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NEW YORK

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Welcome to new york

www.mvpny.net

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(9854)

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WHERE Guestbook 2013/2014

simply, beautifully irresistible.

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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

a new york state of mind Welcome to the city that never sleeps—and never ceases to amaze, inspire and exhilarate. Having selected one of the finest hotels for your stay, you are about to experience the singular sensation that is New York City. A global center of finance, fashion, media, communications, film, television and the arts, New York City is the world’s most cosmopolitan and influential metropolis. Whether you’re a first-time or seasoned visitor, the sheer amount of things to do in this bustling city is almost limitless—with new places to go, sights to see and memories to be made around every corner. Please allow this edition of Where GuestBook® New York to acquaint you with our city’s infinite pleasures. For starters, some of the world’s finest shopping awaits: top designers’ flagship stores on Madison and Fifth avenues, as well as in the Meatpacking District and SoHo; trendy boutiques in Greenwich Village and on the Lower East Side; and dazzling baubles in the Diamond District and at world-class jewelry stores all over town. Theater fans can marvel at the amazing performances on Broadway, where 40 historic playhouses on the Great White Way present classic and contemporary dramas, revivals, comedies and

ABove: a serene moment at the tribeca pier in downtown manhattan.

musicals, often featuring superstars of the stage and screen. To the north, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the world’s leading cultural complex, entertains with a year-round schedule of classical music, ballet, theater, opera and jazz in more than 40 spectacular concert halls and public spaces on and off its newly revitalized campus. Culture and art reign supreme at the Museum of

photo: tribeca pier chairs, © veer

Modern Art (MoMA), The Frick Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, Museum of Arts and Design, the Rubin Museum of Art and on “Museum Mile,” a 23-block, Upper East Side stretch of Fifth Avenue studded with eight incredible institutions, including the Museum of the City of New York, Jewish Museum, Neue Galerie, El Museo del Barrio, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art and National Academy Museum & School of Fine Arts. On nearby Madison Avenue, the Whitney Museum of American Art has unrivaled holdings by such artists as Edward Hopper and Georgia O’Keeffe. On the Upper West Side, the American Museum of Natural History (which also houses the Rose Center for Earth and Space) is one of the largest and most important scientific and research institutions in the world. WHERE GUEST B OOK n ew york

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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER Art and antique collectors will enjoy the many art galleries throughout the city—with the highest concentrations in Chelsea, SoHo, TriBeCa and, more recently, the Lower East Side—showcasing everything from ancient to avant-garde art, as well as shops offering museum-quality antiques. Of course, you’ll have to make time to see our array of historic landmarks, such as the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, Empire State Building, Grand Central Terminal, South Street Seaport, Top of the Rock, Times Square and the National September 11 Memorial. Recognized as one of the foremost culinary capitals on the planet, New York City is home to a vast selection of classic. You can sample a melting pot of mouthwatering international cuisines ranging from Afghani to Vietnamese, Nordic to Australian. For a taste closer to home, New York City steak and seafood houses are legendary, and many chefs are sourcing farm-to-table ingredients. When you only have time for a quick bite, do as the locals do and enjoy a slice of pizza, a pastrami sandwich on rye from one of our delis or a gourmet treat from any of the trendy food trucks parked around town. After dinner and a show, put on your dancing shoes and get ready to dance away the night. Or just sit back and let others entertain you through the wee hours of the morning! Nightclubs, lounges, jazz, dance and comedy clubs feature top headliners and tomorrow’s brightest stars. You may even rub shoulders with some of our famous residents, who are in town shooting a movie or television show or here for a concert tour stop. For help navigating Manhattan and its four sister boroughs, start by speaking with your hotel Concierge, who can offer insider tips and information. In fact, all members of the hotel staff—from the Bellmen to the General Manager—are committed to ensuring that your visit to New York City is as rewarding and fulfilling as your stay at their hotel. On behalf of the management and staff of your hotel, we're delighted you're here, so get out and "paint the town red!"

Merrie L. Davis President/Publisher Where GuestBook® New York

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top, left: the plush red, cream and gold interior of carnegie halL. bottom, left: ellis island was, for thousands of immigrants at the turn of the last century, the gateway to the new world. bottom: the time warner center on the upper west side, which includes the shops at columbus circle.

photos: carnegie hall, jeff goldberg/esto; ellis island, © r.g. belie 2012; columbus circle, time warner center

restaurants, both casual and refined, contemporary and

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WHEN YOU FIND

ATHATPIECE OF ART YOU LOVE, YOU ALSO FIND ANOTHER PIECE

OF YOURSELF.

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“Love” Dorit Levinstein

437 Madison Ave. corner of 50th St. (212) 888 0177. Open every day, 9am - 9pm.

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WHERE WHERE Guestbook Guestbook 2013/2014 2013/2014 Watch Watch

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contents

new york Essence 26 first look Iconic sights that demand a place on every visitor’s itinerary.

46 a fine line His and her fashions, austere, striking and designed to blur the lines.

52 gaining momentum Stars of the art world: innovating, changing and recreating art. by terry trucco

62 taster’s choice Tasting menus that are sure to whet your palate and delight your senses. by karen tina harrison

68 local spirits New York-brewed beverages, from wine to soda pop, that hit the spot.

76 landmark dining

104 period pieces

Enjoy some of the best tastes of the city in restaurants both historic and hallowed. by drew limsky

82 In the blink of an eye

Classic fashion looks, paired with timeless antiques and collectibles. by troy segal

112 art house cinema

Massages, facials and more, faster than you can say ahhh ...

The city’s great museums make their mark in Hollywood. by william

by terry trucco

grant frierson iv

88 sets in motion Spectacular Broadway sets that really know how to move—and how to move you. by francis lewis

120 shutter speed Capturing a moment in sports, one frame at a time. by bob cannon

154 parting shot

96 broadway follies Who doesn’t love a juicy bit of gossip? Here’s what’s been happening backstage at some of Broadway’s hottest shows.

by bill corsello

by robert haynes-peterson

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M B

MAURICE BADLER Where Fashion Begins

485 Park Avenue (between 58th & 59th Streets) New York NY 10022 Monday-Saturday 10AM-7PM (800) M-BADLER (800) 622-3537 www.badler.com

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504 Park Avenue (between 59th and 60th Streets)

New York 800-223-3717

Please call for Catalogue

www.scullyandscully.com

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Crystal

Silver

Fine Furniture

Jewelry

Gifts 10/23/13 3:19:56 PM


Established 1934

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Silver

Fine Furniture

Jewelry

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contents

new york essentials 130 look book H  igh-quality items offered by

140 GARMENT DISTRICT

some of the city’s top retailers and art galleries.

140 GREENWICH VILLAGE

138 all about town P  rofiles of the city’s neighbor- hoods and thoroughfares. 138 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH 138 CHELSEA

144 THEATER DISTRICT

146 TRIBECA

140 HARLEM 142 LITTLE ITALY

146 UPPER EAST SIDE

142 LOWER EAST SIDE

148 UPPER WEST SIDE

142 MADISON AVENUE

148 WEST VILLAGE

138 CHINATOWN 139 EAST VILLAGE

144 SOHO

142 MEATPACKING DISTRICT

148 the outer boroughs

143 MIDTOWN EAST

150 Advertisers INDex

143 NOLITA

139 FIFTH AVENUE

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a–Z by category

139 FINANCIAL DISTRICT

144 PARK AVENUE

140 FLATIRON DISTRICT

144 ROCKEFELLER CENTER

on the cover: chrysler building, photo by jicky/landscapesofamerica.photoshelter.com Inside cover: lincoln center, © siegfried layda

W H E R E G U E STBO O k new york

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Vacation in

NEW YORK

Engraved NY charms available*

3EE3TORE&OR$ETAILS

485 Park Avenue (between 58th & 59th Streets) New York, NY 10022 Monday-Saturday 10AM-7PM WWWBADLERCOMp - "!$,%2 (800) 622-3537

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where GUESTBOOK

®

NEw York

editorial + art

Lois Levine Anna Ratman executive editor Francis Lewis senior editor Troy Segal associate editor William Grant Frierson IV senior editorial assistant Joni Sweet photo editor Margo Dooney designer Laura Resheske editor-in-chief

design director

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Cannon, Bill Corsello, Lisanne Gagnon, Karen Tina Harrison, Robert Haynes-Peterson, Anna Katsanis, Brian Kennedy, An Le, Drew Limsky, Ken Pao, Cun Shi, Evan Sung, Terry Trucco production production and Creative Services Manager

Ray O’Connell

PRODUCTION DESIGNER

Harley Brooks

Morris Visitor Publications Mvp | creative

Haines Wilkerson Margaret Martin Design director Jane Frey Photography Director Susan Strayer Creative coordinator Beverly Mandelblatt Chief Creative Officer

Senior Regional editorial director

Mvp | manufacturing & Technology director of manufacturing

Donald Horton Tony Thorne-Booth

technical operations manager

Morris communications

William S. Morris III William S. Morris IV

Chairman & ceo President

MVP/NY is a proud Corporate & Honorary Member of the NYCAHC

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MVP is a proud sponsor of Les Clefs d’Or USA

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where GUESTBOOK

®

NEw York

advertising, circulation + marketing Publisher & president

Merrie L. Davis

Adeline Tafuri Jurecka VICE PRESIDENT Sales Development Lauren Alperin Meirowitz senior account managers Allyson Deane, Peter DiSalvo account manager Sara L. Procter executive assistant to the publisher Catherine Stack senior manager, accounts & special events Maria Pavlovets sales project manager Ashling Baker Linehan sales development strategist Dyxa Cubi promotion manager Michelle Spaulding natioinal circulation coordinator Noreen Altieri marketing editor Mackenzie Allison marketing designer Marisa Bairros webmaster Lynn Rickert

Senior Vice President marketing & strategic partnerships

business & administration

Daniel Finnegan Sandra Azor office manager Leonard Porter

senior credit manager

senior accounting manager

Morris Visitor Publications Mvp | executive

Donna W. Kessler Angela E. Allen chief travel editor Geoff Kohl General Manager, WHERE MAPS Christopher Huber DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Scott Ferguson national marketing manager Melissa Blanco president

vice president, operations

Mvp | national sales

Rick Mollineaux Paula Cohen director, partnerships & national digital sales Bridget Duffie national sales coordinator David Gately vice president, national sales

vice president, national sales, new york

E-mails for all of the above: Firstname.lastname@morris.com

MVP/NEW YORK 79 Madison Avenue, 8th floor New York, New York 10016 Phone: 212-557-3010; Fax: 212-716-8578 www.mvpny.net Where GuestBook® New York is produced by Morris Visitor Publications (MVP), a division of Morris Communications, Co., LLC. 725 Broad St., Augusta, GA 30901. Where® magazine and the where® logo are registered trademarks of Morris Visitor Publications. MVP publishes Where® magazine, IN New York and IN London magazines, and a host of other maps, guides and directories for business and leisure travelers, and is the publisher for the Hospitality Industry Association.Where GuestBook® publishes editions for the following U.S. cities and regions: Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Colorado, Dallas/Fort Worth/Houston, Florida Gold Coast (Fort Lauderdale & Palm Beach), Hawaii (the Big Island), Jacksonville/St. Augustine Amelia Island, Kansas City, Kaua’i, Los Angeles, Maui/O’ahu, Miami, Milwaukee, New Orleans, New York, Northern Arizona, Orange County, Orlando/Winter Park, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, Tampa Bay, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle/Tacoma, Southwest Florida (Naples), Tennessee (Nashville & Memphis), Tucson and Washington, D.C. Copyright © 2013-2014 by Morris Visitor Publications. All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, in whole or in part, without the express prior written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility to any party for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement. Printed in the United States of America.

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112 W34th Street New York, NY 212-904-1002 www.hourpassion.com

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contRIBUTORS bob cannon

Period Pieces, page 104 While born in Louisville, Kentucky, Senior Editor Segal considers herself an adopted native of New York City, or, rather, all the little cities that exist within New York. She’s lived in the same 19thcentury neighborhood for 25 years, reflecting her love of history. A lifelong writer/voracious reader, she often finds it easier to express herself on the page, where thoughts come across more clearly. Or, if they don’t, can at least be rewritten.

Shutter Speed, page 120 Cannon doesn’t veil his love for NYC: “New York is where it all starts, as far as I’m concerned. It’s the media capital, the cultural capital and the economic capital of the West.” Having authored a sportscentric story for this volume, he knows exactly which competitive game captures the city’s essence: “Roller derby. If you know how the game is played, then you’ll do great here. If you miss a few important rules, they’ll put you over the rail.”

Ken Pao

Period Pieces page 104 For Texas-born photographer Pao, life in New York is about digging in. “I was inspired to come to NYC for the opportunities, culture and creative outlets,” says the Miami Ad School graduate, who first fell in love with visual arts in middle school. While he has shot in such places as Mexico and Tibet, the Big Apple’s skyscrapers and urban energy continue to a inspire him every day. “The light of the city is unreal, especially during dusk with the beautiful interplay of the setting sun bouncing off windows.”

Art House Cinema, page 112 Associate Editor Frierson was tickled by the task of examining movies filmed in NYC’s legendary museums: “I imagine my entire life to be a film, after all,” he says. “Every morning for me is lights, camera, action! In this make-it-or-die-trying town, one always has to be ready for one’s big close-up.” Who’s this film’s star? “You’re looking at him.”

s s

William G. Frierson IV

Local Spirits, page 68; Landmark Dining, page 76 A self-taught photographer, Sung has a client roster that includes The New York Times, Vogue and The Wall Street Journal. His relationship with his camera is an intimate one: “It’s like a marriage. My camera is a machine, so sometimes its quirks can frustrate me, but when I get the results I’m looking for, I’m endeared to it all over again.”

s s

Gaining Momentum, page 52; In the Blink of an Eye, page 82 After 10 years reporting from abroad, journalist Trucco landed back in New York—for good. The Californian first came to the city as a Columbia University student, and she now runs Overnight New York, a website featuring reviews of NYC hotels. Her advice? “Always check the quality of the towels at your hotel.” 22

Local Spirits, page 68 Archaeologist-turned-writer Haynes-Peterson enjoys a stiff drink almost as much as he loves this city: “There has never been a better time to drink in NYC than now. From corner dives and rooftop party bars to hidden craft cocktail dens—the scene is vibrant, expressive, innovative and fun.” What’s in his glass? “Spiritforward classics. Think: Negronis and Old Fashioneds.”

Evan sung

Terry Trucco

ss Robert HaynesPeterson

cun shi Broadway Follies, page 96 Creative energy can run in the family. Brooklyn-based illustrator Cun Shi, raised by two artists, is living proof. He muses on the power of imagery: “Images affect us in a way that is similar to music. It’s an abstract process that begins as soon as the eye perceives the visual cues and sets the gears in motion. A thousand words can describe one image, but a thousand images can also be made from one word.”

photo: william g. frierson iv, eder dominguez

s s

troy segal

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MAGCAL. CAL. MAG

THEREAL REALMAGIC. MAGIC. THE THEREAL REALNEW NEWYORK. YORK. THE Open daily until 2 am. esbnyc.com Open daily until 2 am. esbnyc.com

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Broadway Follies, page 96 Bill Corsello is a native New Yorker, who began his career as an actor before transitioning to writing about Broadway and Off-Broadway, which he’s been doing for more than a decade. A self-professed theater aficionado, connoisseur and obsessive, he considers a week that he hasn’t seen a show to be a bad week. For his feature on Broadway scandals, he dug into his memory, having collected tales of Great White Way peccadilloes as if they were Playbills.

Taster’s Choice, page 62 From a young age, photographer Kennedy knew an “office job” was not for him. The adventurer’s career started with portraiture and documentary photography, but two years ago he began shooting food. What defines the New York experience for Kennedy? “The food, of course. Here, you have the opportunity to experience a slice of many cultures from around the world. Go exploring for the day. Eat some good food, walk around, have fun.”

s s

Bill Corsello

s s

contRIBUTORS

Karen Tina Harrison

anna katsanis

Taster’s Choice, page 62 Karen Tina Harrison is used to being on top of things: She’s worked for the New York Post, penned her own best-selling children’s book and currently runs About.com’s luxury travel site. But that doesn’t mean she isn’t willing to cede some control come dinnertime: “My favorite restaurant meals are those in which I’m in the hands of the chef, who’s cooking his or her preferred recipes with that day’s ingredients.”

All About Town, page 138 Though she was born in Montreal, illustrator Gagnon has come to call New York City home. The city’s architecture, energy and diversity are her sources of inspiration, and it shines through in her paintings and drawings. “Everything comes to life during the coloring stage,” Gagnon says of her creative process. “This is something I look forward to every time.”

Landmark Dining, page 76 NYC doesn’t get old in writer and editor Limsky’s eyes: “I’ve lived in this city most of my adult life, and when I walk down the street, I still feel like something great is going to happen. It’s exciting, edgy, familiar and somehow safe, all at the same time.” Neither does the city’s cuisine scene: “The demand and foot traffic ensure that quality is always great, on both ends of the price spectrum, and everything in between.”

s s

Drew Limsky

s s

A Fine Line, page 46 At age 15, photographer Le embarked on a solo journey to New York in search of a safe haven to practice his craft. “In Vietnam, people didn’t appreciate art. They had the mentality that you have to be a doctor, a lawyer, an engineer to make your family proud.” Inspired by “beauty and darkness,” his work has appeared in magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar Vietnam and Sheer. 24

A Fine Line, page 46 Stylist Katsanis started interning for fashion magazines while studying at FIT. These days, her own work has appeared in Elle, Vogue and Glamour magazines. Katsanis can’t point to just one remarkable time in her career, since “every day is memorable because I am lucky enough to do what I love.” For inspiration, she takes to the city streets in search of new looks.

lisanne gagnon

An Le

Brian Kennedy

francis lewis Sets in Motion, page 88 Executive Editor Lewis, who looks at four innovative set designs, remembers when a puppet version of The Prince and the Pauper visited his grade school and turned him on to live theater. “The lights came up on a flat backdrop, with just enough detail to tell me I was outside a palace. Some images are burned on the retina for ever. This is one of them.”

W H E R E G U E STBO O K New york

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first look EIGHT OF NEW YORK’S MUST-VISIT LANDMARKS PRESENT A STUDY IN CONTRASTS AS THEY DEFINE THE VERY HEART AND SOUL OF THE METROPOLIS.

Artifice rarely looks this natural. In laying out the 843 acres of the country’s first landscaped park, architects Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux employed a staggering 20,000 laborers to sculpt terrain, dig ponds and blow up rocks. Construction of the park began in 1857 and was completed in 1873, though it opened to the public in the winter of 1859. Today, some 25 million people visit the park annually to commune with nature, enjoying its seemingly endless paths for strolling, jogging or cycling; over 150 varieties of trees; numerous ornamental sculptures, fountains and monuments; and 36 bridges and arches. 59th to 110th sts., btw Fifth Ave. & Central Park West, 212.794.6564 26

PHOTO: © VEER

Central Park

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First look

Empire State Building

Photos: Š christopher biggs (detail); Š whitney cox

The most famous skyscraper in the world started out as a purely speculative venture for which building costs were intially estimated at $50 million. Contracts were signed in September 1929, merely weeks before the stock market crash. Yet the building broke records, not only for height but for speed of construction: The job was completed 45 days ahead of schedule and $5 million dollars under budget. Today, it remains a sleek Art Deco landmark, prized for the views from its 86th- and 102nd-floor observatories and for the lighting of its upper floors that changes color to salute holidays (i.e., red, white and blue for the Fourth of July) and other events. But the Empire State Building is more than just a pretty facade. Designed to act as a lightning rod, it protects other nearby properties, absorbing about 100 hits a year. 350 Fifth Ave., 212.736.3100

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Bryant Park

In 1686, when the city was still basic wilderness, the governor of New York, Thomas Dongan, designated the area now known as Bryant Park a public space. The first official park on the site opened in 1848 and was called Reservoir Square; in 1884, it was renamed Bryant Park to honor the New York Evening Post editor and abolitionist William Cullen Bryant. Today the park, located between Fifth and Sixth avenues and between 40th and 42nd streets in Midtown, is favored by New Yorkers as a lunch and lounging spot in all seasons. It includes a number of lovely sections including The Upper Terrace, The Lawn (the jewel of the park), The Fountain Terrace, Le Carrousel and the Southwest Porch, which offers chairs, swings and cushions. It also boasts summer film programs, an ice-skating rink in winter and other events throughout the year and is home to two popular eateries, Bryant Park Grill and ’Wichcraft. 341 W. 40th St., 212.768.4242

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PhotoS: Š veer (detail); bryant park corporation

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PRIDE ROCK revealed

behind the scenes with THE LION KING on broadway

It’s 6:00pm and backstage at the Minskoff Theatre things are starting to heat up just two hours prior to curtain. The show is celebrating its 16th season and over 70 million guests, yet each night is a new opening as the curtain rises on this singular live experience. From stage setup, to makeup, to the performers warming up, we see how every component of this much-lauded show is methodical and meticulous. A small army of dedicated stagehands, artists and actors have arrived once again tonight, to deliver the one show that is unlike anything else on Broadway. 7:02pm: Costumes and props rest silently, soon to be beckoned to the stage again as “The Circle Of Life” unfolds before the audience.

7:16pm: Cast members take the stage and begin their warm-up. Their combination of strength, grace and movement are part of the reason this magnificent production continues to deliver a seamless marriage of entertainment and art.

6:30pm: The stage is set as the crew begins to assemble sets, pull costumes and arrange props for quick scene changes, off-stage cues and last minute directions.

PHOTOS BY JEFF FRIED PHOTOGRAPHY | JEFFREYFRIED.COM

7:45pm: The cast assembles to take their places. As they wait behind the curtain, the sounds of theatre patrons entering and arriving at their seats call to them. The level of excitement rises collectively in the audience and backstage.

7:34pm: Performers complete their pre-show routine and relax before entering wardrobe.

7:40pm: Actors are transformed from NYC’s urban jungle to the exotic world of the savannah.

©Disney

8:00pm: The audience is awestruck as the ensemble of Disney’s THE LION KING emerges from every corner of the theatre and takes its place on stage and in the hearts of theatregoers.

SEE IT NOW. REMEMBER IT FOREVER. Minskoff Theatre THE LANDMARK MUSICALBroadway EVENT& 45th Street Minskoff Theatre, Broadway & 45th Street 866-870-2717 lionking.com 866-870-2717 lionking.com GB-1.indd 2

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Grand Central Terminal

Because the stately edifice known as Grand Central Terminal sits on a precious piece of Midtown real estate, its design integrity has sometimes been threatened by commercial development plans: One proposal, in 1960, would have divided the waiting room into four horizontal stories, with bowling alleys on the upper three. Soon after that project was attempted, Grand Central Terminal was designated a landmark. In 1975, Grand Central’s landmark designation was voided by the court, clearing the way for a building over the station: Largely due to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ efforts, the landmark was saved. Over 140,000 commuters a day pass through Grand Central Terminal, which remains one of the country’s most spectacular architectural achievements and one of the world’s busiest train stations. 89 E. 42nd St., at Park Ave., 212.340.2583

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Photos: metropolitan transportation authority (detail); istockphoto.com/veni

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Jane’s Carousel

Brooklyn Bridge Park is the home of the exquisitely restored Jane’s Carousel, a gift to the park from Jane and David Walentas. Built in 1922 by the Philadelphia Toboggan Company, the carousel was purchsed in 1984 by the Walentas as a way of preventing it from being sold piecemeal. The carousel was in poor condition, so Jane began the work of restoring it to its former glory at her studio in DUMBO, Brooklyn, which included scraping away 62 years of “park paint” with an X-Acto knife. Everything on the ride that could be was repainted, stenciled and releafed to look the way it did in 1922. The carousel, which overlooks the East River, opened to the public Sept. 16, 2011. Today, it dazzles with 1,200 lights, and offers a fully operating ride, delighting the young, the old and the in-between. Brooklyn Bridge Park, Dock Street, Brooklyn, 718.222.2502

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Photos: josef pinlac (detail); © julienne schaer

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59 YEARS OF CONTINUOUS INSPIRATION IN THE PURSUIT OF TECHNICAL PERFECTION

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First look

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

PhotoS: raymond larose (detail); istock

The Cathedral of St. Patrick, which is more commonly known as St. Patrick’s Cathedral, is the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, and also a parish church. Located on the East Side of Fifth Ave., it is directly across the street from Rockefeller Center, facing the Atlas statue. Its Neo-Gothic style, Stations of the Cross, grand galley organ, stained-glass windows and magnificent art, including the Pietà by William Ordway Partidge (three times larger than Michelangelo’s Pietà) make it a breathtakingly beautiful visitor destination. On Christmas Eve, the church is packed with people of all denominations for its world-famous midnight mass. 14 E. 51st St., 212.753.2261

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First look

New York Botanical Garden

Photo: martin schappeit (detail)

In the late 1800s, Columbia University botanist Nathaniel Lord Britton and his wife, Elizabeth, also a botanist, were so inspired by their visit to England’s Royal Botanic Gardens that they came back determined New York should possess a great botanical garden as well. Fast forward over 100 years to what their wish has wrought: the 250-acre New York Botanical Garden, which offers some of the world’s leading plant laboratories, gardens and plant collections, including arguably the most beautiful rose garden in the United States, the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden, which displays more than 3,000 species, ranging from ancient varieties developed more than 2,000 years ago to the latest hybrids. 2900 Southern Blvd., the Bronx, 718.817.8700

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www.beretta.com

The world of Beretta in the heart of New York.

Beretta Gallery - 718 Madison Avenue. Pure Italian lifestyle celebrating the outdoors. NEW YORK - DALLAS - BUENOS AIRES - PARIS - MILAN - LONDON

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First look

Top of the Rock

PhotoS: paul warchol (detail); Mike Mabes

Originally opened in 1933 and modeled after the decks of luxury ocean liners, the observation terraces of the 70-story Top of the Rock set visitors drifting over the city, with wideopen views in every direction, fore and aft, starboard and port. In 2005, after being closed for 20 years, the lofty perch reopened with multimedia exhibits and three levels for gazing at the far horizon. On a clear day, you can see for 80 miles. There’s plenty to view on the way up, too, from the colossal Swarovski crystal waterfall chandelier inside the entrance (left) to the mezzanine exhibition on the history of Rockefeller Center, with a beam that invites visitors to imitate the balancing act of construction workers, to the Breezeway on the 69th-floor deck, which features an interactive lighting system, where guests’ movements trigger changes in sound and light. 30 Rockefeller Plz., 212.698.2000

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a mix-and-match of his and her fashions pushes the boundaries of sophisticated style. snug fits, rich colors and bold prints: does it really matter who wears what?

LEFT: Sunglasses by Italia Independent USA. Atrium NYC, 644 Broadway, 212.473.9200. Cashmere crew sweater by Bloomingdale’s The Men’s Store. 1000 Third Ave., 212.705.2000. “Mercer” corduroy pants and “Burke” blazer by Tommy Hilfiger. 681 Fifth Ave., 212.223.1824. Gloves by Sermoneta Gloves USA, 609 Madison Ave., 212.319.5946. RIGHT, ON HIM: Paisley print buttondown shirt by Etro. 720 Madison Ave., 212.317.9096. Straight-leg trousers by Richard Chai. Odin New York, 199 Lafayette St., 212.966.0026. ON HER: Gray and blue jumpsuit by Ter et Bantine. Maryam Nassir Zadeh, 123 Norfolk St., 212.673.6405. “Meyers” heels by Paul Smith. 108 Fifth Ave., 212.627.9770.

photography by An le

a fine line

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Merchandised and styled by anna katsanis; Hair by Elsa using Oribe Hair Care; Makeup by Mizu; Models: victor norlander/ford models and skye/red nyc


Hat by Eugenia Kim. Barneys New York, 660 Madison Ave., 212.826.8900. Jacket and silk bow blouse. Brooks Brothers, 346 Madison Ave., 212.682.8800. Leather pants by Nicole Miller. 77 Greene St., 212.219.1825.

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ON HIM: Sunglasses by Prada. Sunglass Hut, 605 Fifth Ave., 212.759.3720. White cotton buttonup shirt by Dior Homme. 17 E. 57th St., 212.931.2950. Beige plaid suit by Valentino. 821 Madison Ave., 212.772.6969. PAM 523 Luminor Marina 1950 3 Days Automatic watch by Officine Panerai. 545 Madison Ave., 212.233.1562. ON HER: GNOMI dress in albino by Max Mara. 813 Madison Ave., 212.879.6100. Gray wool jacket by Etro. Venus tote by FURLA. furla.com. Gloves by Sermoneta Gloves USA.

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ON HIM: “Black Sail” sweater by Nautica. Saks Fifth Avenue, 611 Fifth Ave., 212.940.2818. “Hampton” slim-fit dress pants. John Varvatos Soho, 122 Spring St., 212.965.0700. ON HER: Long-sleeve black turtleneck sweater and blue flouncy skirt by Ports 1961. 3 Ninth Ave., 917.475.1022. White shirt by Hache. Kisan NYC, 125 Greene St., 212.475.2470. Black hat by Hache, available at Maryam Nassir Zadeh.

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Since WHERE GUESTBOOK NEW YORK is an annual publication, there is a possibility that the items shown, while available for purchase at press time, may be out of stock. The products featured, however, provide a fine representation of the overall quality of the stores’ merchandise.

ON HIM: Gray vest and black wingtip shoes by Bloomingdale’s The Men’s Store. Charcoal trousers by Etro. Bag by Fairchild Baldwin. Five Story, 18 E. 69th St., 212.288.1338, and Mariana Antinori, 1242 Madison Ave., 646.476.5108. Balloon bleu watch by Cartier. Wempe, 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000. ON HER: Wool bicolor vest and pencil skirt by Ter et Bantine. Muléh, 500 W. 22nd St., 212.524.0220. Heels by Angela Scott, available at Saks Fifth Avenue. Balloon bleu watch by Cartier, available at Wempe.

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10/21/13 11:45:42 AM


MOMENTUM

IF THEY CAN MAKE IT HERE, THEY’LL MAKE IT ANYWHERE: UP-AND-COMING ARTISTS ARE ALWAYS EAGER TO BE ON VIEW IN NEW YORK CITY. BY TERRY TRUCCO

REGENCY TOWN CENTER DUIPSUM DOLOBOR PERILI QUAT, VEL DOLENT NIM DOLORE MODOLORE DOLOR SI BLAMCONSE MAGNIBH ESTO DOLOR AD YO MAGNA AMET NOS DOLENT NIM DOLORE MODOLORE NIBH

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PHOTOS: “MARY’S LAKE, MT 7,” © MATTHEW BRANDT, COURTESY YOSSI MILO GALLERY, NEW YORK; “LES BALLETS DE FAILE,” © FAILE; BRICK WALL BACKGROUND, © VEER

Gaining

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FACING PAGE: “MARY’S LAKE, MT 7” IS TYPICAL OF MATTHEW BRANDT’S COLOR-DRENCHED PHOTOS. THIS PAGE: “LES BALLETS DE FAILE,” DONE FOR THE NEW YORK CITY BALLET BY THE ARTISTIC DUO FAILE.

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t’s hard for an artist to know when his or her career is about to take off. But one pretty good sign is having a work snapped up by the mighty Metropolitan Museum of Art for its permanent collection—and then having that work displayed in a special exhibit, not far from pieces by 20th-century titans like Christo and Robert Smythson. That’s what happened to art photographer Matthew Brandt in summer 2013, when his monumental landscape, “Mary’s Lake, MT 9” (2012) proved a crowd-pleaser at the Met’s Land Marks show. “It’s a crazy honor,” says the self-effacing Brandt, who, at age 31, was the youngest artist in the exhibit. New York’s thriving art scene has been catnip to generations of young artists, with a mega-cast of museums, galleries, art schools, auction houses and collectors. All this makes our town a prime hunting ground for anyone eager to spot a fresh talent, watch a promising artist blossom or augment a collection. Even artists not in residence seek a nod from a New York museum, press from a New York critic and representation by a New York gallery. Brandt, for example, works and shows in Los Angeles, but also is represented in New York by the Yossi Milo Gallery (245 10th Ave., 212.414.0370), which placed “Mary’s Lake, MT 9” at the Met. “There’s a lot going on in his pictures,” says dealer Yossi Milo. At the Met exhibit, viewers admired “Mary’s Lake” as much for its otherworldly beauty and vibrant coloration as for the idea behind it. Brandt developed the 8-foot-wide, near-abstract image using water he collected from the lake itself. His practice of embedding physical elements from the objects depicted in his photos allows “subject and image to meet and collide,” the artist says. And by choosing unconventional elements like dust, bees and even gummy bears, Brandt guarantees no two of his works will be remotely alike. No one’s invented a foolproof way for a young artist to get noticed. Still, at 25, photographer Awol Erizku seems to have done everything right. His arresting portraits evoke the Renaissance masters with a twist: The young, good-looking WHERE G UEST B OOK N EW YORK

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PHOTO: DORIT LEVINSTEIN, “RENOIR DANCERS,” COURTESY OF EDEN FINE ART

COMBINING HER PAINTER’S EYE FOR COLOR WITH A SCULPTOR’S FEEL FOR BRONZE, AS IN “RENOIR DANCERS,” PROVIDED A BREAKTHROUGH FOR DORIT LEVINSTEIN .

subjects are of color. “His intent is to fill in where art history has left out Africans and people of African descent,” says Joseph Kraeutler, a partner at Hasted Kraeutler Gallery (537 W. 24th St., 212.627.0006), where Erizku’s photographs, some a monumental 6 feet tall, range from $3,500 to $5,000. Erizku, who was born in Ethiopia and raised in the Bronx, landed an internship with surrealist photographer David LaChapelle while still an art student at Cooper Union. He was tapped to show his grand-scale portraits at the FLAG Art Foundation, where they caught the eye of Kraeutler, who arranged a solo exhibit in 2012. Since then, collectors have snapped up portraits like “Boy Holding Grapes,” “Lady With a Pitbull” and “Girl With a Bamboo Earring,” revisionist takes on, respectively, Caravaggio, da Vinci and Vermeer that deliver the young artist’s message “without being in-your-face or gimmicky,” says Kraeutler. Not every up-and-comer is a youngster. Consider the career of sculptor Dorit Levinstein, whose upbeat works are on view at Eden Fine Art (437 Madison Ave., 212.888.0177). The Tel Aviv-based artist began as a painter, academically trained, traditionally inclined. When she felt herself growing stale, she turned to sculpture, eventually channeling her love of color into vividly painted pieces shaped from welded lengths of polished bronze. Now 57, Levinstein became a proverbial overnight success, with her work displayed at London’s Royal Academy and galleries from Paris to New York. At Eden, where her statues start at $5,000 and can top $100,000, one series of undulating forms references instantly recognizable paintings by Picasso, Matisse and van Gogh, among others: “My way of studying and reacting to these works,” Levinstein says. Another relatively late starter is Robert Deyber, 58, who became a full-time painter after a 20-year career as an airline exec, and is now one of the most popular living artists represented by Martin Lawrence Galleries (457 W. Broadway, 212.995.8865) In the last four years, prices for his larger acrylic canvases have leapt from $5,850 to $9,850 and higher. A favorite of rock stars—he did the cover image of Tom Petty’s 2006 album Highway Companion—Deyber is famed for Magritte-like images that work a visual pun on a stock phrase or cliché (i.e., a portrait of a confused-looking canine entitled “Dog Daze”). Alison Elizabeth Taylor proves that the right artist can reinvent an age-old craft. Marquetry is her medium, the 16th-century art of piecing together minute wood fragments in decorative patterns. But Taylor blazes her own path. Carried by the James Cohan Gallery (533 W. 26th

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AWOL ERIZKU’S PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS, LIKE “GIRL WITH A BAMBOO EARRING,” OFTEN EVOKE OLD MASTERS’ PAINTINGS—A REMINDER OF PEOPLES AND SUBJECTS THAT ART HISTORY HAS OFTEN IGNORED. 56

PHOTO: AWOL ERIZKU, “GIRL WITH A BAMBOO EARRING,” © AWOL ERIZKU / COURTESY OF HASTED KRAEUTLER

St., 212.714.9500), her latest pieces introduce oil paint to marquetry’s traditional implements of wood and shellac, adding depth to the contrasting textures of the woods in still life portraits and renderings from nature. “Real wood grain is very expressive,” says the 40-year-old artist, who’d been integrating pieces of wood-grained contact paper into her paintings for years. Her move to marquetry ignited her imagination—and her career. Critics took note of a 2010 series shown at Cohan, depicting damage to foreclosed houses: works fashioned from wood renderings of mutilated drywall, floorboards and light sockets. (Marquetry’s historic association with luxury furniture heaped irony on the gritty subject matter.) Lately, curators have come calling, too. Against the Grain, a recent show at the Museum of Arts and Design, featured two Taylor works. While Taylor deals with tiny wood pieces, Brooklyn artist José Parlá is literally a big-picture man, creating murals for the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Fisher Theater and the new Barclays Center in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Complex, color-rich abstract paintings, they are often embedded with writing obscured in layers of paint: Close inspection of “Diary of Brooklyn,” the Barclays mural, reveals borough-centric monikers like street names, words plucked from James Agee’s novel Brooklyn Is and hip-hop lyrics by Big Daddy Kane. Parlá, 40, who got his pre-art-school start painting on walls around the city at night, relishes working on a grand scale: “The canvas is like a palimpsest,” he says. “The process is a performance.” Outside Brooklyn, Parlá fans, who include Tom Ford, Eric Clapton and Agnès B., can find his works at the Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery (505 W. 24th St., 212.243.8830), where they now fetch anywhere from $50,000 to $125,000 and up. Chinese art is increasingly in demand as mainland artists flex their creative muscles, freed from decades of constraints. One closely watched muscle-flexor is Beijing sculptor Chen Wenling, who first appeared on art collectors’ radar after a splashy debut at the 2006 Beijing Biennale. Three years later, he made headlines with his massive bronze of a man with the face of Bernie Madoff pinned to the wall by a charging bull. “His international notoriety skyrocketed after that,” says dealer Martha Sutherland, whose M. Sutherland Fine Arts handles Chen in New York (212.249.0428, by

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PHOTO: ALISON ELIZABETH TAYLOR, “CLOUD 10,” © THE ARTIST / COURTESY JAMES COHAN GALLERY, NEW YORK/SHANGHAI; CHEN WENLING, “PIG,” COURTESY OF M. SUTHERLAND FINE ARTS

ABOVE: IN “CLOUD 10,” ALISON ELIZABETH TAYLOR PUTS THE ANTIQUE ART OF MARQUETRY TO MODERN USE. RIGHT: CHEN WENLING’S SLY SENSE OF HUMOR AND SATIRIC USE OF ANIMALS IS EVIDENT IN PIECES LIKE “PIG.”

appointment). The artist, 43, channels his classical training into formidable works infused with rawness, bawdiness and wit that fetch from $20,000 to $45,000. One work in Sutherland’s inventory, “Pig,” is a smug sow with a coin slot for an anus—a gimlet-eyed comment on China’s new rich. “Pigs are symbols of wealth and fertility, but Chen takes them to a comic extreme,” Sutherland says. The shimmering halls of Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch

Theater, home to the New York City Ballet, are a long leap from the walls of the derelict downtown buildings where FAILE, the Brooklyn-based art team of Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller, wheat-pasted their earliest creations. But in winter 2013, FAILE made the jump appear effortless. For months, their cheeky graphic art, commissioned by the dance troupe—the highlight was a 40-foot tower of woodblocks mixing ballet iconography with pop culture subjects— filled the theater and adorned the programs. London’s Tate Modern museum and a nature park in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, are a few of the places FAILE’s art has appeared. But their formative years as art-school-trained street artists continue to inform the 37-year-old duo, and also influence their business approach. Though brick-and-mortar galleries carry their works, FAILE has an ardent social media following, which signs up online (www.faile.net) to purchase new limited-edition prints priced from $500 by lottery. “Previous generations didn’t have the opportunity to use the Internet this way,” notes Miller. For art aficionados, talent spotters, collectors and anyone hungry for a taste of the new, New York City’s art world awaits, its ranks filled with fresh creative voices.

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TASTER’S CHOICE TASTING MENUS—MULTICOURSE, MULTIHOUR FEASTS—ARE THE BIG THING IN NYC DINING. BY KAREN TINA HARRISON

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN KENNEDY

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ew York’s nighttime meal is more than a meal, or even a social occasion—it’s entertainment. And the city’s great chefs are inspired showmen, displaying their culinary flair in feats known as tasting menus. With multiple courses that are less copious, but more numerous, than those of standard prix fixes, these epicurean extravaganzas pilot a diner through a festive evening replete with exotic flavors and innovative dishes. At some restaurants, the chef’s tasting menu is the star of the show. At others, it waits in the wings, available to those who know to ask for it. Diners at Kellari Taverna (19 W. 44th St., 212.221.0144), for example, are welcome

BOULUD SUD’S MEDITERRANEAN FARE INCLUDES MEZZE (HERBED FALAFEL, HUMMUS AND BABA GHANOUSH, ABOVE) AND A SPICED LAMB BURGER WITH SWEET POTATO CHIPS (RIGHT).

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POPULAR ITEMS ON MEGU’S PRIX FIXE MENUS INCLUDE CRISPY RICE-CRACKER-COATED ASPARAGUS SPEARS (TOP, LEFT), A GREEN TEA CREPE CAKE (TOP, RIGHT) AND BLACK COD WITH YUZU MISO.

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KELLARI TAVERNA DINERS CAN REQUEST THE FIVECOURSE AEGEAN FEAST, WHICH INCLUDES SPECIALTIES LIKE BAKLAVA (LEFT) AND A CATCHOF-THE DAY FISH WITH STUFFED GRAPE LEAVES (RIGHT).

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to put themselves in the Hellenic hands of Corporate Executive Chef Gregory Zapantis and savor his off-themenu Aegean Feast. Says this native son of Kefalonia, “In Greece, every day brings a menu du jour—what the gods of the seas and the fields have granted us.” The Aegean Feast’s quintet of courses honors these gods, with dishes like seafood in the shell, tender octopus grilled with Santorini capers, and Greek salad topped with creamy feta. The main course is a grilled fillet—anything from Arctic char to Aegean fagri. A second entrée of grilled New York State lamb chops or a dessert assortment with now-trendy Greek yogurt finishes the feast. A different side of the Mediterranean is the raison d’être of Boulud Sud (20 W. 64th St., 212.595.1313). At this airy, arty West Side spot, bons vivants volunteer for Executive Chef Aaron Chambers’ seven-course chef’s tasting menu, which he calls “an experience for the entire table, a literal culinary tour of the Mediterranean, showcasing Morocco, Spain, Italy and Greece.” Made with “hyper-local ingredients,” this rich repast commences with mezze—bites of falafel, hummus and baba

ghanoush. Then come Sicilian sardine escabèche, cured anchovies with Provençale socca chickpea crisps, Spanish octopus, and lemon-saffron linguine with Italian bottarga roe. The main meat course could be Moroccan-spiced lamb, while “dessert is usually something chocolate.” A cozy, brick-walled spot tucked into a brownstone near the American Museum of Natural History has become a foodie pilgrimage station. And like the museum’s famed dioramas, Dovetail (103 W. 77th St., 212.362.3800) showcases nature’s wonders. “We have an intense food culture here, with waves of trends and ideas,” marvels Dovetail’s top toque (and proprietor), John Fraser. “And whatever’s new and pure, I like to play up in my prix fixe tasting menu.” This American banquet comprises seven courses, “all compact but intense,” he notes. Dishes can be as simple as a May vegetables consommé infused with ginger-vanilla essence, or as intricate as foie gras transformed to recall a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, but with graham-cracker puree and huckleberry compote. “The tasting menu makes demands on both the kitchen and the diner, like a book of related short stories that you

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read with attention and tie the ends together,” Fraser feels. “Chef’s tastings challenge my team to be at our best and to take chances. On weekend nights, about half my diners are up for it. It’s an investment of time and stomach space.” The return on investment? “Pure pleasure.” “Tasting menus are a voyage for the palate, a journey from high point to high point,” says Chef/owner Jesse Schenker of Recette (328 W. 12th St., 212.414.3000). His prix fixes, which complement à la carte choices, are like his restaurant: rustic yet refined, with savory, satisfying dishes that echo Recette’s view of tree-lined Greenwich Village streets. Schenker intends them to be “a complete experience: warm, inviting and personal,” he says. Patrons choose five-, seven- or 10-course menus, their courses seasoned and sequenced by Chef Schenker “with definite diner input,” he says. “I serve things I think diners must try, but I listen when there are things they won’t.” His modern American dishes are comprised of “pure, rich ingredients like bone marrow, spring lamb, sea urchin and Maine lobster,” which stars in a seafood “cassoulet” with chorizo. On the second Monday of the month, the entire restaurant is devoted to a special 10-course tasting menu; the 20 diners who reserve receive double table (and plate) space in the dining room. While Schenker’s tasting menus “can push the envelope,” as he cheerfully admits, Executive Chef Carmine Di Giovanni takes a different approach at Greenwich Project (47 W. 8th St., 212.253.9333), housed in a vintage town house with a ground-floor cocktail parlor and a glamorous, chandelier-lit dining room upstairs. His five-course contemporary New American prix fixe is “not meant to intimidate or challenge the diner,” he says. “We are cooking for you, making familiar dishes, but with the extra zest and flair that only a chef can bring.” An even more epic eating experience, the seven-course “market menu” offered in fall, winter and spring, also features “finned fish” and pasta courses. Both options spotlight early morning finds from the Union Square Greenmarket a few blocks away and ingredients that “are here today, gone tomorrow,” says Chef Di Giovanni. But whatever the season, Greenwich Project’s menus always include a sweet—say, a chocolate mousse trio or a baba au rhum. “I don’t approve of skipping dessert,” the chef states. Chinese food has meant fun on a plate to generations of New Yorkers. And at stylish Hakkasan (311 W. 43rd St., 212.776.1818), International Development Chef Ho Chee Boon reports that Big Apple diners have taken to his fresh, lively Cantonese cuisine like a Peking duck to water. “Our tasting menu is served and enjoyed the traditional way Chinese people eat,” says Chef Ho. “Everything is cooked to come out at the same time and shared by the

HAKKASAN DINNERS ARE SERVED CHINESE BANQUET-STYLE, WITH SEVERAL DISHES, SUCH AS VEGETABLE STIR-FRY (TOP) AND PRAWNS WITH LILY BULBS AND ALMONDS, SERVED SIMULTANEOUSLY.

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whole table. New Yorkers love it because the tradition here, too, is to taste everything and talk about it. And they appreciate healthy, fresh ingredients. That’s very Chinese, but also very American today.” Arranged in three courses, his signature menus include 10 or 11 items—“which lets the kitchen show off the range of our techniques and ingredients”—and are intended for tables of 10 or more. But three-course prix fixes, supplemented by rice and pak choi, are offered at lunch and pre-theater, and waiters are delighted to help smaller parties create their own tasting menus. Many patrons commence with a soup and then progress to a “small eat” (dim sum, handmade like tiny artworks). Next, they choose an entrée, perhaps a stew like Hakka pork belly clay pot. For dessert, a sampling of macarons in exotic flavors. Chef Ho jokes, “A French dessert in a Chinese kitchen in Times Square: What could be more New York?” New York’s tasting-menu craze may stem in part from the popularity of fine Japanese cuisine, where tasting menus are a vaunted tradition, both in formal kaiseki dinners (a progressively complex parade of seasonal trea-

sures) and omakase meals, in which the chef sends out a succession of freshly prepared items at his discretion. Several tasting menus (along with à la carte items) are on offer at MEGU New York (62 Thomas St., 212.964.7777) and MEGU Midtown (Trump World Tower, 845 United Nations Plaza, 212.964.7777). The Osusume feast, a seven-course menu, accents sumiki aburiyaki, a grilling technique that employs a rare Japanese charcoal and is used on delicacies like king crab and Kobe beef, resulting in a delicate smokiness. The pre-theater menu showcases gindara, a Japanese black cod, gentled with yuzu and miso. Miso also has a starring role in a nine-course Umami menu alongside other mouth-rich morsels, such as crispy okaki asparagus, which arrives in a tempura-style jacket of crushed rice crackers. “This is a visually thrilling dish,” notes Executive Chef Norito Shimura. “Fresh tastes are fundamental, but all the senses are involved in a Japanese tasting menu.” MEGU’s tasting menus all conclude with “Sweet Five,” a handcrafted glass platter bearing a quintet of desserts. “Pure indulgence,” remarks the chef. And isn’t that why you’ve come to New York?

DOVETAIL’S CHEF’S TASTINGS INCLUDE POTATO FONDUE WITH BROCCOLI (TOP, LEFT), FUJI APPLE SALAD WITH BRUSSELS SPROUTS (TOP, RIGHT) AND LOIN OF VENISON WITH SQUASH AND BACON (RIGHT).

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93::/@7B/D3@</ AUTHENTIC GREEK MEDITERRANEAN SEAFOOD Delicately written above the bar, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enter as Strangers, Leave as Friendsâ&#x20AC;? embodies the genuine Greek hospitality that has become a trademark of these New York gems.

From the generous staff to the food and decor, a

feeling of warmth pervades every element of Kellari Restaurants, where a passion for fine, regional ingredients from the Mediterranean results in fresh cuisine that is both imaginative and traditional. Whole fish, brought in daily from Greece, Portugal, Spain and Latin America, are sold by the pound and proudly displayed for guests, who are encouraged to select their own catch. A focus on fresh seafood is matched with a well-developed wine list. Kellari, which is Greek for cellar, is a recipient of the Wine Spectator Excellence Award, and offers 250 wines by the bottle, many of them Greek. In fact, with over 100 Greek wines on hand, Kellari offers its guests the largest collection of Greek wine in New York City. Kellari also specializes in private dining. A recipient of Manhattan's Finest Private Dining Award, the restaurants have beautiful private and semi-private rooms and an event-planning staff that is dedicated to helping its patrons celebrate life's important moments in style.

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LOCAL SPIRITS

FROM HARD LIQUOR TO SODA POP, FROM RIESLINGS TO LAGERS, NEW YORK IS AWASH IN REGIONALLY MADE BEVERAGES. DRINK UP! THEY’RE LITERALLY THE TOAST OF THE TOWN. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY EVAN SUNG

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East Village bar Death & Co. (Left) specializes in cocktails, many of which (below) use spirits crafted by local producers such as the New York Distilling Company of Williamsburg, Brooklyn, which makes several types of gin.

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One of the first “new” local beer makers, Brooklyn Brewery, in Williamsburg (Right), makes a variety of traditional and customized stouts, ales and lagers (above), which can all be sampled in its tasting room after a tour of the premises.

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ilwaukee makes beer. Kentucky is known for bourbon. The Napa Valley produces wine. And New York City is famous for … all three. Well, maybe not famous, yet. But all over town, breweries, distilleries, wineries and even soda-pop makers are thriving and expanding, due to the popularity of locovore dining, craft cocktails, friendly legislation and the lofty dreams of small-business people. By the time you read this, another small producer (or three) has probably launched. STILL LIFES Makers of spirits have a long history in New York, claims Allen Katz, co-founder of New York Distilling Company. The city’s first distillery (of applejack, possibly) opened in 1640 on what is now Staten Island.

Katz’s 2-year-old operation is nestled in a warehouse in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, adjacent to its bar, The Shanty (79 Richardson St., 718.878.3579), a place with low, sexy lighting, dark wood and brick walls. Turn around and admire the gleaming 1,000-liter copper pot still with its dual fermentation tanks in the next room, churning out what will become Dorothy Parker American Gin (floral and aromatic), Perry’s Tot Navy Strength Gin (spicy and bracing, at 57 proof) and Chief Gowanus New-Netherland Gin, which Katz says is “based on what Dutch immigrants were making in the 19th century.” Weekend afternoon tours are offered, and the distillery’s gins are available at around 400 venues around town, according to Katz, served neat or in artisanal cocktails such as those crafted at Death & Co. (433 E. 6th St., 212.388.0882), a shrouded speakeasy-style East Village haunt.

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Malbec RESTAURANT & TANGO HOUSE THEATER Malbec Restaurant and Wine Bar, located on the top floor, features two window-side banquettes, a communal table, and a handful of cozy table-fortwos. There is a full bar, a glass-walled wine room, and works from various artists including a wine cork-lined wall created by Brazilian artist Ignacio Pla. On the menu youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find modern cuisine courtesy of internationally recognized Argentine chef, Rodrigo Sieiro. The dishes are inspired by both his travels and his experience with French, Italian and Spanish cuisine. Ingredients vary with the seasons but are sure to impress any time of year. Also at Malbec, you'll find over 170 Argentine wines and a curated list of vintage Argentine cocktails. For more about the menu and wines, visit malbechouse.com Tango House is located on the bottom floor. Inside youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find a cozy bar/lounge space where food and drink are served. Behind the bar/lounge is an intimate, cabaret-style theater where every night guests enjoy the signature tango show, The Showcase of Esquina Carlos Gardel. This performance chronicles the history of tango through song, dance, and elaborate costumes, and features an international cast of singers, dancers, and musicians. This show has been featured in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the past 12 years and has been viewed by nearly 2 million people to date. The show's producer, Juan Fabbri, is a tango impresario and 25-time winner of the Martin Fierro Award. For more about the show and to purchase tickets, visit tangohouse.net

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Brooklyn Oenology Winery’s intimate tasting room and gallery offers its own colorfully labeled vintages (Below), as well as other made-inNew-York-City liquors and foodstuffs.

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While New York Distilling focuses on the gin game, Kings County Distillery specializes in whiskey. The 3-yearold distillery located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (63 Flushing Ave., Bldg. 121, kingscountydistillery.com) has a working corn and barley farm next door. Visitors are welcome every Saturday afternoon to the 114-year-old former Paymaster Building to tour the 7,200-squarefoot facility, which includes samples of the signature unaged corn liquor (aka moonshine), bourbon and brandnew chocolate-flavored whiskey, incorporating ground “husks” from Brooklyn’s Mast Brothers Chocolate factory. You’ll find Kings County’s wares at The Modern (9 W. 53rd St., 212.333.1220) and Ward III (111 Reade St., 212.240.9194). Although it conjures up images of Caribbean islands, “rum was really a Northeast spirit first,” insists Bridget Firtle, a hedge-fund analyst turned distiller—and indeed, historians have found evidence of 16 NYC-area rum makers in the 1720s.Their spiritual descendent is Firtle’s The Noble Experiment (23 Meadow St., East Williamsburg, Brooklyn, tnenyc.com), which offers by-reservation Saturday tours. Launched in 2013, the Noble Experiment’s

first product, Owney’s Rum, has landed behind the bar at The Rum House (228 W. 47th St., 212.240.9194) and chic eatery Alison Eighteen (15 W. 18th St., 212.366.1818). SUDSY SAGAS In New York, the beer-making scene is hopping. Best known of the new bunch is Brooklyn Brewery (79 N. 11th St., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 718.486.7422), which offers tours every day but Friday, when it hosts a happy hour. At the other end of the city is the Bronx Brewery. Already reputed for its pale ales, it also offers custom casks, such as those at Monument Lane (103 Greenwich Ave., 212.255.0155). Queens is now home to six beer makers. Among them, Astoria’s SingleCut Beersmiths, (19-33 37th St., 718.606.0788) has an 85-seat Tap Room and provides samples of some of its beers. You’ll also find SingleCut brews at suds meccas around town, including Alphabet City Beer Co. (96 Ave. C, 646.422.7103). Then there are the brewpubs, selling their own suds, either crafted on premises or at a local brewery. 508 GastroBrewery (508 Greenwich St., 212.219.2444) has an in-house program and offers such beers as Hamber

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Smoked Amber Ale and Beauty Booty Blonde Ale. Other restaurants and bars make a point of specializing in New York City brews. Houston Hall (222 W. Houston St., 212.675.9323) offers 10 exclusive beers on tap from Greenpoint Beer Works, a craft brewery in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn. DBGB Kitchen and Bar (299 Bowery, 212.933.5300) pairs its Gallic-tinged pub grub with several local suds, such as Sixpoints’ Crisp Lager.

Even teetotalers can get into the locovoreliquid spirit at the greenwich village restaurant Rosemary’s (below), which infuses its fresh lemonade (right) with homemade syrup crafted from the namesake herb.

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WINE TIME Wine production in New York is a growing phenomenon. While it may seem odd that NYCbased producers call themselves “wineries” when they don’t actually grow grapes, Craig Kayaian at Brooklyn Oenology Winery, or BOE (209 Wythe Ave., Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 718.599.1259) points out that France has a history of vineyard-free wineries. Varietals are sold in more than 150 places around town, as well as in BOE’s cozy Tasting Room and Gallery. Red Hook Winery (Pier 41, 325A, 175-204 Van Dyke St., Brooklyn, 347.689.2432)

does blend its grapes on premises, and offers tastings of the resultant 70-odd rieslings, chardonnays and merlots. TINY BUBBLEs Teetotalers need not fret. New York is also home to several artisanal soda producers. GuS (Grown-up Soda), a Manhattan-based label, focuses on full-flavored beverages made with real juices. Eight flavors are found at gourmet groceries and restaurants throughout the city, including Eataly (200 Fifth Ave., 212.229.2560) and Per Se (10 Columbus Circle, 212.823.9335). Brooklyn’s P&H Soda Company packages handcrafted syrups in flavors such as ginger and hibiscus in old-fashioned bottles, sold at retro delis like Zucker’s Bagels & Smoked Fish (370 Lexington Ave., 212.661.1080). Restaurants devoted to local foodstuffs also often create their own drinks; one such is Rosemary’s (18 Greenwich Ave., 212.647.1818), which offers fresh rosemary syrup-infused lemonade. “Producing locally ties into the same reason that New York City is the epicenter for a lot of things,” says Tobin Ludwig, co-founder of Brooklyn’s Hella Bitter, whose wares flavor cocktails at eateries such as The Red Cat (227 10th Ave., 212.242.0199). “There’s a demand for everything here, no matter the niche.”

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Landmark Dining New York restaurants are iconsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;sometimes by virtue of their venue, other times in their own right, and often both. Certainly, sense of place has never tasted so good. By Drew Limsky photography by evan sung

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Howard Chandler Christyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1930s murals are a focal point at The Leopard at des Artistes (above). The restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fregula and lobster salad (facing page), with mullet bottarga and fried capers. WHERE G UEST B OOK N EW YORK

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hen surveying eateries in the city’s signature buildings, it seems logical to begin at the architectural beginning. Fraunces Tavern (54 Pearl St., 212.968.1776) is situated in a Georgian house-turned-inn that dates from 1719. In 1783, Gen. George Washington held a farewell feast for his officers here at the end of the Revolutionary War. Today, entering the dining room is like stepping into a time machine—the décor is a faithful reconstruction of a late-18th-century tavern, with wide-plank wood floors, long wood tables and period portraits—where guests sample Irish-American classics (chicken potpie, corned beef and cabbage) and an extensive list of beers and whiskeys. The building also houses a museum, which includes the room where Washington privately bade the boys goodbye. Many a private dinner also occurred in what is now Frankie & Johnnie’s Steakhouse (32 W. 37th St., 212.947.8940). The brownstone was once the home of stage and screen actor John Barrymore. Guests can dine in his former study, with its stained-glass ceiling and mahogany walls; one prized table is set beside the

Super-fresh shellfish platters (right) with lobster and the namesake bivalve are perennials at the Oyster Bar & Restaurant. Featuring a vaulted tile ceiling, the 100-year-old fish eatery resides on the lower level of Grand Central Terminal.

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working fireplace. “It’s a romantic spot—Barrymore was a romantic man,” says Owner Russ Panopoulos. While Frankie & Johnnie’s suggests intimacy, other landmarks are known for their imposing size. One of the most commanding is Grand Central Terminal. Each year, 21 million people pass through its Beaux Arts portals, from commuters dashing for trains to visitors lingering to gaze upward at the Main Concourse’s famed green ceiling, decorated with a fresco of the constellations. And downstairs the view is just as rewarding, if one dines at The Oyster Bar & Restaurant (89 E. 42nd St., 212.490.6650), with its vaulted ceilings clad in pale tiles by architect Raphael Guastavino. The 400-seat poisson palace opened just after the terminal in 1913. Murals help to make the magic at The Leopard at des Artistes (1 W. 67th St., 212.787.8767), located on the ground floor of an illustrious 1918 apartment building that once housed artistes such as Isadora Duncan, www.mvpny.net

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Noël Coward and illustrator Howard Chandler Christy, who painted a series of “Fantasy Scenes With Naked Beauties” (completed in 1935) for the walls of what was then a tenants’ dining room. These cavorting, lipsticksporting lovelies remained a major draw, even after the dining room became a long-running independent restaurant, Café des Artistes. Acquired by Gianfranco and Paula Bolla Sorrentino, it reopened as The Leopard in 2011, welcoming patrons back to “a full gut renovation and restored murals, so they could be seen as they were first intended—brighter,” Paula says. This incarnation features Italian cuisine, with menu standouts including an eggplant and mozzarella timbale and orecchiette with broccoli Romanesco and anchovies. The Four Seasons (99 E. 52nd St., 212.754.9494) is located in the Seagram Building, a touchstone of International Style architecture created by Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson. Opened in 1959, its then

Nobu New York (above left), where the David Rockwell-designed interior suggests a stylized take on a Japanese farmhouse, features Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s minimally presented dishes, such as a simple umami sea bass (above), which introduced New Yorkers to an innovative take on Japanese cuisine. WHERE G UEST B OOK N EW YORK

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grilled pork chops (ABOVE, RIGHT) accompany a variety of prime beef cuts on the menu at FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S STEAKHOUSE. THE RESTAURANT IS iN A TOWN HOUSE ONCE OWNED BY actor JOHN BARRYMORE, WITH A WOOD-LADEN DINING ROOM (above).

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avant-garde design (a marble pool, two-story windows covered by rippling metal-chain curtains and a canopy of seasonally changing trees) caused it to be the only eatery in the city to be designated an interior landmark by the New York City Landmarks Commission. Much more typical at the time were places such as La Grenouille (3 E. 52nd St., 212.752.1495), at age 51 an icon in its own right—and standard-bearer for the culinary tradition of haute cuisine. “We do French tableside service as it used to be,” says Owner Charles Masson. “It’s almost a lost art to carve the chicken right in the dining room. It’s part of the theater.” Equally old-school is the décor, dominated by dramatic floral arrangements. “And the flowers are in season just like the cuisine,” he points out. Landmarks not only represent the familiar—they

can symbolize a turning point, too. In that sense, Nobu New York (105 Hudson St., 212.219.0500) is an institution, one that introduced the city to fine Japanese cuisine and drew its denizens down to a hitherto deserted-at-night neighborhood. “Nobu helped to put TriBeCa on the map,” declares Co-owner/restaurateur Drew Nieporent. “What used to be an industrial area is now one of New York City’s prime dining destinations.” David Rockwell’s minimalist, Asian-inspired design matches Founding Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s presentations of such delicacies as salmon sashimi and the widely copied, but never-replicated, miso-marinated black cod. Whether they’re famed for their place or their plate, these grand restaurants are the stuff of which legends are made.

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In the

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want to relax or revive fast? the city’s top salons and spas stand ready to serve with streamlined treatments that offer instant gratification.

No one knows who originated the term “a New York minute.” But this fabled nanomoment—or as the late Johnny Carson put it, the interval between a Manhattan traffic light turning green and the guy behind you honking his horn—describes the local pace with breathtaking precision. Small surprise that the city that never sleeps is a splendid place for health and beauty treatments designed to relax, rejuvenate and primp on the quick. Just call ahead. A chic take on time-saving is the idea behind Fix Beauty Bar (847 Lexington Ave., 2nd fl., 212.744.0800), an Upper East Side blowout and manicure salon with multitasking in its DNA. “My partner and I were always short on time and wanted a place where we could combine both services,” says co-founder Michelle Breskin. The result: a white-on-white, 12-chair retreat, where hair is shampooed and blown out while nails are manicured in one simultaneous swoop. With a stylist standing behind and a manicurist perched in front, clients sit at a table outfitted with hand dryers and are out the door in 40 to 50 minutes, sporting a coif out of a look book—options include The Jen (“simply straight”), The Kim (“big dramatic curls”) and The You (“your way or the highway”)—and fashion nail colors by Chanel, Tom Ford and Dolce & Gabbana or salon stalwarts Essie and OPI. And since even speed demons value pampering, Fix offers a complimentary coffee or wine upon arrival.

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Photos: hourglass, © veer; man getting facial, © veer/fancy photography

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FACE TREATMENTS THAT TARGET A SPECIFIC SKIN CONDITION (I.E., BLACKHEADS, WRINKLES, DRYNESS) CAN OFTEN BE DONE IN A THIRD OF THE TIME OF A CONVENTIONAL, FULL-SERVICE FACIAL. WHERE G UEST B OOK N EW YORK

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isn’t a prerequisite. “This feel-good treatment is great for circulation, so a bald man would also love it,” founder John Masters says. Fuller massages can also be done on the fly (relatively speaking). The need for speed is the idea behind the trio of 30-minute sessions offered at Exhale (980 Madison Ave., 212.561.6400), shortened versions of its normally 60- and 90-minute massages, aimed at busy folk who want to duck into the spa on a lunch break or between meetings. A brief massage can be effective, especially if it’s targeted, says National Spa Director Laura Benge. Mention that your lower back is tight, for example, and the therapist will lavish the most time there, but also visit feet, arms and shoulders. Besides, “just lying down on the table, you feel you’re letting go of your day,” Benge says. If pairing the words “eyelash extensions” and “timesaving” seems incongruous, think again. Winks are silk extensions applied only to the outer lashes, a process done in 20 to 30 minutes—half the time of full-blown extensions, or a proverbial blink of the eye. “It’s a flirty, Marilyn Monroe look that’s great for a photo op or an event,” says Jamie Ahn, owner of Townhouse Spa

Photo: woman with eyelashes, © veer/fancy photography

Great Jones spa (above, left) offers a facial that simulates a face-lift’s effect, sans surgery; townhouse spa offers an eyelash extension method (right) that does the job in the blink of a you-know-what.

The beauty equivalent of small-plates dining can be found in the fast-growing array of bite-size treatments that trim the time but still deliver the goods. At its sleekly futuristic outpost, Dermalogica in SoHo (110 Grand St., 212.219.9800) takes a deconstructionist approach, serving walk-ins with an enticing menu of 20-minute MicroZone treatments that zero in on a specific skin condition, be it blackhead relief, flash exfoliation or age management. This is where to go when a blemish erupts the day before the wedding or you want a facial moisture boost before traveling. A gentle head-rub can be an instant soothe, especially when it’s paired with organic conditioners and essential oils. The John Masters Organics haircare store (77 Sullivan St., 212.343.9590) offers a scalp treatment and massage that, in true New York fashion, multitasks. The half-hour experience starts with a consultation with the treatment therapist, who determines which potions to use to help oily scalp, dandruff, split ends or frizzy hair. After a shampoo, the treatment is applied, followed by a 10-minute head, neck and shoulder massage and 10 minutes under the ionic dryer to hydrate the hair. That said, a hirsute head

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Trinity, a hand-held device that emits gentle micro-currents to relax tight muscles (cause of forehead furrows) and tighten saggy ones around the jaw and neck. No needles, anesthesia, incisions or recovery time, in other words. Of course, the effects aren’t permanent, wearing off within a week. But they can be maintained: The NuFace Trinity is “the first device [of its kind] approved for home use by the FDA,” says spa General Manager Karen Terranova. Other facials use oxygen as the go-to ingredient to provide that “instant face-lift” effect. At Janis Chakler Skin Care (850 Seventh Ave., Ste. 406, 646.436.3518), the 75-minute Intraceuticals Oxygen Facial features extractions, an enzyme treatment and massage before the main event—an application of oxygen under pressure that delivers a hydrating serum to the skin with a spray nebulizer. “The lightweight oxygen sends the ingredients deeper into the skin,” Owner/aesthetician Janis Chakler explains. Clients often come in for just the 45-minute oxygen portion, known as the Oxygen Boost. “You look brighter and hydrated, and makeup goes on flawlessly,” Chakler says. “I do it on myself when I’m going out.” The effects last for several days. Time-savvy treatments pamper you. But what makes them even sweeter: They free you to enjoy everything else NYC has to offer. Multitasking doesn’t get much better than that.

Photo: woman getting massage, istock

Patients see whiter teeth after one visit to Dr. Jan Linhart’s stateof-the-art office (above, left). A massage (right) that targets one area of the body, like the lower back, can still relax the entire frame.

(39 W. 56th St., 212.245.8006). Available in a variety of shapes and styles, a silk curl is adhered individually to each eyelash with a vegetable-based glue and lasts about two weeks. “If you put these on, you don’t need eye makeup,” Ahn says—an added time-saver. More substantial improvements to appearance are possible, too—in just one visit, in fact. Dr. Jan Linhart, D.D.S., P.C. (230 Park Ave., Ste. 1164, 212.682.5180), a specialist in cosmetic and restorative dentistry, was dissatisfied with old-style bleaching techniques that worked slowly and required patients to wear a nighttime device. So he developed PearlinBrite, a patented method that whitens teeth in one office visit. It uses a proprietary material that is applied to the teeth and activated by lasers or lights or both, depending on the state of the patient’s pearlies. “People need whitening for different reasons, so we adjust the system to each person’s needs,” Dr. Linhart explains. During the 90-minute-to-two-and-a-half-hour procedure, patients can sleep, listen to music through headphones or use mobiles. “You can’t talk, but you can text,” he says. If the words “nonsurgical face-lift” quicken your pulse, consider the NuFace Microcurrent Facial at Great Jones Spa (29 Great Jones St., 212.505.3185). After applying a fruit enzyme peel and hydrating mask, the aesthetician stimulates facial muscles for 20 minutes with the NuFace

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in motion scenic designers transport audiences to new realms of the imagination.

Photo: matilda the musical, joan marcus. matilda the musical set model, courtesy of rob howell

by francis lewis

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Matilda The Musical

When audiences take their seats in Broadway’s Shubert Theatre for a performance of Matilda The Musical, the curtain is already up. And what they see, as they face the stage, is a riot of alphabet tiles and building blocks, exploding on and totally devouring the proscenium. Imagine a Scrabble board upended, its scores of tiles scattered every which way. Immediately, Rob Howell’s scenic design, winner of the 2013 Tony Award, establishes the show’s tone and underscores its plot. This is a musical about words, and how language and books comfort, sustain and ultimately lead the pint-size (and very precocious) heroine of the title to not only overcome but also triumph over a mean-spirited adult world, as represented by her boorish parents and a sadistic (albeit comically so) headmistress. Throughout the show, tiles with letters shift and spell out words, from “joy” to “beastly;” the use of upper and lower case and a variety of typefaces sustains visual interest. “Each wood block was individually made and represents an amazing amount of work,” Howell has said. “They fit together like a big puzzle.” But, as everyone knows, all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy—and Matilda an even duller girl. In one of the show’s most exuberant production numbers, the kids sing and swing out over the audience. “The swings are complicated,” Howell says. “The pendulum point has to be exactly right to get them to swing in time to the music. It would be maddening if they didn’t.” Fortunately, they do.

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Kinky Boots at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre never stops moving, as befits a musical with footwear at its soul (pun intended). These stiletto heels never stand still, not in Jerry Mitchell’s Tony Award-winning choreography and not on David Rockwell’s Tony-nominated sets. As a celebrated architect, Rockwell has designed hospitals (Children’s Hospital at Montefiore), hotels (Andaz Wall Street), airport terminals (Jet Blue Terminal 5 at JFK International Airport) and restaurants (Nobu 57)—and those are just a few of his NYC projects. For Kinky Boots, his main set—a shoe factory in the English Midlands—is all industrial red brick and iron girders. Within it, there are moving staircases, mobile platforms and four conveyor belts, which represent the factory’s assembly line. Most of the mechanical elements are driven by people-power, with actors changing sets as locations quickly move from the factory floor to the factory office, from a local pub to a London drag club. Kinky Boots’ upbeat finale features a rousing fashion show at the Milan International Shoe Fair. The catwalk? A conveyor belt, of course.

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PHOTO: KINKY BOOTS, MATTHEW MURPHY. KINKY BOOTS SET MODEL, COURTESY OF DAVID ROCKWELL

Kinky Boots

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A LWAY S

PHOTO BY JASON BELL

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Pippin

PHOTO: PIPPIN, JOAN MARCUS. PIPPIN STORYBOARD SKETCH, COURTESY OF SCOTT PASK

A prince goes on a journey in Pippin, 2013’s Tony Award winner for Best Revival of a Musical, striking out in search of adventure and himself. “I’ve got to be where my spirit can run free/Got to find my corner of the sky,” Pippin sings in one of the show’s best-loved Stephen Schwartz songs. And what better place to be free than with a traveling circus, especially one conceived by director Diane Paulus and designed by Scott Pask. On one level, Pask’s blue tent studded with stars represents the hero’s aspirations, his corner of the sky; on another, it is the environment within which jugglers, hand-walkers, trapeze artists and assorted acrobats and tumblers, not to mention actors, fly through the air, breathe fire, balance on balls, walk planks, climb poles, jump through hoops, as well as sing, dance and emote. Pask refers to his set as a “magic box,” which, either knowingly or through sheer happenstance, is ensconced in Broadway’s jewel-box Music Box Theatre.

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Photos by Henry Hargreaves

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“[Peter and the Starcatcher] is a show that doesn’t need any scenery at all. This is a show that is completely about imagination.” And with those words, Donyale Werle accepted her 2012 Tony Award for Best Scenic Design of a Play. Certainly, in creating the environment for this show about Peter Pan—before he became Peter Pan—Werle put her imagination into overdrive. Look closely at her “Victorian jewel box proscenium,” as she calls it, and you’ll see a work sculpted out of everyday found objects. Corks, bottle caps, rolling pins, zippers, chains, rope, records, CDs, plastic spoons: What others might consider trash fit only for the dumpster, Werle rescues and recycles. Buttons can be made to look like rivets; a plastic bottle can be molded into a flower. Werle is in the forefront of green designers working in the theater today. “We can create scenery out of anything,” she has said, referring to herself and her team. “And we do.” Like its peripatetic hero, Peter and the Starcatcher has been a show on the move, bouncing from Off-Broadway (2011-2012) to Broadway (2012-2013) back to Off-Broadway (2013-2014), where it ends its run at New World Stages on Jan. 12, 2014. But in the grand theatrical tradition of “have set, will travel,” the play’s national tour continues to crisscross the United States, with stops in Los Angeles, Houston, Washington, D.C., Chicago and more.

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PHOTO: PETER AND THE STARCATCHER, © O&M CO. PETER AND THE STARCATCHER SET MODEL, © D. WERLE

Peter and the Starcatcher

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Broadway

F O L L I E S

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In mid-April 2011, the highly anticipated new Broadway superhero musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark (left) was, after a record-setting five months of previews and about as many postponed opening nights, about to go on an unprecedented hiatus. The trouble started immediately after it began performances, in late-November 2010. Word of mouth was not good. Chief among the complaints were a convoluted story with extraneous characters, unreliable special effects and strange musical sequences, especially a production number about shoes. Trouble turned to tragedy when an ensemble member fell 30 feet during a stunt gone wrong, suffering a fractured skull, broken ribs, cracked vertebrae and other serious injuries. (He miraculously recovered and rejoined the show four months later.) Trouble turned to scandal when director/designer/writer Julie Taymor, renowned for her work on the musical The Lion King, was ousted, and a revised script and some new musical numbers were instituted (hence the hiatus). Taymor sued the producers, claiming copyright infringement; they countersued, citing breach of contract. The drama at Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark spilled off the stage, into the tabloids and onto TV. The comic-book-style cliffhangers were numerous. Would the show ever open? Would its flying sequences never be perfected? Would hundreds of jobs and a reported $70 million (the largest Broadway budget ever) be lost? What was to become of Julie Taymor?

illustrations by cun shi

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The professional theater doesn’t turn out scandals as steadily as the film or music industries, but when it does, the world tunes in. And the bigger the celebrity, the more intense the scandal. Enter Shia LaBeouf. In February 2013, the star of the blockbuster Transformers film franchise went into rehearsals for what was to be his legit stage debut, in a revival of the hard-hitting drama Orphans. A little more than a week later, he was let go. But he did not go quietly, instead doing what any millennial movie star would do: He took to Twitter, posting links to emails between him, his co-star, the formidable Alec Baldwin, and his director, the esteemed Daniel Sullivan. The emails revealed “a disagreeable situation,” with suggestions of insurmountable differences in acting styles. “This one will haunt me,” an email from Sullivan to LaBeouf read. “You tried to warn me. You said you were a different breed. I didn’t get it.” Though its premiere was delayed (LaBeouf shockingly sat in the first row for the first preview, ostensibly to cheer on his former colleagues and replacement, possibly to keep stirring the pot), Orphans did open, but it ultimately disappointed, playing a truncated run. Baldwin came away unscathed, unlike a previous appearance on the New York stage, in an Off-Broadway production of the black comedy Entertaining Mr. Sloane in 2006. As the story goes, the airconditioning wasn’t turned up high enough in Sloane’s theater, so Baldwin punched a wall backstage, sending his co-star, respected stage actress Jan Maxwell, running for friendlier climes. The verdict from the press was swift: uncool. However, in the court of public opinion, he was acquitted. Audiences are especially forgiving of a divo—or diva—in distress. Enter Patti LuPone. Of the many showstoppers the powerhouse has delivered in her illustrious career—“Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” from Evita, “Blow, Gabriel, Blow” from Anything

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Goes and “A Little Priest” from Sweeney Todd, to name just a few—her most storied might be “Rose’s Turn,” the demanding musical climax of the incomparable Gypsy—or specifically one of her final performances of it in the 2008 Broadway revival, when she literally stopped the show midnumber to deliver a few choice words to a misbehaving audience member. “Stop taking pictures right now,” she hollered. “You heard the announcement at the beginning [of the show], you heard the announcement at intermission. How dare you! Who do you think you are? … Get them out!” An audio recording was uploaded to YouTube, quickly becoming the rant heard around the world. Though

1996: julie andrews turns her back on a tony award nomination.

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Would the show ever open? Would hundreds of jobs and a reported $70 million—the largest Broadway budget ever—be lost?

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LuPone lost it this particular instance, one must commend her for her previous restraint. “Audiences don’t know how many times we don’t stop the show,” she said after the incident. “This is just an epidemic.” It’s one thing to chastise a scofflaw spectator, but imagine the courage needed to publicly reproach a powerful impresario, as Glenn Close did with Andrew Lloyd Webber in 1995. When the actress took a welldeserved two-week vacation from her legendary leading performance as Norma Desmond during the Broadway run of the lush, lavish Sunset Boulevard (based on the 1950 movie), which Lloyd Webber composed and produced, it was announced that box-office revenues remained steady, presumably to imply that Close was an expendable commodity. In reality, the receipts took a dive. A scathing letter Close wrote Lloyd Webber conveniently found its way to the press, and he was forced to admit that the numbers had been fudged. Beloved actress Julie Andrews showed similar bravery—not to mention tremendous loyalty and a refreshing lack of ego—when she took the Tony Awards nominating committee to task in 1996. When Andrews earned the sole nomination for the stage version of the zany film Victor/Victoria, for Best Actress in a Musical, she publicly rejected it. “I have searched my conscience and my heart,” she said in a now-classic speech, “and find that, sadly, I cannot accept this nomination, and I prefer instead to stand with the egregiously overlooked” cast and creators. Another instance of a notable figure standing up to a powerful organization involves British producer Cameron Mackintosh’s battle with the American stageactors union, Actors’ Equity Association. After making Les Misérables and The Phantom of the Opera runaway hits, Broadway audiences were waiting with bated breath for the prolific promoter’s next attraction, Miss Saigon, the Madama Butterfly-inspired megamusical that was slated to open in April 1991 with an astounding $37 million advance sale. Mackintosh wanted his two leads from the London production, Lea Salonga and Jonathan Pryce, to cross the pond. For that to happen, special permission from Actors’ Equity needed to be obtained—and it wasn’t going to give it for Pryce. “The casting of a Caucasian actor made up to appear Asian is an affront to the Asian community,” read the union’s statement. “The casting choice is especially disturbing when the casting of an Asian actor, in this role, would be an important and significant opportunity to break the usual pattern of casting Asians in minor roles.” Mackintosh had a simple solution: He would cancel the production, return the

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advance and leave a multitude of theater professionals bereft. Actors’ Equity quickly changed its tune, and Miss Saigon wound up running for a decade, providing employment for many actors of Asian descent­and winning three Tony Awards—including one for Pryce. Some tortured productions don’t get to open at all. Enter Rebecca, the Musical, the calamity-plagued show whose long-delayed opening night is still a dream as of this writing. A hit in Vienna, Austria, where it premiered in 2006 and ran for three years, the adaptation of the gothic-thriller novel by Daphne du Maurier was slated to bow on Broadway in March, then November 2012 with a reportedly exhilarating score, an opulent physical production and special effects that included the fiery destruction of its set. Two months later, the production was at best postponed, at worst canceled due to the alleged death of a mysterious, never-seen investor from malaria, and the loss of his promised $4.5 million investment, more than one-third of the show’s budget. That investor, it was soon proven, was the fabrication of a con man. The aftermath: scores of actors, musicians, crew and designers out of work, a warehouse filled with props, an inquiry from the FBI and producers scrambling to raise the budget shortfall before they lose the rights. Only time will tell if Rebecca ever gets to debut on the Great White Way, but if it does, it’s not inconceivable that, even with all of the strikes against it, it could be a hit. Re-enter Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. With its revisions in place, it finally opened on June 14, 2011. The consensus was that it was improved. More importantly, audiences were pleased, especially by the thrilling flying sequences, and word of mouth spread. Julie Taymor eventually reached a settlement with the producers, and her name remains on the credits. SpiderMan: Turn Off the Dark had, to paraphrase one of its lyrics, risen above. That’s what true fans of Broadway love about a scandal—when it ends in success.

2013: shia labeouf’s behind-the-scenes tweets go viral.

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When the professional theater turns out a scandal, the world tunes in. And the bigger the celebrity involved, the more intense the scandal.

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Period Pieces Some styles are timeless, for both clothing and dÉcor. by troy segal photography by ken pao ON HIM: Jacket and trousers by Rag & Bone, 119 Mercer St., 212.219.2204. Shirt and pocket square by Thomas Pink, 520 Madison Ave., 212.838.1928. Bow tie by Etro, 720 Madison Ave., 212.317.9096 ON HER: Slip dress by Maggie Norris Couture, 212.239.3433 (by appointment only). Isa Tapia pumps, Saks Fifth Avenue, 611 Fifth Ave., 212.753.4000. Onyx earrings by David Yurman, 712 Madison Ave., 212.752.4255. Diamond, pearl and 18-karat gold rings by Graziela Gems, grazielagems.com FURNITURE: Amboyna wood shaving stand with gilt bronze mirror, ca. 1926 (left), and palisander wood vanity with giltbronze statues, 1948 (facing page), both by Jules Leleu, at Maison Gerard

Streamlined Chic Born in the 1920s, Art Deco style continues to captivate almost a century later, with its slick finishes and sleek curves. Just because the style is simple and stylized, however, doesn’t mean it is plain or spartan. On the contrary: Furnishings seem

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rich in texture and embellishment, from the use of contrasting materials (variously colored inlays, metal/wood combinations) or the materials themselves: grained woods, ivory, tooled leathers. Plush and lush, they are practical as well, supremely comfortable to sit on, says Benoist Drut, partner in Maison Gerard (43 E.10th St., 212.674.7611). “You’re invited to lounge.” Like the Jazz Era in which it thrived, Art Deco furniture conveys a sense of dash, playfulness and, above all, glamour, Drut feels. The 1920s were a liberating time: “Picasso inventing a revolutionary style of painting, Coco Chanel racing a sports car along the Riviera. You sense all this in the furniture of the period.” Indeed, gazing at pieces, it’s easy to envision a gentleman leaning against his shaving stand or a lady sitting at her vanity, respectively garbed in a tailored-to-perfection suit or clinging satin dress, preparing for a night on the town, glossy with the promise of a brave new world. MORE OPTIONS FOR ART DECO FURNISHINGS: Ritter Antik, 35 E. 10th St., 212.673.2213; High Style Deco, 27 W. 20th St., 212.647.003; Eileen Lane Antiques, 236 E. 60th St., 212.475.2988

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Merchandised and styled by anna katsanis; Hair by anja grassegger; Makeup by Mizu for Maybelline New York; Models: Lorenzo/ford models and Iana Godnia/Major Models


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ON HIM: Mandarin collar jacket and trousers by Blanc de Chine, 673 Fifth Ave., 212.308.8688 ON HER: Blouse and pants by Blanc de Chine. Thala Blanc necklace and fuschia python clutch, at Yves Durif Salon, The Carlyle, 35 E. 76th St., 212.452.0954. Cuff bracelet, at Yuta Powell, 967 Madison Ave., 212.570.6889. Ring and earrings, by special order from Mika, 212.452.1662 ANTIQUES: 17th-century blanc de chine porcelain wine cups and late-19th-century Chinese export silver teaset (facing page) and Kangxi Period famille verte spirit bottle (this page), at Ralph M. Chait Galleries

Eastern Standard

“The Exotic Orient.” “The Mysterious East.” Throughout the centuries, a variety of phrases have reflected the Western world’s fascination with China—a fascination dating back to 1299, when a merchant named Marco Polo published an account of his Asian travels. Ever since then, periodic waves of interest have engulfed these shores, especially for decorative art objets—precious pieces that capture the essence of a civilization that’s ancient, erudite and intriguingly distant, both geographically and culturally. “China has always struck a chord as ‘the other,’” says Steven Chait, vice president of Ralph M. Chait Galleries (724 Fifth Ave., 212. 319.0471), which has dealt in Chinese art and antiquities for over a century. His grandfather founded the firm, taking advantage of one of those aforementioned waves of interest—in this case, the vogue among Belle Époque robber barons for amassing collections of Chinese artifacts. Aside from their intrinsic, exotic beauty, such pieces

were originally prized for their uniqueness. They were, literally, made of something Westerners couldn’t have, either because of an indigenous-to-the-East material— say, bamboo or jade—or craft, like lacquer or painted china. Even after the West developed its own factories, for decades “nothing was as refined as Chinese porcelain,” says Chait. “The colors, the attention to detail, the emphasis on symmetry all established the ideal.” The Chinese also adapted their crafts to suit foreign tastes. Silver was not traditionally used by Asian artisans, for example. But, noting Westerners’ fondness for it, in the 1700s craftsmen in port cities began creating “Chinese export silver”: tableware that was European in shape, but decorated with Asian motifs, such as a dragon handle on a teapot or pagoda-adorned tureen. Such cross-pollination has been particularly evident in fashion of late. Asian or Asian-American names (Jason Wu, Phillip Lim) are at the forefront of couture. The growth of the Chinese fashion market has encouraged an explosion of Chinese-influenced designs, in a variety of ways: While Vivienne Tam playfully adorns Western styles with Asian imagery (i.e., skirts with silk-screened Buddhas), the label Blanc de Chine uses characteristic Chinese details, such as mandarin collars or frog closures, in garments made of Western fabrics, like tweed or leather. The gap between East and West may be shrinking—but the fascination remains. MORE OPTIONS FOR ASIAN ARTIFACTS: Kaikodo, 74 E. 79th St., 212.585.0121; Chinese Porcelain Company, 475 Park Ave., 212.838.7744; Zetterquist Galleries, 3 E. 66th St., #1B, 212.751.0650

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ON HER: Hand-embroidered corset by Maggie Norris. Antonio Marras long paneled skirt and Bionda Castana boots, at Saks Fifth Avenue. Long ruched leather gloves by Jane Carr, janecarr.com. Natalie Dejean pheasant-feathered headpiece, at Yuta Powell. Thorin & Co. topaz chandelier earrings, at House of Lavande, houseoflavande.com

Eternal Elegance

The mansionlike premises of antiques dealer Carlton Hobbs houses an extraordinary room. Built in the 1770s, it’s an entire paneled library in white and gold—painted, floorto-ceiling wood walls, with carved and gilded motifs emblematic of the arts and sciences, including eight different musical instrument ensembles (detail, above). Dominating one side is a chimneypiece, adorned with boldly carved flutes; a row of urns, linked by garlands, sits atop the bookshelves. Originally installed in an aristocratic home in Dijon, France, the library has bounced around a bit: In the 20th century, it was acquired by J.P. Morgan Jr. and later resided in the Metropolitan

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Museum of Art before coming to Hobbs—where, miraculously, it fit perfectly into a section of his gallery’s town house (60 E. 93rd St., 212.423.9000). The fact that the room has survived physically is amazing; the fact that it endures stylistically, less so. The late-18th-century look—known as Neoclassicism— never seems dated, somehow. As the name implies, the style was based on classical (ancient Greek and Roman) ideals of simplicity and symmetry, proportion and balance, elegance and grace. Furniture from the period has simple geometric shapes, gently curved or rectilinear. It’s often embellished with small carvings or painted images, along with intricate inlaid patterns and veneers. Designs depict things that are lively and light—swags, ribbons, feathers—or suggestive of living nature: trees, flowers, fruits. With its clean lines, neoclassical design has never gone completely out of style—it “doesn’t seem to be bound to fashion,” as Carlton Hobbs notes—but currently, it is having a sartorial moment. Order and discipline are returning to clothes, in the form of nipped-in waists and defined shoulders, So is discreet adornment: lace lining a lady’s blouse, a detailed floral print on a tie. And accessories are in again—a pair of long gloves or a pocket square for a finishing touch of refinement. May it endure for another 300 years. MORE OPTIONS FOR 18TH-CENTURY ANTIQUES: L’Antiquaire & The Connoisseur, 36 E. 73rd St., 212.517.9176; O’Sullivan Antiques, 51 E. 10th St., 212.260.8985; Hyde Park Antiques, 836 Broadway, 212.477.0033

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Since WHERE GUESTBOOK NEW YORK is an annual publication, there is a possibility that the items shown, while available for purchase at press time, may be out of stock. The products featured, however, provide a fine representation of the overall quality of the storesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; merchandise.


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ON HIM: Double-breasted wool coat, wool trousers and cotton shirt, Paul Smith, 142 Greene St., 646.613.3060. Wingtip shoes, Kenneth Cole, 95 Fifth Ave., 212.675.2550. Lions pocket square, Thomas Pink, 520 Madison Ave., 212.838.1928 ON HER: Black and lichen heavy wool dress, Orla Kiely, 5 Mercer St., 212.775.8340. Optic white Joselle pumps, Michael Kors Rockefeller Center, 610 Fifth Ave., 212.582.2444 FURNITURE: 1960s Lightolier teak and brass lamp and late 1950s Basset walnut desk, at Adelaide

Midcentury Mystique

“If I’d known it was an ‘Era,’ I’d have paid more attention,” singer Helen O’Connell once reminisced about the Big Band days before and after World War II. Many citizens of a certain age might feel that way about the current craze for Midcentury Modern furniture, the moniker for styles from the late-1940s to the early 1970s. While it may cause déjà vu in baby boomers, a lot of the interest today comes from twenty- and thirtysomething collectors, says Michael Smith, co-owner of antiques store Adelaide (702 Greenwich St., 212. 627.0508), which specializes in the period—suggesting that its “appeal is not nostalgia, but design.” Light and

spare—this was a time when the mantra ‘form follows function’ reigned—the angular or amoeba-shaped furniture (or abstract patterns, as in the 1950s American piece of drapery, left) pairs well with the minimalist, sleek architecture of today, Smith notes. Yet it offers “a vintage touch,” too, since the modern designs were often executed in traditional wood or other natural materials. In clothing and fabric, the look was enlivened with bright pops of color (a key characteristic of contemporary “retro” fashions). What has fueled the interest in Midcentury Modern style now? The influence of the TV series Mad Men, a fictional chronicle of the era, has been “huge,” as Smith says. Also, since much of it was factory-made—famed designers of the day, such as Charles and Rae Eames, prided themselves on styling furniture that could be mass-produced—pieces are relatively affordable, by antiques standards (think four figures, not five). Even so, the quality quotient remains high. “You can restore these things,” Smith says. “They clean up beautifully.” MORE OPTIONS FOR MIDCENTURY MODERN FURNISHINGS: L’Art de Vivre, 978 Lexington Ave., 212.734.3510; Hostler Burrows, 51 E. 10th St., 212.343.0471; R Gallery, 82 Franklin St., 212.343.7979

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PHOTO: THE SQUID AND THE WHALE, © SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS/PHOTOFEST; AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, © AMNH/D. FINNIN

BELOW: A BLUE WHALE MODEL HANGS IN THE MILSTEIN HALL OF OCEAN LIFE AT THE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY; FAR LEFT: JESSE EISENBERG MARVELS AT THE GIANT SEA MAMMAL IN THE SQUID AND THE WHALE (2005).

FILM PROJECTS COME AND GO, BUT MUSEUMS ARE ETERNAL—AND NEW YORK CITY IS AN EPICENTER FOR BOTH. HOLLYWOOD DIRECTORS FIND INSPIRATION IN OUR METROPOLIS’ GREAT CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS, SETTING EYE-OPENING SCENES IN THE MOST EYE-OPENING OF MUSEUMS. DON’T WORRY, WE’VE GOT YOUR TICKET. BY WILLIAM G. FRIERSON IV WHERE GUEST B OOK N EW YORK

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above: gwyneth paltrow and michael douglas at the metropolitan museum of art in A perfect murder (1998); above, right: francisco de goya’s “majas on a balcony” (1800-1810), on view at the same museum.

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ening visual and emotional experiences. Scenes set in museums even possess the core qualities of the host institutions themselves: They’re revelatory, discovery-filled and loaded with intrigue. Roll the cameras. When one visits the Metropolitan Museum of Art, lifechanging discoveries are to be expected. But who could anticipate running into the man your wife is having a heated affair with? Such is the case in A Perfect Murder (1998), when a haughty financial executive (Michael Douglas) catches his aristocratic heiress wife (Gwyneth Paltrow) sharing an intimate exchange with her secret artist lover (Viggo Mortensen) in the Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art. It’s easy to understand why the pair chose this wing as an escape: With 26,000 ancient artifacts on view, dating between the Paleolithic and Roman periods and

organized chronologically in over 39 rooms, it’s a choice destination in which to lose oneself. The murderous plot born from this discovery—involving a web of lies and secret assassins aimed at the demise of the unwitting wife—strikes a similar thematic chord as a treasure from the museum’s permanent collection: Francisco de Goya’s (1746-1828) “Majas on a Balcony” (1800-1810, housed in Gallery 612, European Paintings). In the work, two upper-class women sit gazing, beautiful and oblivious (embodying hints of Paltrow’s character’s initial pose), while two menacing men lurk in the shadows, eyes dark with impure thoughts (hello, Douglas and Mortensen). It’s a chilling painting with an aura that aligns alarmingly with a chilling film. The Met is home to a highly coveted, and highly valued, art collection—and is guarded accordingly. Only

Photos: a perfect murder, © warner bros./photofest; francisco de goya, “majas on a balcony,” courtesy of the metropolitan museum of art

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magine, if you can bear to, a city without museums—dull, devoid of culture, intellectually destitute. A thinking man’s nightmare, but a philistine’s paradise. Luckily, New York City plays host to scores of world leaders in the category, from the elegant and timeless Metropolitan Museum of Art to the bold and futuristic Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. We visit them by the droves because we want insight. We want revelation. We want knowledge. It turns out Hollywood directors seek the same inspiration—and NYC museums are where they find it. Considering our upper-crust crop, who can blame them? Moviemakers simply can’t help setting their dramas in our wonder-filled galleries, and it makes a lot of sense: Both films and museums document and engage, offering enlight-

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the most deviously debonair individual could pull off a heist there. Enter Pierce Brosnan as Thomas Crown in The Thomas Crown Affair (1999). His playboy allure, seemingly unlimited finances and elite social status serve him well as he manages to steal—and return, it’s eventually revealed—a prized, and pricey, work from the museum: Monet’s Impressionist masterpiece “San Giorgio Maggiore at Dusk” (1908-1912). In reality, the painting isn’t owned by or shown at The Met, but rather is at the National Museum Wales. Other Monet works from the same period are viewable, however, such as “The Doge’s Palace Seen From San Giorgio Maggiore” (1908). Fortunate for those without fortunes, or art heist aplomb, you can ‘pay as you wish’ for the viewing pleasure (with a recommended donation of $25). The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is a place for quiet contemplation. Not so in the fast-paced The International (2009), which features a climactic shootout in the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed structure. The museum and the flick share a set of identifying aesthetic traits: Both are hypermodern, edgy and global in reach. The chief difference being that the film provides just 118 minutes of action, while the museum itself can captivate for the larger part of a day. The high-octane firefight erupts along Wright’s legendary, winding ramp. Bullets fly—Don’t hit the art! Please, don’t hit the art!—while, to any architecture lover’s despair, a chandelier is dislodged and shattered, crashing on the rotunda floor below. The sequence is thrilling, if you can get past the gross disregard for the museum’s revolutionary

Photos: solomon r. guggenheim museum, david m. heald / © the solomon r. guggenheim foundation, new york; the international, © columbia pictures/photofest Photo credit gotham book 5.5/9pt

below: clive owen and naomi watts star in the international (2009), which features a firefight at the solomon r. guggenheim museum; Below, left: the spiral ramp of the frank lloyd wright-designed space.

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Woody Allen’s 1979 ode to the city’s central borough (and the game of love), Manhattan, turns museums into places of courtship. As Issac Davis (Woody Allen) attempts to woo his best friend’s mistress (Diane Keaton), these cultural centers are where all the romantic sparks fly—from an almost-kiss at the Hayden Planetarium (giving new meaning to “star-crossed lovers”) to a revealing discussion about past romances at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Only after a chance encounter at the Museum of Modern Art’s sculpture garden do the pair open up to each other. As they discover art, they discover one another. The whole film is a comic expression of a man’s struggle to understand the feminine mystique—how women act, think and attract. And Allen isn’t the only great mind inclined to mull over such matters. American artist Edward Hopper (1882-1967) demonstrates a similar fascination with the opposite sex. He frequently featured complex femmes in his works, including “New York Movie” (1939), part of MoMA’s collection, depicting a solitary blonde usherette in a theater, lost in a contemplative cloud, as a film plays behind her (black-andwhite, just like Allen’s). The viewer finds himself, like Issac, trying to decode an alluring woman’s inner thoughts. Allen’s protagonist never fully figures out the girl he pines for, but at least he makes time for some earnest art appreciation. As the opening lines of Manhattan go, “He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion ... no, make that: He romanticized it all out of proportion.” With the museum scene this city has to offer, how could you not?

Photos: manhattan, © united artists/photofest; Edward hopper, “new york movie,” digital image © the museum of modern art/licensed by scala/art resource, ny

abovE: woody allen and diane keaton at the whitney museum of american art in manhattan (1979); above, right: Edward hopper’s “new york movie” (1939), part of the museum of modern art’s collection.

design and exhibits. Fortunately, the damage was done to a studio set and not the actual space or art. Once riddled with bullets, a futurist masterpiece loses a lot of luster, after all. Just one trip to the American Museum of Natural History reveals how The Squid and the Whale (2005)—the story of two Park Slope, Brooklyn, boys coping with their parents’ nasty divorce—found its title. The film’s final two shots take us to the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. The eldest son (Jesse Eisenberg) gazes at the hall’s giant blue whale suspended in the grand room, a 94-foot-long and 21,000-pound beast looming over museumgoers, as he contemplates fraying relations with his mother. Quick cut, and he’s before the fabled diorama depicting a sperm whale in hungry combat with a giant squid, red and alienlike, with toothed tentacles boring holes in the sea mammal’s fleshy hide. It’s a moving sight—a clash of biological titans—and a striking metaphor for two parents at each other’s throats. The boy’s revelation about the ugly nature of divorce, invoked by such powerful imagery, is emotionally crushing. Not easily forgotten. Families, be they dysfunctional or harmonious, can look to the AMNH for coveted together time during the museum’s sleepover program, offering kids between the ages of 6 and 13 (with chaperones over 21) the chance to slumber underneath the same blue whale (check amnh.org for dates). An entire night spent within those walls is fated to be a magical one—just ask Ben Stiller, or anyone who has seen Night at the Museum (2006). Rumor has it that, in this museum, history has a way of coming to life after dark.

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LARRY FLYNT'S

HUSTLER CLUB ROOF DECK & CIGAR LOUNGE It only takes one visit to know why Larry Flynt's Hustler Club, featuring a Heated Roof Deck and Cigar Lounge, has become a favorite place to go to relax and celebrate. Located adjacent to the Hudson River and exuding a casual attitude in an upscale environment, the club puts the fun back into adult cabarets. The Hustler Club Cigar Lounge offers a comfortable place in which to unwind and have a drink with your favorite cigar in the company of our gorgeous and diverse female entertainers. Boasting a stellar selection of private-label and internationally renowned cigars, and with over 150 of the most erotic and exotic entertainers, the club attracts a sophisticated clientele, who seek— and find—a place where their fantasies are fulfilled. Larry Flynt's Hustler Club also offers the ultimate in spirits for those with discerning tastes, from fine cognac and single-malt scotch to champagne bottle service. Within the 10,000 square feet of pure party space, there are two floating glass stages, VIP champagne suites and multiple performance stages. You’re also invited to watch all major sporting events, including PPV boxing and MMA bouts, on oversized HD screens visible from any angle in the club, including the rooftop lounge. Whether you’re a connoisseur of cigars and spirits or just interested in a new, unique experience, stop by Larry Flynt's Hustler Club for a night to remember. We’re positive you’ll become a fan. Must be 21 years of age - Proper attire required

641 West 51st Street, New York

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Photo credit gotham book 5.5/9pt

Speed capturing great sports moments, one click at a time. by bob cannon

WG14_F_Sports.indd 120 PhotoS: derek jeter, al bello/getty images; new york rangers, alex trautwig/getty images

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hen the subject is sports, New York City is inarguably the Big Time. On-field achievements become worldwide headlines when they occur in a New York venue. The talented photographers behind the photos on these pages managed to capture those rare fleeting moments when the athlete, the crowd and the drama of the game, large or small, come together to create a scene that can never be recreated. In New York, of course, the spotlight’s glare—and the photographer’s lens—is unavoidable. For instance, every September the tennis world turns its attention to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens, the home of the U.S. Open. The tournament was held for more than 50 years in nearby Forest Hills before moving to its present location in left: new york yankee derek jeter at yankee stadium (Sept. 19, 2012). Above: Dan girardi, michael del zotto, brian boyle, mats zuccarello and chris kreider of the new york rangers at TD garden in boston, Mass (may 25, 2013). WHERE G UEST B OOK N EW YORK

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tennis champion serena williams at the usta billie jean king national tennis center in flushing, queens (Sept. 9, 2012).

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Photo credit Photo: serenagotham williams, book mike 5.5/9pt stobe/getty images for USTA

1978, where its DecoTurf surface makes it a notoriously fast court that demands a vast amount of power from its champions. Few have combined those qualities better than Serena Williams, whose dominating baseline style has earned her five women’s Open championships among her 17 Grand Slam singles titles. In 2001, she became the first player in tennis history to win the season-ending WTA Tour event on her debut. Serena is currently sixth on the all-time Grand Slam singles list, one major behind Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova. Although she has made winning look easy, it has been anything but. Here, photographer Mike Stobe captures the strain of competition during Williams’ three-set victory in the 2012 U.S. Open final against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus. Just as Queens has the Open, the Bronx is synonymous with the New York Yankees, the most iconic franchise in American sports. The third, and current, version of Yankee Stadium features the famed “Monument Park” that bears the retired numbers of past Yankee greats—with whom most fans are on a single-name basis: the Babe, Lou, DiMaggio, Mickey, Billy. Those names have helpd the Yankees become the most dominant team in baseball history, with 40 American League pennants and 27 World Series championships. In a few years, they will inevitably be joined by No. 2, Derek Jeter, the Yankee captain who has manned shortstop for the Bronx Bombers since 1995, ushering in one of the team’s most successful periods. Between 1996 and 2000, Jeter led the team to four World Series wins in five seasons. In a shot by Al Bello, Jeter waves to the fans on his way to the dugout before the game against the Toronto Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium on the team’s way to clinching the American League East title in 2012. By season’s end, Jeter had amassed 3,305 hits, placing him 11th in major league history. As this photo suggests, Derek Jeter seems bigger than life. When baseball ends and winter descends upon New

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the dazzling Deron Williams of the brooklyn nets takes a shot at the BArclays centeR in brooklyn (May 4, 2013).

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Photo: brooklyn nets, elsa/getty images

York, the ice at Madison Square Garden becomes a focal point for New York Rangers hockey fans, a diehard breed that has stuck by their team through thick and thin—mostly thin. One of NHL’s “Original Six” teams, the Rangers joined the league in 1962 and had 48 Hall of Famers wear their colors. In fact, the Rangers were the first American team to win the Stanley Cup. However, in recent years, the blue shirts have tested their fans patience with just one Stanley Cup win (in 1994) since 1940. Yet the love endures. The 2012-2013 season saw the team reach the Eastern Conference semifinals, winning Game 4 at the Garden before falling to the Boston Bruins. Here, during the series’ decisive Game 5, the Rangers’ Dan Girardi (No. 5) celebrates a first-period goal with teammates Michael Del Zotto (No. 4), Brian Boyle (No. 22), Mats Zuccarello (No. 36), and Chris Kreider (No. 20). This photo by Alex Trautwig captures that moment of elation for a team when all things—including a Stanley Cup title—are possible. Though basketball was invented in Massachusetts, New York City is the sport’s spiritual home. The latest addition to the city’s roundball history is the Brooklyn Nets. Starting out in the old American Basketball Association of the 1970s, the Nets spent years wandering the metropolitan area from Long Island, then to northern New Jersey before finally landing in New York City last season to play their home games at the new Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Here the Nets’ Deron Williams (No. 8) lets go of a jump shot against the Chicago Bulls during Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals on May 4, 2013. Though the Nets came up short in their quest for an NBA title, they announced last summer that they intend to rectify the situation by acquiring superstars Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett from the Boston Celtics (which has since happened). To coin a cliché, the future is now. And if fortune winds up smiling the Nets’ way, it will make for another glorious chapter in the history of New York City, the city of winners.

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ROBIN’S JEAN TAKES THE LEAD IN SOHO Robin’s Jean New York Flagship Store is the destination for fans of the brand who march to the beat of their own drum. The designer denim brand sits amongst the best in the luxury shopping mecca of Soho, New York. Robin’s Jean deep rooted American heritage is exemplified here by a collection of neon signage, vintage jewelry, fairground rides and motorcycles. Located at 60 Grand Street, between West Broadway and Wooster streets, Robin’s Jean offers an assortment of men’s and women’s denim that are known for unique washes and finishes as well as their great fit. The collection also includes men’s and women’s graphic t-shirts, leather jackets and accessories. This store is a one-stop shopping destination for trendsetters and influencers who seek unique denim style and quality. Robin’s Jean Soho Flagship store is located at 60 Grand Street, New York, New York 10013; Phone: 212.226.2191

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Robin's Jean Coming to America Robin arrived in Los Angeles in 1996. His skills and talent caught the eye of the city's premier denim companies. At a time when most denim was designed around basic styles, Robin's attention to fabrics, washes and detail made him a rising star.

Denim Pioneer Robin's Jean features a unique collection of jeans, jackets, tops, hats and belts for men and women, designed by Robin Chretien and bearing the goldwings logo that represents Robin's childhood dream of freedom and flight. After arriving in Los Angeles in 1996 and catching the eye of the best denim companies, Robin decided in 2005 to create his own line, combining his passions for designing clothes and riding motorcycles and vintage cars with his fascination of the Native American spirit.

The Birth of Robin's Jean In 2005, eager to produce high-end jeans that were truly his own, he founded Robin's Jean, symbolized by a gold-wings logo that represents his dream of freedom and flight. "Wearing a pair of our jeans makes you feel alive, free, spontaneous and able to do anything you put your heart and soul into," he says. Experience Robin's Jean at our three stores, in Soho in New York at 60 Grand St., 212.226.2191; In Beverly Hills at 313 N. Beverly Drive, 310.786.7813; and in Laguna Beach at 264 Forest Ave., 949.371.8918. Or shop online at robinsjean.com

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LOOK BOOK We present a stylish array of must-buy items— decorative and functional, indulgent and essential, antique and recently made—for your shopping pleasure.

MART IN LAW R E N C E G A LLE R IE S

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Clockwise from top left: The playfully pink Miu Miu Ostrich Bag ($7,500) is available at Bloomingdale’s 1000 Third Ave., 212.705.2000, bloomingdales.com

B ASSA N O J E W E L RY A N D DANI E L L E B . J E WE L E RS

Takashi Murakami’s “Jellyfish Eyes—Black 5,” mixed-media graphic (price on request) at Martin Lawrence Galleries, 457 W. Broadway, 212.995.8865, martinlawrence.com Stallion Boot & Belt Company’s European calf Texas handmade boots with inlaid top and toe bug and wrinkle ($1,650), available at Space Cowboy NYC, 234 Mulberry St., 646.559.4779, spacecowboyNYC.com TeNo Steel Blaze stainless steel watches in 14 different dial colors ($2,950 for full diamond bezel), available at Bassano Jewelry, 952 Third Ave., 212.371.8060 and Danielle B. Jewelers, 871 Seventh Ave., 212.459.1400 and steelblaze.com 130

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SINCE WHERE GUESTBOOK NEW YORK IS AN ANNUAL PUBLICATION, THERE IS A POSSIBILITY THAT THE ITEMS SHOWN IN THE “LOOK BOOK” PAGES, WHILE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT PRESS TIME, MAY BE OUT OF STOCK. THE PRODUCTS FEATURED, HOWEVER, PROVIDE A FINE REPRESENTATION OF THE OVERALL QUALITY OF THE STORES’ MERCHANDISE OR GALLERIES’ ARTWORK. ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

WEMPE

S C U L LY & S C U LLY

HASTED KRAEUTLER

Clockwise from left: Kim Dong Yoo’s fascinating “Grace Kelly & Clark Gable,” 2011, oil on canvas (price on request), available at Hasted Kraeutler, 537 W. 24th St., 212.627.0006, hastedkraeutler.com

TO U R N E AU

Exquisite pendientes blue Intermezzo drop earrings ($4,115), available at Wempe, 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, wempe.com Herend Reserve Fireworks Dragon, handmade and hand-painted Hungarian porcelain figurine ($3,850), available at Scully & Scully, 504 Park Ave., 800.223.3717, scullyandscully.com This TNY 40 Chrono Automatic has an oversize dial with two layered plates and an ultraslim bezel ($6,400), available at Tourneau, 510 Madison Ave., 212.758.5830 and The Shops at Columbus Circle, 212.823.9425, Tourneau TimeMachine, 12 E. 57th St., 212.758.7300, and tourneau.com Fire jackets with fiery Blaze diamonds encircling diamond studs (price upon request), created exclusively by Bez Ambar for Maurice Badler, 485 Park Ave., 800.622.3537, badler.com

M AU R I C E B A D L E R

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LOOK BOOK

CI TI SHOES

R O B IN ’S JE A N

JO DA M O IN T E R N AT IO N A L

Clockwise from top left: Alden’s cigar shell cordovan tassel loafers ($684), plus other fine brands, can be found at CitiShoes, 445 Park Ave., 212.751.3200, citishoes.com This elegant Marol shirt and Brioni tie (price upon request), both handmade in Italy, can be found at Jodamo International, 321 Grand St., 212.219.1039 or 212.219.0552, jodamointernational.com This 18-karat yellow gold chronometerwerke has a silver dial, is water resistant and comes with a manual winding movement ($19,950), available at Wempe, 700 Fifth Ave., 212.397.9000, wempe.com You can’t get much cooler than these jeans: Marilyn women’s charcoal gray straight leg ($189); the Motard men’s motorcycle jean in cuir black ($409); and the Marilyn olive green straight leg ($189), all available at Robin’s Jean, 60 Grand St., 212.226.2191, robinsjean.com 132

PHOTOS: CITISHOES, JODAMO AND ROBIN’S JEAN, PAUL GELSOBELLO

WE MP E

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION OMEGA BOUTI QUE

A LEXANDRE DE PARI S

PHOTOS: ZARIN FABRICS, GLOBAL GOLD AND SILVER, BEST DRESSED NY AND ALEXANDRE DE PARIS, PAUL GELSOBELLO

Z A R IN FA B R IC S

GLOB AL GOL D & S I LV ER

Clockwise from top right: Beautiful fabrics: top, chenille in fuchsia and verde ($49/yard); middle, birds in paradise, multicolor with cream background ($98/yard); bottom, woven ikat, multicolor ($59/yard), all available at Zarin Fabrics, 69 Orchard St., 212.925.6112, zarinfabrics.com A treat for the finger: This modern antique-style natural blue violet tanzanite and diamond ring ($25,000) is available at Global Gold & Silver, 7 W. 45th St., Ste. 1200, 212.302.4653, globalgoldandsilver.com This Sherri Hill strapless dress is made of satin, iridescent stones and tulle (price upon request), available at Best Dressed New York, 136 E. 73rd St., 3rd fl., 212.600.4607 (by appointment only), bestdressedny.com A lilac-colored chignon comb embedded with Swarovski crystals ($693), available at Alexandre de Paris, 1025 Lexington Ave., 212.717.2122, alexandredeparisnyc.com

B E ST DRESSED N E W YORK

An Omega watch with 18-karat red gold and white satin brushed leather strap (price upon request), available at the OMEGA Boutique, 711 Fifth Ave., 212.207.3333, omegawatches.com WHERE G UEST B OOK N EW YORK

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M E T R O P O L I TA N F I N E A RTS A N D A N TIQ U E S

LOOK BOOK

ME NDE L GOL DB E RG FAB RI C S

This 3-D steel wall sculpture by David Kracov, “Take Another Piece of My Heart” ($8,900), exudes playfulness and is available at Eden Fine Art, 437 Madison Ave., 212.888.0177, eden-gallery.com Rich fabrics, top to bottom: embroidered tulle; beaded French lace; French metallic lace with sequins; beaded French lace (priced between $495-$595/yard), available at Mendel Goldberg Fabrics, 72 Hester St., 212.925.9110 Stack ’em up! Stainless steel rings with colored ceramic, diamonds or pearls, ($95-$295), available at TeNo, teno.com

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PHOTOS: MISSESDRESSY, TEN REN TEA AND MENDEL GOLDBERG FABRICS, PAUL GELSOBELLO

Counterclockwise from above: This early20th-century René Lalique French blue Perruches vase (price upon request) can be found at Metropolitan Fine Arts and Antiques, 10 W. 57th St., 212.974.2584, metroantiques.com

E DE N F INE ART

TE N O

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

HOUR PASSI ON

M ISS E S D R E SSY

MAU RI C E B ADL E R

Counterclockwise from above: Tissot’s brand-new revolutionary Powermatic 80 movement has 80 hours of power reserve, a two-tone stainless steel bracelet and black index dial ($995), available at Hour Passion, 112 W. 34th St., 212.904.1002, hourpassion.com And you thought it was only the Brits who took tea time seriously. The King’s Tea 313 Limited Edition ($28), Wild Pu-Erh Tea ($48) and teapot with bamboo handle ($58) are all available at Ten Ren Tea, 75 Mott St., 800.292.2049, tenrenusa.com

Delicate, sparkling bangle bracelets from Roberto Coin’s new Pois Mois collection (prices start at $3,900). Available at Maurice Badler, 485 Park Ave., 800.622.3537, badler.com This Janique mermaid-cut, champagnecolored gown ($698) is allover lace with floral appliqués and beading scattered throughout. Available at MissesDressy, 37-24 24th St., Ste. 340, Long Island City, N.Y., 212.203.5052, MissesDressy.com

TEN REN TEA

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LOOK BOOK

U LT I MAT E S P E C TAC L E VERSACE V ILE B R E Q U IN

B E R E TTA G ALLERY

Clockwise from top: Ready for a pair of cool new shades? These Thom Browne frames are made of Japanese acetate and titanium with 12-karat gold ($650). Available at Ultimate Spectacle, 789 Lexington Ave., 212.792.8123, ultimatespectacle.com These orange MOKA swim trunks with light blue detailing ($250) and coordinating Havaianas ($60) are sure to make a splash. Available at Vilebrequin, 1007 Madison Ave., 212.650.0353, and 436 W. Broadway, 212.431.0673, vilebrequin.com 136

Inspired by the Beretta Vintage Years Camo Luggage Collection, this bag is made using vintage military canvas with a camouflage pattern that is reminiscent of a watercolor design ($695) and available at Beretta Gallery, 718 Madison Ave., 212.319.3235, berettausa.com You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get much classier, or much sportier than these cool watches, part of the Mystique Sport Collection (priced between $1,595-$1,895), available at Versace, 647 Fifth Ave., 212.317.0224, Versace.com

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all about town

uptown, downtown, east side and west, new york is a collection of neighborhoods that thrive on art, shopping, dining and culture. by liam corell, illustrations By lisanne gagnone

CENTRAL PARK SOUTH A diverse group of musical luminaries have lived along this desirable piece of real estate at the southernmost edge of Central Park, from Liza Minnelli to Lady Gaga to the Three Tenors—Luciano Pavarotti, José Carreras and Plácido Domingo. At Central Park’s southeast entrance near Fifth Avenue, horse-drawn carriages can be hired for leisurely excursions in and around the park. This is also where Central Park Astrology, known for its readings (tarot card, tea leaf, photo and palm, among others), is based. At the western corner of Central Park South is Columbus Circle, marked by a Beaux Arts fountain/monument honoring 15th-century Italian explorer Christopher Columbus, and the Time Warner Center, home of The Shops at Columbus Circle and several of the city’s most exclusive restaurants.

CHELSEA The area bordered by the Hudson River, Sixth Avenue between W. 14th and W. 24th streets and Eighth Avenue between W. 24th and W. 34th streets has, in the last few years, emerged as New York City’s capital of contemporary art. Here, more than 200 galleries, such as Hasted Kraeutler, exhibit and sell cutting-edge works by established and emerging international artists of every medium. Other arts-minded attractions include the Joyce Theater, a year-round home for modern dance companies from the United States and abroad; and the Rubin Museum of Art, which specializes in Himalayan works. For more active entertainment, Chelsea Piers hosts a myriad of sporty diversions, such as bowling, ice-skating, golfing, rock climbing and swimming. The New York office of tech giant Google occupies an entire city block between Eighth and Ninth avenues, while stylish, casual restaurants and bars line Eighth Avenue. Chelsea Market is an indoor food concourse.

CHINATOWN The heart of the largest Chinese enclave in the United States is at the bustling intersection of Canal and Mott streets, while its outer extremities are bordered by Chambers Street in the south, Broadway to the west, the East River to the east and Grand Street to the north. Residents with roots from all over Asia­—Thailand, Malaysia, Korea, Vietnam, Fiji and The Philippines, among others—live as neighbors in this melting pot. Tiny stores selling bargain-priced designer bags, jewelry and clothing spill onto the narrow sidewalks, while establishments, such as Peking Duck House and Ten Ren Tea, present authentic culinary offerings. The Museum of Chinese in America provides a fascinating historical primer of the experiences of early Chinese

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immigrants. In Chatham Square stand the Kim Lau Memorial Arch, built in 1962 to honor Chinese-Americans who lost their lives in World War II, and the statue of Lin Zexu, a scholar official during the Qing Dynasty, who is remembered as a fierce force against the Chinese drug trade. Across from the Manhattan Bridge, a 16-foot-tall golden Buddha marks the entrance to the Mahayana Buddhist Temple.

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EAST VILLAGE

and jewelry mainstays Wempe, Tiffany & Co., Cartier, the OMEGA Boutique and Global Gold & Silver’s showroom on W. 45th Street; antiques The East Village is best known for breeding countercultural dissent and dealers, such as Metropolitan Fine Arts and Antiques, which is just a few political activism. Abounding in rich history, the neighborhood, east steps off Fifth on W. 57th Street; and luxe department stores, including of Broadway between Houston and 14th streets, takes its name from Bergdorf Goodman and Lord & Taylor. Casual, popular retailers abound, Greenwich Village to the west. Like the neighboring Lower East Side, it’s too, including apparel giants H&M, Abercrombie & Fitch and Uniqlo. been home to countless immigrant groups, including German, Irish, Jewish The main branch of the New York Public Library on the west side of Fifth, and Puerto Rican. That diversity helped to spur the creativity of some of between 41st and 42nd streets, is guarded by stone lions Patience and its distinguished 20th-century artists and writers, including painter JeanFortitude; it houses 100 miles of bookshelves and has delighted readers and Michel Basquiat, graffiti artist Keith Haring and Beat poet Allen Ginsberg, scholars since 1911. who wrote his poem “Howl” here and was in attendance at the introduction of Hare Krishna to New York in Tompkins Square Park, where the religion’s mantra was first recorded in 1966. Since 1967, major stars, such FINANCIAL DISTRICT / lower manhattan as Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline, have appeared at The Public Theater. The roots of New York City were planted here—the neighborhood south Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, an architecture, art of City Hall Park, known as both Lower Manhattan and the Financial and engineering school, is where Abraham Lincoln gave the 1860 speech District—in the 17th century, when Dutch fur traders built a wall less than that cemented his presidential candidacy. New York University students and half a mile from the southern tip of the island and dubbed the plot Nieuw skateboarders gather at Astor Place, home of the sculpture “The Alamo,” Amsterdam. Soon after, the British conquered the nascent metropolis (witha towering cube that can be spun on its vertical axis. Restaurants here can out firing a shot) and renamed it New York. The wall was torn down, but the feel like party palaces, as typified by Malbec Restaurant & Tango House street remained; today, the phrase “Wall Street” serves as a general reference Theater in the bordering enclave known as for the American financial system and the finanNoHo (which stands for North of Houston cial industry (many investment firms, banks Street). Lounges, cafés and boutiques with and brokerages have their headquarters here). columbus circle a bohemian bent, plus international eateries The site of the first U.S. capitol, where George CENTRAL PARK SOUTH like Buenos Aires, an Argentinean destination, Washington’s presidential inauguration was populate Alphabet City (named for its major held on Apr. 30, 1789, is today Federal Hall, arteries: avenues A, B, C and D). a museum. In the late-18th century, nearby Maiden Lane was the city’s jewelry center; William Barthman, watch and jewelry retailer FIFTH AVENUE (MIDTOWN EAST, founded in 1884, continues that tradition. MIDTOWN WEST) Other points of interest include the bronze Fifth Avenue, which runs north to south, is sculpture “Charging Bull,” a talisman of capiManhattan’s dividing line, separating the East tal gains; the Federal Reserve Bank; Museum Side from the West Side. Its well-earned repuof American Financial History; Fraunces tation for being one of the most exclusive Tavern Museum; National Museum of the streets in the world began in the late-19th American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; St. century, when the Astors built a glittering Paul’s Chapel and Trinity Church. Passengers mansion on the southwest corner of 34th sail to the Statue of Liberty from Battery Park Street, where the Empire State Building and its aboard Statue Cruises ferries. New York Water observatory now stand. Other powerful famiTaxi makes a stop at the South Street Seaport, lies, including the Vanderbilts, whose fortune a historic district. At Ground Zero, site of the was made in railroads, followed. Today, north former World Trade Center destroyed in the of 59th Street is prime residential real estate, terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, visitors with block after block of apartment buildgravitate to the 9/11 Tribute Center and the ings and town houses fronting Central Park. National September 11 Memorial & Museum Below 59th Street, Fifth Avenue is a pre(the museum is scheduled to open to the public mier shopping destination of designer outposts, in spring 2014). including Versace and Gucci; glittering watch WHERE G UEST B OOK n ew york

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all about town FLATIRON DISTRICT The iconic wedge-shaped Flatiron Building sits at the heart of its namesake neighborhood, which spans 14th to 23rd streets between Park Avenue South and Sixth Avenue. Quite a few famous authors have been associated with the area, including Herman Melville, O. Henry and Edith Wharton. President Theodore Roosevelt was born in a brownstone at 28 E. 20th St., the only U.S. president (so far) to have been born in the city. A respite with well-manicured lawns and public art displays, Madison Square Park holds the distinction of having been the home of the world’s first baseball club, the New York Knickerbockers. The neighborhood is also treasured for its architecture; examples are the pyramid-topped Metropolitan Life Insurance Building and the New York Life Insurance Building, with its octagonal gilt spire. Dining in the area focuses on well-established restaurants, many of which are owned by celebrity chefs (e.g. Craft and Craftbar, founded by Tom Colicchio, known to TV audiences as the co-host of Bravo’s Top Chef). Nearby Union Little Square Park, with a center lawn and impressive bronze statues of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, the Marquis de Lafayette and Mahatma Gandhi, has been a cradle of activism since the 1880s. Rallies are still held there and the northern section hosts the outdoor Union Square Greenmarket, held several days a week all year round.

Passion, the Swatch Group’s concept watch store. Fashionistas can even shop for materials to create their own outfits at one of the neighborhood’s many fabric and trimming stores. Adjacent to the Garment Distrtict is Manhattan’s most fragrant enclave, the Flower District. Concentrated in a single block—W. 28th St. between Sixth and Seventh avenues—this is where Starbright Floral Design carries fresh blooms and arrangements.

GREENWICH VILLAGE Though known in the 20th century as a center of bohemian culture, Greenwich Village also enjoys a history studded with wealth and glamour. Its heart was and still is Washington Square Park, laid out in an elegant European style with a central fountain. Henry James’ 1880 novel Washington Square painted a definitive portrait of rarefied early-19th-century New York society just as the era was coming to an end. (Today, the square is home base for New York University, and the area pulses with youth and energy.) Built in 1892 and designed by Sanford White, the Washington Square Arch stands at the north entrance to the park and commemorates the 1789 inauguration of President George Washington. Dada artist Marcel Italy Duchamp climbed to its top in 1916 and declared the “Independent Republic of Greenwich Village.” Though the assertion didn’t stick, since then, artists, musicians and intellectuals with rebellion on their minds have been drawn to the charming lanes, brownstones and freethinking cultural institutions. The Village’s streets are lined with intimate cafés, cabarets and jazz clubs; the cozy Cornelia Street Café is a popular one-stop dining and entertainment spot.

GARMENT DISTRICT Although it occupies a mere square mile from W. 34th to W. 42nd streets between Sixth and Ninth avenues, the influence of the Garment District spans continents. When newly invented sewing machines and cheap laborers from Europe arrived in the mid-19th century, this area became the nation’s leading manufacturer of textiles and ready-to-wear clothing. Today, approximately one-third of all garments manufactured in America are designed and produced here by designers who include Oscar de la Renta, Donna Karan and Nicole Miller. Style mavens can see which other tastemakers have made an impact by perusing the bronze plaques on Seventh Avenue’s Fashion Walk of Fame, the first permanent landmark dedicated to apparel design in the United States. Along the way, the giant sculpture depicting a needle and button in front of the Fashion Center Business Improvement District’s information kiosk is hard to miss. Shopping-wise, visitors can explore Macy’s Herald Square department store, mainstream outlets at multistore Manhattan Mall, or specialty shops, such as Hour

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HARLEM Originally a Dutch farming village by the name of Nieuw Haarlem, the area, roughly defined as 110th to 157th streets from the East to the Hudson rivers, was transformed drastically during the Great Migration of the early 20th century, when Northern factories recruited Southern blacks. The seeds were planted for what would become the largest, most influential AfricanAmerican community in the nation, and the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s saw it flourish. The sounds of jazz emanated from such ballrooms as the Savoy. Billie Holiday sang the blues and Duke Ellington led his orchestra at the Cotton Club. Writers and civil-rights leaders, including Langston Hughes and W.E.B. DuBois, empowered the community. Notable residents Eubie Blake and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson lived in the famed town houses on Strivers’ Row. Today, these homes are some of the area’s most beautifully preserved landmarks and a must-see while touring a neighborhood that is experiencing its second renaissance. On W. 125th Street stands the iconic

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all about town Apollo Theater, whose world-famous amateur night boosted the career of Ella Fitzgerald, among others. James Brown, Stevie Wonder, Patti LaBelle and Michael Jackson have all performed on its stage. The Studio Museum in Harlem specializes in African-American art, while the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture offers films, lectures, tours and concerts. A visit to Harlem would not be complete without a heaping serving of red grouper and crawfish grits with a side of collard greens at Chef Marcus Samuelsson’s Red Rooster or a night out at Ginny’s Supper Club downstairs. And it’s all easy to get to: As the famed Duke Ellington song says, “Take the ‘A’ Train” (or several other subway lines), hail a cab or arrange for Carmel Limo to take you there.

gogues, such as the restored Eldridge Street Synagogue and its museum, which is open for guided tours. Orchard Street and its environs, where pushcarts once predominated, continues to be the neighborhood’s commercial hub and is lined with retail storefronts selling everything from luggage to European fashions to designer leather, many at discounted prices. The current vibe is decidedly younger as many trendy restaurants, bars, boutiques and art galleries have set up shop, and real-estate developers are busy with the process of gentrification. Even so, the area still honors its traditions and features many family-owned businesses, such as Zarin Fabrics, Jodamo International and Mendel Goldberg Fabrics.

MADISON AVENUE (MIDTOWN EAST, UPPER EAST SIDE) LITTLE ITALY

One of Manhattan’s leading thoroughfares is home to high-end jewelers, haberdashers, boutiques, art galleries, museums and attracFew things are as important to Italians as food, family and tradition. tions. Its personality changes every few blocks. The lower portion, That same unwavering dedication to home values is what has kept Little between E. 28th and E. 34th streets, is known for its Oriental rug Italy one of New York City’s most stalwart ethnic communities since the emporiums and forward-thinking home and furniture showrooms. 1800s. By the 1920s, approximately 63,000 Italians lived between Canal, At the corner of Madison Avenue and E. 36th Street, literary and illuminatBleecker, Rutgers and Crosby streets. Marked by turn-of-the-century ed manuscripts, Mozart’s sheet music, several Gutenberg Bibles, Old Master walk-ups with ubiquitous fire escapes and many cobblestoned byways, drawings and other priceless cultural treasures are housed in The Morgan its delineation has shrunk over the years to the blocks between Bowery Library & Museum. Tailored men’s clothand Crosby Street. Today, the boundaries ing, epitomized by Brooks Brothers and Paul between it and surrounding neighborhoods times square Stuart, occupies the block between E. 44th Chinatown and NoLIta blur more and more, THEATER DISTRICT and E. 45th streets. Many fine establishments but one thing remains constant: Mulberry dominate the avenue between E. 50th and E. Street, the heart of a very spirited nabe. On 57th streets, including Eden Fine Art, which this charming lane, you’ll find the Italian represents Israeli and international artists. American Museum, independent clothing From E. 58th to E. 63rd streets is the Crystal boutiques and a profusion of regional Italian District with glistening shops selling glass masdining options, both casual and formal; terworks by Swarovski and Baccarat, while E. in summer, tables line the sidewalk for 63rd through E. 68th streets constitute a mini alfresco supping. The area comes to boisterjewelry row, populated with precious baubles ous life every September during the Feast of from the likes of Chopard. Exclusive, limitedSan Gennaro, a street festival that includes edition mobile Vertu phones are available parades, games, fairground rides, music and, at the brand’s store between E. 58th and E. of course, food. 59th streets. The Historic District, which runs from E. 59th to E. 72nd streets, is lined with LOWER EAST SIDE the luxe boutiques of American designers This melting pot was the first destination for Calvin Klein, Carolina Herrera, Tom Ford thousands of immigrants between 1863 and and Ralph Lauren, and Italian mainstays 1935, when the neighborhood had the dubiGiorgio Armani and Beretta Gallery. A few ous distinction of being one of the planet’s blocks north, Vilebrequin offers men’s and most populated places. The Lower East Side boys’ matching swimwear with a colorful Tenement Museum, a former apartment South of France insouciance. building that housed settlers from 20 different nations, is a celebration and recreation of that era and a sobering must-visit. The large MEATPACKING DISTRICT Jewish population left its impression on the Long before the pocket west of Hudson Street community, recognizable today in everything between W. 15th and Gansevoort streets was from Katz’s Delicatessen to historic synacrowned the epicenter of hip, it was known

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advertorial

as the Gansevoort Market, a cluster of wholesale beef purveyors. Apartments commanded relatively low rents, which drew creative minds in the early 1990s. Artists established lofts and galleries, which begat high-end boutiques belonging to international designers such as Hugo Boss, Carlos Miele and Diane von Furstenberg. Jeffrey is a clothing department store for men and women. Restaurateurs and nightlife entrepreneurs have swooped in to launch a host of always-on-the-radar restaurants. Bouncers guard the velvet ropes at sought-after clubs and lounges. An abandoned stretch of elevated railroad trestle has been reborn as The chinatown High Line, a landscaped park and promenade that stretches from Gansevoort to W. 30th streets. The new home of the Whitney Museum of American Art, scheduled to open in 2015, is fast taking shape.

Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar Food Network’s celebrity chef, Guy Fieri introduced Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar to Times Square’s theatre district last year. This dynamic

MIDTOWN EAST

restaurant features Guy’s signature style of cooking, big on flavor and

The residential-corporate hybrid of Midtown East (E. 42nd to E. 59th streets, from Fifth Avenue to the East River) lays claim to two of the city’s most recognizable architectural icons: the Chrysler Building, a 71-story marvel topped with stainless steel eagles and a graceful Art Deco pyramid, and the headquarters of the United Nations, which shimmers at its perch on the East River. Midtown East is also filled with several tony (and picturesque) residential areas, including Murray Hill, Sutton Place and Beekman Place. Silver Suites Residences at Beekman Tower offers extended-stay, furnished apartments, ranging from studios to three-bedroom abodes. Shoppers make time for Tourneau TimeMachine’s assortment of fine watches, Bassano Jewelry and Bloomingdale’s department store. Capricorn Luxury Travel’s chauffeur-driven cars provide white-glove transportation, whether to a business meeting or a black-tie social function.

short on boundaries. With its crave-worthy menu, and its buzzing bar scene, offering imaginative cocktails and a wide range of Guy’s own, unique beers locally brewed at Heartland Brewery, Guy’s spirited restaurant offers visitors, locals, and fans a spot that will become a fast favorite for a truly memorable dining experience.

220 West 44th Street, New York

646.532.GUYS www.guysamerican.com

NOLITA By the mid-1990s, this area NOrth of Little ITAly—roughly between Broome, Houston and Lafayette streets and the Bowery—had almost completely lost its Italian character. An influx of yuppies supplied a newfound cachet to this forgotten area—and demanded a sexier name. Chic boutiques beckon with the promise of haute jeans, tropical dresses, organic fabrics, bespoke men’s

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all about town tailoring and Lucchese boots from Space Cowboy NYC. Innovative restaurants serving a range of international cuisines satisfy venturesome palates, while wine bars and atmospheric lounges tempt those craving a mellow place in which to unwind. Sightseers can go to Saint Patrick’s Old Cathedral, the city’s first cathedral church and one of the first local sites to be landmarked.

of the Rock Observation Deck, which is perched 70 floors above 50th Street. (One time- and cost-efficient way to visit Top of the Rock, along with five other attractions around town, is to purchase a New York CityPASS; it allows you to skip ticket-buying lines, and the overall price totals almost half that of the six separate admissions.)

PARK AVENUE (MIDTOWN EAST, UPPER EAST SIDE)

SOHO

In the hierarchy of New York trendsetting scenes, the area SOuth of HOuston— This prestigious boulevard, with its median between Canal and Crosby streets and a showcase of seasonal flowers and greenthe Hudson River—has always been one ery and sculpture, epitomizes New York of the most influential. While its indusglamour and high society. East 32nd Street trial buildings were abandoned by the divides it into two portions: Park Avenue mid-1900s, their cast-iron facades proved South and Park Avenue. The Downtown to be assets in the 1970s, when they were section is the more commercial sweep, while recognized for their architectural signifioffice towers take over the landscape from cance. Throughout its evolution, SoHo’s E. 42nd Street to the mid-50s. The “Park status as an art shrine has held fast, Avenue physician” has long been a synonym with artists fashioning chic storefronts for a high-quality, in-demand medical proand exhibition spaces, such as Martin fessional, and it’s not surprising to see the Lawrence Galleries. The restored and waiting room of a practitioner such as Dr. renovated home and studio of the late Jan Linhart, a specialist in both cosmetic minimalist Donald Judd reopened to the and restorative dentistry, filled with celebripublic for advance-reservation tours in ty patients. A slice of upscale shopping spills city hall lower manhattan 2013. White-hot restaurants and lounges off retail destination 57th Street: CitiShoes continue to impress, but SoHo’s true deshas kept gentlemen well-heeled for generaignation du jour is “Shopping Hot Spot,” tions, while just a few blocks north, jewelry where everyone searches for the next big thing, including the latest in men’s aficionados peruse precious gems at Maurice Badler. Nesters scout Scully & and women’s high-end denim and accessories at Robin’s Jean. Scully, which has purveyed furniture, decorative accessories and tableware since 1934. Above E. 60th Street, the neighborhood’s enviable luxury co-op apartment buildings take over. THEATER DISTRICT Attracting millions of visitors every year, Times Square—the area between W. 42nd and W. 54th Streets and between Sixth and Ninth avenues—beats rockefeller center as the very heart and soul of the Theater District, just as it has for more than The Art Deco complex of commercial buildings, bordered by 46th Street, 100 years. Around 1904, theater owners started building playhouses on the Fifth Avenue, 55th Street and Sixth Avenue, is home base for NBC-TV’s surrounding blocks, each one trumping the other in glitz. These dazzling crowd-pleasing Today show and Christie’s auction house. More than theaters of the Great White Way have enthralled and fascinated ever since 250,000 ice-skaters a year exercise under the gaze of Paul Manship’s gilded their arrival. Of the 40 designated Broadway theaters, the Stephen Sondheim sculpture of Prometheus at The Rink at Rockefeller Center during its seais the newest, while the New Amsterdam on 42nd Street is one of the oldson, October through April. During the warm-weather months, The Rink est, surviving in all its sumptuously restored Art Nouveau glory, thanks to becomes a popular alfresco bar and lounge. Radio City Music Hall, where the painstaking efforts of The Disney Company, which aided in creating the precision dance troupe, the Radio City Rockettes, kicks up its heels in a Times Square light years away from the family-unfriendly landscape it the annual Christmas show, is a prized concert and performance venue; had become in the 1970s and 1980s. Businesses began to return to the tours detailing its storied history and sumptuous décor are conducted sevdistrict throughout the 1990s. Today, everyone can walk Broadway from W. eral times daily. After an in-depth look at the Music Hall’s nooks and cran42nd to W. 48th streets without a care, anticipating the thrill of catching a nies, visitors can get a bird’s-eye view of the city skyline by visiting the Top

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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all about town hit musical, such as The Lion King, Mamma Mia!, Chicago The Musical, Matilda The Musical, Jersey Boys, The Phantom of the Opera, Wicked, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark and The Book of Mormon. Proof positive of the neighborhood’s gentrification is the western extremity of 42nd Street, one of Manhattan’s premier real-estate strips that has attracted settlers to its many skyscraping apartment buildings, such as the Silver Suites Residences at Silver Towers. As family-friendly as the neighborhood has become, it is also a destination for adult entertainment at swank venues like Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club. Local restaurants cater to every culinary taste, including modern Greek establishment Kellari Taverna, Heartland Brewery for burgers and beer, and Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar from celebrity chef Guy Fieri. Shopping options range from soft knit sweaters at American Eagle to Steel Blaze watches at Danielle B. Jewelers. While millions of people know the area from watching it on TV during the cacophonous New Year’s Eve countdown held every Dec. 31, no one forgets his or her first in-person glimpse of Times Square by night, when it seems as if the entire universe (or that part of it that resides on Manhattan Island) is lit by the vast array of neon, LED lights and computerized signage, bringing communications and advertising to a mass audience. The closure of sections of Broadway to cars has boosted the foot traffic in what is truly “the crossroads of the world.”

TRIBECA In its 19th-century industrial incarnation, TriBeCa’s majestic buildings—with marble, limestone and cast-iron facades—were home to munitions warehouses. In the early 20th century, textiles were the name of the game. By the 1960s, counterculturists seeking solitude and cheap-to-free rents moved in. By the early 1970s, the fight to gain legal zoning status led a group of artists to coin the term TRIangle BElow CAnal Street (even though it’s really a trapezoid, with Broadway, Chambers Street and the Hudson River as its other three borders). Its transformation into a coveted enclave was prompted by such celebrities as Robert De Niro, who helped create two of its most eminent restaurants, Tribeca Grill and Nobu, and co-founded the Tribeca Film Festival held every spring. Bold-faced names, such as Mariah Carey and Jon Stewart, have maintained residences here at one time or another. Keeping these stars and their homes outfitted are some of the city’s most exclusive boutiques, art galleries and antiques shops. Visitors to TriBeCa can arrive in style in a Commonwealth Worldwide car.

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UPPER EAST SIDE

From its earliest days, when its well-heeled residents earned it the nickname Silk Stocking District, the Upper East Side has laid claim to being Manhattan’s wealthiest, most socially prominent and most rarefied neighborhood. At the turn of the last century, affluent captains of industry such as Andrew Carnegie, James B. Duke and Henry Clay Frick chose to build their “country estates” in the once-bucolic enclave bounded by Fifth Avenue, the East River, E. 59th and E. 96th streets. Today, the city’s elite continues to nest in prewar co-op apartments and town houses. Gracie Mansion, the Mayor of New York’s official residence, is a charming Federal house set in a park overlooking the East River. Visitors to the privileged area can revel in some of the most important art in the world, which is on view in the stellar museums that abut Central Park on the stretch of Fifth Avenue known as Museum Mile. Institutions here include the all-encompassing and encyclopedic Metropolitan Museum of Art. More specialized institutions along Museum Mile include the Jewish Museum, Museum of the City of New York, National Academy Museum and School of Fine Arts, El Museo del Barrio and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, famously designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Glorious mansions from a bygone era now house The Frick Collection, renowned for its Old Master paintings and decorative arts, and the Neue Galerie, which specializes in early-20th-century German and Austrian art and design. The Whitney Museum of American Art is a fixture on Madison Avenue. Many new york public library long-standing commercial art and antiques fifth avenue galleries, as well as Sotheby’s and Doyle New York auction houses, maintain their headquarters on the Upper East Side. The neighborhood is also home to sprawling strips of green, including the eastern portion of Central Park (which features the Tisch Children’s Zoo, Boat Pond and Conservatory Garden). Upscale restaurants abound, including a steak house with a difference: Prime 333, which is housed in the Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club. While strictly fiction, the television show Gossip Girl was nonetheless a fairly accurate portrait of the lifestyles of the rich, famous and privileged who live in this district. Stylish Upper East Side preteens and teens shop for special-occasion dresses at Best Dressed New York; they and their moms top off a look with fashion-forward sunglasses from Ultimate Spectacle and a chic hair accessory from Alexandre de Paris. And to make a special occasion even more special, Bermuda Limousine International supplies the chauffeured transportation.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CARMEL

ALEXANDRE DE PARIS

CAR & LIMOUSINE SERVICE

DISTINGUISHED CONCERTS INTERNATIONAL NEW YORK

For over 30 years, Carmel has been the trans-

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all about town UPPER WEST SIDE

Joan Rivers and Woody Allen got their starts, is Manhattan’s oldest continuing cabaret; it’s also a popular piano bar. The Stonewall Inn, still remembered as the site of the Stonewall Riots in 1969, is considered the birthplace of the gay-rights movement. Today, the West Village is brimming with young families and professionals, who wait in line for buttercream-slathered cupcakes at Magnolia Bakery before winding their way down Bleecker Street, a tree-lined thoroughfare and mecca for designer shopping at the boutiques of Marc Jacobs, Ralph Lauren, Michael Kors, Cynthia Rowley, Lulu Guinness, Coach, Jo Malone, Burberry Brit and many more A-listers. Loft buildings, like architect Richard Meier’s three rippling glass towers on the West Side Highway, exhibit some of the city’s most innovative and exclusive residential architecture. Among the film stars who have succumbed to the West Village are longtime residents Hugh Jackman and Julianne Moore.

From its beginnings in the 1830s as a status address for well-to-do liberal families and the cultural elite, to its stint as a mainly workingclass neighborhood in the early 20th century, to its current run as—once again—a status address for well-to-do liberal families and the cultural elite, the Upper West Side makes a convincing argument for just how cyclical life in New York City can be. Families, socialites and celebrities live and play among the treelined blocks between Central Park West and the Hudson River from W. 59th to W. 110th streets. Their playground consists of the NewYork Historical Society, which has a fine collection of Hudson River School paintings among its many holdings, and the Children’s Museum of Manhattan, an interactive center for young and old. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a cultural complex and must-visit for classical music, ballet, opera and theater fans. Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall is the permanent home of the New York Philharmonic, but throughout the year it also plays host to artists as diverse as composers the outer boroughs Eric Whitacre and Stephen Schwartz and New York City, as we know it today, came pieces as monumental as Handel’s Messiah into being in 1898, when the five boroughs— and Orff’s Carmina Burana, courtesy of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx St. John THE Divine UPPER WEST SIDE Distinguished Concerts International New and Staten Island—were consolidated into a York. The castlelike American Museum of single entity. While most visitors, especially Natural History is a treasure trove, where first-time visitors, concentrate on Manhattan an astounding number of real dinosaur fossils share the same roof as halls and its neighborhoods, increasingly those who have been to NYC before documenting human evolution and dioramas depicting North American look to the outer boroughs for new adventures and memories. Long Island mammals. The museum’s Rose Center for Earth and Space, with its state-ofCity in Queens, for example, is ripe for discovery, featuring many musts for the-art Hayden Planetarium Space Theater, is one of its most awe-inspiring culture vultures, including the Noguchi Museum, MoMA PS1 and the Fisher attractions. Several elegant restaurants, such as Lincoln Ristorante, have Landau Center for Art. Fashion lovers get their fancy on at MissesDressy turned this area into a fine-dining destination, while the more casual eaterin LIC, while Francophiles swear they’re in Paris at bistro Tournesol. In ies that line Broadway, Columbus and Amsterdam avenues are popular for the same way that the Brooklyn Academy of Music has made its borough Saturday and Sunday brunch. Shopping options include the U.S. flagship of a magnet for theater, opera, ballet and classical music devotees, the openinternational women’s clothing line OSKA. ing in 2012 of the state-of-the-art Barclays Center has attracted pop music enthusiasts to its A-list concerts and professional basketball followers to Brooklyn Nets home games. Staten Island is just a free ferry ride away from WEST VILLAGE Manhattan, and once there the curious gravitate to an authentic Chinese The West Village has always marched to the beat of a different drummer, Scholar’s Garden, the serene Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art and both physically and figuratively. Its maze of narrow streets, from Sixth the all-American Historic Richmond Town. In the summer, nirvana can be Avenue to the Hudson River and W. 14th to Houston streets, does not found at a New York Yankees baseball game at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, follow the grid pattern of much of the city. Its most eminent citizens have hot dog and beer in hand. Foodies might find a stroll up and down Arthur always been writers, performers, musicians and other bohemians. An ambiAvenue in pursuit of Italian delectables more to their liking, but there’s no tious teenager from Brooklyn named Barbra Streisand first gained attention disputing the allure of the Bronx Zoo for animal lovers of all ages. singing in Village cabarets in the early 1960s. The Duplex, where comedians

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CARMEL

BUENOS AIRES

CAR & LIMOUSINE SERVICE

RESTAURANT

Introduced to New York City in 1995 as the first

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advertisers index

a-z

Malbec Restaurant & Tango House Theater.. 71 Mamma Mia!............................................................37 Martin Lawrence Galleries................................. 59 Matilda The Musical ....................................... 99 Maurice Badler ................................................. 11, 15 Mendel Goldberg Fabrics.................................. 153 Metropolitan Fine Arts & Antiques.. 43, 44, 45 MissesDressy...........................................................75 New York CityPASS............................................. 123 New York Water Taxi.......................................... 125 OMEGA Boutique................................. Back Cover OSKA........................................................................ 117 Peking Duck House..............................................151 Phantom of the Opera, The................................97 Robin’s Jean................................................. 128, 129 Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club..................... 126, 127 Scully & Scully.................................................. 12, 13 Silver Suites Residences...................................... 81 Space Cowboy NYC.............................................141

Starbright Floral Design....................................145

Dr. Jan Linhart....................................................... 85

Steel Blaze...............................................................55

Eden Fine Art....................................................... 6, 7

Ten Ren Tea............................................................151

Empire State Building Observatory.................23

TeNo...................................................................40, 41

Inside Back Cover

Global Gold & Silver..............................................73

Top of the Rock................................................ 16, 17

Book of Mormon, The......................................19

Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar.........................143

Tourneau.................................................................... 5

Buenos Aires Restaurant...................................149

Hasted Kraeutler.............................................60, 61

Ultimate Spectacle............................................... 29

Capricorn Luxury Travel................................137

Heartland Brewery..............................................149

Versace ....................................................................25

Carmel Limo................................................. 147, 149

Hour Passion...................................................21

Vertu..........................................................................33

Central Park Astrology........................................87

Jersey Boys............................................................ 101

Vilebrequin..............................................................57

Chicago The Musical............................................. 91

Jodamo International......................................... 153

Wempe.............................................................. 2, 8, 9

CitiShoes................................................................145

Kellari Taverna........................................................67

Wicked..................................................................... 95

Commonwealth Worldwide..............................103

Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club..................................119

William Barthman..................................................35

Cornelia Street Café, The...................................151

Lion King, The......................................................... 31

Zarin Fabrics......................................................... 153

Bermuda Limousine International Inc............115 Best Dressed New York.....................................145 Bloomingdale’s..........................................155, 156,

150

Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark......................... 93

............................................................................ 147

Beretta Gallery...................................................... 39

Distinguished Concerts International New York

photo: radio city music hall, kathryn yu

Alexandre de Paris.............................................. 147

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

"Top 100 Restaurants of New York" - Time Out New York

"100 Great Jazz Clubs of the World" - Downbeat Magazine

"A Culinary as Well as a Cultural Landmark " - City of New York

PEKING DUCK HOUSE

THE CORNELIA STREET CAFÉ

CHINESE CUISINE

LANDMARK RESTAURANT/BAR/CABARET

TEN REN TEA Small Golden Canister Collection Mini version of our iconic five and half Kilogram Golden Tea Canisters. Lightweight, Practical and highly collectible. Each Small Golden Canister contains 75g of our high quality tea. We invite you to experience our innovative art of tea.

TEN REN TEA

As you might guess, the eponymous dish has

In May 1977 three artists stumbled across a

For half a century, the name Ten Ren has been

been the house specialty here—and a crowd

tiny storefront in the heart of Greenwich

famous for the highest-quality traditional teas

favorite since 1978. The New York Times called it

Village and thought it the perfect place to

in every classic type, especially green and

“one of the world’s most spectacular Peking duck

open a café.

oolong. Its menu of inventive hot and cold flavors, including luscious fruit-based drinks with

preparations,” while ZAGAT raved, the “luscious namesake specialty is as good as it gets.” The

36 years later, it has become a New York

"pearls" of tapioca, is all the range in Taiwan,

duck is roasted until the meat is tender and the

City icon--with 3 rooms upstairs and a caba-

Hong Kong, on the West Coast and now, in

skin is crispy. This mouthwatering Beijing dish is

ret downstairs--as celebrated for its food

New York. In addition to the Chinatown flagship,

then served with house-made pancakes, green

(Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Weekend Brunch)

Ten Ren has four other locations in the New

scallions, fresh cucumbers and special sauce. A

and drink (35 wines by the glass) as for its

York Metro area. Visit Ten Ren's online store.

wonderful ambience and elegant party rooms

performances (Jazz, Theater, Poetry, Fla-

add to an enjoyable Chinese culinary experience.

menco, Brazilian, Classical, Cabaret—you name it, they do it).

28 Mott Street, New York

212.227.1810

Check out the website for whatever unpredictable magic may be happening tonight!

212.759.8260

800.292.2049 www.tenrenusa.com

236 East 53rd Street, New York

pekingduckhousenyc.com

75 Mott Street, New York

29 Cornelia Street, New York

212.989.9319 www.corneliastreetcafe.com

WHERE G UEST B OOK

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advertisers index ART, ANTIQUES & collectibles

by CategorY

Eden Fine Art.........................................................6, 7

Commonwealth Worldwide— Transportation ............................................... 103

Hasted Kraeutler.............................................. 60, 61

Dr. Jan Linhart—Cosmetic Dentistry ............... 85

OSKA—Apparel/Women . ...................................117

Martin Lawrence Galleries................................... 59

New York Water Taxi— Transportation ................................................125

Robin’s Jean— Apparel/Men & Women ......................128, 129

Silver Suites Residences—Extended Stay ...... 81

Scully & Scully—Home Décor & Gifts...........12, 13

Starbright Floral Design—Floral Design ...... 145

Space Cowboy NYC— Footwear/Men & Women ............................ 141

Metropolitan Fine Arts & Antiques........................................... 43, 44, 45

Dining

OMEGA Boutique— Timepieces........................................Back Cover

Buenos Aires Restaurant.................................... 149

shopping

Cornelia Street Café, The.................................... 151

Alexandre de Paris—Hair Accessories.............147

Steel Blaze—Timepieces ..................................... 55

Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar.......................... 143

Beretta Gallery— Apparel/Men & Women.................................. 39

Ten Ren Tea—Tea & Utensils ............................. 151

Heartland Brewery............................................... 149 Kellari Taverna......................................................... 67 Malbec Restaurant & Tango House Theater.... 71 Peking Duck House............................................... 151

ENTERTAINMENT/ATTRACTIONS Book of Mormon, The— Broadway Musical.............................................19

Best Dressed New York— Apparel/Women & Girls............................... 145 Bloomingdale’s—Department Store.......155, 156 Inside Back Cover CitiShoes—Footwear/Men & Women............. 145 Global Gold & Silver—Jewelry............................ 73 Hour Passion—Timepieces & Jewelry................ 21

TeNo—Timepieces .......................................... 40, 41 Tourneau—Timepieces.............................................5 Ultimate Spectacle—Eyewear ........................... 29 Versace—Timepieces ........................................... 25 Vertu—Electronics ............................................... .33 Vilebrequin— Apparel/Men & Boys....................................... 57

Chicago The Musical—Broadway Musical.........91

Jodamo International—Apparel/Men..............153

Distinguished Concerts International New York— Musical Entertainment..................................147

Maurice Badler— Jewelry & Timepieces..............................11, 15

Empire State Building Observatory— Attraction........................................................... 23

Mendel Goldberg Fabrics­—Textiles..................153

William Barthman— Timepieces & Jewelry..................................... 35

MissesDressy—Apparel/Women........................ 75

Zarin Fabrics—Textiles ........................................153

Wempe— Gifts, Jewelry & Timepieces................... 2, 8, 9

Jersey Boys— Broadway Musical........................................... 101 Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club . ................................ 119 Lion King, The— Broadway Musical............................................. 31 Mamma Mia!—Broadway Musical....................... 37 Matilda The Musical— Broadway Musical............................................99 New York CityPASS .............................................123 Phantom of the Opera, The— Broadway Musical............................................ 97 Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club ...................... 126,127 Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark— Broadway Musical............................................ 93 Top of the Rock™ Observation Deck at Rockefeller Center®—Attraction.......16, 17 Wicked—Broadway Musical................................ 95

services Bermuda Limousine International Inc.— Transportation ................................................ 115 Capricorn Luxury Travel— Transportation ................................................137 Carmel Limo—Transportation . ................ 147, 149 Central Park Astrology— Psychic Guidance ............................................ 87

152

W H E R E G UESTBOOK n ew york

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ZARIN FABRICS

JODAMO INTERNATIONAL

MENDEL GOLDBERG

MEN'S CLOTHING

FABRICS

Zarin Fabrics is the largest resource of dis-

Family-owned

1983,

This family-owned business, located in the his-

counted designer fabrics in New York City.

Jodamo International carries the best and lat-

toric Lower East Side shopping district, carries

Established in 1936, this third generation fam-

est styles in men’s fashion clothing, acces-

European designer fabrics, from French lace to

ily-owned business is a three-floor fabric won-

sories and footwear. From tuxedos to casual

brocades, woolens, silk prints and novelties.

derland stocked with thousands of bolts of up-

wear and everything in between, you’ll find the

holstery and drapery fabrics.

best bargains from the biggest names: Hickey

You’ll be amazed by their selection of imported

Freeman, Brioni, Versace, Gianfranco Ferré,

couture fabrics. They would be happy to ar-

Allen Edmonds, Bally, Eton, Schneiders, Hugo

range for garments to be made to your specifi-

Boss and many more! Stop by and explore

cations by their expert staff of tailors.

Nestled in the charming Lower East Side, this fabric landmark is easily accessible from anywhere in the City. Shop where the locals shop and leave with gorgeous fabrics the same day.

and

operated

since

three floors of the highest fashion at the lowest prices—in all sizes (special sizes avail-

Open Sunday - Friday 9:30am - 6pm

able by order). Impeccable customer service

– WORLDWIDE SHIPPING -

enhances your experience, while the in-house alteration team ensures a perfect fit. Open Sun–Fri. 9am - 6pm. and Thurs, 9am - 8pm.

72 Hester Street, New York

321 Grand Street, New York

Email: mendelgoldbergny@aol.com

212.925.9110

69 Orchard Street, New York

212.925.6112 www.zarinfabrics.com

212.219.1039 or 212.219.0552 www.jodamointernational.com

FABRICS

WHERE G UEST B OOK

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PHOTO: MACY’S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE, © ELLIOTT ERWITT/MAGNUM PHOTOS

PARTING SHOT

He’ll Be Comin’ ’Round the Corner … IN THIS CITY, YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT NEXT. AT CHRISTMASTIME, IT CAN BE AN IMPROMPTU SHOW OF STREET SINGERS RAPPING TO THEIR VERSION OF A HOLIDAY FAVORITE; THE 4TH OF JULY CAN BRING THE RANDOM POP! OF FIREWORKS IN CHINATOWN; SPRING CAN SHOCK WITH THE SUDDEN BURST OF CHERRY BLOSSOMS. AND THANKSGIVING? THESE UNSUSPECTING BOYS HAVE NO IDEA THAT THE PINK PANTHER FROM THE ANNUAL MACY’S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER, WAITING TO SURPRISE AND DELIGHT THEM.

154

W H E R E G U E STBO O K NE W YO RK

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For over 135 years, we’ve been an icon of international style. We’ve traveled the world and the world has traveled to us. Now with over 40 stores, including our legendary 59th Street flagship and our trendsetting Soho store—and international shipping to over 90 countries—we continue to bring the latest fashions for women, men, kids and the home. Whether it’s a Big Brown Bag, a Medium or a Small, we love making sure our visitors’ bags are full of things that express their unique tastes and needs.

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UPTOWN OR DOWNTOWN, MAKE US YOUR FIRST STOP 59TH STREET First Floor Visitors Center, 59th St. and Lexington Avenue SOHO 504 Broadway ( between Spring and Broome) Don’t see the item you want? Talk to a sales associate, and we’ll do our best to find it and have it delivered straight to your door. Once your trip is over, remember you can shop any time, any day at bloomingdales.com

LIKE NO OTHER STORE IN THE WORLD WHGB

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er

TO NEW YORK

10/23/13 3:54:29 PM


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Where GuestBook New York - 2014 Edition  

Discover the essence of New York with our annual coffee-table book.