTTO VAN DEN TOORN; TRACY MORGAN, PAUL MOBLEY; SONYA YONCHEVA IN VERDI’S “LA TRAVIATA,” KEN HOWARD/METROPOLITAN OPERA; “ALADDIN,” MATTHEW MURPHY; DAVE DOUGLAS, AUSTIN NELSON

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 60-62)


Come From Away Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. comefromaway.com. (In previews, opens March 12) (1 hr 40 mins, no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, following the terrorist attacks in NYC, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., 38 airplanes were diverted to Gander, Newfoundland. How the passengers adjusted to a changed world on Sept. 12 is the basis of the upbeat new musical. H14 The Glass Menagerie Belasco Theatre, 111 W. 44th St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.239.6200. glassmenagerieonbroadway.com. (In previews, opens March 9) Sally Field stars with Joe Mantello and Finn Wittrock in the revival of the Tennessee Williams drama, which premiered on Broadway in 1945. H14 Groundhog Day August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 800.745.3000. groundhogdaymusical.com. (Previews begin March 16, opens April 17) A cynical TV weatherman is on assignment, covering Groundhog Day in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, when he finds himself trapped inside a time loop, doomed to repeat the same day over and over again in the new musical, based on the 1993 movie. H13

4

Hello, Dolly! Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. hellodollyonbroadway.com. (Previews begin March 15, opens April 20) The new production of the 1964 musical comedy stars Bette Midler as meddlesome matchmaker Dolly Gallagher Levi and David Hype Pierce as crusty Horace Vandergelder, the object of her affection. H14 The Little Foxes Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (Previews begin March 29, opens April 19, closes June 18) An Alabama family at the turn of the last century is at war with itself in Lillian Hellman’s play. Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon alternate as sisters-in-law: scheming Regina Hubbard and timid Birdie Hubbard. H14 5 (Previews begin March 31, opens April 26) (2 hrs 30 mins) A band of World War II veterans enter a radio contest to become America’s next big swing band in this new musical, directed and choreographed by Tony Award winner Andy Blankenbuehler (“Hamilton”). H14

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. charlieon broadway.com. (Previews begin March 28, opens April 23) Roald Dahl’s semi-dark chocolate world is now a family-friendly

Miss Saigon Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200. saigonbroadway.com. (Previews begin March 1, opens March 23) (2 hrs 40 mins) During the last days of the Vietnam War, a Saigon bar girl falls in love with an American GI in the new production of the musical tragedy that first opened on Broadway in 1991. H13 Oslo Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (Previews begin March 23, opens April 13) (2 hrs 55 mins) J.T. Rogers’ play tells the true, untold story about how a Norwegian diplomat and her socialscientist husband arranged the top-secret

meetings between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization that resulted in the historic 1993 Oslo Accords. I12

The Play That Goes Wrong Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. broadwaygoeswrong.com. (Previews begin March 9, opens April 2) (2 hrs) Everything that could possibly go wrong does when the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society puts on a 1920s murder mystery. H14 Present Laughter St. James Theatre, 246 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. laughteronbroadway.com. (Previews begin March 10, opens April 5, closes July 2) A self-centered actor, played by Oscar and two-time Tony Award winner Kevin Kline, is in the throes of a midlife crisis in Noël Coward’s evergreen comedy, first produced on Broadway in 1946. H14 The Price American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. roundabouttheatre.org. (In previews, opens March 16, closes May 7) In the revival of Arthur Miller’s 1968 play, two estranged brothers (Mark Ruffalo and Tony Shalhoub) meet to settle their father’s estate. Danny DeVito plays the furniture dealer who appraises the possessions. H14 Significant Other Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. significantotherbroadway.com. (In previews opens March 2) (2 hrs 15 mins) Joshua Harmon’s funny and heartbreaking play about twentysomething singles searching for love and friendship in New York City makes its Broadway debut after a critically acclaimed Off-Broadway engagement. H14 Sweat Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. sweatbroadway .com. (Previews begin March 4, opens March 26) (2 hrs 10 mins) In the new play by Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage, the bond between friends who have spent their entire work lives together on the line of a factory floor comes undone when layoffs and picket lines turn mates against each other. H13 War Paint Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. warpaintmusical.com. (Previews begin March 7, opens April 6) Beauty queens Helena Rubinstein (Patti LuPone) and Elizabeth Arden (Christine Ebersole) bare their claws in the new musical written and directed by the team behind “Grey Gardens” several seasons ago. H14

BROADWAY Aladdin C0L46N 7 ew Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717. aladdinthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) Disney’s family-friendly musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride, filled with romance, special effects and the Oscar-winning songs from the 1992 animated feature. H14 INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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entertainment

musical. When Willy Wonka opens his candy factory to five lucky Golden Ticket winners, Charlie Bucket goes on a life-changing journey that turns his life from sour to sweet. H14


entertainment Beautiful–The Carole King Musical C0L421Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. beautifulonbroad way.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The hit musical traces the rise of the singer/songwriter, from her early days as Carole Klein, an aspiring composer from Brooklyn, to her global success as Carole King, chart-topping sensation. H14

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The Book of Mormon C0L97231Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. bookofmormonthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a mission in Africa in an irreverent Tony Award-winning musical comedy that only Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of Comedy Central’s “South Park,” could dream up. H13 A Bronx Tale Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. abronxtalethemusical.com. (2 hrs 10 mins) In the 1960s Bronx, a gangster becomes a father figure for a young boy when he introduces him to the mob life. The score for this new musical is by Alan Menken and Glenn Slater. H13

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Cats Neil Simon Theatre, 250 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. catsbroad way.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) The musical juggernaut receives its first NYC revival. Based on T.S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats” and composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, the show first opened in 1982 on Broadway. H13 Chicago Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. chicagothemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the Tony Award-winning revival of the vaudeville musical, two alluring jailbirds (and femmes fatales) named Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly attain stardom while singing about sex and Page corruption. H13# 1

Dear Evan Hansen Music Box Theatre, 239 W. Inks Approvals 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., Cyan CD None dearevanhansen.com. (2 hrs 25 CW GARTH 212.239.6200.Magenta Yellow AD Christy mins) In the musical, a socially awkward Black Studio Miles high-school senior goes from outsider to cool Used Swatches Acct Michael/Jeff/Kirk Black Proofrd Joe Fguy when he fabricates emails that idealize the C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0 Prod Steve C=0 M=100 Y=0himself K=0 friendship between and a classmate C=0 M=0 Y=100 K=0 who commits suicide. Will the lie eventually C=15 M=100 Y=100 K=0 C=75 M=5 Y=100 K=0 undo him? H14

Visual Artist Jolene Malloy Previous Artist Miles Freyberger

���� ou’ll feel the earth move!” Stephen Sondheim Theatre 124 West 43rd Street www.BeautifulOnBroadway.com

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Photo: Zachary Maxwell Stertz

— Time Out New York

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Lin-Manuel Miranda (“In the Heights”) has written the book, music and lyrics for the musical about political mastermind Alexander Hamilton. Print Ad Slug Expect the unexpected when America’s past is told through the hip-hop sounds of today. H14

In Transit Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. intransitbroadway.com. (1 hr 40 mins, no intermission) The new a cappella musical follows 11 New Yorkers who hope to catch the express subway train to success, love and happiness, but make local stops along the way. I13 Jitney Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (Closes March 12) (2 hrs 25 mins) August Wilson’s play about a group


Kinky Boots C0L4751Al Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 877.250.2929. kinkybootsthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) Cyndi Lauper has written the music and lyrics and Harvey Fierstein the book for the Tony Award-winning musical about a down-on-itsheels shoe factory given a transfusion of style, thanks to a drag queen. I14 The Lion King C0L41896Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. lionking.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Disney’s megahit family-friendly musical features revolutionary puppetry and vibrant costumes by Julie Taymor, as well as melodious songs by Elton John and Tim Rice. Winner of six 1998 Tony Awards, including Best Musical. H14

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entertainment

of drivers of unlicensed taxicabs (jitneys) In 1970s Pittsburgh is produced on Broadway for the first time. H14

Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812 Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. great cometbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A 70-page section of Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” has been adapted into an immersive musical by Dave Malloy. Josh Groban makes his Broadway debut as Pierre. H14 On Your Feet! Marquis Theatre, W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. onyourfeetmusical.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) The story of Gloria and Emilio Estefan—their legendary partnership in life and in music—is set to such chart-toppers as “Rhythm Is Gonna Get You,” “Conga,” “1-2-3” and others. H14 Paramour Lyric Theatre, 213 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. paramour onbroadway.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) Cirque du Soleil’s first production created specifically for Broadway is set in Hollywood and tells the story of a beautiful young actress who must choose between love and her art. Featured in the grand-scale musical spectacle are actors, dancers, aerialists and acrobats. H14 The Phantom of the Opera C0L64M 187 ajestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Broadway’s longest-running musical ever tells the tragic story of a disfigured composer who falls in love with a young singer, whisking her away to his chambers beneath the Paris Opera House. H14 The Present Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. thepresentbroadway.com. (Closes March 19) (3 hrs) When friends gather in a country house in post-Perestroika Russia to celebrate the birthday of a widow (Cate Blanchett), 20 years worth of blighted relationships rankle. H14 School of Rock Winter Garden Theatre, 1634 Broadway, btw W. 50th & W. 51st sts., 212.239.6200. schoolofrockthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) It’s only rock ‘n’ roll, but the kids at a prestigious prep school love it when their wannabe rock star substitute teacher turns them into a rock band in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical hit. H13

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OFFICIAL AIRLINE

PREFERRED

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entertainment Sunday in the Park With George Hudson Theatre, 139-141 W. 44th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 855.801.5876. thehudsonbroadway.com. (Closes April 23) The revival of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s musical stars Jake Gyllenhaal as painter Georges Seurat, whose obsession with and dedication to finishing his most renowned work, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte,” drives a wedge between him and his patrons, fellow artists, and his muse and lover, Dot. What price great art? H14 Sunset Boulevard Palace Theatre, 1564 Broadway, at W. 47th St., 877.250.2929. sunsetboulevardthemusical.com. (Closes June 25) (2 hrs 40 mins) This new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Tony Award-winning Best Musical of 1995, featuring the largest orchestra on Broadway in more than 80 years— 40 pieces—stars Glenn Close. H14 T:4.75”

Ana Villafañe. Photo: Matthew Murphy

C IS . I S U M THE SISTIBLE IRRE IS Y R . O E T L S B E A H T T GET R O F N U

Waitress Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. waitressthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A waitress in a diner bakes delicious, creative pies, but her private life is complicated by an abusive husband, an unwanted pregnancy and an affair with her doctor. Will she bake the perfect pie and find happiness? Sara Bareilles has written the musical’s score. H14

MARQUIS THEATRE, 46TH ST. BETWEEN BROADWAY & 8TH AVE. TICKETMASTER.COM 877-250-2929�OnYourFeetMusical.com TICKETMASTER.COM 877-250-2929�

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Wicked C0L418Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. wicked themusical.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Based on the book by Gregory Maguire, the long-running musical—a prequel to “The Wizard of Oz”— imagines Oz as a land of strife, where a young, green-hued girl named Elphaba is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. I13

Print/Export Time 9-30-2016 12:39 PM Visual Artist Steve Gordon Previous Artist Jared Narber

All the Fine InksYoung Boys Pershing Square Approvals Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & Cyan CD Vinny 10th aves., 212.279.4200. thenewgroup.org. (In Magenta CW None Yellow AD Jared previews, opens March 1, closes March 26) In Black Studio Joe E South Carolina in the late 1980s, two 14-yearUsed Swatches Acct Matt, Kara, Megan Black Proofrd Joe F old girls are eager to learn about life, love, sex GRAY @ 60% Prod Steve C4 and growingPMS up178from two older boys. J14 OYF C6 (100.74.0.0) OYF C1 (5.65.0.0)

C1 (5.65.0.0) copyStages, Stage 3, 340 W. 246 ppi; Studio:ON YOUR FEET:ART:GLUEKIT:BACKGROUNDS:BACKGROUND-4C.psd) Avenue Q C0L4185NOYF ew World C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0 BRIGHTER_4C.psd (CMYK; 757 ppi; Studio:ON YOUR FEET:ART:GLUEKIT:BRUSHES:SECTION_02-NoDancers_02_BRIGHTER_4C.psd) 50th St., btw PSD Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. Black a Estefan in ON YOUR FEET! (c) Matthew Murphy-ret_GLUE_NOSTRIPE_4C.psd (CMYK; 542 ppi; Studio:ON YOUR FEET:ART:GLUEKIT:FIGURES:5-3545_Ana Villafañe as Gloria avenueq.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) People and tthew Murphy-ret_GLUE_NOSTRIPE_4C.psd) puppets live together on a fictitious New York sd (CMYK; 4247 ppi; Studio:ON YOUR FEET:ART:LOGOS:CMYK:_THE_EMILIO_GLORIA_MUSICAL_RULES:OYF.LOGO_VRT_v4_FLAT_4C.psd)

City block in this uproarious Tony Award-winning musical for adults. I13

Cagney Westside Theatre Upstairs, 407 W. 43rd Print Ad Slug St.,, btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.239.6200. cagneythemusical.com. (2 hrs) The life of screen legend James Cagney—from mean streets of New York to vaudeville song-and-dance man to Hollywood tough guy—is told via George M. Cohan songs and original music and lyrics co-written by Robert Creighton, who also stars in the leading role. I14 Church & State New World Stages, Stage 5, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. churchandstatetheplay.com. (Previews begin March 3, opens March 20) Charlie Whitmore is up for reelection to the U.S. Senate when, three days before voters go to the polls, he decides to tell everyone exactly

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How to Transcend a Happy Marriage Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. lct.org. (In previews, opens March 20, closes May 7) A young polyamorous woman, who hunts her own food and has two live-in boyfriends, teaches two older married couples a thing or two about love, friendship and going wild. Sarah Ruhl’s new play stars Academy Award winner Marisa Tomei and Tony Award winner Lena Hall. I12

THE EPIC LOVE STORY OF OUR TIME

entertainment

what is on his mind. Jason Odell Williams’ new play takes a comic look at the serious business of faith and politics. I13

CA M ERO N M AC K I N TO S H PRESENTS

B O U B L I L & S C H Ö N B E R G ’S

The Imbible: A Spirited History of Drinking New World Stages, The Green Room, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. imbible.org. (1 hr 45 mins) Audiences (21+) drink their way through the 10,000-year history—and science—of alcoholic beverages, tutored by a knowledgeable bartender, who is also an engaging storyteller and amusing entertainer. Music accompanies the imbibing and revelry. Ticket price includes three cocktails. I13 The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical Lucille Lortel Theatre, 121 Christopher St., at Bedford St., 866.811.4111. lightningthiefmu sical.com. (Previews begin March 23, opens April 4, closes May 6) Percy Jackson, who has mythical powers he can’t control, is on a journey to find Zeus’ lightning bolt. The adventure musical is based on the popular children’s books. H19

ON BROADWAY FOR A LIMITED TIME

O BROADWAY THEATRE

SAIGONBROADWAY.COM

Spamilton The Triad, 158 W. 72nd St., btw Columbus Ave. & Broadway, 212.362.2590. spamil tonnyc.com. (1 hr 20 mins, no intermission) If you can’t get tickets to “Hamilton,” this spoof written and directed by Gerard Alessandrini, creator of “Forbidden Broadway,” is the next best thing. J11 Stomp C0L94O 1 rpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave., at E. 8th St., 800.982.2787. stomponline.com. (1 hr 40 mins) In a dazzling percussive performance, the eight-member cast conjures rhythm out of brooms, dustbins, hubcaps and more. E18 The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart The McKittrick Hotel, 542 W. 27th St., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.564.1662. strangeundoing.com. (Closes March 26) (2 hrs 10 mins) The National Theatre of Scotland’s immersive experience is a supernatural, music-filled folk fable. The McKittrick Hotel’s bar, The Heath, has been transformed into a Scottish pub for the occasion. J16 Sweeney Todd Barrow Street Theatre, 27 Barrow St., at Seventh Ave. So., 866.811.4111. sweeneytoddnyc.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) By creating a working pie-shop environment in which bloodthirsty barber Sweeney Todd can wreak vengeance and Mrs. Lovett, his partner in crime, can bake “the worst pies in London,” the Tooting Arts Club revival of the Stephen Sondheim musical is unlike any other. H19 Turning Page Dixon Place, 161A Chrystie St., btw Delancey & Rivington sts., 866.811.4111. dixonplace.org. (Closes April 8) Actress INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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— Charles Isherwood,

Geraldine Page, who died in 1987, was one of the leading lights of the American stage and a formidably intense film star and Academy Award winner. Her daughter, Angelica Page, has written and stars in a solo play about her mother’s trailblazing career and sometimes tragic personal life. D20

CABARETS+COMEDY CLUBS The Box C0L4561 39 89 Chrystie St., btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.982.9301. theboxnyc.com. Formerly a sign factory in the 1920s, this exclusive, intimate variety theater has a New Orleans-style decor—dramatic chandeliers and velvety balcony booths—and hosts mind-twisting, late-night acts, from human oddity shows to avant-garde striptease. D19 T:4.75”

A GORGEOUS NEW MUSICAL FOR ANYONE WITH A BEATING HEART.

entertainment

Café Carlyle C0L9431The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel New York, 35 E. 76th St., at Madison Ave., 212.744.1600. rosewoodhotels.com/en/carlyle/ dining/cafe_carlyle. One of the swankiest supper clubs in town, Café Carlyle features original murals by Marcel Vertès and serves French cuisine pre-show. Feb. 28-March 11: Joan Osborne. March 14-25: Suzanne Vega. Every Monday thru June 19: Woody Allen & the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band F10

Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St. • Telecharge.com • 212-239-6200 • DearEvanHansen.com

@DearEvanHansen

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Print/Export Time 12-5-2016 5:18 PM Visual Artist Steve Gordon Previous Artist Miles Freyberger

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Carolines on Broadway C0L941 318 626 Broadway, btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.757.4100 carolines .com. Performances by some of the nation’s hottest headliners and up-and-coming talents. Highlights: March 10-12: Vir Das. March 16-18: Christopher Titus. March 30-April 2: Big Jay Oakerson. H13

Comedy Cellar C0L1 9517 17 MacDougal St., btw W. 3rd St. & Minetta Ln., 212.254.3480. comedycellar .com. The Greenwich Village spot is known for Page #1 unexpected appearances from such famous comedians as Chris Rock, Colin Quinn, Wanda Sykes, JonInks Stewart and Dave Chappelle. Several Approvals shows nightly. G19 CD None CW AARON AD Gerri Studio Miles Acct Kara Proofrd joef Prod Steve

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Don’t Tell Mama C0L3624343 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.757.0788. donttellmamanyc.com. Used Swatches This popularBlack cabaret, piano bar and restaurant C=100 M=0 Y=0 K=0 C=0 M=100 Y=0 K=0 and up-and-coming showcases established C=0 M=0 Y=100 K=0 performers nightly. I14K=0 C=15 M=100 Y=100 C=75 M=5 Y=100 K=0 C=100 M=90 Y=10 K=0

Duane ParkGRAY C0L4231D@uane Park, 308 Bowery, btw 60% PMS 178 C 4 Houston & Bleecker DEH Light Blue sts., 212.732.5555. DEH Medium Blue duaneparknyc.com. Seasonal American food DEH Dark Blue with a Southern accent whets the appetite for jazz and burlesque entertainment at this swank supper club. Shows Tu-Sa. E19 Print Ad Slug

Feinstein’s/54 Below C0L52138254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.476.3551. 54below .com. The Theater District’s subterranean nightclub is underneath the former Studio 54 disco. Several shows nightly. Highlights: March 3-4: Melissa Manchester. March 8, 14-16: Carmen Cusack. March 9-11: Linda Eder. March 17-18, 31-April 1: Tony Danza: “Standards & Stories.” March 24-25, 29: Mickey Dolenz. H13 Gotham Comedy Club 208 W. 23rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.367.9000. gotham comedyclub.com. Jerry Seinfeld, Dave Chappelle, Louis CK and Amy Schumer are among the big-name stand-ups who have performed in the 10,000-square-foot space, known for its

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


comfortable Art Deco ambience. In addition to headliners, New Talent Showcases are a staple of the club’s calendar. Food and drink served. Highlights: March 2-5: Craig Robinson. March 10-12: Adam Ray. March 16-18: Steve Byrne. March 23-26: Shawn Wayans. March 30-April 1: Paul Zerdin. I16

T:4.75”

Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre 153 E. 3rd St., btw aves. B & A, 212.366.9231; 307 W. 26th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.366.9176. ucbtheatre.com. Newcomers and seasoned comics perform improv, sketch and stand-up shows in Upright Citizens Brigade’s two Manhattan theaters. (UCB was founded by Matt Besser, Amy Poehler, Ian Roberts and Matt Walsh.) Nightly. C19, I16

entertainment

L E T YOUR F A N TA S I E S U N W I ND

DANCE+MUSIC Photo: Matt Crockett

American Songbook in The Appel Room C0L942T 6 he Appel Room, Frederick P. Rose Hall, Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.721.6500. american songbook.org. (Thru March 11) Celebrating the diversity of American popular song, Lincoln Center’s acclaimed series returns for its 18th season. Highlights: March 8: The Songs of Elizabeth Swados. March 9: Tanya Tagaq. March 10: José González. March 11: Kristin & Bobby Lopez. All shows at 8:30 pm. I12

O MAJESTIC THEATRE | 247 West 44 th St. American Songbook in the Penthouse C0L841Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse, Lincoln Center, 165 Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 | phantombroadway.com W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.721.6500. americansongbook.org. (March 22-29) Celebrating the diversity of American popular song and its interpreters, the second half of Lincoln Center’s acclaimed series presents adventuresome performers in folk, indie-rock, pop, musical theater and country. Highlights: March 22: Joan Shelley. March 23: Julian and Leon Fleisher: “The Man I Love.” March Path: & Macintosh 24: Olga Bell. March 27:Document Matt Gould GriffinHD:Users:franklind:Documents:Storage:DAILY WORK FOLDER:032816:127696_PHAN_In NY _May2016_REL.indd Matthews. March 28: The Cactus Blossoms. Pg Specs Job # 127696 Sprd Specs Print / User Info Fonts March 29: Ruby Amanfu. All shows at 8 pm. I12

EDITS ROLL. RE THEL CR SEE IT BET HFO ROUGH APRI 16 ONLY!

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Carnegie Hall C0L9541Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., Pub IN NY MAG 212.247.7800. carnegiehall.org. The 2016-2017 Run Date MAY01 Visual Artist Delano Franklin Gutter None season is the venerable concert Release Date hall’s MAR28 126th. Previous Artist Joe Eichelberger Concerts are given in the Stern Auditorium/ Perlman Stage, the Weill Recital Hall and Zankel Images NY _4Cswop.psd (CMYK; 298 ppi; Studio:PHANTOM:ART:REFRESH 2016:Final retouching:4C:127696_PHAN_In NY _4Cswop.psd) Hall. Highlights: March127696_PHAN_In 1-2: Boston Symphony PHAN.Social-Media-Icons_SNPCHT.ai (Studio:PHANTOM:ART:ART-Phantom25:Social Media Icons:PHAN.Social-Media-Icons_SNPCHT.ai) Orchestra. March 7: The Philadelphia Orchestra. Phantom_Broadway_Ropes_AW_Logo_LighterShadow_4Cswop.psd (CMYK; 895 ppi; Studio:PHANTOM:ART:REFRESH 2016:Final retouching:Logos:Phantom_Broadway_Ropes_AW_Logo_ March 8: Goran Bregovic & His Wedding and LighterShadow_4Cswop.psd) Funeral Band. March 9: Sir András Schiff, piano. March 10: The New York Pops: “Life Is a Cabaret: The Songs of Kander and Ebb.” March 15: Richard Goode, piano. March 19: Elina Garanca, mezzo-soprano. March 30: Simone Lamsma, violin. March 31: St. Louis Symphony. H13 Print/Export Time 3-28-2016 6:14 PM

Jazz at Lincoln Center C0L74T 53 ime Warner Center, Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.721.6500. jalc.org. Lincoln Center’s state-of-the-art jazz complex. Highlights: March 3-4 in the Appel Room: Dave Douglas: “Metamorphosis.” March 3-4 in the Rose Theater: Eddie Palmieri. March 17-18 in the Rose Theater: “Free to Be: Jazz of the ’60s and Beyond” featuring the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. March 31-April 1 in the Appel Room: Joshua Redman. I12 Joyce Theater C0L1 9541 75 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.242.0800. joyce.org. The respected venue welcomes renowned modern-dance companies

P A R A M O U R O N B R O A D W A Y. C O M E X C L U S I V E LY A T

213 W. 42 ND ST., NYC

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entertainment from the United States and abroad. Highlights: Feb. 28-March 5: Wendy Whelan/Brian Brooks/ Brooklyn Rider in “Some of a Thousand Words.” March 7-12: Sydney Dance Company. March 14-19: Gauthier Dance/Dance Company Theaterhaus Stuttgart: “Nijinski.” March 21-25: Hamburg Ballet. March 28-April 2: Stephen Petronio Company. H17

Metropolitan Opera C0L3572Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000. metopera.org. The 2016-2017 season features new productions as well as repertory favorites. Highlights: March 1, 4 (evening), 7, 11 (matinee), 14, 18 (evening), 22, 25 (evening), 29: “La Traviata.” March 2: “Rusalka.” March 3, 8, 11 (evening), 15, 18 (matinee): “Roméo et Juliette.” March 4 (matinee), 9: “Werther.” March 6, 10, 13, 17, 21, 25 (matinee): “Idomeneo.” March 16, 20, 24, 28: “Fidelio.” March 23, 27, 31: “Aida.” March 30: “Eugene Onegin.” I12 New York City Center C0L1 9541 31 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. nycitycenter .org. A former Shriners Temple, this performing arts venue hosts music, dance and theater events. Highlights: March 9-12: Flamenco Festival 2017. March 22-26: Encores!: Cole Porter’s “The New Yorkers.” March 30-April 1: Bianca Li: “Goddesses & Demonesses.” H13 New York Philharmonic C0LD 1964 avid Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., 212.875.5656. nyphil.org. The 2016-2017 season is a momentous one, as New York’s preeminent orchestra marks two significant milestones: its 175th anniversary and the final season of Alan Gilbert as its music director. Concerts: March 1-3, 4, 9-11, 15-18. I12 Paul Taylor’s American Modern Dance C0L5186David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 63rd St., 212.496.0600. ptdc.org. (March 8-26) The legendary American choreographer’s company performs a world premiere (“Ports of Call”), the New York premiere of “The Open Door” and 14 classics by Mr. Taylor, as well as works by Lila York, Larry Keigwin and Doug Elkins. The Orchestra of St. Luke’s performs live at every program. I12

JAZZ CLUBS Birdland C0L9641315 W. 44th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.581.3080. birdlandjazz.com. “The jazz corner of the world” is how Charlie Parker described this club. Highlights: Feb. 28-March 4: John Pizzarelli. March 7-11: Gary Burton and Mokoto Ozone Duets. March 14-18: Kurt Rosenwinkel. March 21-25: The Tristano Project with Helen Sung, Greg Osby, Jaleel Shaw, Ben Allison and Matt Wilson. March 28-April 1: Eliane Elias. Dinner served nightly. I14 Blue Note Jazz Club C0L1 79641 31 W. 3rd St., btw MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592. bluenote.net. The best and brightest have performed here, including the late Dizzy Gillespie. Highlights: March 2-5: Lou Donaldson. March 8-12: Roy Haynes 92nd Birthday Celebration with special guests. March 15-19: Roberta Gambarini. March 21-26: Roy Hargrove Quintet. March 28-April 2: Stanley Clarke/Ron Carter Duo with special guest Russell Malone. G18

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola C0L96418Jazz at Lincoln Center, Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.258.9595. jazz.org/ dizzys. Sleek furnishings, low lighting and talented performers define this intimate club that also boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the glittering Manhattan skyline. Highlights: March 1-2: Nicole Henry. March 3-5: MVP Jazz Quartet. March 10-12: Ted Nash Quintet. March 17-19: Michele Rosewoman: New Yor-Uba. March 24-26: Victor Goines Quartet. March 31-April 2: DIVA Jazz Orchestra. Dinner served nightly. I12 Jazz Standard C0L31 627 16 E. 27th St., btw Lexington Ave. & Park Ave. So., 212.576.2232. jazzstandard .com. An eclectic lineup of world-class artists performing classic jazz to funk, R&B, blues and more, plus Blue Smoke restaurant’s awardwinning barbecue. Every Monday: “Mingus Mondays” concert series. Highlights: March 1-5: George Coleman Birthday Celebration. March 9-12: Billy Hart Quartet. March 15-18: Kenny Barron Quintet. March 23-26: Steve Kuhn Trio Birthday Celebration. March 30-April 1: Chano Dominguez Flamenco Quartet. F16 Village Vanguard C0L1 9471 78 Seventh Ave. So., btw Perry & W. 11th sts., 212.255.4037. villagevan guard.com. One of New York’s most prestigious jazz clubs, this West Village landmark has been in the same location since 1935. Highlights: Feb. 28-March 5: Craig Taborn. March 7-12, 19: Bill Frisell Trio. March 14-18: Bill Frisell Quartet. March 21-26: Trio 3 + 1. H18

POP/ROCK CLUBS+VENUES B.B. King Blues Club & Grill C0L9421237 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.997.4144. bbkingblues.com. Dedicated to the musical legend, this intimate space has been in Times Square for 15 years. Lucille’s Bar & Restaurant within the club is named for King’s beloved Gibson guitar. Highlights: March 4: David Cassidy. March 8: Ladysmith Black Mambazo. March 10: Steven Seagal Blues Band. March 18: Martha Reeves & the Vandellas. Every Saturday at noon: Beatles Brunch. Every Sunday at 1:30 pm: Gospel Brunch. H14 Barclays Center C0L46 7 20 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. barclayscenter .com. Brooklyn’s state-of-the-art entertainment and sports arena. Highlight: Feb. 23-March 3: Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: “Out of This World.” March 15: Green Day. March 29: Charlie Wilson with special guests Fantasia and Johnny Gill. March 30: Bastille. AA24 Beacon Theatre C0L2 941 124 Broadway, at W. 74th St., 866.858.0008. beacontheatre.com. A classic Upper West Side theater has been revamped to house pop-music concerts and other acts. Highlights: March 1: ZZ Top. March 10: Dawes. March 11: Passenger. March 18-19, 21-22: Wilco. March 31: Zucchero. J11 Madison Square Garden C0L95461Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. thegarden .com. The entertainment and sporting venue hosts concerts and other live events in its arena and The Theater at MSG. Highlights in the Arena: March 1: Luke Bryan. March 2: Panic! at the Disco. March 3: Billy Joel. March 6: BNP Paribas Showdown with Venus Williams. March 7: “Game of Thrones”: Live Concert Experience.

Featured in the “Made” section of this month’s Architectural Design Show (this page) is Pelle’s “Louise” cabinet, inspired by the sculptures of Louise Bourgeois, designed and made in New York.

March 19-20: Eric Clapton. Highlight in The Theater: March 28 in The Theater: “Garden of Laughs,” featuring Leslie Jones, Sebastian Maniscalco, Tracy Morgan, John Oliver, Chris Rock, Bob Saget and others. H15

Radio City Music Hall C0L1 657 260 Sixth Ave., at W. 50th St., 866.858.0008. radiocity.com. The Art Deco landmark is one of the world’s most beautiful concert halls and seats nearly 6,000 spectators. Highlights: March 4: Il Volo. March 11: Regina Spektor. March 25: Franco De Vita. March 31-April 1: “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” in Concert. G13

SPECIAL EVENTS Architectural Digest Design Show C0L7P 1 ier 92 and 94, 12th Ave., at W. 55th St., 800.677.6278. addesignshow.com. (March 16-19) Luxury home furnishings from hundreds of retailers and brands, plus design ideas for kitchen and bath, floor coverings, lighting and accessories. Th 10 am-6 pm (open to the trade and VIP ticket holders only), F-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. $40 general admission, $95 preview March 16 and re-admission on all four days. K13 Broadway Backwards C0LA 724 l Hirschfeld Theatre, 302 W. 45th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.840.0770. broadwaycares.org. (March 13) No lyrics are changed when Broadway leading ladies sing men’s show tunes and leading men sing women’s show tunes in this annual all-star, gender-bending benefit concert produced by Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. 8 pm. Tickets start at $85. I14 St. Patrick’s Day Parade 718.231.4400. nycstpatricksparade.org. (March 17) Green pride abounds at this annual event celebrating Irish heritage and culture in New York City. Beginning at 11 am, the parade marches north up Fifth Ave., starting at 44th St. and ending at 79th St. around 4 pm. G14-G10


SPORTS

entertainment

Brooklyn Nets C0L47Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. nba.com/nets. The B-ballers score on their home court. Highlights: March 12: New York Knicks. March 14: Oklahoma City Thunder. March 17: Boston Celtics. March 19: Dallas Mavericks. March 21: Detroit Pistons. March 23: Phoenix Suns. March 28: Philadelphia 76ers. AA24 New York City FC Yankee Stadium, 1 E. 161st St., Bronx, 855.776.9232. nycfc.com. New York’s professional Major League Soccer (MLS) franchise plays its 2017 home matches at Yankee Stadium. Highlights: March 12: D.C. United. March 18: Montreal Impact. New York Islanders Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 917.618.6700. newyorkislanders.com. The National Hockey League (NHL) franchise plays home games in Brooklyn. Highlights: March 13: Carolina Hurricanes. March 16: Winnipeg Jets. March 18: Columbus Blue Jackets. March 25: Boston Bruins. March 27: Nashville Predators. March 31: New Jersey Devils. AA24 New York Knicks C0L6M 9471 adison Square Garden, Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 877.465.6425. nba.com/knicks. The Knicks’ keep their eye on the ball. Highlights: March 5: Golden State Warriors. March 14: Indiana Pacers. March 16: Brooklyn Nets. March 27: Detroit Pistons. March 29: Miami Heat. H15

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New York Rangers C0L395Madison Square Garden, Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.465.6741. nyrangers.com. The hockey team takes to the ice. Highlights: March 4: Montreal Canadiens. March 13: Tampa Bay Lightning. March 17: Florida Panthers. March 22: New York Islanders. March 31: Pittsburgh Penguins. H15

TICKET SERVICES New York CityPASS 888.330.5008. citypass .com. Six attractions (Empire State Building, American Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Museum of Art, choice of Guggenheim Museum or Top of the Rock Observation Deck, choice of Circle Line Sightseeing Cruise or Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, choice of 9/11 Memorial & Museum or Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum) at great savings. Ticket booklets purchased either online or at participating attractions are good for nine days. $116 adults, $92 children ages 6-17. TKTS Father Duffy Square, Broadway & W. 47th St. in the Theater District; South Street Seaport, at the corner of Front & John sts. in Lower Manhattan; 1 MetroTech Center, at the corner of Jay St. & Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn; David Rubenstein Atrium, Broadway, btw W. 62nd & W. 63rd sts on the Upper West Side, tdf.org. The four discount ticket booths offer same-day Broadway and Off-Broadway shows; theatergoers can save between 20 and 50 percent off full-price tickets. The David Rubenstein Atrium location also sells discounted tickets to Lincoln Center performances. Log on for box-office hours and real-time listings of all shows and performances on offer. H14, D22, A23, I12

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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dining+drinking

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/EDITORSBLOG

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 60-62)

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3

1 1 Freshly squeezed juice drinks are available, with or without alcohol, at this artistic restaurant. | Rouge Tomate, p. 43 2 Grilled octopus is served over chickpeas, an example of Chef Christou’s crafty modern Greek fare. | Nerai, p. 44 3 Mixed grilled vegetables come á la carte or as part of a prix fixe dinner at this Indian Midtown staple, open since 2000.| Utsav, p. 45 4 Daniel Boulud’s brasserie is meat-centered, but don’t write off his freshly selected seafood. | DBGB Kitchen & Bar, p. 43 5 Eat like a delegate, but remember, reservations only. | Delegates Dining Room, p. 44.

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

CENTRAL PARK SOUTH

Redeye Grill– C0L5A 72 merican 890 Seventh Ave., at W. 56th St., 212.541.9000. redeyegrill.com. Steps away from Carnegie Hall and Jazz at Lincoln Center, live music and Red Grooms artwork greet guests as they nosh on creative sushi rolls, burgers and grilled steaks. L (M-F), D (nightly), B & Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ H13

Marea– C0L572Italian 240 Central Park So., btw Seventh Ave. & Broadway, 212.582.5100. marea-nyc.com. Seared orange clam with little meatballs and prosciutto is served in a posh room designed to resemble a yacht. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ I12

Todd English Food Hall– C0L78451Various 1 W. 59th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves, 212.986.9260. theplazany.com/dining/todd-english-food-hall. The food hall, which has mosaic marble floors, elegant wood paneling and stained-glass windows, offers nine food stations ranging from

Pricing Legend: $=inexpensive (average meal under $25) $$=moderate ($25-$50) $$$=expensive ($50-$80) $$$$=luxe ($80+)

PHOTOS: ROUGE TOMATE, NICK SOLARES; NERAI, EVAN SUNG

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Rouge Tomate–Contemporary American C0L5321 97 26 W. 18th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 646.395.3978. rougetomatechelsea.com. Locally sourced, seasonal and health-oriented culinary offerings, as well as over 200 wines, including biodynamic and international bottles. L (Tu-F), D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$$ G17 Socarrat Paella Bar–Spanish C02 1L546 59 W. 19th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.462.1000; and two other NYC locations. socarratnyc.com. The signature saffron rice dish comes in eight varieties; the black rice version features fish, shrimp, scallops and calamari, while the “Valenciana” is cooked with pork rib, rabbit, snails, scallions and asparagus. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ H17 4

Txikito–Spanish C0L416240 Ninth Ave., btw W. 24th & W. 25th sts., 212.242.4730. txikitonyc.com. The menu of bona fide Basque cuisine encompasses canapés topped with chorizo and quail egg, chilled octopus carpaccio and crispy beef tongue with Spanish mustard. L (Tu-Sa), D (nightly). $$$ I16

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CHELSEA+MEATPACKING Colicchio & Sons– C0L5A 72 merican C0L645785 10th Ave., at W. 15th St., 212.400.6699. craftrestaurantsinc .com. Chef Tom Colicchio’s menu of farm-totable fare (scallops with bacon and succotash). L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ J17 Il Bastardo– C0L572Italian C0L1 35146 91 Seventh Ave., btw W. 21st & W. 22nd sts., 212.675.5980. nycrg.com /il-bastardo. A Northern Italian steak house

Katz’s Delicatessen– C0LJ572 ewish-American C0L683205 E. Houston St., at Ludlow St., 212.254.2246. katzsdelicatessen.com. One of NYC’s oldest delicatessens, this iconic spot has been serving famous pastrami, corned beef, knishes and other classics since 1888. Tickets are given for purchase; don’t lose them! L & D (daily). $$ D19 La Gamelle– C0L4589French 241 Bowery, at Stanton St., 212.388.0052. lagamellenyc.com. The traditional Gallic bistro (zinc bar, globe lights and tiled floor) lives on, with a menu of classics such as wine-splashed mussels and charcuterie. D (M-Sa), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ D19

FINANCIAL DISTRICT+TRIBECA

CHINATOWN+LITTLE ITALY

Tablao– C0L4589Spanish C0L49361 Greenwich St., btw Harrison & Franklin sts., 212.334.4043. tablaonyc .com. Traditional plates—from tapas to seafood—and sangria are served in a colorful, mirrored dining room. Live flamenco (W & F). L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ G21

Hop Kee– C0L572Chinese C0L63421 Mott St., at Mosco St., 212.964.8365. hopkeenyc.com. Family-style Cantonese delights such as roast duck, chicken with black bean sauce, and beef and bitter melon in oyster sauce. L & D (daily). $$ E21

Takahachi– C0L4589Japanese C0L9411 7 45 Duane St., at Church St., 212.571.1830. takahachi.net. Casual hideaway for traditional fare made from fish imported from Japan’s coastal Kyushu province. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). $$ F21

La Nonna– C0L572Italian C0L61 72 34 Mulberry St., btw Hester & Grand sts., 212.334.6200. lanonnaristorante .com. Classics, such as fresh pizza and pasta in vodka sauce, are served at this cozy eatery with a 100-bottle wine list. L & D (daily). $$ E20

The Odeon– C0L4589French 145 C0L645 W. Broadway, at Thomas St., 212.233.0507. theodeonrestaurant .com. A warmly lit, Art Deco brasserie beckons guests to sip international wines and nosh on hearty French fare and late-night bites. B & L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ G21

Lombardi’s– C0L572Italian C0L52133 6 2 Spring St., at Mott St., 212.941.7994. firstpizza.com. America’s first pizzeria has been serving its New York-style, coal-oven slices for more than 100 years. L & D (daily). Cash only. $$ F20

a taqueria to an oyster bar to a lobster bar to a bakery. B, L & D (daily). $$-$$$ F12

DBGB Kitchen and Bar– C0L5A 72 merican C0L5438299 Bowery, btw Houston & E. 1st sts., 212.933.5300. dbgb.com. Chef Daniel Boulud’s take on a brasserie offers shellfish, meaty mains and Lyonnais-inspired fare, plus over 20 draft beers. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ E19

Wo Hop 0– C0L572Chinese 17 Mott St., btw Worth & Mosco sts., 212.962.8617. wohopnyc.com. Established in 1938, this subterranean Cantonese joint is a popular NYC late-night hangout, staying open 24 hours a day and serving roasted duck lo mein, vegetable chow fun, chicken with oyster sauce over rice and other classic dishes. L & D (daily). $$ E20

FLATIRON+UNION SQUARE+GRAMERCY Adalya– MM ciex editerranean 55 Irving Pl., btw E. 17th & E. 18th sts., 646.896.1441. adalyanyc.com. Adventurous small plates with a healthy bent in a casual bar space. Dishes include seared octopus, grilled lamb ribs and tzatziki potato salad. D (nightly). $$ E17

EAST VILLAGE+LOWER EAST SIDE

Eleven Madison Park–Contemporary American C0L94211 Madison Ave., at E. 24th St., 212.889.0905. elevenmadisonpark.com. Seasonal, refined dishes are on the customizable tasting menu that also offers an impressive wine list. L (F-Su), D (nightly). $$$$ F16

Birds & Bubbles– C0L572New Southern 100B Forsyth St., btw Broome & Grand sts., 646.368.9240. birdsandbubbles.com. Opposites attract, and that’s just the case at this sanctuary for fried chicken and champagne. Southern classics are given modern imaginings by Chef/Owner Sarah Simmons. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ D20

Upland–AmericanC0L3 345 Park Ave. So., at E. 26th St., 212.686.10006. uplandnyc.com. Named after Chef Justin Smillie’s northern California hometown, this trendy spot features Italian and coastal California-inspired dishes such as blistered shishito peppers with bottarga (cured fish roe) and a variety of housemade pastas. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ E16 INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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and bustling bottomless brunch spot featuring exposed brick walls and such dishes as squid ink ravioli. L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ H16


dining+drinking GREENWICH+WEST VILLAGE Bâtard–Contemporary American C0L4589 239 W. Broadway, at N. Moore St., 212.219.2777. batardtribeca.com. This restaurant, named by the James Beard Foundation the Best New Restaurant in America in 2015, serves up inventive Modern European cuisine, expertly crafted cocktails and fine wine in a relaxed setting with warm lighting and cozy banquettes. L (F), D (M-Sa). $$$$ G21 Bosie Tea Parlor– C0L9721T 5 eahouse C0L41651 73 0 Morton St., btw Bleecker St. & Seventh Ave. So., 212.352.9900. bosieteaparlor.com. This teahouse serves salads, quiches, hearty vegetarian dishes such as cauliflower with creamy cashew sauce, pastries, teas and wines. B & L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ H19

RedFarm– C0L572Chinese C0L46529 Hudson St., btw W. 10th & Charles sts., 212.792.9700; and one other NYC location. redfarmnyc.com. The menu, combining Chinese and American elements, features “Pac-Man” shrimp dumplings. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$$ H18

HARLEM Amy Ruth’s– C0L78451Soul Food C0L61 82 13 W. 116th St., btw Lenox & Seventh aves., 212.280.8779. amyruths .com. Home-style soul-food dishes—from smothered pork chops to glazed ham and waffles—are named after renowned African Americans. B (Tu-Su), L & D (daily). $$ G5 Melba’s– McA iex merican C0L6283300 W. 114th St., at Frederick Douglass Blvd., 212.864.7777. melbasrestaurant.com. Owner Melba Wilson serves Southern comfort food at her swanky restaurant, including Southern fried chicken with eggnog waffles and barbecued turkey meat loaf. D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ I5 Red Rooster Harlem– McA iex merican C0L133 7 10 Lenox Ave., btw W. 125th & W. 126th sts., 212.792.9001. redroosterharlem.com. In celebration of local diversity, Ethiopian-born Chef/owner Marcus Samuelsson names his neighborhood spot after the famed Harlem speakeasy and serves refined local comfort foods, such as coconut rice with lentils and papaya, blackened catfish with fried pickles and grilled pork loin. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ G4

MIDTOWN EAST Benjamin Steakhouse– C0L9721S 5 teak House Dylan Hotel, 52 E. 41st St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.297.9177. benjaminsteakhouse.com. Executive Chef Arturo McLeod prepares six cuts of USDA prime steaks—dry-aged on the premises—at this classic chophouse. B (M-F), L & D (daily). $$$ F14 Benjamin Steakhouse Prime– C0L9721S 5 teak House 23 E. 40th St., btw Park & Madison aves.,

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

Come for lunch and dinner during the week and enjoy the wood-fired, brick-oven potato pizzas, salmon burgers and hearty main courses including duck bolognese. Then, come back on the weekend for the brunch (wood-fired, hand-rolled bagels, Italian baked eggs, truffle egg toast). | Macchina, p. 47

212.338.0818. benjaminsteakhouse.com. Sister restaurant of Benjamin Steakhouse, this Midtown newcomer serves up USDA prime steaks, seafood and more from the grill. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). $$$ F14

Delegates Dining Room– C0LI94135 nternational C0L61United Nations Building, visitors’ entrance at E. 46th St. & First Ave. For lunch reservations, call 917.367.3314. delegatesdiningroom-un.com. Dine alongside delegates and dignitaries at an international prix fixe buffet with wide views of the East River. L (M-F). $$$ D14 Nerai– MG ciex reek 55 E. 54th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.759.5554. nerainyc.com. Executive Chef Chris Christou crafts a modern Greek menu with such dishes as calamari stuffed with feta, sausage and avgolemono, and Alaskan king crab linguini with Neapolitan cream sauce, roasted red peppers and moschofilero. B & L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ F13 Zengo– McA iex sian/Latin 622 Third Ave., at E. 40th St., 212.808.8110. richardsandoval.com/zengony. Chef/owner Richard Sandoval spins regional ingredients into appealing dishes designed for sharing. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ E14

MURRAY HILL Ai Fiori– C0L572French C0L81L7 angham Place Fifth Avenue, 400 Fifth Ave., 2nd fl., btw 36th & 37th sts., 212.613.8660. aifiorinyc.com. Chef/owner Michael White serves French and Italian Riviera-inspired dishes, such as pan-seared sea scallops with smoked eggplant, olives and radishes. B & D (daily), L (M-F). $$$ F15 Café China– C0LC 94135 hinese C0L9411 8 3 E. 37th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.213.2810. cafechina nyc.com. Step back in time, through its heavy steel doors, to 1930s Shanghai at this vintage-outfitted restaurant with Michelin-

starred Szechuan cuisine that includes dim sum and tea-smoked duck. L & D (daily). $$$ F15

Le Parisien Bistrot– MF ciex rench C0L51163 E. 33rd St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.889.5489. leparisiennyc.com. Comfort food for Francophiles prepared by Chef Johnathan Masse in a space with classic French charm. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ F15

ROCKEFELLER CENTER Del Frisco’s Grille– McA iex merican 50 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St. btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.762.0371. delfriscosgrille.com. This stylishly casual sister of Del Frisco’s has a more varied menu of grills and grub cooked in a wood-burning oven. The digs include a sweeping bar and a sprawling patio. $$$ G13 Rainbow Room– C0L347American 49 W. 49th St., 65th fl., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.632.5000, rainbowroom.com. The storied rooftop bar and restaurant delivers retro cuisine, live entertainment and spectacular skyline views. Call in advance for dinner schedule. Jackets required for gentlemen. Brunch (Su). $$$$ G13 The Sea Grill– C0L347Seafood Rockefeller Center, 19 W. 49th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.332.7610. patinagroup.com. Ocean fare, such as Maine lobster with housemade squid ink tagliatelle, is served in an elegant space with views of Rockefeller Center. L & D (M-Sa). $$$ G13

SOHO+NOLITA Antique Garage– C0L972M 15 editerranean C0L4 4291 1 Mercer St., btw Grand & Broome sts., 212.219.1019. antiquegaragesoho.com. Exposed brick, ornate chandeliers and mismatched wood tables define the funky yet elegant look here. Tempting mezes, salads and entrées, such as spicy beyti (ground lamb grilled on a skewer). L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ F20

PHOTO: PIZZA AT MACCHINA, CRYSTAL TAYLOR

Cafe Cluny– C0L572French C0L65284 W. 12th St., at W. 4th St., 212.255.6900. cafecluny.com. Frisée aux lardons, burrata toast and asparagus risotto with chives and pecorino cheese in airy dining rooms situated on a quiet, cobblestoned street. B & L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ H18


Aquagrill– C0L9721S 5 eafood C0L963210 Spring St., at Sixth Ave., 212.274.0505. aquagrill.com. Global offerings at this inviting restaurant include a citrusy Maine lobster salad and Casco Bay cod cakes, plus an award-winning wine list. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ G19

Coco & Cru–Australian 643 Broadway, at Bleecker St., 212.614.3170. cocoandcru.com. This café serves all-day breakfast, in addition to salads and sandwiches after noon. Try “the Aussie” burger—a burger with beets and a fried egg. Brunch & D (daily). $$ F19

THEATER DISTRICT+HELL’S KITCHEN+GARMENT DISTRICT Chez Josephine–FrenchefrF 414 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.594.1925. chezjosephine .com. A Broadway tradition since 1986, the restaurant is a tribute to 1930s Paris and singer/ actress Josephine Baker, with live music and a tantalizing menu. L (Sa-Su), D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). $$ I14 Guy Fieri’s American Kitchen & Bar– C0L97215 American C0L4812 5 20 W. 44th St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 646.532.4897. guysamerican.com. Foodie and TV personality Guy Fieri offers a diverse spin on bar favorites, such as Mongolian chicken wings and General Tso’s pork shank. L & D (daily). $$ H14

dining

Balaboosta– C0L972M 15 editerranean C0L685214 Mulberry St., btw Prince and Spring sts., 212.966.7366. balaboostanyc.com. From hummus to ceviche, flavors from the Middle East and Spain combine at this imaginative storefront. “Balaboosta” is Yiddish for “homemaker.” L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ E20

LUNCH & DINNER DAILY TIMES SQ

EMPIRE STATE

MIDTOWN W

HB BURGER

127 43 ST AT B’WAY

625 8TH AVE AT 41 ST

350 5TH AVE AT 34 ST 127 43 ST AT B’WAY

SINCE 1995

HB Burger– C0L9721A 5 merican C0L51 3249 27 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.575.5848. heartland brewery.com. Diners enjoy specialty burgers, housemade sodas, milkshakes, egg creams and “the world’s smallest hot fudge sundae.” L & D (daily). $$ H14 Heartland Brewery & Chophouse–A American C0L631 28 27 W. 43rd St., btw Broadway & Sixth Ave., 646.366.0235; 350 Fifth Ave., at 34th St., 212.563.3433; 625 Eighth Ave., at W. 41st St., 646.214.1000. heartlandbrewery.com. Handcrafted beers, housemade sodas and a hearty steakhouse menu, including free-range bison burgers. L & D (daily). $$ H14, G15, I14 Sardi’s–Continental C0L63234 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.221.8440. sardis .com. This legendary restaurant, known for its humorous celebrity caricatures, has been a staple since 1921. Dishes include jumbo lump crab cakes and grilled sirloin steak. L & D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). $$$ H14 Utsav Indian Bar & Grill– C0LI94135 ndian C0L61 379 185 Sixth Ave., entrance on W. 46th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.575.2525. utsavny.com. In a bi-level space, Chef/author Hari Nayak fuses Indian flavors with his signature New York twist. L & D (daily). $$$ G14 Zoob Zib–Thai C0L41639462 Ninth Ave., btw W. 35th & W. 36th sts., 212.971.8530. aurazoobzib.com. INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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UPPER EAST SIDE Copper Kettle Kitchen– C0LA 94135 merican 1471 Second Ave., btw E. 76th & E. 77th sts., 212.744.1100. copperkettlekitchen.com. A cozy eatery in a cabinlike dining room. Vegetarian options, such as the baby organic kale salad, join meatier plates like braised short ribs. L (W-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ E10 Daniel– C0LVegFrench C0L646 31 0 E. 65th St., btw Madison & Park aves., 212.288.0033. danielnyc.com. Chef Daniel Boulud’s contemporary take on Gallic cuisine—chorizo-wrapped monkfish tail and vodka-flambéed foie gras—is served in a regal space with neoclassical accents. Jackets required, ties preferred. D (M-Sa). $$$$ F12 Vaucluse– C0L769French 100 E. 63rd St., at Park Ave., 646.869.2300. vauclusenyc.com. French bistro fare in a stately space featuring Art Deco light fixtures and gray linen banquettes. L (M-F), D (M-Su). $$$ E12

UPPER WEST SIDE Bar Boulud– C0L9687French C0L4231900 Broadway, at W. 64th St., 212.595.0303. barboulud.com. A casual bistro with an outdoor terrace from Chef Daniel Boulud serves seasonal fare with an emphasis on signature terrines and pâtés. Plus, wines from the Burgundy and Rhône Valley regions. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ I12 Cafe Fiorello– C0LI94135 talian C0L1 5916 900 Broadway, btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.595.5330. cafefiorello .com. Antipasti selections, signature thin-crust pizzas, daily caught seafood and Roman classics are served in a wood-walled dining room across the street from Lincoln Center. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ I12 The Leopard at des Artistes–IaltI talian C0L413 1 W. 67th St., btw Central Park W. & Columbus Ave., 212.787.8767. theleopardnyc.com. Featuring influences from Sardinia, Sicily, Campania and Apulia in an elegant dining room with wood wall accents. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ I11 Macchina–IaltI talian 2758 Broadway, btw W. 107th & W. 108th sts., 212.203.9554. macchina .nyc. Though it’s set in a rustic setting embodying 1920s Little Italy, Macchina’s menu expands far beyond wood-fired pizzas. Specialties include avocado bruschetta, veal and pork meatballs, spaghetti and clams and homemade vanilla zabaglione parfait for dessert. An expansive wine list complements the Northern Italian-inspired menu. L (M-F), D (daily), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ J6 Per Se– C0LN94135Contemporary ew American C2L 10 Columbus Cir., 4th fl., at W. 60th St., 212.823.9335. perseny.com. Easily among the most exclusive restaurants in the city, this high-end venue—with sweeping views of Central Park—serves tasting menus with seasonal flair. Dress to impress, and be prepared to give your credit card a workout. Reservations required. L (F-Su), D (nightly). $$$$ I12

Sugar Factory– C0LA 94135 merican 1991 Broadway, btw W. 67th & W. 68th sts. I11; 835 Washington St., btw Little W. 12th & W. 13th sts. H20. Phone for all locations, 212.414.8700. sugarfactory.com. A carousel greets you at the newest location of this quality brasserie chain that is a magnet for celebrities and offers sweet and savory dishes, such as monster burgers, chicken paillard, chocolate martinis and King Kong Sundaes. B, L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$

dining

This Thai noodle and beer bar fuses traditional dishes with such items as Korean-style marinated beef (bulgogi). L & D (daily). $$ I15

THE OUTER BOROUGHS The Bounty– C0LA 94135 merican 131 Greenpoint Ave., at Manhattan Ave., Greenpoint, Brooklyn, 347.689.3325. thebountybrooklyn.com. Guests savor hearty seafood dishes, such as fish and chips or smoked trout spread on a baguette. D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$ BB16 Greenpoint Fish & Lobster Co.– C0LS 94135 eafood 114 Nassau Ave., at Eckford St., Greenpoint, Brooklyn, 718.349.0400. greenpointfish.com. Responsibly sourced and often local catches, plus regional beers and eat-in dishes such as Baja fish tacos with citrus-cabbage slaw. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). $$$ Sisters– C0LA 94135 merican 900 Fulton St., btw Washington & Waverly aves., Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, 347.763.2537. sistersbklyn.com. A bar/restaurant/café hybrid inside a former hardware store offers charcuterie plates, beers on tap and live music. B, L & D (daily). $$

BARS+LOUNGES The 40/40 Club C0L5896 W. 25th St., btw Broadway & Sixth Ave., 212.832.4040. the4040club.com. Jay Z’s luxurious multifloor arena-like space features dozens of flat-screen monitors, Italian marble floors and DJs spinning rap and hip-hop. M-Su 5 pm-4 am. F16 Minus5° Ice Bar C0L43N 7 ew York Hilton Midtown, 1335 Sixth Ave., btw W. 53rd & W. 54th sts., 212.757.4610. minus5experience.com. Bundle up in a parka, hat and gloves (provided), down cool cocktails and admire the hand-carved Canadian ice interior. Su-Th 11 am-midnight, F-Sa 11 am-2 am. D18 Mr. Purple HHotel Indigo, 180 Orchard St., btw Stanton & Houston sts., 212.237.1790. mrpurple nyc.com. Sip specialty concoctions in a lounge with views of Lower Manhattan. Su-Tu 11 am2 am, W 11 am-3 am, Th-Sa 11 am-4 am. D18 1 OAK C0L5896453 W. 17th St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.242.1111. 1oaknyc.com. This mega-club, whose name is an acronym for “one-of-a-kind,” offers world-renowned DJs, plenty of dancing and stadium seating. The celebrity hot spot celebates its 10th anniversary in 2017. Tu-Su 11 pm-4 am. J17 SPiN New York C0L4 9176 8 E. 23rd St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.982.8802. newyork.wearespin .com. This table-tennis club includes a lounge, shop, two bars, and a menu serving entrées and small bites. Rent tables for 30-60 minutes at a time. M-Tu 11 am-midnight, W 11 am-1 am, Th-Sa 11 am-2 am, Su 11 am-10 pm. F17

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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shops+services

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/EDITORSBLOG

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 60-62)

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1 Coveted designer clothes and bags, like this Louis Vuitton Vernis Forsyth purse, fill the resale boutique. | A Second Chance, p. 49 2 The eponymous Australian designer’s high-end streetwear for men, women and kids now has a SoHo home. | Daniel Patrick, p. 49 3 Handcrafted cashmere sweaters, like this mohair ‘Wave’ knit, are the signature of this British-made brand. | Brora, p. 49 4 This Park Avenue stalwart carries luxury home decor and gifts, including this leather watch roll case. | Scully & Scully, p. 50

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

ACCESSORIES+FOOTWEAR Emporio Armani C0L65793601 Madison Ave., btw E. 57th & E. 58th sts., 212.317.0800; and several other NYC locations. armani.com/us/emporio armani. The Italian boutique is filled with haute couture and accessories, including belts, eyewear and handbags. F12 Henri Bendel C0L4687 5 12 Fifth Ave., btw 55th & 56th sts., 212.247.1100. henribendel.com. This chic emporium of women’s accessories, gifts, bags and more offers imaginative designs and splashy colors, as well as monogramming services. F13

Liebeskind Berlin C0L487276 Lafayette St., btw Prince & E. Houston sts., 212.993.7894. usa.liebeskindberlin.com. This German line creates fashionable, yet practical, women’s accessories, including handbags, footwear and belts. E19 Mephisto C0L511 89 040 Third Ave., btw E. 61st & E. 62nd sts., 212.750.7000; and one other NYC location. mephistousa.com. This French label offers comfortable, casual and sporty footwear. E12 Smythson of Bond Street C0L95416667 Madison Ave., btw E. 60th & E. 61st sts., 212.265.4573; and several other NYC locations. smythson.com. This high-end British leather goods and stationery


APPAREL Brooklyn Industries C0L695290 Lafayette St., btw Prince & E. Houston sts., 212.219.0862; and several other NYC locations. brooklynindustries .com. At this NYC label, signature hoodies and hip bags come with a lifetime warranty. E19 Brora 1204 Madison Ave., btw E. 87th & E. 88th sts., 212.426.1101. brorausa.com. Handcrafted cashmere is the signature material for this British brand’s dresses, sweaters and coats; silk and embroidered blouses are also sold. F9 Cockpit USAC0L3285 15 W. 39th St., 12th fl., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.575.1616. cockpitusa.com. Classic American contemporary and replica clothing for all ages, inspired by military garb—including leather flight jackets made in the USA—available at the line’s showroom. By appointment only. G14 Daniel Patrick 96 Grand St., btw Mercer & Greene sts., 646.682.9934. danielpatrick.us. This eponymous Australian brand offers New York City-inspired high-end streetwear with a minimalistic and militaristic aesthetic. F20 The Fur Salon at Saks Fifth Avenue C0L312611 Fifth Ave., 2nd fl., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.940.4465. thefursalon.com. Designer coats, capes and accessories—made from exotic skins, such as python, crocodile and sable— plus restyling of fur garments. G13 Harlem Haberdashery 245 Lenox Ave., btw W. 122nd & W. 123rd sts., 646.707.0070. harlemhaber dashery.com. The retail outpost of 5001 Flavors—a custom clothing company for celebrities—offers limited-edition apparel, accessories and sneakers. G5 Paul Smith C01 L 42 Greene St., btw Prince & W. Houston sts., 646.613.3060; and one other NYC 04 he British designer location. paulsmith.co.uk. T offers sophisticated, tailored men’s apparel— suits with splashy linings, cuff links, eyewear, watches and a new loafer every season. F19 Rag & Bone C0L1 3871 1 E. 68th St., at Madison Ave., 646.517.7586; and several other NYC locations. rag-bone.com. Rooted in Kentucky but influenced by British tailoring, this designer duo creates classic yet modern collections. F11 Saint James 41 E. 78th St., btw Madison & Park aves., 646.422.1190; and one other NYC location. saintjamesboutique.com. This high-end shop carries handwoven nautical striped wool tees, canvas bags and more. F10 A Second ChanceC0L6428 1109-1111 Lexington Ave., 2nd fl., btw E. 77th & E. 78th sts., 212.744.6041; 155 Prince St., at W. Broadway, 212.673.6155. asecondchanceresale.com. The consignment shop carries gently used discounted designer bags, clothing and accessories from the likes of Chanel, Hermès and Louis Vuitton. E10, G19

Vaute 114 Stanton St., at Essex St., 917.388.3995. vautecouture.com. This specialist in outerwear offers made-in-NYC coats and apparel using recycled fabrics and vegan materials. C19

BEAUTY+HEALTH Elizabeth Arden Red Door Spa C0L7426663 Fifth Ave., btw 52nd & 53rd sts., 212.546.0200; and several other NYC locations. reddoorspas.com. The makeup master’s legacy lives on at this retreat, which offers facials, manicures, massages and hairstyling. F13 Linhart Dentistry058731 230 Park Ave., Ste. 1164, at E. 46th St., 212.682.5180. drlinhart.com. An official dentist of the Miss Universe Organization, Dr. Linhart specializes in cosmetic and restorative procedures, and offers his own Pearlinbrite™ laser tooth-whitening service. Patients can also receive treatment in a luxurious private suite. F14 Osswald 311 W. Broadway, btw Canal & Grand sts., 212.625.3111. osswaldnyc.com. With a brand that dates back to 1921, this family-owned shop boasts an array of high-end fragrances and skincare products for men and women. F20 Ouidad Salon 37 W. 57th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.888.3288. ouidad.com. For over 30 years, this salon has specialized in empowering women with curls and textured hair. G12

BOOKS Kinokuniya Bookstore C0L1 962 073 Sixth Ave., btw W. 40th & W. 41st sts., 212.869.1700. kinokuniya .com. This specialty store carries more than 150,000 books on topics related to Japanese culture, from travel to art. G15 192 Books C0L631 947 92 10th Ave., btw W. 21st & W. 22nd sts., 212.255.4022. 192books.com. A bright and orderly shop carrying many genres and rare and out-of-print books. The store also hosts readings, talks, signings and art exhibitions. J16 Rizzoli Bookstore 1133 Broadway, at W. 26th St., 212.759.2424. rizzoliusa.com. This iconic bookstore features high ceilings, dreamy Fornasetti wallpaper and dark wood shelves filled with oversize art books and novels. G16 Strand BookstoreC0L574 828 Broadway, at E. 12th St., 212.473.1452. strandbooks.com. New, used, out-of-print and rare books are in this multifloor space, which also hosts book signings. E18

DEPT. STORES+CENTERS

Bloomingdale’sC0L3294 1000 Third Ave., at E. 59th St., 212.705.2000; 504 Broadway, btw Broome & Spring sts., 212.729.5900. bloomingdales.com. A one-stop shop for couture and ready-to-wear fashions, gifts and accessories. E12, F20 Brookfield Place 230 Vesey St., at West St., 212.417.2445. brookfieldplaceny.com. This shopping center carries high-end apparel and accessories brands, along with bookstores, beauty shops and eateries. G22 Century 21C0L31295 1972 Broadway, btw W. 66th & W. 67th sts., 212.518.2121; 22 Cortlandt St., btw Broadway & Church St., 212.227.9092; and two other NYC locations. c21stores.com. Shoppers find discount apparel for men, women and kids, as well as bags, shoes and more. F22, J11 Lord & Taylor C0L964 1 24 Fifth Ave., btw 38th & 39th sts., 212.391.3344. lordandtaylor.com. Cuttingedge and classic clothing, handbags, shoes and accessories from more than 400 brands at the oldest upscale U.S. department store. G15 Macy’s Herald SquareC0L36 Broadway, at W. 34th St., 212.695.4400; Events: 212.494.4495; Puppet Theatre (large groups): 212.494.1917. macys.com. The world’s largest department store bursts with designer clothing, luggage, accessories and furniture. G15 Saks Fifth AvenueC0L362 611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.753.4000. saksfifthavenue.com. Top fashions, plus home items, handbags, shoes, jewelry, cosmetics and high-end fragrances. G13 The Shops at Columbus Circle Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle, btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.6300. theshopsatcolumbus circle.com. More than 40 stores, including Thomas Pink and L.K. Bennett, along with the Restaurant and Bar Collection. I12 Westfield World Trade Center 185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts., 212.284.9982. westfield.com. This recently opened shopping center features a stellar lineup, including John Varvatos, Kit & Ace, Roberto Coin and London Jewelers. G22

FLEA MARKETS+MARKETS Chelsea Market C0L7 67 5 Ninth Ave., btw W. 15th & W. 16th sts. 212.652.2110. chelseamarket.com. An indoor market and food court—adjacent to the High Line elevated park—that also hosts the indie designer market Artists & Fleas. J17

Barneys New YorkC0L32496 101 Seventh Ave., btw W. 16th & W. 17th sts., 212.264.6400; and several other NYC locations. barneys.com. Apparel for men and women from top designers. H17

Grand Bazaar NYC 100 10 W. 77th St., at Columbus Ave., 212.239.3025. grandbazaarnyc .org. This indoor/outdoor market offers new and antique home goods, jewelry, books, art, vintage clothing, crafts and food. Su 10 am-5:30 pm. I10

Bergdorf GoodmanC0L32749 754 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.753.7300. bergdorfgoodman.com. At this sleek store, designer clothes, accessories, cosmetics and a Chanel boutique overlooking The Plaza Hotel. G12

Hell’s Kitchen Flea Market C0L9W 71 . 39th St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.243.5343. annexmarkets .com. Clothing, collectibles, furniture, fresh produce and handmade jewelry can be found at this year-round market. Sa & Su 9 am-5 pm. I15 INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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shops+services

boutique offers personalized paper goods, as well as bags, wallets and passport covers. F12


NEW YORK’S GRANDEST SHOPPING & DINING

shops+services GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL COMPLETES YOUR VISIT TO NYC Shop and dine in the splendor of one of the most iconic buildings in the world. 65 SHOPS including Apple Store, Banana Republic, Jo Malone, M•A•C Cosmetics, TUMI, Swatch, vineyard vines 35 DINING OPTIONS including Agern, Grand Central Oyster Bar, Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, Michael Jordan’s The Steak House N.Y.C.

GIFTS+HOME Hershey’s Chocolate World C01 L51674 593 Broadway, at W. 48th St., 212.581.9100. hersheys.com/ chocolateworld. Chock-full of sweets, the shop also offers Hershey’s merchandise and unique treats, such as a five-pound chocolate bar. H14 M&M’s World New York C0L41 7891 600 Broadway, btw W. 48th & W. 49th sts., 212.295.3850. mmsworld .com. Shop for items inspired by the beloved candies, such as T-shirts, drinkware, candy dispensers and holiday gifts. H13 Moleskine C0L45263436 W. Broadway, at Prince St., 646.964.4146; and several other NYC locations. moleskine.com. The paper-goods company offers its popular pocket- and full-size notebooks, planners and journals, along with a selection of bags and travel supplies. F20 Scully & Scully C0L35 917 04 Park Ave., at W. 59th St., 212.755.2590. scullyandscully.com. Established in 1934, this shop has gifts and housewares, including Baccarat crystal, Limoges and Gien porcelain, American and English furniture, antique lamps and clocks. F12

42nd Street at Park Ave. grandcentralterminal.com

4 5 6 S 7

Starbright Floral Designs 1 510 40 W. 26th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.229.1610. starbrightnyc.com. Over 500 types of flora, including rare and unusual blossoms, as well as chocolates, gifts and event-planning. H16

JEWELRY Erica WeinerC0L476 173 Elizabeth St., btw Kenmare & Spring sts., 212.334.6383; and one other NYC location. ericaweiner.com. This NYC designer digs through New England factory warehouses to find unique charms for antique-style jewelry. E20 Lalique C0L726609 Madison Ave., btw E. 57th & E. 58th sts., 212.355.6550. lalique.com/en. Known for its exquisite crystal, this elegant boutique also offers crystalline jewelry, perfume and accessories such as silk scarves. F12 Martinique Jewelers C0L727 6 50 Seventh Ave., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.262.7600. martinique jewelers.com. This fine jeweler offers a Pandora boutique with exclusive NYC charms, Alex and Ani bangles, the Thomas Sabo collection, diamond and 18-karat gold pieces, and even watch batteries and jewelry repair. H13 Mikimoto C0L7 729 30 Fifth Ave., btw 56th & 57th sts., 212.457.4600. Shop Japanese Akoya pearls, plus white, black and golden South Sea pearls, diamonds, emeralds, sapphires and rubies. G12 Museum of Arts and Design 22 Columbus Circle, at W. 58th St. & Broadway, 212.299.7700. thestore.madmuseum.org. Reflecting the museum’s innovative exhibits, the shop offers jewelry, accessories, small sculptures, toys and home decor. I12 Tiffany & Co. C0L727 6 27 Fifth Ave., at 57th St., 212.755.8000; and two other NYC locations. tiffany.com. The famous jewelry store carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, timepieces, crystal and more—all of which come nestled in their signature robin’s-egg blue boxes. F12

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM


Wempe JewelersC0L3415 700 Fifth Ave., at 55th St., 212.397.9000. wempe.com. This official Rolex dealer also carries other brands, including Patek Philippe, Jaeger-LeCoultre and Baume & Mercier, as well as fine jewelry and precious gems. G13

shops+services

SPORTING GOODS NBA Store C0L3575 1 45 Fifth Ave., at 45th St., 212.515.6221. nba.com/nycstore. Basketballs, jerseys, gifts, sneakers and other merchandise fill this high-tech emporium of official gear. G14 Paragon Sporting Goods C0L48 317 67 Broadway, at E. 18th St., 212.255.8889. paragonsports.com. This sports mecca carries equipment and clothing from the likes of Timberland and Patagonia. F17 Reebok FitHub C0L42420 Fifth Ave., btw 37th & 38th sts., 212.395.9614; and several other NYC locations. reebok.com. The sportswear brand’s concept stores offer athletic apparel and shoes for all ages, plus in-store fitness activities. F15 Sweaty Betty 1153 Madison Ave., at E. 85th St., 212.320.9724; and several other NYC locations. sweatybetty.com. The British brand offers fashionable athleticwear—printed leggings, strappy sports bras and sweat-wicking tops. F9

Beautiful curls begin here. A sanctuary for curly hair. Our master stylists and colorists know curls like no one else.

TECH+MUSIC AC Gears C0L742969 E. 8th St., btw Broadway & University Pl., 212.375.1700. acgears.com. Innovative electronic products, such as robotic pets, solar-powered lights and selfie sticks, are sold in this Japanese gadget shop. F18

Ouidad New York  37 W. 57th St, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10019  (212) 888-3288 Mention IN New York Magazine & get 20% OFF your next service

Academy Records & CDs C0L1 4961 2 W. 18th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.242.3000. academyrecords.com. This shop is a treasure trove of rare CDs and vinyl records, in numerous genres. G17 B&H Photo, Video, Pro AudioC0L79468 420 Ninth Ave., at W. 34th St., 212.444.6615. bhphotovideo.com. Discover more than 100,000 video and audio products, including cameras, phones, tripods and lighting equipment, at this multilevel store. I15

the world’s most

TOYS+GAMES American Girl Place New YorkC0L3816 609 Fifth Ave., at 49th St., 877.247.5223. americangirl.com. Browse the popular doll collection, accessories, matching doll-and-girl apparel, books, a theater and a café. G13

luxurious fragrances

Forbidden Planet C0L69832 Broadway, btw E. 12th & E. 13th sts., 212.473.1576. fpnyc.com. A massive stock of graphic novels and comics, plus games, DVDs, anime merchandise, key chains, patches, wallets and other fun, geeky gear. F18

and skincare

kidding aroundC0L4862 60 W. 15th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.645.6337; Grand Central Terminal, E. 42nd St., at Park Ave., 212.972.8697. kiddingaround toys.com. This family-owned store specializes in toys, games, clothes and gifts. F17, F14

in New York

Linhart Dentistry has been practicing the art and science of dentistry for over 30 years in midtown Manhattan. EXPERTISE IN: † Veneers (2 days) † PearlinbriteTM Laser Whitening † Implants † Crowns

† Invisalign® † Root Canals † Periodontics † 24-Hour Emergency Care † Multilingual

LINHART DENTISTRY

The Red Caboose C0L42 967 3 W. 45th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.575.0155. theredcaboose.com. This hobby shop carries model trains (including mini subway cars), boats, cars and planes. G14 311 WEST BROADWAY, NYC WWW.OSSWALDNYC.COM

ONE-STOP DENTAL PERFECTION™ 230 Park Ave. at 46th St., Suite 1164 212.682.5180 | drlinhart.com

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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museums+attractions

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/EDITORSBLOG

2

3

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5 1 Marquesan tattoos, as interpreted by artist Ruth Marten, make their mark in “Tattooed New York,” thru April 30. | New-York Historical Society Museum & Library, p. 54 2 James Welling’s composite photograph of a picture gallery is among “The Arcades” featured at this uptown museum, March 17–Aug. 6. | The Jewish Museum, p. 53 3 Los Angeles artist Raymond Pettibon’s first major New York museum exhibition, thru April 9, displays more than 700 of his drawings. | New Museum, p. 54 4 From bean (pictured) to Colonial breakfast staple, “A Taste for Chocolate” prevails thru May 29. | Morris-Jumel Mansion, p. 54 5 “JADA 2017: An Exhibition by the Japanese Art Dealers Association” displays ceramics like this c. 1680 serving dish, March 11–13. | Ukrainian Institute of America, p. 54

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IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

MUSEUMS American Folk Art Museum C0L5482 Lincoln Sq., Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533. folkartmuseum.org. The museum focuses on works created by self-taught (as opposed to formally trained) American artists in a variety of mediums and dating from the 18th century to today. Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. I11 American Museum of Natural History C0L365Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100. amnh.org. Guests explore halls filled with full-scale dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas,

artifacts, gems and minerals (including a rare 2-foot-long jade slab), meteorites and more. The Hayden Planetarium’s immersive space show is here, too. Daily 10 am-5:45 pm. Suggested admission: $22 adults, $17 seniors/ students (with ID), $12.50 ages 2-12. I10

Brooklyn Museum C0L5948200 Eastern Pkwy., at Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org. Ancient Egyptian artifacts, photography and American art are housed in a grand Beaux Arts building. W 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-10 pm, F-Su 11 am-6 pm. Suggested admission: $16 adults, $10 seniors (62+)/students, age 19 and under free.

PHOTOS: RUTH MARTEN, “MARQUESAN HEADS,” 1977, COLLECTION OF THE ARTIST; JAMES WELLING, “MORGAN GREAT HALL,” 2014, COURTESY REGEN PROJECTS, LOS ANGELES; RAYMOND PETTIBON, “NO TITLE (AS A BOOKMAN …),” 2001, COLLECTION ALAN HERGOTT AND CURT SHEPARD; MARK CATESBY, “THE CACAO TREE,” FROM “THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE CAROLINAS, FLORIDA AND THE BAHAMA ISLANDS,” VOL. 2 APPENDIX, 1731, PRIVATE COLLECTION; SERVING DISH (SHAKUZARA) WITH THE ATTRIBUTES OF THE SEVEN GODS OF GOOD FORTUNE (TAKARAMONO), EDO PERIOD, C. 1680, COURTESY SEBASTIAN IZZARD LLC ASIAN ART

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 60-62)


Guggenheim MuseumC0L136 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St., 212.423.3500. guggenheim.org. A major architectural icon of the 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright’s spiraling landmark building houses a collection of modern and contemporary art, as well as temporary exhibitions. Su-W & F 10 am-5:45 pm, Sa 10 am-7:45 pm. $25 adults, $18 seniors (65+)/students (with ID), under 12 free, pay what you wish Sa 5:45-7:45 pm. G8 ICP Museum 250 Bowery, btw Prince & E. Houston sts., 212.857.0000. icp.org. Devoted to photography and visual culture. Tu-W, F-Su 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-9 pm. $14 adults, $12 seniors, $10 students, children 14 and under free, pay what you wish Th 6-9 pm. E19

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Cooper Hewitt 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.849.8400. cooperhewitt.org. Located in the former residence of Andrew Carnegie, this Smithsonian museum uses groundbreaking technology to create interactive exhibits on historic and contemporary design. Su-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. $18 adults, $12 seniors (65+), $9 students, under 18 free, pay what you wish Sa 6-9 pm. F9 El Museo del Barrio C0L1 415 230 Fifth Ave., at 104th St., 212.831.7272. elmuseo.org. The art and cultural heritage of the Caribbean and Latin America are celebrated at this center of Latin pride. W-Sa 11 am-6 pm, Su noon-5 pm. Suggested admission: $9 adults, $5 seniors/ students, children under 12 free. G7 Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration05 libertyellisfoundation.org. Ferry (Statue Cruises): 201.604.2800. statuecruises.com. Visitors seeking their immigrant heritage are welcomed on this historic island in New York Harbor to view exhibits, search archives and take an audio tour. Open daily. Free. Fisher Landau Center for Art C0L81538-27 30th St., btw 38th & 39th aves., Long Island City, Queens, 718.937.0727. flcart.org. The extensive private art collection of Emily Fisher Landau, which includes 20th-century and contemporary prints, paintings and sculpture from major American artists, such as Ed Ruscha, Cy Twombly and others, is housed in a converted industrial building. Th-M noon-5 pm. Free. AA11 Fraunces Tavern Museum 0316 54 Pearl St., at Broad St., 212.425.1778. frauncestavern museum.org. Built in 1719, the building showcases Revolutionary War-era manuscripts, art, memorabilia and meticulously recreated period rooms. M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. $7 adults, $4 seniors (65+)/children 6-18/students, children 5 and under free. F23

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum C0L3276Pier 86, 12th Ave., at W. 46th St., 212.245.0072. intrepid museum.org. A national historic landmark, the USS Intrepid aircraft carrier offers access to several decks featuring historic aircraft, multimedia presentations, interactive exhibits and flight simulators, plus the guided missile submarine USS Growler, the British Airways Concorde and the space shuttle Enterprise. Daily 10 am-5 pm. General admission: $26 adults, $24 seniors (65+)/college students, $19 children 5-12, children under 5, retired U.S. military and active-duty personnel free. K14 The Jewish Museum 1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St., 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org. Art and artifacts, from antiquities to folk art to broadcast media, showcase Jewish culture and identity through a contemporary lens. Sa-Tu 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm, F 11 am-4 pm. $15 adults, $12 seniors (65+), $7.50 students, under 18 and Sa free, pay what you wish Th 5-8 pm. G8 The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. metmuseum.org. Renowned for its encyclopedic collections of American, European, Oriental, Oceanic, Islamic and ancient arts. Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-9 pm. Suggested admission (which includes same-day admission to the museum’s two satellites: The Met Breuer and The Met Cloisters): $25 adults, $17 seniors (65+), $12 students, children under 12 with an adult free. G9 MoMA PS1 C0L56422-25 Jackson Ave., at 46th Ave., Long Island City, Queens, 718.784.2084. momaps1.org. Housed in what was once a public school, this affiliate of the Museum of Modern Art presents exhibits of up-and-coming artists. Restaurant and bookshop on the premises. Th-M noon-6 pm. Suggested admission: $10 adults, $5 seniors/students, children under 16 free, New York City residents free (thru Oct. 15, 2017). BB13

The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. themorgan.org. An Italian Renaissance-style palazzo, once the library of financier Pierpont Morgan, contains rare books, manuscripts, drawings, prints and other treasures. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. $20 adults, $13 seniors (65+)/students/ages 13-16, under 12 with adult and F 7-9 pm free. F15 Museum of American Finance C0L5848 Wall St., at William St., 212.908.4110. moaf.org. Permanent galleries and several special-focus temporary exhibitions in the former headquarters of the Bank of New York chronicle the creation of the nation’s financial structure and encourage visitors to learn more about their own financial lives. Tu-Sa 10 am-4 pm. $8 adults, $5 seniors/ students, children under 6 free. F23 Museum of Arts and DesignC0L36 2 Columbus Circle, btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.299.7777. madmuseum.org. The transformation of materials into expressive objects is explored at this center for arts and crafts. Tu-W, Sa-Su 10 am-6 pm, Th-F 10 am-9 pm. $16 adults, $14 seniors, $12 students, children under 18 free, pay what you wish Th 6-9 pm. F13 The Museum of Modern Art 11 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. moma.org. World-renowned modern and contemporary works, including masterpieces of sculpture, drawing, painting, photography and film, are in the permanent collection. M-Th, Sa-Su 10:30 am-5:30 pm, F 10:30 am-8 pm. $25 adults, $18 seniors (65+), $14 students, children under 16 and F 4-8 pm free. G13 Museum of the City of New YorkC0L5914 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. mcny.org. NYC is on display in paintings, photographs and artifacts. The new permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” is a three-gallery, high-tech look at the city’s 400-year history. Daily 10 am-6 pm. Suggested admission: $14 adults, $10 seniors/ students, under 19 free. F7 Museum of the Moving Image C0L52913 4 6-01 35th Ave., at 37th St., Astoria, Queens, 718.777.6888. movingimage.us. The art, history, technique and technology of film, television and digital media are explored through exhibitions, programs and the nation’s largest permanent collection of moving-image artifacts. W-Th 10:30 am-2 pm, F 10:30 am-8 pm, Sa-Su 11:30 am-7 pm. $15 adults, $11 seniors (65+)/students, $7 ages 3-17, children under 3 and F 4-8 pm free. AA10 National Museum of the American Indian C0L561 2 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700. nmai.si.edu. A branch of the Smithsonian Institution, this museum promotes Native American history, culture and arts. Su-W, F-Sa 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. F23 National September 11 Memorial & MuseumC0L415879 Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.312.8800. 911memorial.org. The memorial features INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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museums+attractions museums+attractions

The Frick Collection 1 E. 70th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.288.0700. frick.org. Paintings by old masters are on display in the former home of industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $22 adults, $17 seniors (65+), $12 students, pay what you wish Su 11 am-1 pm. Children under 10 are not admitted. G11


museums+attractions waterfalls set within the footprints of the Twin Towers, which were destroyed in terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Memorial: Daily 7:30 am-9 pm. Free. Museum: Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6 pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). Museum admission: $24 adults, $18 seniors (65+), U.S. veterans, college students, $15 children 7-17, children under 6 and Tu 5-8 pm free. G22

Neue Galerie New York C0L1 457 048 Fifth Ave., at 86th St., 212.628.6200. neuegalerie.org. The elegant town-house museum is dedicated to 20th-century German and Austrian fine and decorative art and design by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Otto Dix and others. Th-M 11 am-6 pm. $20 adults, $15 seniors (65+), $10 students, first F of the month 6-8 pm free. Children under 12 not admitted, children 12-16 must be accompanied by an adult. G9 New Museum C0L57235 Bowery, btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. newmuseum.org. Cutting-edge art in various mediums by U.S. and international artists. Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. $18 adults, $15 seniors (65+), $12 students, under 18 free, pay what you wish Th 7-9 pm. D20 New-York Historical Society Museum & Library C0L51 8 70 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. nyhistory.org. This cultural institution features objects and works of art focused on the rich history of New York. Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $20 adults, $15 seniors/educators/ active military, $12 students, $6 children 5-13, children under 4 free, pay what you wish F 6-8 pm. I10 9/11 Tribute Center C0L941 12 20 Liberty St., btw Greenwich St. & Trinity Pl., 866.737.1184. tributewtc.org. Recovered objects, photographs, oral stories, films and personal effects displayed in the museum’s galleries offer visitors the chance to pay their respects to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, NYC terrorist attacks. M-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 10 am-5 pm. Gallery admission: $15 adults, $10 seniors/ students/military, $5 children 8-12. Gallery admission and guided walking tour of the 9/11 Memorial: $25 adults/seniors/students/ military, $10 children 8-12. Tours, which last approximately one hour and 15 minutes and are in English, are led by survivors, family members, rescue and recovery workers, volunteers and local residents of Lower Manhattan who experienced 9/11. Tours: Su-Th 11 am, noon, 1, 2 & 3 pm, F 10:30 & 11 am, noon, 1, 2 & 3 pm, Sa 10:30 & 11 am, noon, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2 & 3 pm. G22 The Noguchi Museum C0L589 7 -01 33rd Rd., at Vernon Blvd., Long Island City, Queens, 718.204.7088. noguchi.org. The former studio of Japanese sculptor and set designer Isamu Noguchi now houses permanent and traveling exhibitions, as well as an outdoor sculpture garden. W-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-6 pm. $10 adults, $5 seniors (65+)/students, children under 12 and first F of the month free. A10 Rubin Museum of Art C0L1 4957 50 W. 17th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.620.5000. rmanyc.org. Paintings, textiles and more from the Himalayas and surrounding regions. M & Th 11 am-5 pm, W

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11 am-9 pm, F 11 am-10 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-6 pm. $15 adults, $10 seniors (65+)/students, children under 12 free. First M of the month free for seniors; F 6-10 pm free for all. H17

The Studio Museum in Harlem C0L561 8 44 W. 125th St., btw Malcolm X & Adam Clayton Powell Jr. blvds., 212.864.4500. studiomuseum.org. Dedicated to local, national and international artists of African descent. Th-F noon-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. $7 adults, $3 seniors/students, children under 12 and Su free. H4 Tenement Museum C0LV 516 isitor center: 103 Orchard St., btw Broome & Delancey sts., 212.982.8420. tenement.org. Turn-of-the-20thcentury immigrant life on the Lower East Side is illustrated on guided tours of preserved tenement apartments. Daily 10 am-6 pm (last tour 5 pm). $25 adults, $20 seniors (65+)/ students, children under 6 not admitted. C20 Ukrainian Institute of America 2 E. 79th St., at Fifth Ave., 212.288.8660. ukrainianinstitute.org. Housed in the imposing turn-of-the-last-century Fletcher-Sinclair mansion on Fifth Avenue’s Museum Mile, the cultural institution promotes the art, music and literature of the Ukraine through exhibitions, concerts, screenings and children’s programs. Tu-Su noon-6 pm. Suggested admission: $8 adults, $6 seniors, $4 students. F10 Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., 212.570.3600. whitney.org. More than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000 square feet of outdoor exhibition space are devoted to American art and artists. M, W-Th, Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F-Sa 10:30 am-10 pm. $25 adults, $18 seniors (65+)/students, children under 18 free, pay what you wish F 7-10 pm. I18

ATTRACTIONS Bronx Zoo C0L5312300 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.220.1500. bronxzoo.com. The largest urban zoo in the United States provides natural habitats and environments for its approximately 4,000 species, including snow leopards, lemurs and Western lowland gorillas. Daily 10 am-4:30 pm. “Total Experience” tickets: $24.95 adults, $22.95 seniors (65+), $17.95 ages 3-12, under 2 free. The Edgar Allan Poe Cottage C0L312 5 640 Grand Concourse, at E. Kingsbridge Rd., Bronx, 718.881.8900. bronxhistoricalsociety.org/ poe-cottage. Built in 1812, this tiny wooden farmhouse is where poet Edgar Allan Poe lived during the final years of his life, 1846–1849. Th-F 10 am-3 pm, Sa 10 am-4 pm, Su 1-5 pm. $5 adults, $3 seniors/students/children. Empire State Building ExperienceC0L3487 350 Fifth Ave., btw 33rd & 34th sts., 212.736.3100. esbnyc .com. Views of New York City and beyond from the 86th- and 102nd-floor indoor and outdoor observatories. Daily 8 am-2 am. Main deck (86th floor) admission: $34 adults, $31 seniors (62+), $27 children 6-12, children under 5 free. Main & top decks (86th floor & 102nd floor) admission: $54 adults, $51 seniors (62+), $47 children 6-12, children under 5 free. G15

Exhibitionism: The Rolling Stones Industria, 775 Washington St., btw W. 12th & Jane sts., 800.653.8000. stonesexhibitionism.com. (Thru March 12) The immersive exhibit devoted to the rock ’n’ roll band is a six-decade retrospective, featuring items from the group’s private archive and including instruments, clothes, handwritten song lyrics and album art. Su-W 10 am-6 pm (last entry 4:30 pm), F-Sa 10 am-9 pm (last entry 7:30 pm). M-Th: $32 all tickets; F-Su: $39 adults, $36.50 seniors (65+)/students/military, $30 children 6-17, under 6 free. I18 The High Line C0L568G 1 ansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th & 12th aves., 212.500.6035. thehighline.org. The 1.45-mile-long elevated park and promenade, reclaimed from derelict railway tracks, offers views of the skyline, plus gardens and art displays. Daily 7 am-7 pm. Free. J15-J18 Morris-Jumel Mansion C0L5465 Jumel Terrace, btw W. 160th & W. 162nd sts., 212.923.8008. morrisjumel.org. Built by British Col. Roger Morris in 1765, this Palladian-style house was used as Gen. George Washington’s headquarters in 1776; today, its rooms are furnished to recreate different periods in the mansion’s storied history. Tu-F 10 am-4 pm, Sa & Su 10 am-5 pm. $10 adults, $8 seniors/students, children under 12 free. New York Botanical Garden C0L48572900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.817.8700. nybg.org. Miles of lush gardens and walking trails offer an escape from the city. Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. All-garden pass (grounds plus exhibitions): M-F $20 adults, $18 seniors (65+)/students, $8 children ages 2-12, children under 2 free. Sa-Su: $30 adults, $28 seniors (65+)/students, $18 children ages 2-12, children under 2 free. Free grounds admission all day W and Sa 9-10 am. One World Observatory One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776. oneworldobservatory.com. The indoor observatory is located on the 100th, 101st and 102nd floors of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere—1,250 feet above street level. Dining options available, plus a gift shop. Daily 9 am-8 pm (last ticket sold at 7:15 pm). $34 adults, $32 seniors (65+), $28 children 6-12, children 5 and under free. G22 Statue of Liberty libertyellisfoundation.org. The copper-clad neoclassical statue in New York Harbor, a gift from France to the United States, is a symbol of freedom and democracy. Open daily. Free. Statue Cruises (201.604.2800. statuecruises.com) operates a ferry to Liberty and Ellis islands. Top of the Rock C30 0L57 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.698.2000. topofthe rocknyc.com. Open 365 days a year, the observation deck at the top of Rockefeller Center welcomes visitors with panoramic vistas of the city some 70 floors above the ground. Daily 8 am-midnight (last elevator ascends at 11:15 pm). $34 adults, $32 seniors (62+), $28 children 6-12. The “Sun & Stars” combination ticket allows visitors to enjoy Top of the Rock twice in one day: $49 adults, $43 children 6-12. G13


neighborhoods

A SNAPSHOT OF THE MAJOR MANHATTAN COMMUNITIES 19

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1 FINANCIAL DISTRICT The southernmost tip of Manhattan. The economic hub of the nation is now the city’s newest hot ’hood, and includes One World Observatory as well as high-end shopping, museums and dining options.

2 TRIBECA North of Vesey St., south of Canal St. & west of Centre St. Cobblestoned streets that were once lined with 19th-century warehouses in the TRIangle BElow CAnal St. are now home to trendy shops, cafés, galleries and lounges.

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3 CHINATOWN North of Frankfort St., south of Canal St., east of Centre St. & west of Eldridge & Rutgers sts. Along these narrow streets and teeming boulevards are markets, eateries and shops selling everything from jade to birds’ nests.

4 SOHO North of Canal St., south of Houston

PHOTO: SKYLINE, ©MARC JACKSON/GETTY IMAGES

and chess players in Washington Square Park, as well as clubs, coffeehouses, shops and restaurants.

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8 MEATPACKING DISTRICT North of Gan-

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sevoort St., south of 14th St. & west of Ninth Ave. This area is at the cutting edge of cool, with a roster of chic eateries, boutiques, galleries and the home of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

9 CHELSEA West of Sixth Ave., north of W. 14th & south of W. 24th sts., & west of Eighth Ave., north of W. 24th & south of W. 34th sts. A thriving contemporary art scene has enriched this waterfront area with art galleries found between garages and in lofts. In addition, gay residents have created a sense of real community here. 10 FLATIRON DISTRICT North of 14th St.,

St. & west of Centre & Lafayette sts. The hip area located SOuth of HOuston St. has cast-iron buildings, bistros, trendy bars and lounges, cutting-edge fashion boutiques and name-brand chain stores.

south of 24th St., east of Sixth Ave. & west of Park Ave. So. The area’s core is the 22-story building at 23rd St. and Fifth Ave., dubbed the Flatiron, due to its triangular shape. Highlights include acclaimed eateries and nightspots.

5 LITTLE ITALY North of Canal St., south of

11 GRAMERCY PARK East of Park Ave. So.,

Houston St., east of Centre St. & west of Eldridge St. The colorful streets, such as Mulberry, are where in-the-know Italian-food lovers go for homestyle pasta and cannoli.

north of E. 14th & south of E. 23rd sts., & east of Fifth Ave., north of E. 23rd & south of E. 30th sts. This historic and exclusive area of tree-lined streets contains a wealth of shopping and dining establishments, plus the beautiful park itself.

6 LOWER EAST SIDE North of Canal St., south of Houston St. & east of Eldridge St. Visitors can head to this diverse melting pot for kosher pickles, knishes, designer clothes bargains, historic sites and sleek new eateries for hipsters. 7 GREENWICH VILLAGE North of Houston St., south of 14th St., btw the East & Hudson rivers. The Downtown neighborhood is divided in two, with each section retaining a distinct personality. The ultra-hip East Village is best known for its tiny boutiques, the Public Theater, bars and eateries. The residential West Village, famous for attracting the creative and rebellious, is home to performers

12 GARMENT DISTRICT West of Sixth Ave., east of Eighth Ave. north of W. 24th & south of W. 34th sts., & east of Ninth Ave. north of W. 34th & south of W. 42nd sts. Men’s, women’s and children’s clothes are designed and produced in this historic area of factories, wholesale shops and designer showrooms. The Fashion Walk of Fame, located on Seventh Ave., btw W. 35th & W. 41st sts., honors iconic American designers. 13 MURRAY HILL North of E. 30th St., south of E. 40th St. & east of Fifth Ave. With the Morgan Library & Museum and the Empire State Building

as two landmarks, this neighborhood also boasts the New York Public Library’s Science, Industry and Business Library and excellent dining options.

14 MIDTOWN EAST North of E. 40th St., south of E. 59th St., from the East River to Fifth Ave. Attractions include the Chrysler Building, Citigroup Center, Grand Central Terminal, New York Public Library, St. Patrick’s Cathedral and the United Nations, along with department stores, boutiques and restaurants. 15 THEATER DISTRICT North of W. 42nd St., south of W. 55th St., west of Sixth Ave. The city that never sleeps is at its most hyperactive in Times Square. Side streets are lined with the famous theaters in which Broadway plays and musicals are staged, while Hell’s Kitchen, a vibrant community, sits on the west side.

16 CENTRAL PARK North of W. 59th St. (Central Park South), south of W. 110th St. (Central Park North), west of Fifth Ave. & east of Central Park West. This verdant, 843-acre oasis provides sanctuary for birds and is a playground for humans of all ages with its zoo and walking paths. It also includes Strawberry Fields, a tribute to the late Beatle, John Lennon. 17 UPPER EAST SIDE North of E. 59th St., south of E. 110th St. & east of Fifth Ave. Along affluent Fifth Ave., the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Museum of the City of New York are three links in the Museum Mile cultural chain, while Madison Ave. is home to boutiques and galleries.

18 UPPER WEST SIDE North of W. 59th St., south of W. 110th St. & west of Central Park. Major attractions in this culturally rich and ethnically diverse area include Lincoln Center and the American Museum of Natural History, plus boutiques, gourmet shops, restaurants and bars.

19 HARLEM North of 110th St., btw the East & Hudson rivers. Known for jazz music, gorgeous architecture and elaborate churches, this neighborhood features soul-food and trendy global-fusion restaurants, stores, jazz and supper clubs, and the Studio Museum of Harlem.

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galleries+antiques

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/EDITORSBLOG

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1 1 East meets West in the first exhibition, thru March 11, to pair the abstract landscapes of Zao Wou–Ki (1920–2013) and Willem de Kooning (1904– 1997), whose “Door to the River” (above) dates from 1960. | Lévy Gorvy, p. 57 2 This mall is a one-stop shop for collectors. | The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center, this page 3 “Seams,” March 2 thru April 21, creates a dialogue between Stephanie Patton’s quilted sculptures and Jacinto Moros’ supple woodworks, like “R100” (above). | Voltz Clarke, p. 57 4 In Sydney Licht’s oneman show, thru March 25, an everyday object, such as a tissue box (above), becomes a still life. | Kathryn Markel Fine Arts, p. 57

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ANTIQUES Á La Vieille Russie C0L7 594 81 Fifth Ave., at 59th St., 212.752.1727. alvr.com. Fine European and Russian art and antiques, including icons, objets d’art, antique jewelry, Fabergé items, silver and porcelain. M-F 10 am-5:30 pm. G12 James Robinson Inc. C0L58480 Park Ave., at E. 58th St., 212.752.6166. jrobinson.com. English and Continental silver, porcelain and glass (16th-18th centuries); antique and Art Deco jewelry; handmade sterling silver flatware. M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa 10:30 am-4:30 pm. F12

Lillian Nassau C0L59220 E. 57th St., btw Second & Third aves., 212.759.6062. lilliannassau.com. Specialist in Tiffany Studios lamps, favrile glass, favrile pottery, mosaics and desk pieces. M-F 10 am-5 pm, Sa 10:30 am-5 pm. E12 The Manhattan Art & Antiques Center C0L51 9 050 Second Ave., at E. 55th St., 212.355.4400. the-maac.com. More than 100 established galleries on three levels offer an encyclopedic selection of antiques, fine art, decorative accessories, silver and jewelry from the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. M-Sa 10:30 am-6 pm, Su noon-6 pm. E13

PHOTOS: WILLEM DE KOONING, “DOOR TO THE RIVER,” 1960, DIGITAL IMAGE ©WHITNEY MUSEUM, N.Y.; RENDERING OF THE MANHATTAN ART & ANTIQUES CENTER, COURTESY THE MANHATTAN ART & ANTIQUES CENTER; JACINTO MOROS, “R100,” 2010, COURTESY VOLTZ CLARKE; SYDNEY LICHT, “STILL LIFE WITH TISSUE BOX,” 2016, COURTESY KATHRYN MARKEL FINE ARTS

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 60-62).


ACA Galleries C0L8145529 W. 20th St., 5th fl., btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.206.8080. acagalleries.com. American paintings, drawings and sculpture from the 19th to 20th centuries from such artists as Romare Bearden, Max Weber and Reginald Marsh. Tu-Sa 10:30 am-6 pm. J17 Brooke Alexander Gallery C0L525 1 9 Wooster St., at Broome St., 212.925.4338. baeditions.com. Represents established and emerging artists and publishes the prints and multiples of such artists as Donald Judd, Jenny Holzer and Raymond Pettibon. M-F 10 am-6 pm. F20 Danziger Gallery C0L42995 Rivington St., btw Essex & Ludlow sts., 212.629.6778. danzigergallery.com. The gallery’s focus is on photography. Tu-F 11 am-6 pm, Sa noon-5 pm. D19 Kathryn Markel Fine Arts C0L643529 W. 20th St., Ste. 6W, btw 10th & 11th aves., 212.366.5368. markelfinearts.com. Abstract and contemporary paintings and works on paper from emerging and established artists, including Arden Scott and Tracey Adams. Tu-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 11 am-6 pm. J17 Lévy Gorvy C0L453909 Madison Ave., at E. 73rd St., 212.772.2004. levygorvy.com. Artists represented include Günther Uecker, Pierre Soulages and Pat Steir, as well as the estates of Yves Klein and Germaine Richier. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm. F10 Ronin Gallery C0L542425 Madison Ave., 3rd fl., at E. 49th St., 212.688.0188. Japanese prints from the 17th to the 21st centuries, as well as books, posters and netsuke (miniature wood and ivory carvings). Tu-F 11 am-6 pm, Sa 11 am-4 pm. F13 Voltz Clarke 141 E. 62nd St., 2nd fl., at Lexington Ave., 212.933.0291. voltzclarke.com. Established in 2002, the gallery seeks to introduce emerging international artists to the United States market. Artists represented include Yiorgos Kordakis, Xin-Yi and Sasha Sykes. M-F 10 am-6 pm. E12

AUCTION HOUSES Christie’s C0L5724120 Rockefeller Plz., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.636.2000. christies.com. A prestigious auctioneer of fine art and antiques since the 18th century. Highlights: March 3: Postwar and Contemporary Art. March 15: Important Chinese Art From the Fujita Museum. March 22: Handpicked: 100 Works Selected by the Saatchi Gallery. Call for viewing and sale hours. G13 Doyle New York C0L51 7431 75 E. 87th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.427.2730. doylenewyork .com. The auction house sells fine art, jewelry, furniture and more. Highlights: March 8 & 29: Doyle at Home. March 13: Asian Works of Art. Call for viewing and sale hours. E9 Phillips C0L968450 Park Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th sts., 212.940.1300. phillips.com. This well-established auction house was founded in London in 1796.

Highlights: March 8 & 10: 20th-Century and Contemporary Art. Call for viewing and sale hours. F13

galleries+antiques

ART GALLERIES

Sotheby’s C0L1 2315 334 York Ave., at E. 72nd St., 212.606.7000. sothebys.com. Fine art and collectibles. Highlights: March 14: Important Chinese Art. March 15: Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art. Call for viewing and sale hours. C8 Swann Auction Galleries C0L1 4687 04 E. 25th St., btw Lexington & Park aves., 212.254.4710. swanngal leries.com. A family-owned auction house specializing in rare and antiquarian books and works on paper. Highlights: March 9: Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books. March 30: Printed & Manuscript African Americana. Call for viewing and sale hours. F16

SPECIAL SHOWS The Affordable Art Fair New York C0L5389Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 W. 18th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.255.2003. affordableartfair .com. (March 29-April 2) This fair limits its selection to pieces (including illustrations, contemporary photographs and paintings by emerging and established artists) priced between $100 and $10,000, with more than half under $5,000. W 6-9 pm (private view), Th-F 11 am-6 pm, Sa 11 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $70 private view, $10-$18 general admission. G17 Asia Art Fair Bohemian National Hall, 321 E. 73rd St., btw First & Second aves., 212.988.1733. theasiaartfair.com. (March 14-18) More than 25 dealers from China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India, the Himalayas and the Middle East showcase fine art and objects spanning centuries and cultures. Tu 5-9 pm, W-F 11 am-7 pm, Sa 11 am-5 pm. $120 opening night, $20 general admission. D11 NADA New York Skylight Clarkson North, 572 Washington St., btw W. Houston and Clarkson sts., 212.594.0883. newartdealers.org. (March 2-5) The New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) cultivates, supports and advances new voices in contemporary art. The fair features scores of international exhibitors under one roof. Th 4-8 pm, F-Sa 11 am-7 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. $20 single day, $40 run of show. H19 SCOPE New York C0L64M 951 etropolitan Pavilion, 125 W. 18th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.268.1522. scope-art.com. (March 2-5) Sixty galleries show contemporary art by emerging global talents. Th 3-9 pm first view, F-Sa 11 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. $100-$150 first view, $25 general admission, $15 seniors/students. H17 Volta NY Pier 90, 12th Ave., at W. 50th St. ny.voltashow.com. (March 1-5) A showcase for solo art projects by emerging international artists, trendsetters and rising stars. W 7-10 pm vernissage, Th-Sa noon-8 pm, Su noon-5 pm. $25 general admission, $20 students. K13

The nation’s premier art and antiques center. Fine and vintage jewelry, antique furniture, silver, Chinese & Japanese works of art, antiquities and more.

70 plus galleries with expert dealers in every category 1050 2nd Avenue, New York NY 10022 • 212-355-4400

www.the-maac.com INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

MAAC_IN_NEW_YORK_MAY_1third_2016.indd 1

57

31/05/16 17:24


transportation+tours

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/EDITORSBLOG

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 60-62).

times vary. Check online for closed stops during the winter.

Penn Station C0L5E 213 ighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6401. amtrak.com. Subways converge with commuter rail and bus services to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail services. I15 Port Authority Bus Terminal C0L526 13 25 Eighth Ave., btw W. 40th & W. 42nd sts., 800.221.9903. panynj .gov/bus-terminals/port-authority-bus-terminal .html. Bus carriers available at this terminal include New Jersey Transit, Greyhound and ShortLine Bus. H14 Roosevelt Island Tram E. 60th St. & Second Ave., 212.832.4583. rioc.ny.gov. Purchase an MTA MetroCard and then take a tram ride to historic Roosevelt Island. Departing every seven minutes, it crosses the East River, offering unusual photo ops of Manhattan en route. A visitor center with a helpful staff is adjacent to the tram station, and buses offer transport around the island. D12

Inside this historic building (built in 1873) lies the Masonic Hall, headquarters of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New York and the Chancellor Robert R. Livingston Library and Museum. Tours offer a look at a dazzling number of rooms, along with their intricate detailing (above), including the Corinthian Room, the French Doric Room, the Gothic Room and others. Rooms can also be rented out as event spaces. | Masonic Hall, p. 59

TRANSPORTATION Amtrak C0L800.872.7245. amtrak.com. Penn Station, Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6400. Guests travel in comfort on these passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout the country. Travelers should arrive at the station at least 30 minutes before the train is scheduled to depart. I15 Carmel Car & Limousine Service C0L5234 212.666.6666. carmellimo.com. Luxury sedans (late-model Lincoln Town Cars), limos, minivans and large passenger vans are all available by the hour and for airport transportation. Commonwealth Limo C0L48 7162 00.558.5466. commonwealthlimo.com. Luxury chauffeured transportation throughout the NYC metro area offering a variety of vehicles, such as stretch limousines and executive vans that can seat up to 13 passengers. Go Airlink NYC C0L212.812.9000. 6154 goairlinkshuttle .com. Door-to-door shuttles and rides in late-model vans, SUVs and sedans to and from

58

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

JFK, LaGuardia and Newark terminals. For reservations, call 877.599.8200.

Statue Cruises C0L511 4 .877.523.9849. statuecruises .com. Ferries carry visitors to the Statue of Liberty National Monument 100 times a week. Daily departure times from Battery Park vary. Crown reserve tickets: $21 adults, $17 seniors (62+), $12 children ages 4-12. Audio tour included. F24

Grand Central Terminal C0L457E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.340.2583. grandcentralterminal.com. Trains run on the Metro-North railroad line to and from this landmark. For schedules and prices, visit mta .info/mnr. Terminal open daily 5:30 am-2 am. Stores: M-F 8 am-8 pm, Sa 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. Dining concourse: M-Sa 7 am-9 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. F14

SuperShuttle C0L511 4 .800.258.3826. supershuttle .com. Brightly-colored vans or black cars take travelers to the tri-state area’s major airports, including LaGuardia, John F. Kennedy and Newark International airports, as well as provide transportation around town. Prices and times vary.

Long Island Rail Road mta.info/lirr. Operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week (including all holidays), taking visitors from Penn Station or Jamaica, Queens, to more than 100 destinations throughout Long Island. For pricing and schedules, go online or call 511 and say “LIRR” at any time.

Big Apple Greeter C0L9b 518 igapplegreeter.org. Local volunteers highlight the ins and outs of New York City when they lead free two-to-four-hour jaunts tailored to your interests. Tours must be booked three weeks in advance. For more information, call 212.669.8159.

Metro-North Railroad C0L52 18 12.532.4900. mta .info/mnr. Trains operate daily from 4 am to 2 am, arriving and departing from Grand Central Terminal. On weekdays, peak-period trains east of the Hudson River run every 20-30 minutes, while off-peak trains run every 30-60 minutes. On weekends, trains are available on the hour.

TOURS

Carnegie Hall Tours C0L5823881 Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.903.9765. carnegiehall.org/tours. Guided tours of the world-famous performance venue are given M-Sa btw 10 am and 4 pm. $17 adults, $12 students, seniors and children under 12. H12

New Jersey Transit C0L4851 973.275.5555. njtransit .com. Trains, buses and airport connections, all with online ticketing options to various cities and towns throughout New Jersey.

Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises C0L58C 27 ruises depart from Pier 83, at W. 42nd St. & 12th Ave. For schedules, call 212.563.3200. circleline42 .com. Views of the NYC skyline and landmarks can be seen on one of these narrated sightseeing cruises. Times/prices vary. K14

New York Water Taxi C0\L5246 212.742.1969. nywatertaxi.com. Commuter taxis cruise the Hudson and East rivers daily. All-Day Access Pass: $31 adults, $19 children 3-12. Routes/

CitySights NY C0L235V 87 isitors Center: 234 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves. (inside the lobby of Madame Tussauds), 212.812.2700. citysightsny .com. Hop-on, hop-off double-decker buses allow


transportation+tours

passengers to experience Manhattan from the top (Harlem) to the bottom (Battery Park). Frequent departures daily 8 am-6 pm. Prices vary. H14

Citysightseeing Cruises New York Pier 78, 455 12th Ave., at W. 38th St., 212.445.7599. citysightseeingnewyork.com. Sightseeing cruises include a twilight sail, a skyline cruise and a hop-on, hop-off sightseeing ferry. Times/prices/ packages vary. K15 Gray Line New York C0L516Buses leave from the Gray Line New York Visitor Center, 777 Eighth Ave., btw W. 47th & W. 48th sts., 212.445.0848. newyorksightseeing.com. Sightseeing tours by bus, boat and helicopter let visitors discover NYC’s iconic sites. Prices vary. H14 Ground Zero Tour 646.801.9113. 911ground zero.com. Guided, two-hour walking tours offer a deeper understanding of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The stroll includes skip-theline access to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Daily tours at 10:30 am and 2 pm. Prices vary. G22 Harlem Gospel and Jazz Tours C0L4835690 Eighth Ave., btw W. 43rd & W. 44th sts., 212.391.0900. harlemspirituals.com. Take in Manhattan’s Harlem, tour a Baptist church and hear inspiring spirituals. Times/prices vary. I14

I ARRIVE AS RECHARGED

Like a Local Tour likealocaltours.com. Visitors sample gourmet bites and libations on strolls around some of New York’s most beloved neighborhoods. Self-guided tours and maps are also available. Times/prices/dates vary. Madison Square Garden All-Access Tour C0L64589Seventh Ave., at W. 33rd St., 212.465.6080. thegarden.com. This tour goes behind the scenes of the revamped arena, including the locker rooms. Most days 10:30 am-3 pm, but check website for varied hours. $26.95 adults, $19.95 children 12 and under. H15 Masonic Hall C0L647 589 1 W. 23rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.337.6602. nymasons.org. You are bound to be wowed by a tour of this historic space, two buildings with ornately designed rooms that were once home to prominent Freemasons. Tours are free and conducted M-F 10:30 am-2:15 pm. G16 The Ride expepriencetheride.com. Comedic hosts narrate 75-minute, interactive tours on a comfortable bus, where seats face the streets of Midtown Manhattan and Times Square. F13 Woolworth Building Lobby Tours 233 Broadway, at Park Pl., 203.966.9663. woolworth tours.com. Guided tours of this elegant building, once the tallest building in New York City, allow visitors to learn about the structure’s history and architecture. Times/dates/lengths vary. $20-$45 per person. F22

AS MY CELL PHONE.

Book a ride at SuperShuttle.com

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SEE WHERE THE TRAIN CAN TAKE YOU. VISIT AMTRAK.COM Amtrak and Acela are registered service marks of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation.

INNEWYORK.COM | MARCH 2017 | IN NEW YORK

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About Buses There are approximately 5,900 air-conditioned buses on over 300 routes. Buses stop at street corners about every three blocks. Look for signposts marked with a bus emblem and route number. Most buses operate btw 5 am and 2 am, while certain buses run 24 hours a day. Select Bus Service on First and Second aves. (btw South Ferry & E. 126th St.), as well as 34th St. (from the FDR Dr. to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center), requires riders to pay their fares prior to boarding and to enter through any of three doors. Schedules and maps are posted at stops.

About Subways There are 24 subway lines designated by either a route number or letter, serving 469 stations. Round-the-clock, air-conditioned service is provided seven days a week. Subways run every 2-5 mins. during rush hours, 10-15 mins. during the day and about every 20 mins. btw midnight and 5 am. Stops are clearly posted and subway maps are on view at stations and in every car.

Cost of Ride The base fare is $2.75 per ride, payable by MetroCard or exact change for buses (no bills or pennies); subways accept only the MetroCard. There are two kinds of MetroCards: 1) Unlimited Ride—$31/seven consecutive days and $116.50/30 consecutive days; 2) Pay-Per-Ride—Purchase a multiple-ride MetroCard and receive an 11 percent bonus, as well as free transfers from subway to bus, bus to subway or bus to bus within a two-hour period. Buy MetroCards at subway station booths and vending machines, train terminals and select stores throughout NYC. Pay for Select Bus Service with a MetroCard or coins (exact change only) at fare collection machines at designated bus stops. For assistance in English and Spanish: 718.330.1234.

Getting Around The maps indicate MTA bus and subway routes. Each line is in a different color.


sneak peek

Judith Leiber: Crafting a New York Story (thru Aug. 6), Museum of Arts and Design, madmuseum.org

18

Earth Day Event Union Square, earthdayinitiative.org

21

Art Expo (thru April 24), Pier 94 (W. 55th St. & West Side Highway), artexponewyork.com

29 1

MoCCA Arts Festival (also April 2), Metropolitan West and Ink48, societyillustrators.org

64

29

Bacon and Beer Classic (also April 30), Citi Field, baconandbeerclassic.com

10

New York Yankees 2017 season home opener vs. Tampa Bay Rays, Yankee Stadium, mlb.com

IN NEW YORK | MARCH 2017 | INNEWYORK.COM

14

Cherry Blossom Festival (also April 30), Brooklyn Botanic Garden, bbg.org

NY International Auto Show, (thru April 23) Jacob Javits Convention Center, autoshowny.com

19

Tribeca Film Festival (thru April 30), various locations, tribecafilm.com/ festival

PHOTOS: BACON AND BEER CLASSIC, CANNONBALL PRODUCTIONS; CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL AT BROOKLYN BOTANIC GARDEN, LIZ LIGON; EARTH DAY INITIATIVE, YAEL MALKA

4

APRIL’17 HIGHLIGHTS


WHITNEY

YOU CAN SEE AMERICA FROM HERE

AMERICAN ART FROM THE 20TH CENTURY TO TODAY

@whitneymuseum whitney.org Whitney Museum of American Art. Photograph © Ben Gancsos

Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort Street New York, NY


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IN New York - March 2017  

Read our cover story on Jake Gyllenhaal! Plus, NYC neighborhoods built for the traveler and the coolest art fairs to check out.

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