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NEW YORK

A MUST-SEE EXHIBITION AT LINCOLN CENTER THE INSIDERS’ GUIDE: GLOBAL HOME COOKING IN NYC

“I can pop over to Restaurant Row to get lunch or a drink with friends or my fellow actors. That makes me so happy!” —ADRIENNE WARREN

ADRIENNE WARREN

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NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 CONTENT

departments 6

SKYLINE Big happenings around town

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features 8

Simply the Best

Brian Scott Lipton interviews Adrienne Warren whose galvanic performance as rock icon Tina Turner on Broadway has her tipped for a Tony Award.

10 Taste of Home

Who doesn’t get homesick? Globe-trotter Joni Sweet asks diplomats stationed in NYC where they go to eat the comfort foods they know and love.

14 A Prince Among Men

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On the Cover What did Adrienne Warren learn from Tina Turner? See p. 8.

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts stages an exhibition on the theater world’s irreplaceable Harold Prince, and Harry Haun is our tour guide.

listings 18

ENTERTAINMENT

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DINING+DRINKING

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SHOPS+SERVICES

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MUSEUMS+ATTRACTIONS

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TRANSPORTATION+TOURS

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NYC STREET MAP SNEAK PEEK: Special dates of note in late December and early January

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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COVER PHOTO: TIFFANY NICHOLSON

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HOT HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN by Francis Lewis

(THRU JAN. 5) Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, recognized by the U.S. Congress as “a vital American cultural ambassador to the world,” returns home for its annual five-week season at New York City Center. Among the more than two dozen works presented are timely world premieres by choreographers Donald Byrd and Jamar Roberts. | alvinailey.org

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

PHOTO: KHALIA CAMPBELL OF THE ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER, ANDREW ECCLES

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NOV NOV

The balloon of Pikachu, everyone’s favorite Pokémon, makes its 19th consecutive appearance in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. The cute little monster’s not so little, though: The balloon is 29 feet wide, which translates—in New York speak—to six taxicabs placed side by side. social.macys.com/parade

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(THRU JAN. 5) The holidays just wouldn’t be the same without New York City Ballet’s presentation of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker” at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater. nycballet.com

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(THRU DEC. 22) France’s oldest Christmas market, the Marché de Noël de StrasbourgAlsace, crosses the pond to New York City’s oldest park, Bowling Green. Expect traditional food, decorations, craft stalls and music.

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PHOTOS: PIKACHU IN THE MACY’S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE, KENT MILLER STUDIOS–MACY’S INC.; TAYLOR SWIFT, JSTONE / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM; HARRY CONNICK JR., MATTHEW MURPHY; STRASBOURG-ALSACE CHRISTMAS MARKET, CHRISTOPHE URBAIN; NEW YORK CITY BALLET IN A SCENE FROM “GEORGE BALANCHINE’S THE NUTCRACKER,” PAUL KOLNIK

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Taylor Swift rings in her 30th birthday with a host of fellow pop superstars (Jonas Brothers!) at Z100’s Jingle Ball at Madison Square Garden. msg.com

(THRU DEC. 29) Harry Connick Jr.—and a 25-piece orchestra— fill Broadway’s Nederlander Theatre with the sophisticated sounds of songwriter Cole Porter. harryconnickjr.com IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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But Warren’s slow-if-steady rise to the top shot up like a rocket the second she stepped on the stage of London’s Aldwych Theatre in the spring of 2018 as the legendary rock goddess Tina Turner in the biomusical “Tina.” She received raves from the critics, who used words such as “astonishing” and “starmaking” to describe her work—and she earned a coveted Olivier Award nomination for Best Actress in a Musical. Now, after a fairly brief hiatus, Warren is once again tackling this iconic role at Broadway’s Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, shimmying and shaking through such hit songs as “Private Dancer,” “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” and “Proud Mary.” Warren spoke to IN New York about the challenges of the part, what she has personally learned from Tina Turner, why she is so happy to be finally back in New York City, and what fellow performer would “freak her out” if she came to the show.

Adrienne Warren channels Tina Turner on Broadway. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

How did you get the role of Tina? I had a very unconventional way of getting involved in the show. I was asked to be part of the first table read in 2016, but when I went to my agent’s office to pick up the script, I did not know what it was going to be. When I saw that it was “Tina,” I thought, “This will be great!” And then I asked what part they wanted me to read. I never figured it was actually Tina.

Adrienne Warren

IN JUST A DECADE onstage, 32-year-old actress Adrienne Warren has already made a major splash in the pool of musical theater. She first caught audiences’ attention portraying the role of sassy Lorrell Robinson in the 2009 touring production of “Dreamgirls,” took Broadway by storm in 2012 as high school cheerleader Danielle in the joyful “Bring It On,” and stole the spotlight in 2016’s star-studded “Shuffle Along,” earning a Tony Award nomination for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her dual roles of divalicious actress Gertrude Saunders and the more demure Florence Mills. 8

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

Once you got the part—which I hear Tina personally picked you for—what kind of research did you do for the role? I read her autobiography, “I, Tina,” immediately, and then I watched as many YouTube videos of her as I could find. But it wasn’t so much about the research; I had to find it in myself to become the best Adrienne I could be to become the best Tina I could be. There is so much responsibility in sharing her story, both as a fan and a performer, that I literally changed my body and my voice in order to capture her energy and style. I put a lot of pressure on myself, so I was very relieved when the audiences in London liked what they saw. I think when you’re onstage in a part like this, you know that if the show doesn’t work, it’s really all on you! Over the last two years, you have become friendly with Tina. What have you learned from her, both about being a performer and being a woman? First, Tina taught me there are no shortcuts as a performer. What we do is hard work, and you have to do the work.

PHOTO: ADRIENNE WARREN, TIFFANY NICHOLSON

Why would you think that? First, I idolized Tina so much as a kid, I really thought no one can play her. But I really didn’t think anyone would see me as her when I had just done “Shuffle Along,” which was set in the 1920s and used more traditional Broadway music. Eventually, I did ask someone why they wanted me, and I found out the great casting director Bernie Telsey had given them my name. He knew rock ’n’ roll was always in my blood. In fact, I was in a rock band in college, and I later toured with the Jim Steinman Band and the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. I’ve come full circle, in a way.


Second, and more important than anything else, she has taught me the importance of believing in yourself, especially when no one else is there for you. She always says you have to find something to push you onto the path you want to take, and then you take it, and then you remember that there is no obstacle you can’t overcome. She has an inner strength that is so admirable; it’s why she and her music resonate so strongly after all these years. You can hear her tenacity in every breath she takes and see it in every move she makes. This show is so exhausting that you’re only doing six shows a week. In fact, I thought you might not want to do it again in New York after the London run. Did that thought ever cross your mind? I didn’t ever think I wouldn’t do it, but I wasn’t sure my body would make it. It was particularly hard for me in London, because I didn’t have my family or personal support system nearby. But now I feel ready to do it again. And I feel really grateful to have the opportunity. How much does it mean to you now that you’re back in New York City? I’ve loved this city my entire life. I grew up in Virginia, and I first came to visit when I was 10. We saw Heather Headley in “The Lion King” (she was the original Nala), and I told my mom during the show, “This is what I want to do.” I don’t think she was thrilled. But I did everything I could to be able to come here and then get to Broadway, including going to Marymount Manhattan College. Of course, that said, I never thought it would lead to playing Tina!

PHOTO : ADRIENNE WARREN IN “TINA: THE TINA TURNER MUSICAL,” MANUEL HARLAN, 2018

Other than your “support system,” what did you miss most about New York during your time in London? Honestly, I really missed having my Broadway community around. Our theaters are so close together here, which isn’t true over there. I barely saw anyone in London. I felt very isolated. Now, I can just pop over to Restaurant Row, which has a lot of my favorite places, to get lunch or a drink with friends or my fellow actors. That makes me so happy! You had a lot of celebrity visitors in London, including the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Oprah Winfrey and Benedict Cumberbatch, to name a few. Whom do you most want to come see the show here? I’d really love the Obamas to come. And then there’s Beyoncé, although I don’t think I could actually go onstage if I knew she was in the audience! Knowing she was there would just freak me out. So how do you top playing Tina Turner? I don’t think you do. Artistically, this show is probably the most fulfilled I will ever be in musical theater, and that’s OK! But there are other things I want to do. I want to produce; I want to create work for other artists; and when I come back onstage, I think I’d like to do it in a play. Don’t worry, I’m not going to retire. All I can do is just keep moving forward.

Adrienne Warren as Tina Turner IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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Taste of Home Comfort foods from around the world—right here in NYC.

PHOTO : TKKTK

By Joni Sweet

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM


PHOTO, OPPOSITE PAGE: ©ZURIJETA/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM. PHOTO, THIS PAGE, © AFRICA STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

THERE’S NO PLACE like home for the holidays. Maybe it’s the decorated store windows, or a familiar song belted by a busking saxophonist, or the way snowflakes dance down to the sidewalk, but there’s something about New York City this time of year that makes locals and visitors alike feel homesick. Where can we find the comfort of home in the Big Apple?

makes you feel like you’ve been transported to [a German] town’s oldest café with familiar sights, sounds and, most importantly, smells,” he says. “It’s the perfect spot on a cold winter night when you need a bit of German gemütlichkeit [good cheer] or coziness.” Another place that banishes homesickness for Gill is Zum Schneider in Alphabet City. “Zum Schneider has a year-round biergarten vibe, especially when a soccer game is on the big screen,” he says. “All of the waiters speak German. There’s no better way to feel at home than when you’re speaking your mother tongue and eating your favorite foods.”

To find out, we consulted some bona fide experts on homesickness—foreign diplomats. They spend years away from home, running the consulates in NYC. Like many travelers, these officials have learned that familiar flavors are often the fastest cure for homesickness. And lucky for them (and us!), this vibrant city has restaurants serving cuisines from every corner of the world. Diplomats have scoured all five boroughs to find the best versions of comfort food from their homelands. Here’s where they dine for a taste of home.

AUSTRALIA

GERMANY When German Consul General David Gill hankers after food from home, he heads to the Upper East Side’s Heidelberg, one of the oldest family-run German restaurants in the United States. “It has a classic German atmosphere that

Alastair J.M. Walton, Australian consul general, may not be able to find the open spaces and beaches that he misses in Australia here in New York, but he’s pinpointed a few places in the city to nosh on Down Under grub. “You only have to visit NoLIta, which has been dubbed ‘Little Australia,’ to get your Aussie fix,” he says. “It’s incredible seeing the likes of Two Hands, Charley St, Bluestone Bowery Café, Ruby’s Cafe, Gran Tivoli and Good Thanks taking over the area.” Nothing beats an Aussie breakfast, and for that, Walton heads to Banter in Greenwich Village. “I also visit Chinese Tuxedo for its Australian-Asian fusion [cooking],” he says. “Lastly, we can’t forget about The Australian Bar and Restaurant in Midtown—the iconic goto when you want a parma [chicken Parmesan] or meat pie paired with live Australian sport.” IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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Barbecue is a big deal in Brazil, according to Marco Antonio Nakata, the country’s deputy consul general in New York. Servers cut a staggering array of beef tableside, and diners can also hit the buffet for salads, sides and fixins. For the most genuine Brazilian barbecue experience here, Nakata makes a reservation at Fogo de Chão, across from the Museum of Modern Art. “When I’m there, I feel that I’m in a steak house in Brazil,” he says. “It has the right atmosphere and interior design.” But when Nakata craves something lighter (say, Brazil’s beloved cheese bread snack, pão de queijo), he pops into Padoca, a Brazilian bakery on the Upper East Side. And when he’s looking for Brazilian home cooking (and the warm hospitality of his motherland), he chooses Casa in the West Village. “Casa uses decorations from Brazil. The furniture, the color of the walls and everything reminds me of a traditional Brazilian home,” he says. Plus, the chef there prepares Brazil’s national dish, feijoada, a black bean stew that might just be the ultimate comfort food for Brazilian expats.

INDONESIA Most Indonesian immigrants to New York have made Queens their home, which is exactly why Annisa Tyas Purwanti, Indonesia’s consul for consular affairs, heads to this diverse borough when she yearns for the country’s spicy fried foods.

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“We’re a nation of foodies, and food is the lifeblood of every social gathering or life event,” she says. “Don’t be surprised that each Indonesian has their own strongly championed favorite dish or vendor.” This Indonesian’s favorites include Awang Kitchen, Asian Taste 86 Halal Indonesian Fusion and Upi Jaya. “From Awang Kitchen my go to-is always the crispy fried duck or chicken, with green chili sambal. It’s Indonesian-style fried chicken, so it’s been marinated and steamed with spices and then fried,” says Purwanti. “From Asian Taste 86, I love the grilled fish and the steamed fish dumplings and veggies with peanut sauce,” she continues. “And from Upi Jaya, [I get] Indonesia’s most iconic dishes, beef rendang and saté padang.”

JAPAN Sushi, tempura, ramen and even okonomiyaki—Japanese foods are everywhere in New York. So which spots serve authentic Japanese cuisine? “Sakagura and Jukai,” says Yusuke Mizoroki, consul of the economic division at the Consulate General of Japan, referring to two restaurants in Midtown East. “I find these restaurants are really cozy [and] a good way to feel Japan itself.” He typically orders seafood dishes and washes them down with complementary sake when he’s feeling homesick. But it’s not just the cuisine that makes him feel at home—it’s the hospitality, especially the ritual of the oshibori [wet towel] offered to diners to clean their hands before the meal.

PHOTO: ©MARCELO_KRELLING/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

BRAZIL


ESTONIA Estonian cuisine is rooted in its famous black rye bread. Known as leib, the hearty bread is served at most meals with cultured butter. The simplicity of the crispy crust and fermented flavor is deeply satisfying. When Kairi Künka, Estonian consul general, longs for leib (or home in general), she heads to Estonian House, a cultural center with a bar and restaurant in Murray Hill. “First and foremost, it’s the people [at Estonian House who] give you a taste of home. [But] it also provides the most popular staples of Estonian cuisine,” she says. In December, Künka looks forward to trying the holiday specialties at the restaurant. “The Christmas menu with sauerkraut, blood sausage and potatoes is a family favorite,” she adds.

PORTUGAL When Portuguese Consul General Maria de Fátima Mendes, a self-proclaimed “sweet tooth,” longs for a pastel de nata, a traditional Portuguese egg custard tart, in New York, she turns to Joey Bats Café on Allen Street. “The pastel de nata is Joe’s mother’s recipe, and it’s delicious and crusty,” she says. But when the diplomat finds herself missing the savory side of Portuguese cuisine, she’s found a few restaurants in New York with top-notch menus. “For dinner, Aldea by Chef George Mendes creates haute cuisine from original Portuguese recipes, with an innovative approach,” she says of the upscale restaurant that has earned a Michelin star for traditional dishes like arroz de pato (rice with duck) and shrimp with corn porridge. Mendes also recommends Taberna 97, a tavern that offers Portuguese-style tapas. Diners can choose from small, flavorpacked plates like smoked firewater-grilled sausage, jumbo shrimp sautéed with garlic and white wine, and cod fritters.

MEXICO In the six years Carlos Gerardo Izzo, Mexican consul for public affairs, has been posted in New York City, he’s had a chance to try a lot of the city’s Mexican restaurants. “The first thing I think of when I’m homesick is tacos. So I go to Taco Mix in East Harlem. It’s really rustic, and it has tacos al pastor, made like a gyro,” he says. “I also like La Chula, in the heart of Spanish Harlem, where the trays are made of tin.” When he wants a more elaborate Mexican meal, Cosme is his restaurant of choice. The sleek spot in the Flatiron District earned the highest ranking among U.S. restaurants on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list this year. And finally, when he wants a fun, unfussy place to sip margaritas and crunch on chips and guac after a day at the consulate, he grabs a seat at the bar at La Pulperia, a Latin fusion restaurant on the Upper East Side. “La Pulperia has the best margaritas and sangria,” he says. “But it’s not the food that reminds me most of Mexico—it’s the warmth of the Mexican people working there. Food is just the excuse.”

Aldea 31 W. 17th St. 212.675.7223 aldearestaurant.com

Gran Tivoli 406 Broome St. 917.714.8832 grantivoli.com

Asian Taste 86 Halal Indonesian Fusion 8610 Whitney Ave. Elmhurst, Queens 718.779.8686 asiantaste86.com

Heidelberg 1648 Second Ave. 212.628.2332 heidelberg-nyc.com

The Australian Bar and Restaurant 20 W. 38th St. 212.869.8601 theaustraliannyc.com Awang Kitchen 8405 Queens Blvd. Elmhurst, Queens 347.492.9264 awangkitchennyc.com Banter 643 Hudson St. No phone banternyc.com

Joey Bats Café 129 Allen St. 212.519.2289 joeybatscafe.com Jukai 237 E. 53rd St. 212.588.9788 jukainyc.com La Chula 137 E. 116th St. 646.590.3975 lachulanyc.com La Pulperia 1626 Second Ave. 212.933.0757 pulperianyc.com

Bluestone Bowery Café 19 Kenmare St. 718.374.6858 bluestonelane.com

Padoca Bakery 359 E. 68th St. 212.300.4543 padocabakery.com

Casa 72 Bedford St. 212.366.9410 casarestaurant.com

Ruby’s Cafe 219 Mulberry St. 212.925.5755 rubyscafe.com

Charley St 41 Kenmare St. 646.982.4951 charleysst.com

Sakagura 211 E. 43rd St. 212.953.7253 sakagura.com

Chinese Tuxedo 5 Doyers St. 646.895.9301 chinesetuxedo.com

Taberna 97 97 St. Marks Pl. 212.477.5600 taberna97.com

Cosme 35 E. 21st St. 212.913.9659 cosmenyc.com

Taco Mix 234 E. 116th St. 212.289.2963 tacomixnewyork.com

Estonian House 243 E. 34th St. 212.684.0336 estonianhouse newyork.com

Two Hands 164 Mott St. No phone twohandsnyc.com

Fogo de Chão 40 W. 53rd St. 212.969.9980 fogodechao.com

Upi Jaya 76-04 Woodside Ave. Elmhurst, Queens 718.458.1807 No website

Good Thanks 131 Orchard St. No phone goodthanksnyc.com

Zum Schneider 107 Ave. C 212.598.1098 nyc.zumschneider.com


A

A major new exhibition turns the spotlight on Broadway’s most protean talent, the late Harold Prince. By Harry Haun YEAR IN AND YEAR OUT, theater-savvy visitors to New York routinely pounce on the same 13 blocks of magical real estate called Broadway. That’s all well and good, but now and through the end of March, they’ll want to cast a wider net—one that stretches north 13 more blocks to The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center, where a free and fascinating exhibit is currently in full sway. It’s titled “In the Company of Harold Prince: Broadway Producer, Director, Collaborator.”

The exhibition opens with a replica of Prince’s office.

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PHOTO, THIS PAGE: REPLICA OF HAROLD PRINCE’S OFFICE, JONATHAN BLANC/THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY. PHOTOS, OPPOSITE PAGE: VAN WILLIAMS, BILLY ROSE THEATRE DIVISION, THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

AMONG MEN


The young Hal Prince—everybody called him Hal, referencing Shakespeare’s Prince Hal—at work.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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Prince was all of those things—in spades! He produced the original productions of “Damn Yankees” (1955), “West Side Story” (1957), “Fiorello!” (1959), “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” (1962), “Fiddler on the Roof” (1964) and “Zorba” (1968). He directed “She Loves Me” (1963), “Company” (1970), “Follies” (1971), “Sweeney Todd” (1979), “Show Boat” (1994), “Parade” (1998) and his “current hit”—still running majestically after 32 years (and counting) at Broadway’s Majestic Theatre— “The Phantom of the Opera” (1988). Some of these he produced with his left hand and directed with his right. His collaborations were so profound and transformative on shows like “Cabaret” (1966), “Pacific Overtures” (1976) and “Evita” (1979), he was as much of an auteur as the people who wrote them. In one capacity or another, Prince brought 59 shows to town, and they brought him 21 Tonys—eight for directing, eight for producing the year’s Best Musical, two as Best Producer of a Musical and three special awards. Put them all together, and that makes him the all-time Tony Award champ. Bashful but practical, he feared that, once this awesome, untouchable total got out, he would never win another—and he didn’t. But, in short, it’s no exaggeration to say that, for 60-plus years, Hal Prince was Broadway. Doug Reside, curator for the library’s Billy Rose Theatre Division, threw this elaborate installation together in three

Win some, lose some: Harold Prince’s Broadway roulette wheel.

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

years’ time. It helped being a lifelong fan of Prince’s work and having The Great Man on hand to run things by him. Prince was pleased with the library’s work and expected the exhibition to be exciting and theatrical. But it’s the one opening he didn’t make. He died on July 31, 2019, at age 91, 50 days before it opened. In the artifice assembled—miniature sets, original costumes, and archival video and audio of Prince’s work—Reside strives to show how Prince encouraged and inspired designers, actors, composers and writers, unifying all in a common goal. “He talked about how he realized the need to be present with his collaborators,” Reside recalls. “For ‘Kiss of the Spider Woman’ in 1995, [composer and lyricist] John Kander and Fred Ebb rewrote several numbers, as one does during the process. I think just having him there to respond to the work was really important to them, as it was with all of his collaborators. He would give very, very detailed notes—not just to writers but also to the actors and designers. He was always very, very interested in design.” For example, Prince asked scenic designer Boris Aronson to present set models for “Company,” “A Little Night Music” (1973) and “Pacific Overtures” first so Stephen Sondheim and the various librettists would have an idea of how to proceed with the music and story. “I was fascinated to see the first meeting for a show always [began] with them looking at set models, often before the score was complete or even written,” says Reside. “Hal had a visual approach to directing.” But Broadway, whether you’re a director or a producer, is a gamble. Ruth Mitchell, Prince’s associate producer, reminded him of it when she gave him a roulette wheel of his show titles. It’s the exhibition’s centerpiece. In 1948, Prince bolted out of the University of Pennsylvania, full of energy and with letters of recommendation that

The dress Patti LuPone wore in “Evita” is on display.


PHOTOS, OPPOSITE PAGE: EXHIBITION DISPLAYS, JONATHAN BLANC/THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY. PHOTO, THIS PAGE: “THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA,” MATTHEW MURPHY

“The Phantom of the Opera” is the longest-running show in Broadway history.

eventually got him a job in the theater—first as an assistant stage manager for “Tickets, Please!” and “Call Me Madam” in 1950, then three years later as a full-time stage manager on “Wonderful Town” and finally as co-producer of “The Pajama Game” in 1954. The rest, as they say, is history. Richard Bissell’s 1953 novel “Say, Darling” about turning another of his novels, “7½ Cents,” into “The Pajama Game” became an Abe Burrows/Jule Styne 1958 play with music, also titled “Say, Darling,” and Prince became a character in it—a hotshot young producer, daftly dispatched by actor Robert Morse. “Initially, Hal may have been a bit offended by it,” says Reside, “but he came to realize it was fun, and he thought it might be nice to have [an Al] Hirschfeld caricature of the character in the exhibition.” The first stop on this exhibit is a replica of the office Prince shared with his first co-producer, Robert Griffith. On the door, over their names in a protective arc, are the words George Abbott. Prince couldn’t have had a better mentor than theatrical giant Abbott, but they didn’t always agree. There’s a video of Kander and Ebb and Liza Minnelli talking about how director Abbott was adamantly opposed to her as their “Flora, the Red Menace” in the 1965 musical of that name. Producer Prince sweet-talked Abbott, who ultimately embraced the idea. And a star (Minnelli) was born. As you journey through the library’s Princeland, gently wafting around in the background are lilting, surging, subliminal Sondheim sounds—sometimes the “Follies” pro-

logue, sometimes the “Night Waltz” from “A Little Night Music.” On personal loan from actress Patti LuPone is a floral print dress she wore in “Evita.” Exhibition designer Caitlin Whittington, who positioned the myriad of props within the gallery and says it’s the largest number of artifacts the library has attempted, found a place of prominence for the boat that the Phantom uses to negotiate the underground Paris sewers. Variations of it have played all the key capitals of the world, but this particular one is docked in the library from a freshly wrapped Australian production. After an interview spanning his whole career, Prince phoned me with a crucial postscript. He wanted to make sure “The Phantom of the Opera” didn’t get short shrift in my article. “It’s the show that made all of this possible,” he said. On the day of his death, and for several weeks thereafter, the Majestic Theatre’s marquee had a commemorative red rose resting under its iconic white mask logo. As long as the Phantom roams the catacombs of the globe, the legacy of Harold Prince lives on. “In the Company of Harold Prince,” New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza, at Columbus Ave. & W. 65th St., nypl.org/locations/lpa “The Phantom of the Opera,” Majestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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entertainment FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

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The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 38-39).

1 New Yorker Kyle Driggs is known as a juggling jackof-all-trades. | Big Apple Circus, p. 26 2 Ben Vereen is “Steppin’ Out” this Thanksgiving at this Midtown club. | The Cutting Room, p. 23 3 Ballet Hispánico, the nation’s premier Latino dance company, stages three works by female, Latinx choreographers. | Apollo Theater, p. 24 4 Iconic folk singer/songwriter Judy Collins is coming to the end of her yearlong residency at this Downtown venue. | Joe’s Pub, p. 23 5 Swiss mime troupe Mummenschanz uses oversized props and masks to tell wordless stories. | New Victory Theater, p. 22

BROADWAY OPENINGS A Christmas Carol Lyceum Theatre, 149 W. 45th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200.

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achristmascarolbroadway.com. (Previews began Nov. 7, opens Nov. 20, closes Jan. 5) (2 hrs 15 mins) Tony Award-winning playwright Jack Thorne’s new interpretation of the Charles Dickens classic about transformation and redemption stars Campbell Scott as Ebenezer Scrooge. G9

Harry Connick Jr.—A Celebration of Cole Porter Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. harrycon nickjr.com. (Previews begin Dec. 7, opens Dec. 12, closes Dec. 29) Backed by a 25-piece orchestra, the vocalist/pianist/arranger/ orchestrator/conductor pays tribute to the sophisticated composer and witty lyricist of Broadway shows and Hollywood films. G10

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

The Inheritance Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 243 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. theinheritanceplay.com. (Previews began Sept. 27, opens Nov. 17) (Part I: 3 hrs 15 mins; Part 2: 3 hrs 20 mins) Matthew Lopez’s epic two-part play, a hit in London’s West End where it won the Olivier and Evening Standard awards for Best New Play, is set in 21st-century New York, where three generations of gay men search for a community of their own and a place to call home. G9 Jagged Little Pill Broadhurst Theatre, 235 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. jaggedlittlepill.com. (Previews began Nov. 3, opens Dec. 5) (2 hrs 30 mins) The new musical uses the songs and themes

PHOTOS: KYLE DRIGGS, COURTESY BIG APPLE CIRCUS; BEN VEREEN, ISAK TINER; BALLET HISPANICO, RACHEL NEVILLE; JUDY COLLINS, BRAD TRENT; MUMMENSCHANZ, MARCO HARTMAN, COURTESY MUMMENSCHANZ FOUNDATION

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explored in Alanis Morissette’s 1995 album of the same name to tell the story of an apparently picture-perfect suburban family. The book by Academy Award winner Diablo Cody delves beneath the surface, as the family falls apart and confronts the truth about themselves, their community and the world they live in. G9

West Side Story Broadway Theatre, 1681 Broadway, btw W. 52nd & W. 53rd sts., 212.239.6200. westsidestorybway.com. (Previews begin Dec. 10, opens Feb. 6) Tony-winning director Ivo van Hove, choreographer Teresa de Keersmaeker and designer Jan Versweyveld radically reinterpret the landmark musical by Leonard Bernstein (music), Stephen Sondheim (lyrics) and Arthur Laurents (book). G9

BROADWAY Ain’t Too Proud—The Life and Times of The Temptations Imperial Theatre, 249 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. ainttooproudmusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The musical captures the R&B group’s dance moves, harmonies and personal stories. G9

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Aladdin C0L46N 7 ew Amsterdam Theatre, 214 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 866.870.2717. aladdinthemusical.com. (2 hrs 20 mins) The musical comedy is an exotic magic carpet ride, filled with romance, special effects and songs from Disney’s 1992 animated feature. G9 Beetlejuice Winter Garden Theatre, 1634 Broadway, btw W. 50th & W. 51st sts., 212.239.6200. beetlejuicebroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The musical is based on the 1988 film about a demented, rambunctious ghost named Beetlejuice. G9 Betrayal Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, 242 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. betrayalonbroadway.com. (Closes Dec. 8) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) Tom Hiddleston, Zawe Ashton and Charlie Cox star in the revival of Harold Pinter’s play about a seven-year extramarital affair and the marriage it destroys, told in reverse chronological order. G9 The Book of Mormon C0L97231Eugene O’Neill Theatre, 230 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. bookofmormonthemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Two Mormon boys are on a mission to save souls in Africa in the irreverent, politically incorrect Tony Award-winning musical comedy. G9 Chicago Ambassador Theatre, 219 W. 49th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. chicagothemusical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) In the 1997 Tony Award-winning revival of the vaudeville musical, two alluring jailbirds named Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly attain stardom while singing about sex and corruption. G9 Come From Away Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 236 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. comefromaway.com. (1 hr 40 mins, no intermission) On Sept. 11, 2001, 38 commercial airplanes were diverted to Gander,

COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein Directed by Christopher Ashley

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY OF THE SMALL TOWN THAT WELCOMED THE WORLD

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entertainment Newfoundland; when the 6,579 passengers landed, they found themselves stranded in a small town with a population half their size. How they adjusted to a changed world on Sept. 12 is the basis of the upbeat musical. G9

David Byrne’s American Utopia Hudson Theatre, 141 W. 44th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 855.801.5876. americanutopiabroadway .com. (1 hr 40 mins, no intermission) The theatrical concert includes songs from pop/ rocker Byrne’s 2018 album of the same name, as well as songs from Talking Heads and his solo career. Byrne performs with an ensemble of 11 musicians from around the globe. G9 Dear Evan Hansen Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. dearevanhansen.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) A socially awkward high-school senior goes from outsider to cool guy when he comforts the parents of a troubled teenager who has committed suicide in the Tony Award-winning musical. G9 Derren Brown: Secret Cort Theatre, 138 W. 48th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. derrenbrownsecret.com. (Closes Jan. 4) (2 hrs 30 mins) Two-time Olivier Award winner Derren Brown puts his individual spin on mind reading, persuasion and psychological illusion. G9 Freestyle Love Supreme Booth Theatre, 222 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. freestylelovesupreme.com. (Closes Jan. 5) (1 hr 25 mins, no intermission) Hip-hop, improvisation, music and vocal stylings make up the fast-paced evening in which the cast takes suggestions from the audience and turns them into instantaneous songs, riffs and fully realized musical numbers. G9 Frozen St. James Theatre, 246 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. frozenthe musical.com. (2 hrs 15 mins) Disney’s 2013 Academy Award-winning animated film is now a full-length stage work, featuring the original songs, plus new songs and story material. G9

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Lyric Theatre, 214 W. 43rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. harrypottertheplay.com. (Part One, 2 hrs 40 mins; Part Two, 2 hrs 35 mins) Harry Potter is a grown-up with children of his own in this eighth story in the Harry Potter series. “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” is one play presented in two parts. G9 The Height of the Storm Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. manhattantheatreclub.com. (Closes Nov. 24) (1 hr 20 mins, no intermission) André, a celebrated writer, and Madeleine, his wife of 50 years—played by Jonathan Pryce and Eileen Atkins—are in the inevitable twilight of their lives, dealing with dementia, loss and fractious parent-children relationships. G9 The Illusionists—Magic of the Holidays Neil Simon Theatre, 250 W. 52nd St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. theillusionistslive.com. (Nov. 29-Jan. 5) (2 hrs; family matinees: 1 hr 30 mins) The high-energy spectacle, featuring seven international magicians and mentalists, returns for its fifth holiday season. G9 Kristin Chenoweth: For the Girls Nederlander Theatre, 208 W. 41st St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 877.250.2929. officialkristinchenoweth.com. (Nov. 8-17) The Tony Award winner returns to Broadway with a solo concert: a tribute to the women who have influenced her, including Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Dolly Parton. G10 The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical Longacre Theatre, 220 W. 48th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. lightning thiefmusical.com. (Closes Jan. 5) (2 hrs 5 mins) Adapted from the novel by Rick Riordan, the rock musical follows a present-day teen—a son of the Greek god Poseidon—on his mission to find Zeus’ lightning bolt and prevent a war between the gods. G9

The Lion King C0L41896Minskoff Theatre, 200 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 866.870.2717. lionking .com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Theatergoers sing along at the hit stage version of Disney’s beloved animated The Great Society Vivian Beaumont Theater at movie, enjoying songs by Elton John, as well as Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & spectacular masks and dazzling puppets. Winner Amsterdam Ave., 212.239.6200. greatsociety of the 1998 Tony Award for Best Musical. G9 broadway.com. (Closes Nov. 30) (2 hrs 45 mins) Mean Girls August Wilson Theatre, 245 W. 52nd Robert Schenkkan’s companion piece to his St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. Tony Award-winning Best Play, “All the Way,” meangirlsonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Newbie depicts the conclusion of Lyndon B. Johnson’s Cady Heron is taken up by her high school’s most turbulent term as president of the United States. Emmy Award winner Brian Cox stars as elite clique, The Plastics, but is this the pink pack she really wants to hang with in the musical with the controversial 36th president. I7 a book by Tina Fey? G9 Hadestown Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th Moulin Rouge! The Musical Al Hirschfeld St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. hadestown.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Anaïs Mitchell’s Theatre, 302 W. 45th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., musical is an epic interpretation of two classic 877.250.2929. moulinrougemusical.com. (2 hrs 35 love stories: that of Orpheus and Eurydice; and mins) The musical spectacle celebrates truth, that of Hades and his wife, Persephone. Winner beauty, freedom and love in Belle Époque Paris. The greatest-hits score runs the gamut from of the 2019 Tony Award for Best Musical. G9 Georges Bizet to Edith Piaf to Lady Gaga. H9 Hamilton Richard Rodgers Theatre, 226 W. 46th Oklahoma! Circle in the Square Theatre, 235 W. St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. 50th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. hamiltonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) Expect oklahomabroadway.com. (Closes Jan. 5) (2 hrs 45 the unexpected when America’s past is told through the hip-hop sounds of today in the Tony mins) Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1943 musical is Award- and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical about reinvented for the 21st century in an intimate and immersive production. G9 political mastermind Alexander Hamilton. G9

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The Phantom of the Opera C0L64M 187 ajestic Theatre, 247 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. phantombroadway.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) Broadway’s longest-running show tells the tragic story of a disfigured composer who falls in love with a young soprano. G9 The Rose Tattoo American Airlines Theatre, 227 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.719.1300. roundabouttheatre.org. (Closes Dec. 8) (2 hrs 15 mins) The Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of Tennessee Williams’ Tony Award-winning Best Play of 1951 stars Marisa Tomei as Serafina, a grieving widow who finds love and passion again. G9 Slava’s Snowshow Stephen Sondheim Theatre, 124 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.6200. slavaonbroadway.com. (Closes Jan. 5) (1 hr 40 mins) Using pantomime and special effects, the immersive, familyfriendly thrill ride is set in an absurd and surrealistic world, where the audience is enveloped in a spider web, theatergoers bounce balloons on their fingertips and a never-to-be forgotten snowstorm brings the adventure to an end. G9 Slave Play John Golden Theatre, 252 W. 45th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. slaveplaybroadway.com. (Closes Jan. 19) (2 hrs, no intermission) Jeremy O. Harris’ play, set in the Old South on the MacGregor Plantation, explores race, sex and power. The play contains nudity, sexual content, violence and racially violent language, and is recommended for ages 17 and over. G9 The Sound Inside Studio 54, 254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. soundinsidebroadway.com. (Closes Jan. 12) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) A tenured professor of creative writing at an Ivy League university (Mary-Louise Parker) and a talented student (Will Hochman) —both introverted and isolated—meet and connect as their lives spiral out of control in Adam Rapp’s play. G8 Tina: The Tina Turner Musical Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, 205 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. tinaonbroadway.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) The story of the Queen of Rock ’n’ Roll who broke and rewrote every rule in the book—defying age, gender and race along the way—is told through the music that made her an international sensation. G9 To Kill a Mockingbird Shubert Theatre, 225 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.239.6200. tokillamockingbirdbroadway.com. (2 hrs 35 mins) Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prizewinning novel has been adapted for the stage. Ed Harris stars as Atticus Finch. G9 Tootsie Marquis Theatre, 210 W. 46th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. tootsiemu sical.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The 2019 Tony Award-winning musical comedy is based on the 1982 movie of the same name and stars Santino Fontana in the title role. G9 Waitress Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. waitressthemusical.com. (Closes Jan. 5) (2 hrs 30 mins) A waitress in a diner, with a talent for


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Wicked C0L418Gershwin Theatre, 222 W. 51st St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 877.250.2929. wickedthe musical.com. (2 hrs 45 mins) This hit musical— now in its 17th year—imagines Oz as a land of strife, where a young, green-hued girl is branded the Wicked Witch of the West. G9

OFF-BROADWAY+BEYOND Blue Man Group C0L4186Astor Place Theatre, 434 Lafayette St., btw E. 4th St. & Astor Pl., 800.258.3626. blueman.com. (1 hr 45 mins, no intermission) The show features a trio of bald blue life-forms utilizing high-energy music, props, splatters of paint, comedy and pantomime as it stretches the limits of performance art. E13 David Kwong’s The Enigmatist The High Line Hotel, 180 10th Ave., btw W. 20th & W. 21st sts. enigmatistshow.com. (Closes Jan. 11) (1 hr 30 mins) Reality and fiction blur, as magician and crossword creator David Kwong presents an entertaining evening of puzzles, cryptology and illusions. I12

–Peter Marks,

Harry Townsend’s Last Stand New York City Center Stage II, 131 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. HarryTownsends LastStand.com. (Previews begin Nov. 14, opens Dec. 4, closes Feb. 9) A concerned son pays a potentially life-changing visit to his father, an 85-year-old widower living alone in rural Vermont. Tony Award winner Len Cariou and Craig Bierko star as father and son in George Eastman’s new comedy. G8 Jersey Boys New World Stages, Stage 1, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. jerseyboysnewyork.com. (2 hrs 30 mins) The behind-the-scenes story of pop sensations Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons includes the group’s greatest hits, such as “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Walk Like a Man” and “Oh What a Night.’ H9 Judgment Day Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Ave., btw E. 66th & E. 67th sts., 212.933.5812. armoryonpark.org. (Dec. 5-Jan. 11) A stationmaster is caught between guilt and self-protection when a train crash under his watch results in 18 casualties. Ödön von Horváth’s 1937 play,

Music Box Theatre, 239 W. 45th St. • DearEvanHansen.com

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Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation The Triad, 158 W. 72nd St., btw Columbus Ave. & Broadway, 212.279.4200. forbiddenbroad way.com. (1 hr 30 mins) The all-new edition of the musical spoof by Gerard Alessandrini lampoons such current Broadway hits as “Moulin Rouge,” “Beetlejuice,” “Tootsie,” “Dear Evan Hansen” and stars including Billy Porter, Ben Platt, Bette Midler and others. H6

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Fiddler on the Roof in Yiddish Stage 42, 422 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.239.6200. fiddlernyc.com. (Closes Jan. 5) (3 hrs) The Yiddish language adaptation of the 1965 Tony Award-winning musical about dairyman Tevye, his family and their traditional community in pre-revolutionary Russia is performed with English and Russian supertitles. H10

ONE OF THE MOST REMARKABLE SHOWS IN MUSICAL THEATER HISTORY.


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Start your trip in NYC. End it in OZ.

newly adapted by Christopher Shinn, is often seen as an allegory for the indoctrination of Nazi ideology. E7

Little Shop of Horrors Westside Theatre Upstairs, 407 W. 43rd St.,, btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.239.6200. littleshopnyc.com. (Closes Jan. 19) (2 hrs 15 mins) The horror/comedy/rock musical—about a nerdy fl orist, the love of his life and a voracious human-eating plant— returns to its Off-Broadway roots in an intimate revival. Jonathan Groff, Tammy Blanchard and Christian Borle star. H9

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New Victory Theater C0L4189209 W. 42nd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 646.223.3010. newvic tory.org. New York’s oldest active theater presents entertainment appropriate for young people and families. Highlights: Nov. 15-17, 22-24, 29-Dec. 1: Mummenschanz: “Re:Play.” Dec. 6-7, 13-15: Mechanics’ “42FT—A Menagerie of Mechanical Marvels.” G9 The Play That Goes Wrong New World Stages, Stage 4, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. broadwaygoeswrong .com. (2 hrs) Everything that could comically go wrong does when a college drama society puts on a 1920s murder mystery. H9 Rock of Ages New World Stages, Stage 3, 340 W. 50th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.239.6200. rockofagesmusical.com. (Closes Jan. 12) (2 hrs 15 mins) Rock ballads and power anthems from the 1980s— including “I Wanna Know What Love Is,” “Don’t Stop Believin’” and more—propel the action and love story. H9

GERSHWIN THEATRE, 222 W. 51st St. WickedtheMusical.com T:4.625”

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Print/Export Time 7-2-2019 4:32 PM Visual Artist Bo Krucik Previous Artist Garrett Doll

Signature Theatre C0L5213P 7 ershing Square Signature Center, 480 W. 42nd St., btw Ninth & 10th aves., 212.244.7529. signaturetheatre.org. The Page #1 Signature Theatre Company presents new plays and revivals in its state-of-the-art, Frank Gehry-designed Inks multistage venue. Thru Dec. 8: Approvals “Fires in the Mirror” by Anna Deavere Smith. Cyan CD Jay Magenta CW None Nov. 5-Dec. 15: “The Young Man From Atlanta” Yellow AD Peter Black H10 by Horton Foote. Studio Garrett Acct Kelly / Anna Proofrd Joe F. Sleep Prod Heather

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O MAJESTIC THEATRE | 247 West 44 th St. Telecharge.com | 212.239.6200 | phantombroadway.com

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No More C0L4T 59 he McKittrick Hotel, 530 W. NYC Skyline Wicked Black 27th St., btw 10th 11th aves., 866.811.4111. Wicked& Green Sky Darken sleepnomorenyc.com. (up to 3 hrs) In this immersive, interactive theater piece, maskwearing audiences wander at will and at their own pace through a 100,000-square-foot environment—an abandoned 1930s luxury hotel—eavesdropping on scenes and characters that conjure up Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” I11 Print Ad Slug

Stomp C0L94O 1 rpheum Theatre, 126 Second Ave., at E. 8th St., 800.982.2787. stomponline.com. (1 hr 45 mins, no intermission) In a dazzling percussive performance, the cast conjures rhythm out of brooms, dustbins, hubcaps and more. D13 Yeti, Set, Snow! Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre in Central Park, enter the park at W. 81st St. & Central Park W., 212.988.9093. cityparks foundation.org/arts/swedish-cottage-marionettetheatre. (Nov. 12-Feb. 23) (45 mins) In this musical puppet show for the family, Pascetti, a yeti who lives on a mountaintop, dislikes the snow. But when he meets Widget and her friend, Twig, he discovers that snow can be fun and friends are invaluable. G5


entertainment CABARETS+COMEDY CLUBS Café Carlyle C0L9431The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel New York, 35 E. 76th St., at Madison Ave., 212.744.1600. cafecarlylenewyork.com. One of the swankiest supper clubs in town, Café Carlyle features original murals by Marcel Vertès. Highlights: Nov. 5-9, 12-16: John Pizzarelli and Jessica Molaskey. Nov. 18-23, 26-27, 29-30: Herb Alpert and Lani Hall. Dec. 3-7, 10-14: Steve Tyrell. Every Monday: Woody Allen and the Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band E6

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Carolines on Broadway C0L941 318 626 Broadway, btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.757.4100. carolines .com. Nightly performances by some of the nation’s hottest headliners and up-and-coming comics. Nov. 14-17: D.L. Hughley. Nov. 21-23: Ron Funches. Dec. 5-8: Justin Willman. Dec. 12-14: Jim Norton. G9 The Cutting Room C0L419644 E. 32nd St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.691.1900. thecuttingroomnyc .com. The nightclub, with a bar in the shape of a guitar, is known for its mix of live acts, from music and comedy to burlesque. Nov. 28-30: Ben Vereen. E11 Feinstein’s/54 Below C0L52138254 W. 54th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 646.476.3551. 54below .com. The subterranean nightclub, restaurant and lounge is underneath the former Studio 54 disco. Highlights: Nov. 12-16, 18-23: Brian Stokes Mitchell. Nov. 26-30: Liz Callaway & Ann Hampton Callaway: “Broadway the Calla-way!” Dec. 3, 5-6: Linda Eder. Dec. 10-11: Sam Harris. Dec. 13-15: The 12th Annual Joe Iconis Christmas Extravaganza. G8

Featuring the 80’s songs you love: Every Rose Has Its Thorn • I Wanna Know What Love Is Here I Go Again • Don’t Stop Believin’ and more!

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RockOfAgesMusical.com

Gotham Comedy Club 208 W. 23rd St., btw Seventh & Eighth aves., 212.367.9000. gothamcomedyclub.com. Headliners and new talents are on the calendar. Highlights: Nov. 22-23: Francis Ellis. Nov. 29-30: Chris DiStefano. Dec. 6-7: Tom Papa. Dec. 13-14: Jeff Dye. Food and drink menus are available. G12 The Green Room 42 Yotel Hotel, 570 10th Ave., 4th fl., btw W. 41st & W. 42nd sts., 646.449.7790. thegreenroom42.com. The 120-seat, purplehued music club features a 21-foot stage, grand piano and a cool lineup of singer/songwriters performing Broadway classics, contemporary and original material. Small plates and cocktails served. Highlights: Nov. 17: Reeve Carney. Nov. 22: Mark William. Dec. 11: “Simply Barbra: A Christmas Show.” Dec. 13-15: Lillias White. I10 Joe’s Pub C0L9431425 Lafayette St., at Astor Pl., 212.539.8778. publictheater.org. The performance space in the Public Theater boasts an eclectic lineup. Highlights: Nov. 12-16: Bridget Everett & The Tender Moments. Nov. 18-20, 22-23, 25-27: Judy Collins: “Winter Stories,” with Jonas Fjeld and Chatham County Line. Nov. 30: Ana Gasteyer: “Sugar & Booze.” Dec. 3: An Evening with Stew & Heidi of The Negro Problem. Dec. 12-14: The Losers Lounge: Tom Jones v. Glen Campbell. E13 Pangea C0L1 9431 78 Second Ave., btw E. 11th & E. 12th sts., 212.995.0900. pangeanyc.com. The alt-cabaret lounge in an East Village seasonal Italian/Mediterranean comfort food restaurant serves up sophisticated nightclub acts. D13

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS IN NYC

or 800-982-2787 · ORPHEUM THEATRE, 2nd Ave. at 8th St. #StompNYC

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DANCE+MUSIC Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater C0L891N 6 ew York City Center, 131 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. alvinailey.org. (Dec. 4-Jan. 5) The renowned dance troupe returns for its annual fi ve-week holiday season devoted to more than two dozen diverse works by the world’s leading choreographers, including world premieres by Donald Byrd and Jamar Roberts, company premieres by Aszure Barton and Camille A. Brown, and new productions by Judith Jamison and Lar Lubovitch. G8

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Apollo Theater C0L4981253 W. 125th St., btw Adam Clayton Powell Jr. & Frederick Douglass blvds., 212.531.5300. apollotheater.org. The historic Harlem venue has launched a myriad of legendary performers, including James Brown, Ella Fitzgerald and Michael Jackson. Nov. 13, 20 & 27: Amateur Night at the Apollo. Nov. 22-23: Ballet Hispanico. Dec. 8: Double Dutch Holiday Classic. Dec. 14: Amateur Night Holiday Special. Dec. 16: Cynthia Erivo and Shoshana Bean: “Night Divine.” C5

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entertainment

Carnegie Hall C0L9541Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.247.7800. carnegiehall.org. Carnegie Hall’s 2019–2020 season is the venerable concert hall’s 129th. Highlights: Nov. 15-16: Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Riccardo Muti. Nov. 18: Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Andris Nelsons, with Leif Ove Andsnes, piano. Nov. 22: Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, with Joyce DiDonato, mezzosoprano. Nov. 25: Ninth Annual Christmas in New York. Nov. 30: Arlo Guthrie’s Last Annual Thanksgiving Concert at Carnegie Hall. Dec. 4: Pretty Yende, soprano, and James Baillieu, piano. Dec. 7: Artemis. Dec. 8: Vienna Boys Choir. Dec. Page 10: Behzod Abduraimov, piano. Dec. #1 11: Idina Menzel. Dec. 13: Lionel Loueke Trio. Dec. 15: Joyce DiDonato, mezzo-soprano, and Inks Approvals Yannick Nézet-Séguin, piano. G8 Cyan CD Jay Magenta CW None The Chase Brock Yellow Experience: “The Four AD Gerri Black 41 heatre Row, 410 W. 42nd St., btw Studio Alli Seasons” C0L95T Used Swatches Acct Jackie/Anna Ninth & 10th aves., 212.239.6200. chasebrockex Black Proofrd Joe F C=75 M=68 Y=67 K=90 (Nov. 21-Dec. 8) (1 hr, no Prod Joleneperience.com. ATP RED (0.100.97.0) ATP MAGENTA (0.100.0.0) intermission) The contemporary New York ATP ORANGE (0.75.100.0)

City-based dance company performs choreogstudio:AINT TOO PROUD:ART:TITLE:_4C:ATP_TITLE_4C_NEW-TAG.ai) rapher Chase Brock’s dance narrative, set to Rscale_CMYK_PE.ai (Studio:LOGOS:AMEX:blue-box-logo-without-registration:AXP_BlueBoxLogo_REGULARscale_CMYK_PE:print:AXP_BlueBoxLogo_REGULARscale_CMYK_PE.ai) ps (Studio:LOGOS:Airlines:American Airlines:aa_aa_®_hrz_1cs_grd_pos.eps) Vivaldi’s “Le quattro stagioni,” about an American community adapting to climate change in the not-too-distant future. H8

Christmas Spectacular Starring the Radio City Rockettes C0L49Radio City Music Hall, 1260 Print Slug St., 866.858.0007. rockettes Sixth Ave., at W.Ad50th .com/christmas. (Nov. 8-Jan. 5) (1 hr 30 mins, no intermission) This family-friendly holiday variety show features the high-kicking Rockettes, the world-famous precision dance team, who perform crowd-pleasing routines such as the “Parade of the Wooden Soldiers.” Favorite scenes include the “Living Nativity” and the “Rag Dolls” number set in Santa’s workshop. 3-D effects and enhanced projections add to the enjoyment. F9 David H. Koch Theater C0L9541Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 63rd St., 212.496.0600. davidhkochtheater.com. The home of New York City Ballet also hosts other esteemed dance

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM


entertainment companies throughout the year. Highlight: Oct. 29-Nov. 17: Paul Taylor Modern American Dance. H7

Distinguished Concerts International New York C0L5C 1 arnegie Hall, Seventh Ave., at W. 57th St., 212.247.7800. dciny.org. The creative producing entity presents diverse programs of music performed by leading musicians, the Distinguished Concerts Orchestra and Distinguished Concerts Singers International. Nov. 17: “Sing! Christmas Dreams.” Nov. 24: The Holiday Music of Eric Whitacre. Dec. 1: Messiah … Refreshed! Dec. 2: Sounds of the Season: The Holiday Music of Mark Hayes and Pepper Choplin. G8 Joyce Theater C0L1 9541 75 Eighth Ave., at W. 19th St., 212.242.0800. joyce.org. Modern and contemporary dance companies from the United States and abroad. Highlights: Nov. 13-17: Kate Wallich + The YC X Perfume Genius. Nov. 19-Dec. 1: Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca. Dec. 3-8: “And Still You Must Swing,” with tap dancers Dormeshia, Derrick K. Grant and Jason Samuels Smith. Dec. 10-15: Pam Tanowitz + Simone Dinnerstein. H12 Metropolitan Opera C0L3572Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., btw W. 63rd & W. 64th sts., 212.362.6000. metopera.org. The world-famous opera company presents its 2019–2020 season, featuring new productions as well as repertory favorites. Nov. 15, 19, 23 (matinee), 30 (evening), Dec. 4, 7 (matinee): “Akhnaten.” Nov. 16 (matinee), 20, 23 (evening), 26, 30 (matinee), Dec. 3, 7 (evening), 11, 14 (evening): “Le Nozze di Figaro.” Nov. 16 (evening), 22, 25: “Madama Butterfly.” Nov. 17 (matinee), 21: “La Bohème.” Nov. 29, Dec. 2, 5, 8 (matinee), 14 (matinee), 18, 21 (evening): “The Queen of Spades.” Dec. 13, 17, 20, 23, 28 (evening): “Der Rosenkavalier.” Dec. 15 (matinee), 19, 21 (matinee), 24, 26 (matinee), 28 (matinee): “The Magic Flute.” Dec. 27: “Wozzeck.” Dec. 31: New Year’s Eve Gala starring Anna Netrebko. H7 New York City Ballet: George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker C0L467David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 63rd St., 212.496.0600. nycballet.com. (Nov. 29-Jan. 5) Toy soldiers, sugar plum fairies and more dance their way across the stage in the holiday favorite, choreographed by George Balanchine to music by Tchaikovsky. H7 New York City Center C0L1 9541 31 W. 55th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.581.1212. nycitycenter .org. A former Shriners Temple, this performing arts venue, celebrating its 76th season, hosts music, dance and theater events. Highlight: Nov. 13-24: “Evita,” Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s rock opera. G8 New York Philharmonic C0LD 1964 avid Geffen Hall at Lincoln Center, Columbus Ave., at W. 64th St., 212.875.5656. nyphil.org. The preeminent classical-music orchestra is now under the direction of Jaap van Zweden. Concerts: Nov. 14-16: Santtu-Matias Rouvali conducts Tchaikovsky, Sibelius and Bryce Dessner. Nov. 21-23: Jakub Hrusa conducts Borodin, Dvorak and Saint-Saëns, with Alisa Weilerstein, cello. Nov. 27, 29-30, Dec. 3: Jaap van Zweden conducts Tchaikovsky and Scriabin, with Daniil INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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entertainment Trifonov, piano. Dec. 5-7: Jaap van Zweden conducts Steve Reich and Beethoven, with Yefim Bronfman, piano. Dec. 11-14: John Williams‘ score for “Harry Potter and the Sorcer’s Stone” performed live to the complete film. Dec. 15: Holiday Brass. H7

The Town Hall C0L1 96451 23 W. 43rd St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.840.2824. thetownhall.org. “The People’s Concert Hall” boasts an eclectic lineup of performers. Highlights: Nov. 16 & 23, Dec. 7 & 14: Live From Here with Chris Thile. Nov. 21: Trisha Yearwood. Nov. 22: Andrew Schulz. Nov. 29-30: Hot Tuna Electric. Dec. 1: Benjamin Grovesnor, piano. Dec. 2: Seth Rudetsky’s Broadway, starring Megan Hilty and Jessie Mueller. Dec. 4: Béla Fleck and The Flecktones. Dec. 5: Robert Earl Keen. Dec. 6: Joey Diaz. Dec. 13 & 19: Girls Gotta Eat. G10 The Yorkville Nutcracker C0LT6197 he Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College, 695 Park Ave., btw E. 68th & E. 69th sts., 212.772.4448. dancespatrelle.org. (Dec. 13-15) In this version of the Tchaikovsky ballet, performed by Dances Patrelle, the setting has been transported to New York City in 1895. Set pieces include a holiday party at Gracie Mansion, home of the city’s mayor; dancing at the Crystal Palace in the New York Botanical Garden; and ice skating in Central Park. E7

JAZZ CLUBS Birdland 315 W. 44th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.581.3080. birdlandjazz.com. “The jazz

corner of the world” is how Charlie Parker described this club. Highlights: Nov. 12-17: The Django Reinhardt Festival 20th Anniversary Celebration. Nov. 19-23: Cyrille Aimee: “A Sondheim Adventure.” Nov. 26-30: Veronica Swift with the Emmet Cohen Trio. Dec. 3-7: The Joe Lovano Nonet. Dec. 10-14: Stacey Kent. Every Monday: Jim Caruso’s Cast Party. H9

Nov. 14-16: Joe Bonamassa. Nov. 17: Sylvan Esso. Nov. 20: Il Divo. Nov. 21-22: Jerry Seinfeld. Nov. 23, 24, 26, 27, 29, 30, Dec. 2, 3, 5, 6: Bob Dylan. Dec. 10: Holiday Cheer for FUV, featuring Mavis Staples, Nathaniel Rateliff and Yola. Dec. 12: Make the Season Bright! Christmas on Broadway with David Jeremiah. Dec. 13: Jerry Seinfeld. Dec. 14: Kansas. I6

Blue Note Jazz Club 131 W. 3rd St., btw MacDougal St. & Sixth Ave., 212.475.8592. bluenote.net. The best and brightest perform here. Highlights: Nov. 14-17: Kenny Garrett. Nov. 19-24: The Stanley Clarke Band. Nov. 26-Dec. 1: John Scofield & Dave Holland Duo. Dec. 4-8: Arturo Sandoval. Dec. 9-Jan. 5: Chris Botti. F14

Madison Square Garden C0L95461Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0008. msg.com/ madison-square-garden. An entertainment and sporting venue. Highlights in the Arena: Nov. 15: Billy Joel. Nov. 19: SuperM: We are the Future Live. Dec. 3-4: Cher: Here We Go Again Tour. Dec. 11: Billy Joel. Dec. 13: Z100’s Jingle Ball, with Taylor Swift, Jonas Brothers, Camila Cabello, Halsey, 5SOS, Niall Horan, Lizzo, Dan + Shay, Monsta X, Lewis Capadi and Fletcher (lineup subject to change). Dec. 15: Mariah Carey: All I Want for Christmas Is You Tour. Highlights in the Hulu Theater: Nov. 14-17: “We Will Rock You–The Musical.” Nov. 22-23: Brockhampton: Heaven Belongs to You Tour. Nov. 30-Dec. 1: A Pentatonix Christmas Tour. Dec. 12-15, 19-23, 26-29: “‘Twas the Night Before … by Cirque du Soleil.” G11

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola C0L96418Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Cir., Broadway & W. 60th St., 212.258.9595. jazz.org/dizzys. Sleek furnishings, low lighting and talented performers define this intimate club that also boasts a stunning stage backdrop: the Manhattan skyline. Highlights: Nov. 14-17: Willie Jones III. Nov. 20-21: The RodBros. Nov. 22-24: Paula West. Nov. 26-Dec. 1: Wycliffe Gordon and the International All Stars. Dec. 5-8: Ulysses Owens Jr. Dec. 13-15: Mary Stallings. Dinner served nightly. H8 Jazz Standard C0L31 627 16 E. 27th St., btw Lexington Ave. & Park Ave. So., 212.576.2232. jazzstan dard.com. World-class artists perform classic jazz to funk, R&B, blues and more. The menu features Southern cuisine and barbecue. Highlights: Nov. 14-17: Vinicius Cantuaria sings Jobim and Joao. Nov. 19-24: Bill Frisell. Nov. 26-27, 29-Dec. 1: Maria Schneider Orchestra. Dec. 5-8: Charles McPherson Quintet. Dec. 13-15: Louis Hayes. E11 Smalls C0L371 6 83 W. 10th St., basement, at Seventh Ave. So., 646.476.4346. smallslive.com. This tiny jazz club offers at least three live acts nightly and documents all live jazz bands and jam sessions on video. G13

FRANCIS ELLIS

CHRIS DISTEFANO

Fri. Nov. 22 – Sat. Nov. 23

Fri. Nov. 29 – Sat. Nov. 30

TOM PAPA

JEFF DYE

Fri. Dec. 6 – Sat. Dec. 7

Fri. Dec. 13 – Sat. Dec. 14

Purchase tickets online at www.GothamComedyClub.com

Village Vanguard C0L1 9471 78 Seventh Ave. So., btw Perry & W. 11th sts., 212.255.4037. villagevan guard.com. Since 1935, this Greenwich Village stalwart has been one of NYC’s most prestigious jazz clubs. Highlights: Nov. 12-17: Dayna Stephens Quintet. Nov. 19-24: Javon Jackson Quartet. Nov. 26-Dec. 1: Jason Moran & The Bandwagon. Dec. 3-8: Johnathan Blake & Pentad. Dec. 10-15: Christian McBride & Inside Straight. Every Monday: Vanguard Jazz Orchestra. G13

POP/ROCK CLUBS+VENUES Barclays Center C0L46 7 20 Atlantic Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, 800.745.3000. barclayscenter .com. Brooklyn’s entertainment and sports arena. Highlights: Nov. 15-17: Disney on Ice Presents Road Trip Adventures. Nov. 19: Tool. Nov. 23: Jonas Brothers. Dec. 4: Stars & Strings (country music). Dec. 5: Not So Silent Night, featuring Mumford & Sons, Vampire Weekend, Jimmy Eat World and more. Dec. 6: Bad Bunny. Dec. 10: Dimash Qudaibergen. Dec. 12: Anuel AA. Dec. 13: D’usse Palooza. AA18 Beacon Theatre C0L2 941 124 Broadway, at W. 74th St., 866.858.0008. msg.com/beacon-theatre. Pop-music concerts and other acts. Highlights:

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

PlayStation Theater C0L7691515 Broadway, at W. 44th St., 212.930.1950. playstationtheater.com. The 2,100-capacity venue welcomes performers in all genres. Highlights: Nov. 27: Lil Tjay. Nov. 29: Fobia. Nov. 30: Immortal Technique: The Middle Passage Tour. Dec. 7: Caifanes. G9

SPECIAL EVENTS Big Apple Circus Damrosch Park, Lincoln Center, W. 62nd St., at Amsterdam Ave., 646.793.9313. bigapplecircus.com. (Thru Feb. 2) NYC’s very own intimate one-ring circus—no seat is more than 50 feet away from the action—marks its 42nd season with a new Brooklyn-born ringmaster (Storm Marrero); The Aliev Troupe aerial acrobats; a straps act; a hand balancing duo and more. H7 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade C0L6513M 4 acy’s Herald Square, W. 34th St. & Broadway, 212.494.4495. social.macys.com/parade. (Nov. 28) Almost 3 million people line the streets for the annual event, which features giant balloons, marching bands, celebrities riding on elaborate floats and performances from Broadway shows and pop sensations. The parade kicks off at 9 am at W. 77th St. & Central Park West and continues south to Columbus Circle, where it turns east onto Central Park South, marches to Sixth Ave., where it heads south to W. 34th St. and ends at noon at Macy’s Herald Square. G15 Winter’s Eve at Lincoln Square C0L3574Dante Park, Broadway, at W. 63rd St., 212.581.3774. winterseve.nyc. (Dec. 2) New York City’s largest outdoor holiday festival salutes the season when it transforms Broadway, between The Shops at Columbus Circle and W. 70th St., into a family-friendly winter wonderland, featuring live musical entertainment, dancing, in-store activities, ice sculpting, food tastings, a tree-lighting ceremony and more. 5:30-9 pm—rain, snow or shine. H8–I7


dining+drinking FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

PHOTOS: FOOD AT BUMU, ANDREW BUI; TY BAR, COURTESY FOUR SEASONS HOTEL NEW YORK; MARTINEZ COCKTAIL AT DANTE, STEVE FREIHORN; JOHN SLOVER, NOAH FECKS; GRAIN BOWL AT ASSET RESTAURANT, COURTESY ASSET RESTAURANT

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The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 38-39).

1 Yaki skewers are a specialty at this new Japanese restaurant, whose name translated into English means “boom.” | Bumu, this page 2 The soaring Art Deco-inspired hotel cocktail lounge boasts plush banquettes and a roaring fireplace. | Ty Bar, p. 29 3 The Our Martinez martini helped earn this Village mainstay the title World’s Best Bar at the World’s 50 Best Bars 2019 Awards. | Dante, this page 4 Sommelier John Slover has deepened the restaurant’s wine offerings from the Loire, Rhône, Arbois and Savoie regions. | Dirty French, this page 5 The New American menu features house-made pastas, simplygrilled mains and hearty bowls. | Asset, p. 29

New York City Restaurant Prices Prices in the five boroughs vary wildly, from inexpensive pizza and burger joints to high-ticket temples of haute cuisine. To get a sense of price points for a particular eatery, we suggest you visit the restaurant’s website.

DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN Bâtard—Contemporary European C0L4589239 West Broadway, at N. Moore St., 212.219.2777. batard tribeca.com. This Michelin-star TriBeCa stalwart serves Modern European cuisine and 800 international wines in a relaxed setting with warm lighting and cozy banquettes. D (M-Sa). F15 Bumu—Japanese 61 W. 8th St., at Sixth Ave., 212.505.2610. bumunyc.com. Chef Joaquin

Baka’s izakaya-inspired menu offers raw items, yakitori, and hearty entrées, complemented by natural wines and beer and sake from Japan as well as independent local New York producers. D (nightly). F13

Canal Street Oysters—Seafood 380 Canal St., at West Broadway, 646.448.4447. canalstreet oysters.com. The handsome American oyster bar serves an extensive mollusk selection, as well as raw bar items (scallops, whelks and Jonah crab), and fresh and cooked dishes, such as scallop crudo, cod bahn mi and squid ink paella. D (nightly). F15 Carbone—Italian 181 Thompson St., btw Houston & Bleecker sts., 212.254.3000. carbonenewyork.com. The posh but unpretentious Greenwich Village ristorante with a retro backroom features classic red-sauce Italian fare (linguine vongole, veal Parmesan, lobster fra diavolo) and is frequented by celebrities. L (Tu-Su), D (nightly). F14 Chumley’s—Gastropub 86 Bedford St., btw Barrow & Grove sts., 212.675.2081. chumleys newyork.com. Originally opened in 1922 as a Prohibition-era speakeasy, this storied American resto on a charming West Village street serves classic fare (beef pie, chili, burgers) behind a covert green door. D (M-Sa), Brunch (Su). G14

Craft—American C0L4 179 3 E. 19th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, 212.780.0880. craftrestaurant .com. Celebrated James Beard Award-winning chef and TV personality Tom Colicchio’s flagship restaurant in the Flatiron District uses seasonal ingredients to create family-style dishes. L (M-F), D (nightly). E12 Dante—Italian C0L4167 58 9-81 MacDougal St., btw W. Houston & Bleecker sts., 212.982.5275. dante-nyc .com. The original Caffè Dante was open for 100 years; today’s iteration maintains its Italian roots while embracing global ingredients. Check out Negroni Sessions from 3 to 6 pm, featuring a dozen permutations of the classic cocktail. Brunch & D (daily). F14 Dirty French—French The Ludlow Hotel, 180 Ludlow St., btw Stanton & E. Houston sts., 212.254.3000. dirtyfrench.com. Bold flavors enrich timeless bistro favorites in this spacious and atmospheric wood-filled space with iron chandeliers and vaulted ceilings. B (daily), L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). C14 Gramercy Tavern—American 42 E. 20th St., btw Park Ave. So. & Broadway, 212.477.0777. gramercytavern.com. Guests experience the comfort of a late-19th-century American inn at this ever-popular restaurant in the Flatiron District. This is a non-tipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L & D (daily). E12

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dining+drinking Katz’s Delicatessen—Jewish-American 205 E. Houston St., at Ludlow St., 212.254.2246. katzsdelicatessen.com. This iconic spot on the Lower East Side has been serving pastrami, corned beef, knishes, house-made pickles and other classics since 1888; open around the clock F-Su. Tickets are given for purchase and seating; don’t lose them! B, L & D (daily). D14 Le Club New York—French 85 10th Ave., btw W. 15th & W. 16th sts., 212.488.8886. leclub-newyork.com. Evocative of a sophisticated hotel bar, this new addition to the Meatpacking District serves a French-inspired small-bites menu divided into four sections: Garden, Sea, Land and Sweet & Cheese. The beverage program features large-format cocktails and a weekly daiquiri special, while the wine list is old-world. D (Tu-Sa). I12 Nobu Downtown—Japanese–Peruvian 0L4181 27 95 Broadway, btw Vesey & Fulton sts., 212.219.0500. noburestaurants.com. Celebrated dishes on Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s menu include yellowtail with jalapeño and black cod with miso. The restaurant has been designed by David Rockwell with theatrical flair. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). E17 Pastis—French 52 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & Washington sts., 212.929.4844. pastisnyc.com. One of the restaurants that helped put the Meatpacking District on the culinary destination map is back: bigger and more of a magnet that ever. The decor is classic—a curved zinc bar, subway tiles, vintage mirrors listing daily specials—while the menu adheres to favorites such as steak frites, roasted half chicken, beef bourguignon and more. B, L & D (M-F), Brunch & D (Sa-Su). H13 Seamore’s—Seafood 390 Broome St., at Mulberry St., 212.730.6005; and several other NYC locations. seamores.com. Seamore’s serves fresh, locally caught and sustainable seafood in simple preparations. Tacos, filled with either crispy or seared fish, are a specialty. L & D (daily), Brunch (Sa-Su). D15 Union Square Cafe—American 0L1 41 01 E. 19th St., at Park Ave. So.,, 212.243.4020. unionsquare cafe.com. Restaurateur Danny Meyer’s hot spot is known for such classics as ricotta gnocchi, roasted monkfish and Berkshire pork chop. Since 1985, Union Square has been treasured for its effortless, friendly service. This is a non-tipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L (M-F) D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). E12 Untitled—American 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., 212.570.3670. untitledat thewhitney.com. Seasonal American fare is served in a windowed, Renzo Piano-designed space in the Whitney Museum of American Art in the Meatpacking District. This is a nontipping restaurant; hospitality is included. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). I13 Via Carota—Italian 51 Grove St., btw Seventh Ave. So. & Bleecker St., 212.255.1962. viacarota .com. The West Village gastroteca on a tree-lined street is old-world Tuscan in ambience, food and decor. Chefs Jody Williams and Rita Sodi were jointly named Best Chef in New York City at the 2019 James Beard

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Foundation Awards. Via Carota has a no-reservations policy. L & D (daily). G13

MIDTOWN MANHATTAN Aureole—American 1 0586 Bryant Park, 135 W. 42nd St., btw Sixth Ave. & Broadway, 212.319.1660. charliepalmer.com/aureole-newyork. Chef Charlie Palmer’s flagship restaurant is a sleek haunt in Times Square with a dual personality. The dining room is white-tablecloth formal and serene, while the Liberty Room and bar area is more casual and lively. Both serve the cuisine for which Palmer is justly renowned. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). G9 Benjamin Prime 23 E. 40th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.338.0818. benjaminsteak house.com. Sister restaurant of Benjamin Steakhouse, this Midtowner serves up USDA prime steaks, seafood and more from the grill. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). E10 Benjamin Steakhouse—Steak House Dylan Hotel, 52 E. 41st St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.297.9177. benjaminsteakhouse.com. Cuts of U.S.D.A. prime steak are dry-aged on the premises at this chophouse with a clubby ambience. B, L & D (daily). E10 db Bistro Moderne—French City 06431 Club Hotel, 55 W. 44th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.391.2400. dbbistro.com. At Daniel Boulud’s Theater District restaurant, French dishes are fused with contemporary invention for specialties such as paupiette de loup de mer (potato-wrapped branzino). B (daily), L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). F9 E.A.K. Ramen Hell’s Kitchen—Japanese 360 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 646.850.8032. eakramen.com. In addition to seven kinds of signature thick-cut-noodle iekeistyle ramens, the expanded menu includes vegan and vegetarian offerings and a sake program. L & D (daily). H9 Eleven Madison Park—American 1 Madison Ave., btw E. 23rd & E. 24th sts., 212.889.0905. elevenmadisonpark.com. Seasonal, refined dishes on a customizable tasting menu are enhanced by a lengthy international wine list at this gem, which was named the greatest resto in the world by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants Organization in 2017. L (F-Su), D (nightly). E12 Felidia—Italian C0L457243 E. 58th St., btw Second & Third aves., 212.758.1479. felidia-nyc.com/. Haute fare by celebrated chef, television personality and cookbook author Lidia Bastianich and Executive Chef Fortunato Nicotra—such as filet mignon carpaccio, pasta with clams and mussels, and whole baked bass with poached vegetables—ensures the devotion of diners and critics alike. L (M-F), D (nightly). D8 Gabriel Kreuther—French 41 W. 42nd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.257.5826. gknyc.com. A warm space featuring weathered wood beams and cream banquettes sets the stage for Alsatian-inspired creations by James Beard Award winner and Michelin-starred chef Gabriel Kreuther. Prix fixe menus only, except at the bar. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). F10

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

The Grill—American The Seagram Building, 99 E. 52nd St., btw Lexington & Park aves., 212.375.9001. thegrillnewyork.com. A powerlunch mainstay of the last century has been refreshed and reinvigorated for the 21st with a firm attention to detail, service and cuisine. The elevated menu features such classics as Dover sole, whole grilled squab and prime ribs of beef, the latter spit-roasted and served tableside from a trolley. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). E9 Le Bernardin—French 155 W. 51st St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.554.1515. le-bernardin .com. Simply prepared fish dishes are offered in an elegant space by world-renowned culinary legend Eric Ripert. Consistently awarded three Michelin stars. Jackets required, ties optional. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). G9 Orso—Italian 322 W. 46th St., btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 212.489.7212. orsorestaurant.com. Established restaurateur Joe Allen pays homage to Italy with a simple, cozy decor and classic menu of crispy pizzas, savory pastas, and roasted fowl and steaks. A popular stop before or after a Broadway show. L (W, Sa & Su), D (nightly). H9 Piggyback NYC—Asian 140 W. 30th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.239.0570. pigandkhao .com/piggyback. Chef Leah Cohen’s latest venture brings a melting pot of Asian regions to North Chelsea. Specialties include Cantonese-style pan-fried red mullet fish and charcoal-smoked dry-aged ribeye with roasted bone marrow. Floor-to-ceiling movie posters of American classics in Thai decorate the walls. L & D (daily). G11 The Polo Bar—American 1 E. 55th St., at Fifth Ave., 212.207.8562. ralphlauren.com/global-polobar. The menu at this exclusive eatery (featuring a chopped vegetable salad. Loch Duart salmon and a corned beef sandwich) is inspired by stylemaker Ralph Lauren and his culinary tastes. The clubby space is filled with plaid pillows, equestrian art and saddles. Celebs like Serena Williams have dined here. Reservations required. Jackets recommended for men. D (nightly). F8 Sardi’s—American 234 W. 44th St., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.221.8440. sardis .com. This legendary restaurant, known for its humorous caricatures of Broadway luminaries past and present, has been a Theater District hangout since 1921. Specialties include jumbo lump crab cakes and grilled sirloin steak. L & D (Tu-Su), Brunch (Su). G9 The Sea Fire Grill—Seafood 158 E. 48th St., btw Third & Lexington aves., 212.935.3785. theseafiregrill.com. Contemporary dishes emphasize the flavors of fresh, seasonally sourced fish—whole Maine lobsters stuffed with crabmeat, roasted Nova Scotia halibut—in a space with a sleek, modern bar and an elegant dining room. Steaks and chops are also on the menu. L (M-F), D (nightly). E9 Shun—French/Japanese 610 Lexington Ave., at E. 53rd St., 212.451.9228. shun-nyc.com. Shun, the Japanese culinary tradition that celebrates seasonal food at peak flavor, informs the menu prepared by Chef Alain Verzeroli, a protégé of


dining+drinking the late chef Joël Robuchon. Verzeroli’s cooking is grounded in French technique and integrated with Japanese fl avors and aesthetics. The intimate Art Deco-inspired dining room features an open kitchen. Prix fi xe and chef’s tasting menus only. D (Tu-Sa). E8

Tudor City Steakhouse—Steak House 45 Tudor City Pl., btw E. 42nd & E. 43rd sts., 212.682.4000. tudorcitysteakhouse.com. Given its close proximity to the United Nations, this bright and airy restaurant in a luxury apartment complex enlivens its classic American steakhouse menu—U.S.D.A. prime cuts of beef dry-aged on the premises—with appropriately international options, like a yellow corn Venezuelan tamale appetizer and a range of ceviches and pastas. L (M-F), D (nightly). D10 21 Club—American 21 W. 52nd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.582.7200. 21club.com. A top-tier menu of filet mignon, Dover sole, chicken hash and steak tartare, a well-stocked wine cellar and a festive atmosphere and clubby lounge make this spot a favorite of movers and shakers and captains of industry, who have donated the toys and sports memorabilia that dangle from the ceiling of the Bar Room. Jackets recommended for men. L (M-F), D (M-Sa). F9 Ty Bar—Bar bites Four Seasons Hotel New York, 57 E. 57th St., btw Park & Madison aves., 212.758.5700. fourseasons.com/newyork/dining. The lounge in the only I.M. Pei-designed hotel in the Western Hemisphere is known for classic 1920s and 1930s cocktails, as well as a collection of custom and bespoke drinks made with barrel-aged spirits. Bar bites include Korean beef tacos, prime sirloin sliders and king salmon skewers. Daily (noon-midnight). E8 Zuma New York—Japanese 261 Madison Ave., btw E. 38th & E. 39th sts., 212.544.9862. zumarestaurant.com. Sleek, upscale and dimly lit digs set the scene for a menu that features sushi, steaks from the robata grill and izakaya bites. Specialties can include lobster no oven yaki (roasted lobster with shizo-ponzu butter). House-branded sake and house-made specialty cocktails are on offer. L (M-F), D (nightly). E10

Celebrating our 1 Year Anniversary

UPTOWN MANHATTAN Asset Restaurant—American 1329 Columbus Ave., btw W. 75th & W. 76th sts., 212.517.1987. assetrestaurant.com. The design of this two-level Upper West Side eatery (each level has a dining area and a bar) pays homage to the urban character of Manhattan: Layers of building and rebuilding are metaphorically and literally woven throughout the neutral space via metal and wooden textures. D (nightly), Late-night D (Th-Sa), Brunch (Sa-Su). H5 Bar Boulud—French 1900 Broadway, at W. 64th St., 212.595.0303. barboulud.com. Chef/ owner Daniel Boulud’s bistro, close to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, serves seasonal fare—including signature terrines, pâtés, charcuterie and cassoulet. Wines come from the Burgundy and Rhône Valley regions. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). H7 Bluebird London NYC—Modern British Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., 3rd fl., at

Hors D’Oevres Prime Dry Aged Beef Surf n’ Turf Signature Desserts International Dishes Events & Parties As seen in Sophisticated Weddings Located across from the United Nations and three blocks from Grand Central Terminal tudorcitysteakhouse.com hello@tudorcitysteakhouse.com 212.682.4000 LET'S CONNECT:

COMPLIMENTARY PARKING

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dining+drinking

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W. 58th St., 347.682.2100. bluebirdlondon.nyc. The stateside offshoot of Bluebird Chelsea on London’s King’s Road offers a contemporary menu and outstanding views of Central Park. Fish and chips and beef Wellington are on the menu. L (M-F), Afternoon Tea (daily), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). H8

Cafe Sabarsky—Austrian C0L6428Neue Galerie, 1048 Fifth Ave., at E. 86th St., 212.288.0665. neuegal erie.org/cafes/sabarsky. Chef Kurt Gutenbrunner’s authentic menu features sausages, Schnitzel, coffee specialties and Sachertorte mit Schlag, in a beautiful dining room evocative of a turn-of-the-last-century Viennese coffeehouse. B & L (M & W), B, L & D (Th-Su). F5 Daniel—French 46 31 0 E. 65th St., btw Madison & Park aves., 212.288.0033. danielnyc.com. Awarded two stars in the 2020 Michelin Guide, Chef Daniel Boulud’s haute dining experience on the Upper East Side embraces seasonal Gallic cuisine, imbued with tradition but with a contemporary accent. Prix fi xe tasting menus; wine pairings available. As befi ts the luxurious, regal space with neoclassical accents, jackets are required. D (M-Sa). E7 Jean-Georges—French 4C310L92T6 rump International Hotel & Tower, 1 Central Park W., btw W. 60th & W. 61st sts., 212.299.3900. jean-georges.com. This four-star haven overlooking Central Park offers the seasonal, market-driven cuisine of Chef/owner Jean-Georges Vongerichten in a formal dining room and the more casual Nougatine café. Jackets required in the dining room. L & D (daily), Brunch (Su). H8

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Lincoln Ristorante—Italian C0L9L6184 incoln Center, 142 W. 65th St., btw Broadway & Amsterdam Ave., 212.359.6500. lincolnristorante.com. A stunning glass-enclosed pavilion, with a sloping roof covered in lush grass, houses Chef Shea Gallante’s culinary visions, from pasta and meat dishes to focaccia breads and charcuterie. L (W-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). I7 Masa—Japanese 0453Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., 4th fl., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.9800. masanyc.com. The omakase dinner costs $595 per person; the dress code, however, is casual. A non-tipping restaurant, Masa received three stars in the 2020 Michelin Guide. L (Tu-F), D (M-Sa). H8 Red Rooster Harlem—Soul Food 310 Lenox Ave., btw W. 125th & W. 126th sts., 212.792.9001. redroosterharlem.com. Ethiopian-born Chef/ owner Marcus Samuelsson serves comfort foods, such as Papa Eddie’s shrimp and grits, seafood jambalaya and jerk chicken. Ginny’s Supper Club downstairs features live music and a gospel Sunday brunch. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). B5 Rosa Mexicano—Mexican C0L193661 Columbus Ave., at W. 62nd St., 212.977.7700. rosamexicano .com. The spirited decor matches the menu of citrus-marinated seafood, skewered and grilled filet mignon, tacos and enchiladas. Rosa is renowned for its signature frozen pomegranate margaritas and guacamole prepared tableside. L (M-F), D (nightly), Brunch (Sa-Su). H8

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM


out & about CONCIERGES MIXED & MINGLED AT SEVERAL POSH EVENTS AROUND NEW YORK CITY

TUDOR CITY STEAKHOUSE hosted concierges and their guests to light appetizers and cocktails before they enjoyed an evening performance of the Tony Awardwinning Broadway musical, “Tootsie.” Left to right: Guest of Tony Breen; Tony Breen, Colonial House Inn.

PINKO BOUTIQUE welcomed concierges and their guests to its SoHo boutique to learn about the brand and its concierge program. Concierges and guests enjoyed hors d’oeuvres and champagne as they perused the store.

Above, left to right: Renaldo Moore, Ameritania at Times Square; guest of Nellie Salas; Nellie Salas, retired NYCAHC member; Dorothy Witty, The St. Regis New York.

Jeffrey Pai, Stewart Hotel New York; Asimina Mitilineos, Le Meridien New York.

Left: Miles Mandwelle and Jolle Hsu, The Quin Hotel. Above, left to right: Jamaa Outhamou, Hudson Yards; Sergio Nieto, Macy’s Herald Square; Thomas Adams, Millennium Broadway New York Times Square; Shannon Allen, Waterline Square with LIVunLtd; Felix Hernandez, The Ritz-Carlton Central Park.

Above, left to right: Guest of Gabrielle Sarmiento; Gabrielle Sarmiento, News Inflight Inc.; Ryan Lettier, Four Seasons Hotel New York; guest of Ryan Lettier. Right: Guest of Diana Romero; Diana Romero, LIVunLtd.

MADISON AVENUE BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT provided concierges and their guests with a twohour walking tour of the historic stores on Madison Avenue. Concierges visited 13 luxury boutiques as they enjoyed the leafy views of the Upper East Side.

Guest of Chantel Dillon; Chantel Dillon, INNSIDE New York Nomad.

Left: Ela Orosova, Loews Regency New York; Stephanie Matthei, The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel. Right, left to right: Steven Kyriakides, Westgate New York Grand Central; Deniz Altan, Hotel NH New York Madison Avenue; Diana Romero, LIVunLtd.

Left to right: Helen Chiang, The Mark Hotel; Nellie Salas, retired NYCAHC member; Erika Mercado, Millennium Broadway New York Times Square; Ana Ivanic, Parker New York.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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shops+services

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The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 38-39).

1 Stand out this holiday season when you party in a brown tuxedo from the brand’s new Midtown West store. | SuitSupply Hudson Yards, p. 33 2 Diamonds are a girl’s best friend when set in 18-karat white gold and designed to sweep from the ears and along the neck. | Beauvince Jewelry, p. 33 3 Customers at the new two-story atelier of the luxury faux fur brand can customize their coats with vintage patches sourced by the store’s owners. | Maison Atia, p. 33 4 Watchmaker RJ launched its new limited-edition ARRAW Spider-Man collection, created in partnership with Disney and Marvel, at this SoHo emporium. | Watches of Switzerland, p. 33 5 Treffort shirts for men, made with premium Egyptian and Turkish cotton, come in a host of patterns, from solids to stripes to checks to florals. | Treffort, p. 33

ACCESSORIES+FOOTWEAR Allen Edmonds C0L729551 Madison Ave., btw E. 55th & E. 56th sts., 646.682.2554; and several other NYC locations. allenedmonds.com. These high-quality, handcrafted leather shoes (made in the USA) are the preferred footgear of corporate types, who appreciate their conservative styling and excellent materials— soft, sturdy leather both outside and in. E8

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Harrys of London 463 Park Ave., btw E. 57th & E. 58th sts., 646.905.8670. harrysoflondon.com. Designed in London and made in Europe, the innovative and classic shoes for men include lace-ups, boots, sneakers and loafers. E8 Il Bisonte C0L475381 Bleecker St., at Perry St., 212.633.0334. ilbisonte.com. High-quality, well-designed handbags, briefcases, backpacks, travel bags, passport holders and desk accessories can be found at the New York flagship of this luxury Italian leather goods brand. G13 Manolo Blahnik C0L3 731 1 W. 54th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.582.3007. manoloblahnik.com. Equally at home on the runway as they are on the red carpet, Manolos, as these luxurious women’s shoes are known around the world, are well-made, sexy and pricey, with personalities that range from classic to whimsical. One of the most popular models is the Hangisi heel, featured in “Sex and the City.” F8 Roger Vivier C0L4357 8 50 Madison Ave., at E. 65th St., 212.861.5371. rogervivier.com. The French footwear designer’s legendary line for women

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

offers sexy, timeless and chic shoes with coordinating bags. The signature shoe is the “Belle Vivier,” a classic pump with an oversized chrome-plated buckle, designed for Yves Saint Laurent’s 1965 Mondrian collection and worn by Catherine Deneuve in “Belle de Jour.” E7

T. Anthony 445 Park Ave., btw E. 56th & E. 57th sts., 212.750.9797. tanthony.com. The American luxury goods house, launched in 1946, provides stylish and durable leather and canvas luggage for globe-trotters. E8

APPAREL Brooks Brothers C0L695346 Madison Ave., at E. 44th St., 212.682.8800. brooksbrothers.com. Since 1818, this well-respected American clothier has been known for its superior-quality conservative clothing and accessories for boys, men and women. E9 J. Press C0LY 5142 ale Club, 51 E. 44th St., at Vanderbilt Ave., 646.973.1329. jpressonline.com. Ivy league-inspired (J. Press was founded in New Haven, Connecticut, home of Yale University) suits, sport coats, blazers, neckwear, shirts, outerwear, shorts, trousers, sweaters and accessories. E9

PHOTOS: WASHINGTON BROWN TUXEDO, COURTESY SUIT SUPPLY; GARDEN OF EDEN DIAMOND SUITE, COURTESY BEAUVINCE; MAISON ATIA INTERIOR, COURTESY MAISON ATIA; RJ SPIDER-MAN WATCH, COURTESY RJ AND WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND; TREFFORT SHIRTS, COURTESY TREFFORT

FOR INSIDERS’ PICKS, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC


shops+services Maison Atia C0L6587833 Madison Ave., btw E. 69th & E. 70th sts., 212.600.4204. maisonatia.com. The luxury faux fur brand’s first brick-and-mortar boutique carries coats, totes and pochettes, hats, scarves and styles from the Fall/Winter 2019 Collection. Many pieces are one of a kind; others come in colors exclusive to the store. E7 Misha Nonoo Pop-Up C0L1 6587 30 Greene St., btw Prince & W. Houston sts. mishanonoo.com. The direct-to-consumer business has opened a temporary brick-and-mortar location in SoHo (through December) in which to feature its own products for women, including classic separates and outerwear, and partner brands, such as The Laundress and Sarah Flint. E14 Paul Stuart C0L6587350 Madison Ave., at E. 45th St., 212.682.0320. paulstuart.com. The updated classics at this outfitter can seamlessly take both men and women from the boardroom to a night on the town. E9 Richard James 461 Park Ave., btw E. 57th & E. 58th sts., 646.905.8733. richard-james.com. The Savile Row tailor’s first American store for men is divided into two main areas: seasonal ready-to-wear and bespoke. Color, cut and unconventional combinations help define the James aesthetic. E8 SuitSupply Hudson Yards 20 Hudson Yards, at 10th Ave. & W. 33rd St., 646.825.5030; and five other NYC locations. us.suitsupply.com. Men’s suits, jackets, trousers, shoes, outerwear and accessories in a range of sizes and styles, from classic to contemporary. Custom-made service available, and there is an in-store tailor for on-demand alterations. I11 Todd Snyder 25 E. 26th St., btw Madison and Fifth aves., 917.242.3482. toddsnyder.com. The New York flagship, a one-stop shop for business and casual menswear, carries the full range of Todd Snyder’s designs as well as his collaborations with other designer brands. E11 Treffort Studio: 315 W. 39th St., #304, btw Eighth & Ninth aves., 917.293.7661. treffortshirts .com. While these luxury men’s dress shirts are mainly available online, visitors to New York can see, feel and pick out their shirts in person at the brand’s Midtown West studio. H10 Uniqlo 546 Broadway, btw Spring & Prince sts., 877.486.4756; and several other NYC locations. uniqlo.com. High-quality and stylish basics for men, women, children and infants, plus designer collaborations. E14

DEPT. STORES+CENTERS Bergdorf Goodman C0L7 32749 54 Fifth Ave., btw 57th & 58th sts., 212.753.7300. bergdorfgoodman.com. Women find designer labels, accessories and cosmetics in this iconic New York store. The separate men’s store is across Fifth Avenue. F8 Bloomingdale’s C0L421 5 000 Third Ave., at E. 59th St., 212.705.2000; and several other NYC locations. bloomingdales.com. The fashion and home hub has extensively renovated its shoe, cosmetics, ready-to-wear, designer and home floors. D8 Brookfield Place 230 Vesey St., btw West & Liberty sts., 212.978.1698. brookfieldplaceny.com.

The shopping center brings high-end apparel and accessories brands for men, women and kids, along with dining options. F17

Century 21 C0L962 87 2 Cortlandt St., btw Broadway & Church St., 212.227.9092; and several other NYC locations. c21stores.com. Deep discounts on everything, from famous designer apparel for men, women and children to cosmetics, shoes, electronics and housewares. F17 Empire Outlets 1 Richmond Terr., Staten Island. empireoutlets.nyc. The only outlet shopping center in New York City houses more than 100 designer outlet retailers. With easy and free access to and from Manhattan via the Staten Island Ferry, the center is less than a five-minute walk from the St. George Terminal. Macy’s Herald Square C0L961 3 51 W. 34th St., btw Broadway & Seventh Ave., 212.695.4400. macys .com. The department store spans a full city block with clothing, accessories and home decor, plus cosmetics and fragrances. G10 Neiman Marcus 20 Hudson Yards, at 10th Ave. & W. 33rd St. neimanmarcus.com. The luxury department-store chain’s first-ever brick-andmortar flagship in NYC offers the highest level of service and exclusive designer apparel and accessories for men and women. I11 Saks Fifth Avenue C0L48156611 Fifth Ave., btw 49th & 50th sts., 212.753.4000, F9; 250 Vesey St., Brookfield Place, at West St., 212.301.2440, F17. saksfifthavenue.com. A luxury department store carrying designer apparel, accessories, home decor, luxury brand cosmetics and fragrances. The Shops at Columbus Circle C0L36Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Cir., btw W. 58th & W. 60th sts., 212.823.6300. theshopsatcolumbuscircle .com. This high-end retail and dining complex features more than 40 stores, the world-class Restaurant and Bar Collection, a park-view atrium and art installations. H8 The Shops at Hudson Yards 20 Hudson Yards, at 10th Ave. & W. 33rd St. hudsonyards newyork.com/shopping. Scores of luxury and specialty stores fill the seven floors of this new retail mecca. Among the establishments under one roof are Aritzia, Coach, Jo Malone, Kiehl’s, Piaget, Rolex and Van Cleef & Arpels. I11 Westfield World Trade Center 185 Greenwich St., btw Vesey & Barclay sts., 212.284.9982. westfield.com/westfieldworld tradecenter. This shopping center features a stellar lineup of stores, including John Varvatos, L.K. Bennett and Roberto Coin. F17

GIFTS+HOME Blackbarn Shop at Chelsea Market 75 Ninth Ave., btw W. 15th & W. 16th sts., 212.620.3110. blackbarnshop.com. Artists and artisans, both local and from countries such as Morocco, Bali and South Africa, have been commissioned to create pieces for personal care and the home, including fragrances, furniture and tabletop items. H12 Harney & Sons C0L7261433 Broome St., btw Crosby St. & Broadway., 212.933.4853. harney.com. The Millerton, New York-based purveyor of fine teas

offers a selection of more than 250 international varieties (loose and in sachets and tea bags) and tea-related products in its SoHo retail shop, tasting bar and lounge. Two-hour educational tea-tasting experiences are led by a master Harney & Sons tea blender by prior arrangement. E15

MoMA Design Store C0L72644 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.767.1050, F8; 81 Spring St., at Crosby St., 646.613.1367, E14. momastore.org. Cutting-edge designs for the home, office and body, along with fun gadgets, toys and jewelry, are selected by the discerning eyes of the Museum of Modern Art’s curatorial staff.

JEWELRY Beauvince Jewelry C0L3126 W. 47th St., 6th fl., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 646.775.8724. beauvince.com. The second-generation jeweler in the heart of New York’s Diamond District specializes in high jewelry, customer service and craftsmanship. Bespoke diamond designs and one-of-a-kind custom engagement rings available. F9 Martinique Jewelers C0L727 6 50 Seventh Ave., btw W. 49th & W. 50th sts., 212.262.7600. martinique jewelers.com. In Times Square since 1963, this fine jeweler has a vast selection of jewelry, including Alex and Ani bangles; a full Pandora boutique with exclusive NYC charms; the Thomas Sabo collection; and timeless diamond and 18-karat gold pieces. G9 Tiffany & Co. C0L727 6 27 Fifth Ave., at 57th St., 212.755.8000. tiffany.com. The world-famous jewelry store carries diamonds, pearls, gold, silver, sterling flatware, fine timepieces, crystal and more—all of which come wrapped in signature robin’s-egg blue boxes. F8 Watches of Switzerland 60 Greene St., btw Broome & Spring sts., 646.973.3363; and one other NYC location. watchesofswitzerland.com. In addition to Rolex, Patek Philippe, JaegerLeCoultre, Cartier, Omega and other brands, the two-floor SoHo emporium in a cast-iron building enhances the shopping experience with an on-site cocktail bar. Services include repairs and a strap bar. E15

TOYS+TECH Apple Fifth Avenue C0L4967 8 67 Fifth Ave., btw 58th & 59th sts., 212.336.1440. apple.com. Sleek laptops, computers, the latest iPhones, and gadgets and accessories are stocked within the geek-chic brand’s high-tech location beneath the can’t-miss glass cube. F8 FAO Schwarz 30 Rockefeller Plz., btw E. 49th & E. 50th sts. faoschwarz.com. The legendary toy store, now reborn in Rockefeller Center, is known for its plush teddy bears, life-size stuffed animals, dolls, action figures, games, train sets and more. F9 Nintendo New York C0L5110 Rockefeller Plz., at W. 48th St., 646.459.0800. nintendonyc.com. A 10,000-square-foot interactive gaming paradise offers branded merchandise, exclusive items featuring favorite Nintendo characters and franchises, and all the latest video games. F9

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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museums+attractions

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4 The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 38-39).

1 Robert Rauschenberg’s “Yoicks” is featured in the exhibition, “Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019,” opening Nov. 22. | Whitney Museum of American Art, p. 35 2 “Holiday Express: All Aboard to Richard Scarry’s Busytown” showcases toys from this museum’s Jerni Collection, as well as artwork and graphics by children’s book author and illustrator Scarry. | New-York Historical Society Museum & Library, p. 35 3 Robert Mapplethorpe’s photo of Grace Jones has pride of place in the exhibit, “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now.” | Guggenheim Museum, p. 35 4 More than 100 looks by American fashion designer Anna Sui are on display in a career retrospective. | Museum of Arts and Design, p. 35

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MUSEUMS AKC Museum of the Dog 101 Park Ave., at E. 40th St., 212.696.8360. museumofthedog.org. The museum, under the auspices of the American Kennel Club (AKC), pays homage to man’s best friend and features artwork and interactive digital displays. Tu-Su 10 am-5 pm. E10 American Folk Art Museum C0L5482 Lincoln Sq., Columbus Ave., at W. 66th St., 212.595.9533. folkartmuseum.org. The permanent collection focuses on works created by self-taught artists

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

in a variety of mediums and dating from the 18th century to today. Tu-Th, Sa 11:30 am-7 pm, F noon-7:30 pm, Su noon-6 pm. Free. H7

American Museum of Natural History C0L365Central Park West, at W. 79th St., 212.769.5100. amnh.org. Guests explore halls filled with dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas, artifacts, gems and minerals, meteorites and more. Daily 10 am-5:45 pm. H6 Brooklyn Museum C0L5948200 Eastern Pkwy., at Washington Ave., Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org. Ancient Egyptian artifacts, photography and European, Asian and American art. W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-10 pm.

PHOTOS: ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG, “YOICKS,” 1954, WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NEW YORK, GIFT OF THE ARTIST, ©2019 ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG FOUNDATION / LICENSED BY VAGA AT ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; TOYS: THE JERNI COLLECTION, THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, ILLUSTRATIONS: LOWLY WORM AND HUCKLE CAT, ©2019 BY THE RICHARD SCARRY CORPORATION; ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE, “GRACE JONES,” 1984, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK, GIFT OF THE ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION, 1998, ©ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION. USED BY PERMISSION; INSTALLATION VIEW OF “THE WORLD OF ANNA SUI” AT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN, NEW YORK, JENNA BASCOM

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museums+attractions Cooper Hewitt 2 E. 91st St., at Fifth Ave., 212.849.8400. cooperhewitt.org. This Smithsonian museum uses groundbreaking technology to create interactive exhibits on historic and contemporary design. Su-F 10 am-6 pm, Sa 10 am-9 pm. F4 Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration C0L6E 15 llis Island: 212.363.3200. libertyellisfounda tion.org. Millions of immigrants entered the U.S. on this historic island between 1892 and 1954. In addition to viewing artifacts displayed in the museum, visitors are welcome to consult the archives of the American Family Immigration History Center. The Peopling of America galleries tell the story of immigration to America before the processing center opened and after it closed. Daily. Free. Fraunces Tavern Museum 0316 54 Pearl St., at Broad St., 212.425.1778. frauncestavern museum.org. Built in 1719, the building showcases Revolutionary War-era manuscripts, art, memorabilia and recreated period rooms. M-F noon-5 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-5 pm. E18 The Frick Collection 1 E. 70th St., btw Madison & Fifth aves., 212.288.0700. frick.org. Paintings by Old Masters are on display in the palatial former home of industrialist Henry Clay Frick. Tu-Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. F7 Guggenheim Museum 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St., 212.423.3500. guggenheim.org. An architectural icon, Frank Lloyd Wright’s landmark building houses significant modern and contemporary art. M, W-F & Su 10 am-5:30 pm, Tu & Sa 10 am-8 pm. F5 Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum Pier 86, 12th Ave., at W. 46th St., 212.245.0072. intrepidmu seum.org. The USS Intrepid aircraft carrier offers access to several of its decks featuring historic aircraft, interactive exhibits and flight simulators, plus the space shuttle Enterprise, submarine Growler and the Concorde. Daily 10 am-5 pm. J9 The Jewish Museum 1109 Fifth Ave., at 92nd St., 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org. Jewish art and culture. M, Tu, F-Su 11 am-5:45 pm, Th 11 am-8 pm. F4 The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St., 212.535.7710. metmuseum.org. Renowned for its encyclopedic collections of American, European and Far Eastern fine and decorative art, the museum celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2020. Su-Th 10 am-5:30 pm, F-Sa 10 am-9 pm. F5 The Morgan Library & Museum 225 Madison Ave., at E. 36th St., 212.685.0008. themorgan.org. Rare books, manuscripts, drawings, prints and other treasures. Tu-Th 10:30 am-5 pm, F 10:30 am-9 pm, Sa 10 am-6 pm, Su 11 am-6 pm. E10 Museum of Arts and Design C0L6312 Columbus Cir., btw Broadway & Eighth Ave., 212.299.7777. madmuseum.org. The center celebrates innovative arts and crafts. Tu-W, F-Su 10 am-6 pm, Th 10 am-9 pm. H8 Museum of Illusions 77 Eighth Ave., at W. 14th St., 212.645.3230. museumofillusions.us. Interactive exhibits, based on mathematics,

psychology, biology and other sciences. M-Th 9 am-10 pm, F-Su 8 am-11 pm. H12

The Museum of Modern Art 11 W. 53rd St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.708.9400. moma.org. The expanded and reimagined museum has reinstalled its world-renowned collection. Daily 10 am-5:30 pm, F and the first Th of the month until 9 pm. F8 Museum of Sex C0L52 76 33 Fifth Ave., at 27th St., 212.689.6337. museumofsex.com. This museum is dedicated to the history, evolution and cultural significance of human sexuality. Su-Th 11 am-11 pm, F-Sa 11 am-midnight (last ticket sold two hours before closing). F11 Museum of the City of New YorkC0L5914 1220 Fifth Ave., at 103rd St., 212.534.1672. mcny.org. The permanent exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” is a three-gallery, high-tech look at NYC’s 400-year history. Daily 10 am-6 pm. F3 National Museum of the American Indian C0L561 2 Bowling Green, at Broadway, 212.514.3700. nmai.si.edu. This Smithsonian Institution museum promotes Native American history, culture and arts. Su-W, F-Sa 10 am-5 pm, Th 10 am-8 pm. Free. E18 National September 11 Memorial & MuseumC0L415879 Museum entrance at 180 Greenwich St., btw Liberty & Fulton sts., 212.312.8800. 911memorial.org. The memorial features waterfalls set within the footprints of the Twin Towers. Memorial: Daily 7:30 am-9 pm. Free. Museum: Su-Th 9 am-8 pm (last entry 6 pm), F-Sa 9 am-9 pm (last entry 7 pm). F17 Neue Galerie New York C0L1 457 048 Fifth Ave., at 86th St., 212.628.6200. neuegalerie.org. German and Austrian fine and decorative art and design. Th-M 11 am-6 pm. F5 New Museum C0L57235 Bowery, btw Rivington & Stanton sts., 212.219.1222. newmuseum.org. Contemporary cutting-edge art in a variety of mediums by American and international artists. Tu-W, F-Su 11 am-6 pm, Th 11 am-9 pm. D14 New-York Historical Society Museum & Library C0L51 8 70 Central Park West, at Richard Gilder Way (W. 77th St.), 212.873.3400. nyhistory.org. Objects and works of art focusing on the rich history of NYC and New York State. Tu-Th, Sa 10 am-6 pm, F 10 am-8 pm, Su 11 am-5 pm. H6 Rubin Museum of Art C0L1 4957 50 W. 17th St., btw Sixth & Seventh aves., 212.620.5000. rubinmu seum.org. Paintings, books, artifacts, textiles and more from the Himalayas and the surrounding regions, including Nepal and Mongolia. M & Th 11 am-5 pm, W 11 am-9 pm, F 11 am-10 pm, Sa-Su 11 am-6 pm. G12 Tenement Museum C0LV 516 isitor center: 103 Orchard St., btw Broome & Delancey sts., 212.982.8420. tenement.org. Turn-of-the-20thcentury immigrant life on Manhattan’s Lower East Side is illustrated on guided tours of authentically preserved tenement apartments. Daily 10 am-6 pm (last tour 5 pm). C15

212.570.3600. whitney.org. Indoor galleries and outdoor spaces are devoted exclusively to 20th-century and contemporary American art and artists. M, W, Th, Sa & Su 10:30 am-6 pm, F 10:30 am-10 pm. I13

ATTRACTIONS Bronx Zoo. 2300 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.220.1500. bronxzoo.com. The largest urban zoo in the United States provides natural habitats and environments for its 4,000 species, including snow leopards, lemurs and Western lowland gorillas. Highlight: Nov. 21Jan. 5: Holiday Lights. Daily 10 am-4:30 pm. Empire State Building ExperienceC0L3487 Entrance: 20 W. 34th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.736.3100. esbnyc.com. Views of NYC and beyond can be seen from the 86th- and 102nd-floor observatories. Daily 8 am-2 am (last elevator ascends at 1:15 am). F10 The High Line C0L568G 1 ansevoort to W. 34th sts., btw 10th and 11th aves., 212.500.6035. thehighline .org. A 1.45-mile-long elevated park and public promenade. Daily 7 am-10 pm. Beginning Dec. 1: Daily 7 am-7 pm. Free. I13–I10 New York Botanical Garden C0L48572900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, 718.817.8700. nybg.org. Lush gardens, walking trails, educational programs, special exhibits and a children’s adventure garden offer an escape from the city, even in winter. Highlight: Nov. 23-Jan. 26: Holiday Train Show. Tu-Su 10 am-6 pm. One World Observatory One World Trade Center, 285 Fulton St., entrance to the observatory is on West St., at Vesey St., 844.696.1776. oneworldobservatory.com. The indoor observatory is at the top of the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Visitors ascend in "Sky Pod" elevators from ground level to the 102nd floor in less than 60 seconds. Daily 8 am-9 pm (last ticket sold at 8:15 pm). F17 Statue of Liberty C0L652 7 12.363.3200. libertyellis foundation.org. The 151-foot neoclassical statue is known worldwide as a symbol of freedom and democracy. The new Statue of Liberty Museum, occupying 26,000 square feet in a stately garden pavilion, contains immersive and interactive exhibits detailing the statue’s history, design and role. Lady Liberty’s original copper torch is among the displays. Statue Cruises operates a daily ferry service to Liberty Island: 877.523.9849. statuecruises.com. Top of the Rock C30 0L57 Rockefeller Plz., W. 50th St., btw Fifth & Sixth aves., 212.698.2000. topoftherocknyc.com. Panoramic vistas of the city can be enjoyed from a vantage point some 70 floors above the ground. Daily 8 am-midnight (last elevator ascends at 11 pm). F9 The Vessel C0L4152 7 0 Hudson Yards, at 10th Ave. & W. 33rd St., 332.204.8500. hudsonyardsnewyork .com. The interactive centerpiece of Hudson Yards is a sculptural spiral staircase made of 154 interconnected flights of stairs with 80 landings and 2,500 steps. The work is meant to be climbed. Daily 10 am-9 pm. Free. Same-day tickets on-site or in advance online. I11

Whitney Museum of American Art 99 Gansevoort St., btw Greenwich & West sts., INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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transportation+tours FOR MORE ON WHAT TO DO, GO TO INNEWYORK.COM/BLOG/DAILY-NYC

The letters/numbers at the end of each listing are NYC Map coordinates (pp. 38-39).

TRANSPORTATION Amtrak C0LPenn Station, Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 800.872.7245. amtrak.com. Guests travel in comfort on these passenger trains, stopping at stations throughout the United States and Canada. G11 Citi Bike C0L436citibikenyc.com. Up to 12,000 classic two-wheel bicycles are available for rent for 30-minute intervals at 750 docking stations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and Jersey City. $3 for one ride (up to 30 minutes), $12 for a day pass (24 hours of unlimited 30-minute rides) and $24 for a three-day pass (72 hours of unlimited 30-minute rides). Consult the website for popular routes and a map of stations.

old and beautifully restored, houses 65 shops and 35 restaurants. Tours of the landmark are offered daily. Metro-North Railroad trains arrive and depart here E9

Hampton JitneyC0L2135 212.362.8400. hamptonjitney .com. First launched in 1974, these comfortable, deluxe motor buses provide daily, year-round transportation to the North and South forks of eastern Long Island from New York City, including airports. Times/prices/ departure points vary. Long Island Rail Road mta.info/lirr. Operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, taking visitors from Penn Station or Jamaica, Queens, to destinations throughout Long Island. For pricing and schedules, go online or call 511 and say “LIRR” at any time. G11

New York Water Taxi C0L5246 212.742.1969. nywatertaxi.com. Luxury seating is available on this commuter taxi, which cruises the Hudson and East rivers daily, making stops that include 42nd Street in Midtown, Battery Park and the South Street Seaport in Lower Manhattan and DUMBO in Brooklyn. All-Day Access Pass: from $37 adults, from $31 children 3-12.

Megabus.com C0L2531megabus.com. Double-decker coaches with reclining seats, free Wi-Fi, climate controls and wheelchair accessibility depart daily from W. 34th St., btw 11th & 12th aves., traveling to cities in the Northeast, including Baltimore, Boston, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Ticket prices start at $1. J10

NJ Transit 973.275.5555. njtransit.com. NJ Transportation to Newark Liberty International Airport, MetLife Stadium, Prudential Center, the Jersey Shore and more. Buy tickets in advance with NJ Transit’s Mobile App.

Empire CLS 8 21. 00.451.5466. empirecls.com. Professional, hospitality-trained chauffeurs take passengers in late-model luxury vehicles to and from airports in the tristate region, as well as to parties, proms, casinos, weddings and family celebrations. Nights on the town are a specialty.

Metro-North Railroad C0L58 18 9 E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.532.4900. mta .info/mnr. Commuter trains operate from Grand Central Terminal to 120 stations throughout seven counties in New York State. E9

Grand Central Terminal C0L45789 E. 42nd St., btw Lexington & Vanderbilt aves., 212.340.2583. grandcentralterminal.com. The majestic transportation hub, now more than 100 years

MTA New York City Transit C0L328718.330.1234, 212.638.7622. mta.info. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) operates New York City’s vast subway and bus systems,

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providing fast, efficient, convenient and affordable transportation to millions of people every day in the five boroughs (Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens and Staten Island). Subways run 24 hours, seven days a week; most buses run between 5 a.m. and 2 a.m. daily. A single bus and subway ride costs $2.75; the MTA’s MetroCard provides multiple rides at a discounted fare. Details about bus and subway service and MetroCard fares can be obtained on the MTA’s website.

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

NYC Ferry ferry.nyc. The ferry service plies the East River, taking commuters and visitors to and from Lower Manhattan and Midtown and parts of Brooklyn and Queens. Adult one-way ticket, $2.75. Penn Station Eighth Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 212.630.6401. amtrak.com. Subways converge with commuter rail and bus services to New Jersey and Long Island and national rail services. G11

PHOTO: COURTESY CLASSIC HARBOR LINE

CLASSIC HARBOR LINE’S “COCOA & CAROLS” CRUISE 212.627.1825. sail-nyc.com. Beginning Nov. 23, the 90-minute, familyfriendly evening cruise of New York Harbor on board a heated 1920s-style yacht features a live musical performance of holiday classics, sing-alongs, cookies and cocoa.


transportation+tours Port Authority Bus Terminal C0L3748625 Eighth Ave., from W. 40th to W. 42nd sts., 800.221.9903. panynj.gov. The nation’s largest bus terminal serves approximately 200,000 passengers from across the nation on a typical weekday. Bus carriers include New Jersey Transit, Greyhound and ShortLine Bus. Information booths, retail shops and services available. H9

Globally Connected

TOURS Big Bus Tours 212.685.8687. bigbustours.com. Visitors can see NYC’s most famous attractions, including the Empire State Building and the Brooklyn Bridge, on this bus service, which offers fixed loops and hop-on, hop-off tours with 30 stops. Times/prices vary. Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises C0L48P 27 ier 83, W. 42nd St., at the Hudson River, 212.563.3200. circleline42.com. Day and night tours around Manhattan Island include the Best of NYC, a two-and-a-half-hour guided tour that circumnavigates the island. Times/prices vary. J10 Harlem Spirituals Gospel and Jazz Tours C0L5839690 Eighth Ave., 1st fl., btw W. 43rd & W. 44th sts., 212.391.0900. harlemspirituals.com. Visitors experience informative sightseeing tours that showcase Harlem’s rich cultural diversity and world-famous sites and attractions centered around gospel and jazz music. Some tours include brunch or lunch. Dates/times vary. H9 EMPIRECLS.COM | 800-451-5466 | @EMPIRECLS

Liberty HelicoptersC0L584 6 East River Bikeway, 800.542.9933. libertyhelicopter.com. Passengers enjoy sweeping views of NYC. Flights last 12 to 20 minutes, soaring past the city’s most popular sights. Times/prices vary. D18 Madison Square Garden All-Access Tour C0L64589Seventh Ave., btw W. 31st & W. 33rd sts., 866.858.0007. msg.com/tours. This tour of the famous sports and entertainment arena takes visitors on an exploration of the totally revamped and modernized venue. Daily 9:30 am-3 pm, departing about every 30 minutes, with tours lasting approximately 75 minutes. $35 adults, $30 seniors/students/children 12 and under. G11 Municipal Art Society of New York Tours C0L584212.935.3960. mas.org. These walking tours are architectural forays through NYC’s neighborhoods, historic districts, landmark buildings and street life. Dates/times vary. A daily 75-minute tour of Grand Central Terminal is offered at 12:30 pm. $30 adults, $20 seniors/ students, children under 10 and military. Sugartooth Tours C0L584917.856.6761. sugartooth tours.com. Walking dessert tours of NYC restaurants, bakeries and ice cream shops in small groups of 16 or fewer, led by a pastry connoisseur who is also a history buff. New tour: “The Village to Village Cupcake and Cookie Crawl.” Watson Adventures Scavenger Hunts C0L5872877.946.4868. watsonadventures.com. These scavenger hunts—private or public, adults-only or family-friendly—are staged in top neighborhoods and attractions, such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Central Park.

INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | IN NEW YORK

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IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

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INNEWYORK.COM | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | IN NEW YORK

39


DEC

sneak peek

DECEMBER ’19–JANUARY ’20 HIGHLIGHTS

23

31

1

New Year’s Eve Times Square, timessquarenyc.org

Salute to Vienna New Year’s Concert David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center, salutetovienna.com

DEC

18 40

9

NYC Winter Jazzfest (thru Jan. 18), various venues, winterjazzfest.com

19

JAN

JAN

DEC

Big Band Holidays (thru Dec. 22), Jazz at Lincoln Center, jazz.org

Winter Solstice Celebration (thru Dec. 21), Cathedral of St. John the Divine, solsticeconcert.com

IN NEW YORK | NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 2019 | INNEWYORK.COM

3

Professional Bull Riders (thru Jan. 5) Madison Square Garden, msg.com

7

American Dance Platform (thru Jan. 12), Joyce Theater, joyce.org

PHOTOS: MUSICA SACRA, COURTESY MUSICA SACRA; NEW YEAR’S EVE IN TIMES SQUARE, AMY HART FOR TIMES SQUARE ALLIANCE; SALUTE TO VIENNA, CHRIS LEE; DONNY MCCASLIN, ©JIMMY KING

JAN

DEC

JAN

Musica Sacra: Handel’s “Messiah” Carnegie Hall, carnegiehall.org


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