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COVER STORY

AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT COMPANY HOSTS GATHERING FOR CUB CONVOY AT SUN ‘N FUN American Legend Aircraft Company hosed a fly-in/out gathering for the 75th anniversary Cub Convoy to Florida. American Legend is a recognized contingent leader for the 2011 Cub Convoy. The company coordinated a state/regional group to gather together for the flight to Florida and a mass arrival at Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In. American Legend, with the assistance of Sulphur Springs-based EAA Chapter 1094 and Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport (KSLR) officials, sponsored a sequence of events at KSLR. Aircraft arrived on March 25, just in time for a hangar dinner at American Legend Aircraft Company headquarters. The next morning, a group departure took place and arrived at Perry-Foley Airport (40J) in Perry, Florida. The 75th anniversary Cub Convoy to Florida was a re-enactment of the first

Cub Convoy to Florida held in 1936. The 2011 event commemorates production of Cub aircraft for more than 75 years. Beginning with the Taylor Aircraft E-2 Cub in 1931, and continuing today with the American Legend Cub, this aircraft type excels in flying pilots, students, and passengers for recreation, liaison, and pleasure. American Legend participated in the 70th anniversary celebration in April 2006, when the Convoy of Cubs arrived at Lakeland Linder Airport for Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In. In similar fashion this year, a gaggle of Cub aircraft made the eightmile final leg of their journeys to Lakeland Linder Airport in unison. Many Piper rag-wing aircraft from E-2 to PA22, and the all-new Legend Cub, participated in the Cub Convoy. These aircraft gathered at Plant City Airport (KPCM), Continued on Page 20

(Courtesy of American Legend)

SUN ‘N FUN REVIEW

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TABLE Volume 27, Number 8

OF

CONTENTS April 2011

650-358-9908 • Fax: 650-358-9254 • E-mail: vickie@inflightusa.com • www.inflightusa.com

ON THE COVER COVER STORY

FEATURE STORY

Sun n’ Fun Review

American Legend Cub 75th Anniversary Cub Convoy Page 4

Hampered by Severe Weather, Show Goes On Starts on Page 37

Photo Courtesy American Legend Aircraft Company

FEATURES

FEATURED COLUMNS Tips From the Pros Safe Landings Goodies and Gadgets

Wingwalking Franklin Team Injured In Accident ........46

Bird Dog: Early Aerial Reconnaissance By Russ Albertson ..........................................................6 CamGuard In A Nutshell: Product Review By Jim Cavanagh ..........................................................11 Ferrying A Beech Baron To Brazil… Part II By Steve Weaver ..........................................................13 The Secret Lives of Gliders… Part II By Quest Richlife ..........................................................20 Book Review: Night Flight By S. Mark Rhodes ......................................................24 Joe Locasto’s Success Story By Herb Foreman ........................................................54

Remos GX Soars After 25,000 Mile Inspection............56

DESTINATION

Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show Set for May 1 ....59

Flying With Faber: A Tour Around The Kitchen By Stuart J. Faber ..........................................................50

NEWS GAMA Applauds DOT, DOD Concern Over GPS ..........3 AEA convention and Trade Show Wrap Up ..................33 Thousands Attend GA Rally in Wichita ........................35 HAI Logs Record Heli-Expo in Orlando........................42 Heli Center Coming To AirVenture 2011 ......................42 GAMA Hails Completion of U.S.-EU Agreement..........42 Garmin GMA 350: Voice Recognition, 3D Sound ........43 Aviation Archaeology /Wreckchasing Symposium Set ..44

by Judy Phelpsl, Master CFI-A ..23

..............................................27 ..............................................36

COLUMNS Aviation Ancestry Light Sport Flying What’s Up?! The Pylon Place

by Scott Schwartz ....................12 by Ed Downs ..........................16 by Larry Shapiro ......................26 by Marilyn Dash ......................45

DEPARTMENTS Calendar of Events ........................................................9 Classifieds ....................................................................62 Index of Advertisers ....................................................66

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

BIRD DOG

By Russ Albertson mazingly, aerial reconnaissance has been in use long before the invention of the airplane. Tethered hot air balloons were used in the late 1700s to spot enemy troops and this same method was used in 1863 during the Civil War. During WWI, with the introduction of the airplane in combat, aerial reconnaissance was now free ranging and commanders could get a far better idea of enemy troops facing them. The Piper L-4 Grasshopper served as the U.S. Army spotter plane in WWII and remained in service until 1949 when the Army put out a contract for an all-metal plane to replace the Piper. Cessna submitted a design based on the C170, a four-passenger, high-wing civilian plane with conventional gear. Cessna modified the fuselage with two seats, in tandem, and added windows all around, including behind the rear seat. The new plane, Model 305A, retained the conventional landing gear with a tailwheel for operations on rough fields. A Cessna employee won the company nam-

A

Mark Foster pre-flights the Bird Dog before our flight at John Wayne. (Russ Albertson) ing contest with Bird Dog, a name that well suited the mission it would perform for the Army. In 1962, the Army re-designated the plane from L-19 to O-1. It was during Vietnam that the Bird Dog really made its mark. Pilots flying the O-1 were known as FACs, “Forward Air Controllers.” Powered by a Continental 0-470 engine producing 213 HP, and flying at 104 MPH, this plane made

it possible for the FACs to spot enemy positions in the jungle that fast jets, flying at higher altitudes, invariably missed. When a target was found, the Bird Dog could remain on scene and direct fighterbombers onto the target. Equipped with two, 2.75 inch, “Willie-Peter” white phosphorus rockets on each wing, the pilot could mark the target with a rocket that produced a large amount of white

smoke and was easily seen by the jets and other attack aircraft, including helicopters. The pilots that flew these missions were very brave and would "troll," low and slow to encourage the enemy to open fire and reveal their position. The pilots were only armed with an M-16 rifle and sidearm. They carried smoke grenades that they could drop to mark targets, and the O-1E Bird Dog carried a flare on each wing for night operations. One pilot equipped his plane with an M-60 machine gun, mounted over the back seat and fired through an open rear window. It was controlled by a trigger on the stick and was aimed by a simple grease pencil mark on the pilot's side window. He used the gun to pin-down enemy troops between attack passes and keep them from moving to new concealed positions. Soon, the very presence of a Bird Dog in the area meant that "death from above" was lurking near and the enemy had to make the decision to open fire and try and down the Bird Dog quickly or simply hide. Bird Dog pilots normally had a specific territory assigned to them and they soon came to know Continued on Page 10

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

ELECTIONS MATTER By Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO s a friend of mine likes to say, “elections matter.” Even when our own political representatives aren’t on the ballot, the fact is that who gets elected and how they view the world have far reaching effects on us all. The 112th Congress has been at work for several months, with new committee leaders getting down to business and acting on their priorities. Fortunately for the GA community, both houses of Congress have moved quickly to pursue long-term funding for the FAA. And, leaders in both houses have expressed

A

their opposition to user fees. At the same time, President Obama’s 2012 budget proposal makes no mention of user fees. That’s all good news as far as it goes, but we’re still a long way from a final result and plenty can happen along the way. And, let’s face it, this is a terrible time to be asking Congress for money, even if it is for running something as vital as our national aviation system. In fact, finding ways to reduce spending is the hottest topic in Washington—and most states—right now. In an environment like that, we’d be naïve to imagine that general aviation spending would be untouched. So far, both parties have indicated

that they want to preserve funding for general aviation airports—though funding for larger airports could be threatened, and that is a concern. They’ve also shown an inclination to fund NextGen, the next generation of aviation system modernization, and efforts to find a safe and effective replacement for avgas. In fact, AOPA was recently appointed to a new FAA rulemaking panel that will address the transition away from leaded fuel. But even so, all of us in the general aviation community must remain vigilant. While we are fortunate to have strong support in Congress, and the interest in general aviation issues is high, we are facing a time of cutbacks across the board.

And we still periodically run up against misguided policies and rules, like the one issued recently that would eliminate a pilot’s right to privacy by allowing just about anyone to track any aircraft any time it flies. That’s why all of us at AOPA, and throughout the aviation community, need to focus on the issues that matter most, be alert for policies and decisions that could have unintended negative consequences, and keep working to enable decision makers and the larger public to understand the many contributions that general aviation makes to our economy and society. And that’s just what we at AOPA are doing—today and every day.

GAMA APPLAUDS DOT, DOD LETTER VOICING CONCERN ON POTENTIAL THREAT TO GPS The General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) welcomes active engagement from the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in a recent letter to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) calling into question the process by which a company called LightSquared is to proceed in repurposing the satellite spectrum immediately neighboring that of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for use in extremely highpowered ground-based transmissions. This has caused serious concern within the GPS user community, especially aviation, since this planned spectrum use by LightSquared is fundamentally incompatible with existing GPS uses. In a meeting last week in Wichita

with Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and general aviation manufacturing leaders, this serious issue was discussed at length. “We are very appreciative that Secretary LaHood has taken up this issue in partnership with Defense Secretary Gates, since the consequences of disruption to GPS signals are far reaching,” said Gary Kelley, vice president of marketing and company officer for Garmin International. “Virtually all modern general aviation aircraft are outfitted with GPS systems that are an integral tool used in all phases of flight. GPS, together with the Wide Area Augmentation System, has long been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration for aircraft navigation and GPS instrument approaches that provide a landing system

“COALITION

TO

option at many airports not equipped with land-based instrument landing systems.” Jack Pelton, chairman, president, and CEO of Cessna Aircraft Company and chairman of GAMA’s Flight Operations Policy Committee said, “Modern air travel for our industry is inconceivable without a reliable GPS system to guide it. Even minimal predicted interference to GPS operations creates unacceptable risks to life and property. It is imperative that the LightSquared system not be deployed unless it can be guaranteed that the existing GPS system is fully protected from radio interference.” GAMA’s President and CEO, Pete Bunce, commented, “GPS was first launched more than 30 years ago and is relied upon by all sectors of aviation –

military, commercial and general aviation. It is an extremely reliable part of our nation’s air transportation system and will play an even more critical role in the modernized Next Generation Air Transportation System, which will address the nation’s need for expanded air traffic capacity while providing greater safety and accuracy. Any system that threatens the reception of GPS signals could have a catastrophic affect upon the extensive ground and air infrastructure that has already been deployed and paid for by operators and the U.S. taxpayer.” GAMA, Garmin International, Cessna Aircraft Company and other GAMA member companies are members of the Coalition to Save Our GPS (www.saveourgps.org)

SAVE OUR GPS” LAUNCHED

Groups Join Together to Resolve a Threat to GPS Representatives from a wide variety of industries and companies announced today that they have joined together to form the “Coalition to Save Our GPS” to resolve a serious threat to the Global Positioning System (GPS) - a national utility upon which millions of Americans rely every day. The threat stems from a recent highly unusual decision by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to grant a conditional waiver allowing the dramatic expansion of terrestrial use of the satellite spectrum immediately neighboring that of GPS, potentially causing severe interference to millions of GPS receivers.

The conditional waiver was granted to a company called LightSquared. A representative of one of the founding members of the coalition, Trimble Vice President and General Counsel Jim Kirkland, will testify on this issue on Friday, March 11 before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice and Science of the House Appropriations Committee. “GPS is essential to Americans every day - it’s in our cars, the airplanes in which we fly and the ambulances, police cars and fire trucks that help keep us safe. It’s also used in many industrial applications and even synchronizes our wireless, computer and utility networks,”

the group said in a statement. “LightSquared’s plans to build up to 40,000 ground stations transmitting radio signals one billion times more powerful than GPS signals as received on earth could mean 40,000 ‘dead spots’ - each miles in diameter - disrupting the vitally important services GPS provides.” The “Coalition to Save our GPS” includes representatives from a broad range of industries, including, aviation, agriculture, transportation, construction, engineering, surveying and GPS-based equipment manufacturers and service providers. Washington, D.C.-based Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld is leading the govern-

ment relations effort. The Coalition’s website is www.SaveOurGPS.org. Initial members of the Coalition are the Aeronautical Repair Stations Association, Air Transport Association, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, American Rental Association, Associated Equipment Distributors, Association of Equipment Manufacturers, Case New Holland, Caterpillar Inc., Edison Electric Institute, Esri, Garmin, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Deere & Company, National Association of ManContinued on Page 16


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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

10

April 2011

Bird Dog

Mark Foster and his beautiful O-1E in front of Lyon Air Museum.

Toll Free: + 1 (888) 901-9987 Tel: + 1 (702) 982-7089 web: www.STARTPAC.com Las Vegas, Nevada

Continued from Page 6 every sampan, water buffalo, trail and village in their area so well that anything out of place would draw their attention. Footprints in the mud along a river might require a low pass to check for ammo carrying sampans concealed under the trees. An extra water buffalo could mean that it was used to carry equipment or that troops were on the move. The Bird Dogs saved many downed airmen and worked closely with Douglas A-1E Skyraiders, known as Sandys, and Sikorsky helicopters called Jolly Green Giants, to attack any troops near the downed airman. After the Skyraiders suppressed the enemy, the FAC would call in the Jolly Green to hover over the airman and lower a rescue crewman known as a "PJ." The PJ, or Para Jumper was highly trained in first aide and jungle rescue. Even thought the FACs flew old, slow aircraft, they were among the most respected pilots in the war. One such pilot, Captain Hilliard Wilbanks, won the Congressional Medal of Honor, while flying a FAC mission on Feb. 24, 1967. Continued on Page 19

(Russ Albertson)

This picture shows the great visibility from the back seat of the Bird Dog. (Russ Albertson)

Mark Foster, in flight, with replica M-16 hanging in the right corner of the cockpit (Russ Albertson)

O-1E front view, displaying Vietnam paint scheme with dog teeth.

(Russ Albertson)


April 2011

www.inflightusa.com

CAMGUARD By Jim Cavanagh very once in a while something comes along that is more than a passing fad. Remember Loran? And then GPS? Well, they were here to stay, and thank God! And then there are snake oils. “Snake oil” is a term from the old west. Dr. McGonicle, or some such, sold it out of his wagon while a shapely lass worked the crowd. It grew hair and cured snakebites. It greased axles and relieved gas. The term became a catch phrase for anything, usually liquid, that was supposed to cure something but didn’t quite get the job done. We saw a lot of snake oil in aviation in the 1980s. In a time when the cost of aircraft, fuel, and maintenance was skyrocketing, these little bottles of magic promised longer TBOs, less fuel consumption, better cooling, and faster speeds. Marketing, or perhaps marketinghooey! Recently, one product has become accepted by some pretty knowledgeable aviation engine people. In fact, it was developed by one. CamGuard was developed by Greg Merrell, owner of Aircraft

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IN A

Specialties Services, Inc. of Tulsa, OK, and Ed Kollin, former head of Exxon’s Engine Research Laboratory, Advanced Fuels and Lubricants. These two men are about as credible as you can get in their respective industries. The genesis of CamGuard was an additive package developed for Exxon by Kollin. After having tested every aviation oil and every aftermarket additive on the market, and interviewing every overhaul and machine shop in the eastern U.S., he settled in to develop the additive package that aviation needed. Naturally, Exxon did not put it into production. The cost per quart to the end user would have been prohibitive. About the same time, Merrell, who owns the country’s premier aviation machine shop, was noticing an increase in the number of parts that were being rejected due to corrosion. It happened that his was a shop Kollin had on his schedule and one day, out of the blue, Kollin walked in. You get two guys like this together, something is going to happen. It took Kollin a few months to develop a non-Exxon formula to address what Merrell was seeing. Mixing up a batch,

11

NUTSHELL

Merrell and his friends and family began using it in their experimental engines and even personal and work vehicles. When they began disassembling the engines for maintenance, the benefits of CamGuard came to light. The additive package in oil is what makes it do its magic. Oil itself is just a

medium for transferring heat and for carrying additives. The additives are formulated for molecular properties that are way too complicated to explain in a short article. The additives do different jobs, including increasing resistance to corrosion, cleaning the oil and sludge by bondContinued on Page 19 P.O. Box 5402 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (650) 358-9908 • Fax (650) 358-9254

Founder ..................................................................................................................Ciro Buonocore Publisher/Editor................................................................................................Victoria Buonocore Managing Editor ........................................................................................................Toni F. Sieling Associate Editors ........................ Nicholas A. Veronico, Sagar Pathak, Richard VanderMeulen ..................................................................................................................................Russ Albertson Staff Contributors ......................................................................S. Mark Rhodes, Roy A. Barnes, .....................................................................................Clark Cook, Larry Nazimek, Joe Gonzalez, ........................................................................................Alan Smith, Herb Foreman, Pete Trabuco Columnists..................................Stuart Faber, Scott Schwartz, Larry Shapiro, Ed Wischmeyer, ..........................................................................................Marilyn Dash, Ed Downs, Anthony Nalli Production Editors ..............................................................................Anne Dobbins, Toni Sieling Copy Editing ............................................................................................................Sally Gersbach Editorial Assistant ........................................................................................................Julie Myhre Advertising Sales Manager ........................................Ed Downs (650) 358-9908, (918) 873-0280 Advertising Sales ....................................................Karyn Dawes (Southern CA) (760) 471-1144 Web Design ..................................................................................................................Josh Nadler In Flight USA is published each month by In Flight Publishing. It is circulated throughout the continental United States. Business matters, advertising and editorial concerns should be addressed to In Flight USA, P.O. Box 5402, San Mateo, Calif. 94402 or by calling (650) 358-9908–fax (650) 358-9254. Copyright © 2008 In Flight Publishing. In Flight USA is not responsible for any action taken by any person as a result of reading any part of any issue. The pieces are written for information, entertainment and suggestion – not recommendation. The pursuit of flight or any action reflected by this paper is the responsibility of the individual and not of this paper, its staff or contributors. Opinions expressed are those of the individual author, and not necessarily those of In Flight USA. All editorial and advertising matter in this edition is copyrighted. Reproduction in any way is strictly prohibited without written permission of the publisher. In Flight USA is not liable or in any way responsible for the condition or airworthiness of any aircraft advertised for sale in any edition. By law the airworthiness of any aircraft sold is the responsiblity of the seller and buyer.

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

12

Aviation Ancestry

April 2011

by Scott Schwartz

HOLE SUCKING AIR: REPUBLIC F-84 THUNDERJET onceived during the closing days of World War II, Republic’s F-84 Thunderjet was conceived in response to a U.S. Army Air Force requirement for a new interceptor/escort fighter/fighter-bomber that would be able to fly fast and far. This was a tall order given the fuel-guzzling jet engines of the time. Initially, Republic’s chief designer – Alexander Kartveli – envisioned a jetpowered version of the P-47 Thunderbolt. In order to obtain the highest speeds possible, the P-47 was re-designed (on paper) to have as narrow a cross section as possible. The problem was that the centrifugal-flow jet engines originally intended for use in the new airplane were large in diameter. Even after a narrower axial-flow engine was decided upon, the fuselage had to be fairly wide. The result was an aircraft with a fuselage that was slender at the front (with a relatively small engine air-intake) and “barrelchested” in the middle, in order to accommodate the engine. Aft of the cockpit, the fuselage tapered to the tail pipe, with the

Republic P-84B; note the small engine air-intake in the nose. jet exhaust gases exiting underneath the empennage. In November, 1944, Republic submitted its design proposal to the USAAF. Because Republic’s design appeared as though it would perform better than Lockheed’s P-80, and because Republic had considerable experience in building fighters, the service accepted the design

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(USAF Photo)

right away and placed an order for three XP-84 (readers will remember that the Army referred to its fighters as “Pursuit” aircraft) prototypes. Favorably impressed with Republic, the Army placed an order for 25 test aircraft (YF-84As) and 74 actual service aircraft (P-84Bs) in January of 1945. The order was shortly changed, with only 15 YF-84As being

Hollister Soaring Center LLC

TER SOA S I

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C

built as such; the remainder were to be built as P-84Bs. Producing roughly 3,750 pounds of thrust, the General Electric J-35 GE-7 powered the XP-84. The new “B” models were equipped with a slightly more powerful version of the same engine, but the engine would now be produced by Allison. While testing various XP-84 models (“models” as in scaled-down replicas of the real aircraft) in its wind tunnels, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) found that the aluminum skin on the horizontal stabilizers was buckling, and that the design was longitudinally unstable. The other problem was that the airplane was getting heavier as the design work progressed. The result of all this was the installation of a more powerful version of the J-35 engine in one of the XP-84s (with this airplane now becoming the XP-84A), the imposition of a design-weight limit of 13,000 pounds, and the return of the XP84A, an XP-84, and a YP-84A to Continued on Page 22

• Glider instruction from beginner onward including aerobatics, landing on tow, and recovery from unusual attitudes • Glider towing with three powerful tow planes • 300+ K flights common along the Diablo range and Panoche Valley in summer • Great local soaring during spring and fall

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• Periodic wave soaring during winter

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Soar over the beautiful Monterey Bay area!

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Call about our super-fun, Spring and Fall soaring get-togethers held in the Panoche Valley.

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Oakland

For directions to Hollister Soaring Center from your location please visit our web site, give us a call, or input our address, 30 Airport Dr., #101, Hollister, CA 95023, into a mapping program. We are located on the Hollister Municipal Airport.

(831) 636-3799 • www.SoarHollister.com

Private glider owners welcome!

If you've never been to Hollister, come and check out a great new place to soar!

Monterey Carmel

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April 2011

Contrails

www.inflightusa.com

13

by Steve Weaver

FERRYING

A

BEECH BARON

TO

BRAZIL: PART 2

December 12, 2009 rom San Juan to the island of St. Lucia is a relatively short flight of three hours or so. I am late getting off at Isla Grande, due in no small part I’ll admit, to my presence at a Christmas party in Old San Juan. There, the hospitality flowed freely, all of the woman in attendance seemed to be named Maria, and I stayed much too late to be flying the next morning. The weather on this leg was perfect, though I filed IFR in order to be more securely in the system. After a routine flight I arrived at St. Lucia in the mid to late afternoon and taxied to the spot designated by the tower, after informing them that I needed to see customs. Since it’s usual to remain in the airplane until customs arrives and bids you step down, I did so for about ten minutes, but no official showed. I turned on the electrical system and called the tower and was told I should walk around the building and enter at the doorway there, for customs was inside. I again shut down and fol-

F

View of the Carribean sunset off the wing.

(Steve Weaver)

lowed their instructions. The door was locked. For the next 15 minutes I knocked on the door until a guard appeared around the corner of the building and asked what I wanted. I explained my quest for customs and he explained that he didn’t have a key or a clue how I could get inside. Finally someone else came and they knew some-

one with a key and a call was made. After another quarter hour the door was opened and I was shown inside. I asked about customs and was told that the lady had been sent for and I should make myself comfortable, a comment I thought strange since there were no chairs. Forty-five minutes passed while I paced to and fro and finally sat down on the floor. At last a

lady in an official appearing uniform strolled up and motioned for me to follow her. We reined up in front of a door labeled ‘Immigration.’ It was locked. A key was mentioned, but its whereabouts remained a mystery. A search was mounted. A very slow moving search, but search nonetheless. Forty-Five more minutes passed, then a guard appeared triumphantly waving the fugitive key and I was ushered inside. My papers were scrutinized and I was asked for my manifest. I explained that I had filed it on line but this was met with a disapproving frown from the official, best summed up with; “Online? You can’t stamp no stinking document online.” Off to the airline office I was sent to make out a decent manifest – a paper manifest, which could be laid flat and stamped thoroughly. Baggage in tow I trudged the 30 yards or so to the airline office. The door was locked. My steady pounding was rewarded with a cracked door through Continued on Page 18


Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

14

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April 2011

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Banking over the hills in a BASA-DG-1000. (Steve Brockman)

Images and visions of Sagar Pathak

By Quest Richlife, Manager Hollister Soaring Center LLC ast month in part one of this series we defined what gliders and sailplanes are, and dispelled some misconceptions as to the mechanisms by which these craft are able to stay aloft or “soar.” We also looked at the four different types of “lift” which the pilot of one of these stealthy birds needs to find and use to engage in the challenging sport of soaring. In this month’s article, we’ll look at the entire aviation subculture surrounding gliders and soaring which will reveal the depth of excitement and variety that exists in this often hidden world.

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Part Two: There’s Something For Everyone In Gliders and Soaring

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The world of powerless flight is so rich and varied that there’s a place in it for pilots who are already certificated to fly powered aircraft, as well as those would-be pilots starting from scratch. Even non-pilots are welcomed into the glider world as there is much to enjoy and

The roomy back seat of the Americanmade Schweizer 2-32 sailplane makes it the only glider in which couples can soar together side-by-side. (Richard Rossi) contribute to the sport from the ground, and also because the glider environment is a very socially interactive one. This social aspect of the sport is so important that most gliderports strive to have an open, relaxed, “people friendly” atmosphere if at all possible. This inviting hospitality encourages enthusiasts to hangout, help out, watch the action, enjoy camaraderie, and sometimes enjoy an informal BBQ and a beer at the end of a long, warm, soaring day. For young people and teenagers who are thinking about exploring aviation as a future career path, or simply because of their love for flight, there is no better way for them to enter this field than through glider flight training. A person who has the basic physical size and motor skills to operate the controls of a glider can solo at 14 years of age, and obtain their Private Pilot Certificate at 16. Additionally, there is no need for them, or any other glider pilots for that matter, to obtain a medical Continued on Page 29


April 2011

www.inflightusa.com

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FAA Approved back-up b k Altitude Altit d indicator i di t replaces l turn t & banks b k under d AC91-75. AC91 Features inclinometer and failing warning flag. Factory new. 15 month warranty. Simple installation. 14V ................................................ P/N 10-02823..........................$2,235.00 28V ................................................. P/N 10-02824......................... No Match 14V w/ 8° tilt ................................... P/N 10-02828..........................$2,195.00 28V w/ 8° tilt ................................... P/N 10-02829..........................$2,235.00

Electronics International UBG-16 Ultimate Bar Graph Engine Analyzer is a sophisticated instrument with unique features designed to provide pilots with a unique tool for detecting engine problems in their earliest stages and assisting you in operation your engine safely and economically UBG-16(Instrument Only)... P/N 10-25335 ..$1,195.00 UBG-16 w/8 Probes ........ P/N 10-00593 ..$1,638.00 UBG-16 w/12 Probes ...... P/N 10-00594 ..$2,098.00

Plane-Power Alternators These are the products of years of research, development and intensive testing. Each component has been engineered, developed, tested and re-tested exclusively for use in general aviation aircraft. PMA Certified New Replacement Alternators AL12-F60 .................. P/N 07-00998 ...........$482.00 AL12-C60 ................. P/N 07-00997 ...........$489.00 Experimental Aircraft Alternators AL12-EI60/b ......... P/N 07-01003 ...........$359.00 AL12-EI70/b ......... P/N 07-01004 ...........$429.95 Visit our website for complete line of Plane Power Alternators

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Fuel Scan 450 JPI Instruments provides continuous display of fuel burned in gal/hour (liter and lbs. available on special order). Fuel Scan 450 also provides total fuel used, fuel remaining, endurance in hours and minutes, fuel required to next waypoint, fuel reserve at next waypoint, and nautical miles/gal. P/N 10-00135 ............ $658.75

8

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X11P .............................................................$799.00 X11 ...............................................................$799.00 H10-13Y Youth .............................................$306.90 H10-20 ..........................................................$302.25 H10-30 ......................................................... $251.10 H10-60 ......................................................... $345.96 H10-13.4 ......................................................$306.90 H10-13.4S ................................................................................... $311.55 H20-10 ......................................................................................... $327.36 H10-13X ANR (battery) ............................................................... $628.68 H10-13XL ANR (battery) ............................................................. $717.03

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Alcor Instruments

Alcor Multi-Probe Analyzers provide the peace of mind pilots want whether they are flying over mountains, oceans or just around home. 2-1/4” EGT................................P/N 46150 ...$146.50 2-1/4” CHT................................P/N 46151 ...$146.50 CHT Probe (Bayonet) ...............P/N 86251 .....$69.85 EGT Probe (Type K-Clamp) .....P/N 86255 .....$62.50

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

16

April 2011

Light Sport Flying By Ed Downs

SPORT PILOTS s there something different about a shiny, new Sport Pilot planning a cross country flight and what we might expect to see from a typical pilot coming out of the pre-GPS world that preceded the late 1990s? It is possible that there is, and pre 90s aviators might be able to learn a thing or two. As spring fights its way into existence to end a long, cold winter, many are planning flying trips to a variety of business or recreational locations. A lot of aircraft owners are beginning to realize that their passion for recreational flying may dribble over into the more mundane transportation needs for which they have used the airlines in the past. Policy and pricing changes within the airline industry have become increasingly customer hostile, service to cities other than major hubs has been further reduced, and the TCA continues to add significant inconveniences to the travel experience. The fact is, point-to-point travel time for most trips of less than 600 miles is significantly less in the typical S-LSA than by modern airliner. The bottom line is that many more folks will turn to their recreational hobby planes for day-to-day travel needs. This means more cross country planning and a careful analysis of your planning skills. Interestingly enough, the newly minted sport pilot may have a head start in this area. The Sport Pilot Practical Test Standard stresses that a sport pilot show strength in basic dead reckoning and pilotage navigation. Electronic navi-

I

AND

gation is optional; that includes GPS or the antiquated VOR system. But the sport pilot industry is not turning out a bunch of DR pros who are a wiz at reading charts. The fact is, the vast majority of SLSAs being used for training have sophisticated glass cockpit displays with integrated autopilots. Sport pilots may never see or operate a VOR, and certainly not an ADF, but give them a complicated integrated cockpit, a laptop or computer tablet, and watch their smoke! Many Private Pilots are being trained on similar equipment, and we old guys flying “steam gauge” airplanes typically have a portable GPS and tablet to supplement our aging brains. This should be good news; flying should be safer, and cross country flying should be a breeze. But, NTSB statistics, and recent Nall reports show a different trend. It seems as though the modern, highly integrated cockpit is leading to a loss of situational awareness and location confusion, often so severe that actual control of the airplane is lost while confused pilots try to locate and push the right buttons. So what is going on? To be sure, it is not a problem with advanced navigational and flight systems, but it may have something to do with the reliance now being placed upon these systems. Many pilots, especially the low timers who have been trained in advanced aircraft, do not start the cross country planning process until after engine start. They simply pre-flight the machine, start the engine and

FLIGHT PLANNING turn on the nav systems. A simple “direct to” entry will start one off on the flight with airport data, runway layout, radio frequencies, routing and even weather links displayed in full color. Toss in a moving map display, and the flight becomes a simple “follow the bouncing ball” drill, until something goes wrong or conditions change. It is then that the pilot discovers that they were simply following someone else’s plan for their flight, and that they have no back up plan. Old timers have some experience to fall back on, but the low time sport pilot, or out of practice “old timer” can find themselves confused and lacking solutions. Not a good place to be. So, how does one optimize the incredible electronics now standard in most S-LSA’s, and/or get the most out of a sophisticated, contemporary, Cessna or Piper type plane? Simple – it is called “proper pre-flight planning.” This means sectional charts, flight logs and an evening spent at home developing a plan as to how tomorrow’s flight is going to go. Okay, so you do not like paper; take a look at www.vfrcopilot.com. Kevin Carlone, President of the Ed/iT Inc., has developed a software package that enables old timers like me to download and use actual sectional charts (and every FAA update to facilities that you can think of) in a practical fashion that permits one to actually create and print a “travel book” for a flight in a page or strip format that actually fits the cockpit of an airplane. I might also add that Ed/iT sub-

scription prices are significantly less than trying to find and buy all of the charts you need for a long flight at the local FBO. Be it charts from the airport, electronic planning tools (like ED/iT) or any number of other planning systems now available, the planning process prior to engine start is the key to a safe flight. Such planning means that the advanced technology familiar to sport pilots and being learned by “old” pilots becomes a valuable backup tool that ensures correct execution of your plan, not somebody else’s plan. New technology can give you the constant assurances needed to know that your plan is going well, leaving time for your mind to be in front of the plane, enjoying the flight, and not behind the plane playing catch-up. Finally, are there businesses out there that produce flight planning systems who are now reading this column, wondering, “why didn’t he mention my product?” Our new feature, Goodies and Gadgets is open for your use. Send product announcements to editor@ inflightusa.com so that you can be added to the growing number of new products and services now being presented in every issue of In Flight USA. Also, be sure to explore our web site at www.inflightusa.com and view the new “Virtual Magazine” with convenient links to all advertisers. In Flight USA is adding many new features. Join the party!

“Coalition to Save Our GPS” Launched Continued from Page 8 ufacturers, OmniSTAR, and Trimble. Additional members are expected to join in the near future. The unusual waiver granted in January to LightSquared by the FCC allows it to use its satellite spectrum for high-powered ground-based broadband transmissions if the company can demonstrate that harmful interference could be avoided. The usual FCC process of conducting extensive testing followed by approvals was not followed in this instance. Instead, the process was approve first, then test. Additional safeguards are needed, so the Coalition recommends: • The FCC must make clear, and

the NTIA must ensure, that LightSquared’s license modification is contingent on the outcome of the mandated study. The study must be comprehensive, objective, and based on correct assumptions about existing GPS uses rather than theoretical possibilities. The views of LightSquared, as an interested party, are entitled to no special weight in this process. • The FCC should make clear that LightSquared and their investors should not proceed to make any investment in operating facilities prior to a final FCC decision (or at least make it explicit that they do so at their own risk). While this is the FCC’s established policy, it failed to make this explicit in its order.

• Further, the FCC’s, and NTIA’s, finding that “harmful interference concerns have been resolved” must mean “resolved to the satisfaction of pre-existing GPS providers and users.” • Resolution of interference has to be the obligation of LightSquared, not the extensive GPS user community of millions of citizens. LightSquared must bear the costs of preventing interference of any kind resulting from operations on LightSquared’s frequencies. GPS users or providers should not have to bear any of the consequences of LightSquared’s actions. • This is a matter of critical national interest. There must be a reasonable opportunity for public comment of at

least 45 days on the report produced by the working group.

About the Coalition The “Coalition to Save Our GPS” is working to resolve a serious threat to the Global Positioning System. The FCC granted a highly unusual conditional waiver for a proposal to build 40,000 ground stations that could cause widespread interference with GPS signals – endangering a national utility, which millions of Americans rely on every day. The conditional waiver was granted to a company called LightSquared. For more information visit www. SaveOurGPS.org

Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...www.inflightusa.com


April 2011

www.inflightusa.com

17

PAINTINGS BREATHE LIFE INTO AMELIA EARHART'S TRANSATLANTIC CROSSING IN NIGHT FLIGHT By S. Mark Rhodes or those who think the romanticism of flight is a thing of the distant past, one need look no further than the illustrations of Wendell Minor who is one of the first ranked artists/illustrators working today. Minor has illustrated a number of different children’s books to great acclaim including ones on Lincoln, Trains, the Revolutionary War figure Henry Knox as well as a work on Buzz Aldrin’s life that was reviewed by yours truly in these pages in 2009. Most recently, Minor has illustrated Night Flight: Amelia Earhart Crosses the Atlantic (Simon and Schuster) by Robert Burleigh (an equally accomplished children’s book author and occasional collaborator with Minor). Minor’s work here has a kind of modest grandeur and dramatic arc that takes us from a pastoral beginning (reminiscent of a film like Days of Heaven) with Earhart taking off from a modest, earthen landing strip in Newfoundland, to a middle section where she is battling the elements including lightning, wind and ice, to a particu-

romanticism to flight and aviators, and it is hoped that he might have the chance to take on some of the other great figures and events of aviation throughout his career.

F

Paintings © 2011 by Wendell Minor larly dramatic moment where she pulls up from a nose dive just about 10 feet above the icy Atlantic. Minor’s paintings have a dramatic composition here, which drives the narrative (with a great deal of help from Burleigh’s rhythmic prose) and when Earhart touches safely down on Irish soil we are as equally relieved as the famed aviatrix must have been. One of the really refreshing aspects of this book is that it chronicles one of

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April 2011

Ferrying a Beech Baron to Brazil: Part 2 Continued from Page 13 which I explained my dilemma. I needed a manifest, could they make me one? I was courteously shown in and with much arm waving and repetition I conveyed my needs and the document was dutifully created – in triplicate of course – one for customs, one for the tower and one I believe, for me. Thirty minutes later I was trudging back to customs, towing my baggage and clutching my manifests. The door was locked. More pounding. Ten minutes of this the door opened and the lady from customs appeared, took my documents and indicated that I follow her back to her office. Once there she scrutinized the manifests, then with barely disguised enthusiasm she drew her stamp and thumped them soundly. Now I was free to visit the tower. There I would give them their copy of the manifest, file my flight plan and order gas. Baggage in tow, once more I rumbled across the rough ramp to the building that had been pointed out to me. The door was locked. This time a few minutes pounding did the trick. This was good because my knuckles were getting sore. I handed the manifest to the tower chief and filed the flight plan and then asked about fuel. Did I want Jet A, he asked? No, I need 100 low lead, I replied. Sorry, he said, we only have jet fuel. My thoughts at this moment are censored, but suffice to say they were liberally laced with the feeling of futility. I’d just spent three and a half hours finding out I should have stopped somewhere else and now it was too late to go there. Well, I would just stay the night, start fresh and go on to Trinidad in the morning. That island was another three hours more away, but I should be able to make it with adequate reserves.

December 13, 2009 The weather this morning was Caribbean perfect and the trip from St. Lucia to Trinidad was accomplished without incident. The airplane was performing perfectly and the only issue that worried me now was my charts. I had had trouble finding charts for the Caribbean and South America, so a friend had found and ordered them online for me. Since I’d been on U.S. charts to Puerto Rico, except for a perfunctory glance at them to make sure they covered the area needed, I hadn’t really looked at them until leaving San Juan. Once I gave them a serious look I found that although they seemed to be aeronautical charts, they gave no navigation information, such as VOR frequencies, airways and

The Beech Baron and I make it to our final destination in Brazil. intersections. Hmm, I thought, but with dual GPS, I couldn’t get lost. Could I? Also there were vast areas of the charts that had no elevation marking or colors, just plain white and noted with “No Elevation Information Available.” I now knew how the early sea explorers felt and I nervously hoped I wouldn’t find a notation saying, “They Be Monsters Here” as some of their charts did. Fortunately, the Garman database included the needed communication frequencies and when the island of Trinidad came into view and I called the tower, the controller cleared to land with the musical tones of the Caribbean, directed me to Customs, and this time I found the office quickly. Presenting my documents, I was puzzled when the official inquired as to who my agent was. Thinking I had misunderstood, I asked what she meant, and was met with a withering look. She explained that I would need an agent to handle the paperwork involved in buying fuel and getting help with the myriad of forms from the several offices that I would need to be cleared through. I won’t bore you with the details; I’ll just say that she told the truth. After getting the picture of what was in store if I tried to navigate this Sargasso Sea of Bureaucracy on my own, I caved and hired the agent. As I write this I am still amazed that people would create a system so unwieldy and complex that to simply stop and buy gas, a traveler would have to hire a professional to navigate the bureaucracy. It was a good lesson for me to appreciate more the freedom and simplicity of travel in our own country and I won’t soon forget it. Even with the agent’s help, about three hours passed before I lifted off the island and headed out for Macapa, my first stop in Brazil. By now it was after-

(Steve Weaver)

noon and the thousand mile distance meant I would be arriving at close to dark with close to minimal fuel. Also, I needed VFR weather there, since I had no approach charts to supplement my close to worthless VFR charts. Again I had filed IFR, hoping that I would be cleared direct as one mostly is these days in the states. However, I was quickly learning that there is very little radar coverage where I was going and without radar coverage the system is more as it was in the U.S. in the 50s. I was given an intersection to fly directly to, before turning toward my destination and I had no way of knowing where that was. My uncertainty led to a barrage of requests from the controller to give my distance and radial from a certain VOR. Again, my chart did not list the frequency for this nav aid and it was impossible for me to know exactly where I was, except “on my way to Macapa.” After a few frustrating minutes of trying to hammer myself into the system I gave up and canceled IFR. I climbed high enough to clear all the mountains, hit Direct on the Garmin and settled down for a long, long flight. My track would take me into South America on the northeastern edge of Venezuela, then across the top of Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana before entering Brazil and crossing the mighty Amazon River, close to its mouth. I had 1,000 miles of very lonesome, very uncertain flying, with no way to get updates on the weather ahead of me. Also, I’d be flying across countries that have used some harsh methods to interdict suspected drug smugglers and I recalled a missionary Cessna being shot down over the Amazon River with a loss of life. These were wonderful, uplifting thoughts and I suspected the next six hours would be some of the longest of

my life. The weather had thickened and I was on instruments now. Without the ground contact, I needed even more altitude to insure clearance over the mountains and I climbed to 14,000 feet. Now I was focused on ground speed, because without at least 160 knots across the ground, Macapa would be beyond my range and I would have to plan a closer destination. I gazed lovingly at the GPS ground speed, like a mother watching the face of a sick child, willing it to give the speed I needed. Thank God, I seemed to be holding at just over 160 and if I could maintain this I would make it with reserve fuel. Hours passed as the little airplane crawled across the face of the GPS. The moving map showed the features along the coast and I could plot my position relative to that. Guyana was finally behind me, and we progressed agonizingly on the GPS, eighth inch by eighth inch, across the top of Suriname. I felt much more than mere hours older than when I had left Trinidad and very, very tired. Now French Guiana was past and I had entered Brazil. The clouds had broken and I could once more see the ground. Trees, dark green and stretching from horizon to horizon were below me. More forest than I had ever seen in my life, an endless, mind boggling expanse of verdant green, without road, without clearing, without any sign that man had ever touched it unrolled below me, endless and without feature. Late afternoon had come and while the shadows some two miles below me had begun lengthening, the weather had kept improving until it was excellent. I began to dare to hope that my arrival at Macapa would be without stress or drama, which meant in VFR weather. Some 200 miles out, I tuned to the approach frequency for the airport and began to listen for other traffic also inbound, but the frequency remained silent. Finally darkness came, suddenly and dramatically as it did in these latitudes, and 40 miles out I made a call to the tower as I begin my decent from 14,000 feet. I was answered almost immediately and I requested the weather, crossing my fingers and toes and everything else that I could cross. The tower, bless their heart, came back with excellent VFR conditions and soon, over the nose of the Baron I spotted the light of the airport beacon. This pilot’s lighthouse of the sky was giving me its encouraging flash of refuge and safety every seven seconds, and I welcomed it like a thirsty man welcomes a cold drink of water. Continued on Page 20


April 2011

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Bird Dog Continued from Page 10 He had already flown 487 combat missions and won the Distinguished Flying Cross. On this day, he was flying over a battalion of South Vietnamese Rangers when he saw they were walking into a trap. He flew over the Rangers and radioed a warning to them, and the enemy knowing they had been seen, opened fire on him and the Rangers. Captain Wilbanks marked the enemy with smoke rockets and Viet Cong charged the Rangers because they knew fighters were on the way. Seeing that the fighters would not arrive in time to save the Rangers, Wilbanks rolled in and fired his remaining rockets which gave the Ranger some time to escape. Even though he was out of rockets, Wilbanks made two more passes, as low as 100 feet over the enemy, and fired his M-16 rifle. Captain Wilbanks was shot down and killed on the third pass but he had delayed the attack long enough for 700 Rangers to escape. The Rangers later said it was the "bravest thing they ever saw." Losses mounted and the Air Force realized the O-1, though highly maneuverable, lacked armor, and was replaced by another Cessna â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the O-2 Skymaster. The O-2 was powered by two engines giving it more speed and survivability. Recently, I was able to ride along in a beautifully restored O-1E Bird Dog with Mark Foster, President of Martin Aviation and Lyon Air Museum at John Wayne Airport in Orange County. Mark has been around warbirds for some time and has flown many of them, including a

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Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless, North American P-51D Mustang and a Chance Vought F-4U-1A Corsair. He holds an A&P certificate and started working on warbirds at Fighter Rebuilders at Chino, Calif. Later, he moved on to manage Planes of Fame Air Museum as VP and General Manager. During his time at Chino, he decided to restore a warbird and chose the O-1

Bird Dog. He searched all over the world via phone and the internet for a plane. He laughed when he said that after all that, he found one "about 200 yards from his office," in pieces and tucked in a corner of an old hangar. The plane had been ground-looped and needed a lot of sheet metal repair. This happened to be his specialty and, about six and half years of "spare time and lunch money," he had a

perfectly restored Bird Dog â&#x20AC;&#x201C; right down to a replica M-16 hanging on a map light and simulated rocket soot on the ends of the rocket launchers! Mark offered me a ride at Orange County airport and I was impressed by its short field performance. As soon as he applied takeoff power, I looked down to check my camera, and in a couple of secContinued on Page 22


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Continued from Page 18 I was cleared to land while overhead (on) the well-lighted runway and I dropped the gear and approach flaps and did a teardrop entry to final. As the numbers flashed underneath, I chopped the power and after almost seven hours in flight the Baron’s tires touched the earth of South America and the country of Brazil. I rolled out through the silky night, then taxied back to the lighted ramp area and shut down. Sitting in the darkened Baron, I listened to the gink and tick of the cooling engines while I gathered my useless charts and straightened the cockpit. As I opened the door, the cool night air touched my face, and I reflected that sometimes the better part of a flight was these moments after arrival: That time where the airplane is silent but you are still joined, airplane and pilot, still one being and not yet released to become separately man and machine. You sit, feeling the completion of a hard task and the release from the tension that has ridden with you all day. This had been such a flight. Tonight as always after hours in the air, the first stop is the men’s room. But this would not be just another trip to an airport restroom. Tonight I would find out, legend or fact, if water really does drain counter clockwise below the equator. In the rest room I finished my post

commode, watched intently and…yes, water really does drain the opposite direction below the equator! I am exultant. It occurs to me, having brought charts of no use for navigation, that without the GPS I would have been reduced to flying south, landing at any airport that I encountered and flushing a commode to find out if I had crossed the equator. Somehow I don’t think Juan Tripp did it this way. And so ended my flight but not my adventure, for there were many exciting things that awaited me in the few days I would spend in Brazil. Meeting the generous and wonderful people that live there, seeing a farm the size of a small country, and being in the middle of busy and crowded Sao Paulo were a few of the things that impressed me, but this is the story of a flight and I won’t go into detail about my stay. During the eight hour trip home in the back of the Delta Jetliner, I had a chance to reflect on all I had seen and done since leaving West Virginia. It began to sink in just how far I had traveled in the Baron, both in terms of miles and of adventures experienced, and I felt very grateful to have had this journey to a new land and for all the memories that I was taking home.

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and then, en masse, flew out to Lakeland arriving Monday, March 28th. The Cubs landed and taxied in parade fashion on the grass strip. The Legend Cub from American Legend Aircraft Company is a thoroughly modern aircraft based on the American classic Cub. Since its introduction in 2005, the Legend Cub has led the lightsport segment as the best selling American-manufactured aircraft. The Legend Cub continues a more than 75year history of providing memorable flying experiences. The Legend Cub made its sixth visit to Sun ‘n Fun Fly-in arriving in the 2011 Cub Convoy. The Legend Cub, Legend AmphibCub, Texas Sport kit version, and a fully restored Piper J3 were all on display during the show. American Legend Aircraft Company manufacturers the sport certified Legend Cub and Legend AmphibCub, and the amateur-built Texas Sport – an aircraft kit based on the Legend Cub. The compa-

(Courtesy of American Legend) ny’s Restoration Services division performs work on most tube-and-fabric aircraft, and manufactures parts to original manufacturer’s specifications. For further information, contact American Legend Aircraft Company at 1810 Piper Lane, Sulphur Springs, Texas 75482; call 903/885-7000.


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Continued from Page 12 Republic so that the instability and skin issues could be worked on. With the end of the P-47’s production run, the development of a long-range reconnaissance airplane known as the XR-12 Rainbow (the production of which was canceled after two prototypes were built), and the production of the Seabee amphibian (which generated disappointing sales figures), having to spend more time and money modifiying the Thunderjet did not bode well for Republic’s financial health. Nevertheless, two XP-84s were flown to Muroc Army Air Base in California after they’d been accepted by the AAF at Republic’s Farmingdale, NY plant in October of 1945. As a side note, one of the Army acceptance pilots assigned to Farmingdale at the time, was a young Captain by the name of Charles Yeager. Lest the reader think that flying the two experimental aircraft from New York to California was a bit risky, it should be noted that the XP-84s were disassembled and carried aboard another “experimental” aircraft: a Boeing XC-97. Well, the XP-84’s first flight took place on February 28, 1946. Only one of the XP-84s could be flown, as GE had not been able to supply an engine for the other one. Allison had not started production of the J-35, yet. In the meantime, the fifteen YP-84As were delivered to Patterson Field (now Wright-Patterson Air Force Base) for testing and were fitted with six .50 caliber machine guns (two in the nose and one in each wing).

1946 saw the Army Air Force order additional P-84Bs; these later “B” models were equipped with retractable underwing racks for unguided rockets. Newer .50 caliber machine guns were fitted, which could fire 1,200 rounds per minute. The USAAF also planned to order 271 Thunderjets, which were to be powered by the more potent GE J-47 engine. These aircraft would be designated as P-84Cs. Things appeared to be looking up for Republic. There was one big problem, however. Most of the J-47s were earmarked for the F-86 and B-47 aircraft. Consequently Republic had to make do with modified J-35 engines. To make matters worse, the delays caused the USAAF to reduce the order to 191 aircraft. Finally; the transfer of J-35 engine production from GE to Allison was causing engine deliveries to be held up. As a result, flight testing of the aircraft was delayed to the point where new production P-84Bs were coming off the assembly line before the XP and YP-84s had completed their test programs! Because new aircraft were being built prior to completion of flight tests, Republic voiced its concerns about the unresolved stability problems to the USAAF. The Army informed Republic that the whole program might be canceled, if un-tested “fixes” were incorporated into production aircraft. Clearly, Republic’s future looked bleak.

The story of the F-84 will continue in next month’s column.

Bird Dog Continued from Page 19 onds, we were airborne. We cruised out over the former El Toro Marine Corps Air Station and Mark let me have control. I made a few turns and the O-1E handled just like the Cessna 170s I remember. It would have been fun to get down low over open country and see what it would have been like for the FACs flying 100 feet above the jungle, but jungle, or even open country for that matter, is in short supply in Orange County, and we headed back to John Wayne. Mark made a great short field landing, with a little crosswind,

and shut down in front of the museum. This plane, along with a B-17, B-25, A-26, C-47 and DC-3, plus other related rare vehicles and memorabilia can be seen at the Lyon Air Museum. Mark said the museum features aircraft flying events every other month, car club displays and book signing by WWII veterans. Also, the museum is working with local schools and the kids get special tours by WWII veterans. Information on the museum can be found at: info@lyonairmuseum.org or by calling 714/210-4585.

Subscribe to In Flight USA today for home delivery ofyour source for aviation news, information and features.


April 2011

IPS FROM THE

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“Tips from the Pros” is a feature dedicated to allowing the In Flight USA family of aviation professionals to share tips and information regarding flying skills, airframe care and engine operations.

EMERGENCY MANEUVER AND UNUSUAL ATTITUDE TRAINING, WHY ?

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By Judy Phelps, Master CFI-A, CFII Vice President, CP Aviation, Inc “2011 National CFI of the Year” mergency Maneuver and Unusual Attitude Training is a must for all pilots. As a new pilot it was this very training that took the fear out of flying and gave me a new sense of comfort that I hadn’t experienced before in an airplane. I absolutely hated stalls and was terrified of the thought of doing one by myself. Could this be you? If so, you need to learn about and explore the unknown. Even if you have no fear, every pilot can benefit from experiencing spin entries and recoveries. Equally important is being turned upside down in an airplane and recovering from the unusual attitude. Although emergency maneuver and aerobatic training go together, a majority of the pilots I train come with the same purpose and that is to gain confidence. Many however become hooked with their new found freedom and continue with basic aerobatics. You may be wondering what kinds of things to expect while taking an Emergency Maneuver Training course. To start with you will probably be flying an airplane that you have never flown before such as a Citabria or Decathlon, both excellent trainers. During the first lesson you should be getting comfortable with the airplane by doing turns, slow flight and stalls. This may sound basic but is necessary anytime you fly a new airplane. Next comes the meat of the course, entry and recovery from one and two turn spins, aggravated spins, skidded turns, spirals, rolls, inverted flight, simulated wake turbulence, over banked conditions, recovery from unusual attitudes, simulated control loss and more. By the time you have completed the training, not only will

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Judy Phelps of CP Aviation you be able to recover from unusual attitudes, but more importantly you will be able to recognize a bad situation and fix it before it becomes worse. There are several schools and flight instructors throughout the country that provide Emergency Maneuver and Unusual Attitude Training. A listing can be found by visiting the IAC (International Aerobatic Club) website WWW.IAC.org. Once there click on “How to begin” and then select “Aerobatic schools.” It is important that you receive this training in the proper aircraft with a qualified instructor. The IAC website also has a link to a scholarship for Emergency Maneuver Training that I award in Oshkosh at AirVenture each year. The next time your flight review rolls around consider taking an Emergency Maneuver Training course. This is a great way to improve your flying skills!

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BRASS BANCROFT OF SECRET SERVICE

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Portrait of the 40th President as a Young Aviation Super Agent

Ronald Reagan in a typically dashing pose from the Brass Bancroft Series. (Warner Bros.)

By S. Mark Rhodes efore Ronald Reagan became the 40th President of the United States, he was a government employee of another kind in the Brass Bancroft of the Secret Service Mysteries Collection (Warner Archive Collection). Brass Bancroft was an intrepid agent of the venerable Secret Service whose job entailed any number of assignments that may strike a somewhat familiar cord with modern audiences including going after illegal aliens and counterfeiters. The Bancroft character, interestingly enough is not based on a pulp or radio character (although he resembles a number of pulp and radio characters such as G-8 and an aviation radio hero called Jimmy Allen that had a short run in the mid-30s), but apparently on a real life retired head of the Secret Service by the name of W. H. Moran whose memoirs loosely inspired this series. This particular collection has all four films in this short-lived series. The most engaging is the first, titled Secret Service of the Air in which the Bancroft character is introduced as a former Navy pilot now a commercial transport pilot who is recruited by the Secret Service due to his reputation and considerable skill set. Interestingly enough, the plot of this film is eerily topical as it concerns the flying of illegal aliens (referred to here as “aliens”) from Mexico into the U.S. Another standout in this series is Code of the Secret Service, which con-

B

cerns counterfeiters operating in Mexico; the film has a witty moment when Bancroft/Reagan is shot but is spared when the bullet hits his copy of Spanish in Seven Days. The final entry Murder in the Air is an intriguing mix of politics, science fiction (including a futuristic device called the “inertia projector” that some suggested influenced Reagan’s attraction to the SDI defense system AKA “Star Wars” Defense System) and early Cold War fear/paranoia. The plot consists of Bancroft attempting to infiltrate a group of saboteurs who pose as a stridently ProAmerican group. As was the case with many of the “B” pictures/serials of the time, a dramatic fight on a dirigible was the films denouement. These films, recently available from the archive collection of Warner Brothers (who sell discs such as this “made to order”) are punchy, pulpy entertainment and are fascinating for Reagan fans, who might want to spot evidence of the future Commander in Chief in his portrayal here. The films have mostly been forgotten so there is the interesting aspect of rediscovery here for film fans and Reagan buffs. Indeed, Reagan is competent and well cast in these films and is often considered a better actor than he was ever Continued on Page 28


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April 2011

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

W h a t’ s U p ! ?

BEFORE I BEGIN . . . any years ago, long before I could spell ICAS, I was an airshow fan and especially of the amazing “ZAR.” I loved his black suit and his black Aerostar, plus the really neat music that was played during his act. I remember one day I flew down to Salinas to try and find him a few days before the annual Airshow that was held there. (Little did I know that one day I’d be their announcer and experience one of the great experiences of my life. My dream would have been to become their home announcer for life but it’s not a perfect world.) As I was saying, while stumbling around the ramp I found this tall blonde dude sitting on a stack of old wooden pallets just quietly staring into space. I crept up to him and actually asked, “Do you know where I can find ZAR?” He calmly asked why I wanted to find him and I can’t believe I also said this, “I wanted to try and get a signed poster from him.” He told me to hold tight for a minute and he disappeared in to the big hangar he was sitting in front of. He was back in a few minutes and handed me a rolled up big poster that he said was signed by ZAR, with my name on it, and he walked away saying ZAR was resting but sent this out to me. By the way, I still have the poster. Sadly ZAR’s Dad was killed in that very same Aerostar while on a ferry flight. We were told the door came open. That ended ZAR’s career in case any of you were wondering. Here I go again, so why am I telling you this? As the years went on I had the privilege of becoming friends with the late great Jimmy Franklin. He was then – and no less now – one of my favorite Airshow heroes. He brought a ton of class and excitement to our business and was loved by all – and I mean by all. The high point of every closing ICAS banquet was Jimmy passing around a 40 pounder of Jack Daniels and everyone drank from his “horn of plenty.” One never forgets his black top hat, red shirt, and black vest. Simply put, he was a star. The first time I worked with Jimmy was at the Truckee Air Show, long before snow was invented, and I remember that he scared the pants off of me and dozens of others that had never seen him do his magic in the air. We didn’t work from a stage in those days; we worked from a tiny balcony on the second floor of the

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terminal building. Some time later that weekend, he and I were having dinner at a place on the water and everything was magic and wonderful, but remember, I was younger back then and I still put my teeth under my pillow when they fell out. Come to think of it, I still do that. As we were sitting by the beach of this Lake Tahoe restaurant a cute little blonde dude slid up to us. Jimmy introduced him as his eight-year-old son, Kyle. Over the years I had the joy and pleasure of watching Kyle grow into the same gentleman and Airshow star his father was. I could write another couple of thousand words about him and that weekend, maybe someday I will, but not right now. I’m sure you all know that we lost his dad Jimmy a few years back in a horrific mid-air mishap. I remember my personal pain by that loss but I also remember my first thoughts were also about Kyle and his feelings. My family and I went on to watch Kyle become his dad by carrying on the family act and becoming a headliner just as his father was. I know that my family and I always had this feeling deep down in our guts that what if…? We really didn’t want to think about history repeating itself. A few days ago we all got the horrible news about Kyle’s in-flight fire and crash during an Airshow in Texas. He and his amazing wife, and wing walker Amanda, (daughter of Bobby Yourkin – the other pilot that died along with Kyle’s dad in the same incident) were both severely injured and hospitalized. Kyle is doing a little better now, but not so for Amanda. Even as I write this I am not sure of her status. I’m not known for writing news like this. I try to find the humor in almost everything I write. This is one of those times I can’t even smile. These two kids have had their lives for all practical purposes, put in a survival mode. Airshowing was their livelihood and only source of income. That source is now gone and whether it ever comes back is left to be seen. At this juncture it really doesn’t matter. Here’s what matters; they need your help. I know, lots of folks need your help but most of you are aviators and therefore they are from your community. Aside from the staggering medical bills, Kyle needs to be near his wife and the costs of that need to be covered somehow.

It doesn’t matter what I think or feel, it does matter what you think or feel. Below are some of the ways you can help these kids with their recovery and you might even help save a life. Please show these amazing flyers your love and support by making a donation. Remember to mention Kyle and Amanda. Due to the peculiarities of IRS regulations, a direct contribution to the Kyle and Amanda Fund will not be tax deductible. Please don’t let that deter you from making a contribution. If you would like for your donation to be tax deductible, you can make a contribution to the ICAS Foundation Family Fund, a program that the Foundation runs to help any member of the air show community who needs financial assistance due to a catastrophic event. An increase in donations to the ICAS Foundation Family Fund will make it possible for the Foundation to make larger contributions to people in the air show community – like Amanda and Kyle – who can benefit from assistance. Visit the ICAS Foundation website at www.icasfoundation.org, for instructions on how to make a donation to the fund, or contact ICAS Foundation Chairman Caroline Trinkwater at 734/595-0864. She can also take donations via credit card. To donate by check, make your check payable to ICAS Foundation and mail it to ICAS Foundation, 750 Miller Drive, Suite F-3, Leesburg, Virginia 20175. Or you can call ICAS headquarters at 703/779-8510 for complete information. My very sincere thank you in advance for your participation in this very important fundraising effort. On a lighter note, very much lighter ...

OK, Here We Go Again! I know you still think I make up my stories, and I keep telling you that I don’t have that much talent, if any at all. In that spirit, here are two more doozies . . . I obviously can’t name names, but here are the facts about the silly things ya’ll do out there, without my help. So this semi-genius, no really, he was a genius and I liked him a lot, but he had way too much money and not quite enough common sense to be a boy scout. He liked to buy airplanes, and they were usually the wrong ones. So, he buys another fancy, new, single-engine airplane and flies it home from way up north across the border

Larry Shapiro where they make them, to one of his houses in that state of the either newlywed or nearly dead. It’s a flight of more than a few hours, and he lands his new financial obligation and pushes it into his hangar. As the sun comes up the next morning and the birds begin their song, he straps on his new tow bar and pulls his sleek new white single engine four-seat Chariot from it’s nest. He loads it with a couple of known tushies, straps them in, and lites the fire. OK, be honest now, how many of you noticed that he didn’t get rid of the tow bar? Yep! Less than five hours on the engine and pop goes the nice new MT Prop and engine. Please, no laughing. Besides, my lips are chapped and it’s painful to laugh.

Want More? OK, here’s another one. I’m going to leave out a lot of the boring stuff and cut to the, “No Way!” stuff. So this very high time commercial airline driver and owner of a really nice Cessna 140 somewhere east of where I live, decides he wants another Cessna 140 for his wife so she’ll keep her cotton pickin’ hands off of his. That was a hint as to where he was from. I knew the airplane he was about to buy, it was one of those I thought would never sell because it had sat for so long and hadn’t flown for as long. Now based on my best guess as to his bank balance, I would have guessed he’d come out to these here parts and do an extensive prepurchase inspection, or better yet, I’d have taken the wings off this little bird and trucked her home. Then I would have given her a major “Look See” when I got home. I was out with friends when I heard about what happened next. I commented that I could guess which airplane was involved and I was not the least bit surprised to find out I was right. Well, Captain Questionable makes his deal with the seller to buy his next Cessna 140, the one that had been sitting out in what I would call a month of great precipitation. Since I wasn’t there when he decided it was time to fly it back to his Continued on Page 32


April 2011

www.inflightusa.com

It has been said that the only voluntary act in aviation is the decision to take-off. Every action after take-off involves the skillful management of risk, the enjoyment of flight and a continuous stream of decisions that result in a safe landing. In 1974, NASAcreated the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) to allow aviation professionals to share experiences in a frank, non-punitive manner. The ASRS structure allows pilots and other aviation professionals to file an anonymous report of an incident, error or occurrence that the contributor feels might be of value to others. These reports are gathered, analyzed and data based by NASA experts and made available to all interested parties as a tool for creating pro-active aviation safety programs. Additionally, NASA distributes an electronic publication, “CALLBACK,” which contains selected, deidentified, reports on a free subscription basis. In Flight USA is proud to reprint selected reports, exerted from “CALLBACK,” for our readers to read, study, occasional laugh at and always, learn from. Visit http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/ to learn how you can participate in the ASRS program.

PREVENTABLE FUEL MANAGEMENT ERRORS: FUEL EXHAUSTION Miscalculation Determining fuel remaining based on assumed fuel burned figures and on gauges that are assumed to be correct is a dangerous gamble. This Piper Navajo pilot learned that physical verification of the fuel onboard is the best way to prevent miscalculations. • The aircraft started to run out of fuel on the midfield downwind position as a result of a fuel miscalculation that I had made. At the first indication of fuel exhaustion, I commenced a descending right turn to the runway and notified Tower of my situation. I was cleared to land and did so without incident. During the turnoff onto a taxiway, the right engine quit running…. To the best of my knowledge, the origin of my fuel miscalculation was during a flight…on the previous day…. Based on [the flight time] and the chart our com-

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pany uses for fuel consumption on the Navajos, I calculated that I departed on this flight with 25 gallons of fuel which should have yielded 38 minutes of flight time. [The flight was] approximately 1015 minutes. When making fuel calculations with this table, it is my personal habit to err on the side of caution, and I often make it a point to add several gallons to whatever number is given so that there is a bit of a “cushion.” Although the numbers on paper indicated that the aircraft had 25 gallons of fuel, I was certain that there was a bit more. I was quite alarmed when both engines started to sputter on the midfield downwind leg. As a result of this incident, I made it a point to review the fuel logs for all flights made several days prior and have come to the conclusion that the error was made sometime during this period. In the end, the lesson learned…. if you cannot physically see or touch fuel in the tanks, you cannot make assumptions.

Misidentification and Misreading With two nearly identical aircraft on the field, refueling the correct plane becomes a concern. Unfortunately, by misreading a fuel sight gauge, this pilot “confirmed” a case of mistaken identity. • I flew a new LSA (Light-Sport Aircraft) for display at [an airshow]. The sister ship to the one I was flying was already there. They are almost identical aircraft and both aircraft arrived with more than two hours of fuel remaining. Company plans required another pilot to take the aircraft I had flown (Aircraft #1)… and to leave the other aircraft (Aircraft #2) at the show with me. I placed a fuel order with the intention of fueling Aircraft #2, but they fueled Aircraft #1 instead…. I witnessed the refueling of Aircraft #1, but misidentified it as Aircraft #2. Continued on Page 35

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

THE AVIATORS SEASON TWO COMING THIS FALL By Anthony Nalli ell, season one was a lot of work but also a bunch of fun. And we’re grateful and sometimes humbled by the response we’ve received by you, our viewers. Here are just a few of those comments… “Very well done! It has the right combination of information that pilots will find interesting, but won’t leave nonpilots in the dark. Keep it coming!” We know that pilots enjoy the show but we’re careful not to speak only to pilots as not to turn off those with an aviation interest who aren’t (yet) pilots. “The only person that seems to love your show more than me is our four-yearold son. He stays glued the whole time.” That’s terrific! Today’s pilots really need to ensure that the next generations of pilots is captivated by aviation and engaged by our community. If The Aviators can play even a small part in that mission then we’re very, very happy about that. “Your show has helped my affinity

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for aviation to resurface. It’s crafted perfectly for non-aviators, helping them to see that it’s never too late to consider taking up flying. It truly feels like a show meant for people just like me.” Bringing people back to aviation is just as important as attracting new people to it. It’s nice to know that we’re reaching that segment of the population as well. “I just watched the program... I had always wanted (dreamed) to fly and when a gentleman being interviewed said, “Just do it!” I decided to enroll in ground school.” Bingo! Season one of The Aviators has aired or is airing on approximately 70 percent of PBS stations across the United States (and rising) and receives impressive ratings despite a challenging timeslot in Canada. Since its premiere last September, The Aviators has aired almost 8,000 times across North America – an average of more than 40 times each and every day and the show’s website averages three million hits monthly driven by those seeking to view episodes online or

having read The Aviators Magazine. European and Asian distribution is already underway, and alternate language versions of The Aviators are in development. The Aviators is also available on Hulu.com and the Hulu Plus subscription service (www.hulu.com/the-aviators). With an incredibly positive season one behind us we are proud to announce that season two of The Aviators is now in production and will premiere this fall. A newly released trailer can be seen online (www.theaviators.tv). We’ve taken steps to ensure that season two will be even better than season one. We’ve enhanced our equipment and will spend more time filming in-flight to give our fans a more immersive viewing experience. Another change is the addition of chart-topping, award-winning country music singer (and pilot) George Canyon to the cast. Filming for season two started in California late in 2010 and is ramping up now that spring is upon us. We get invitations and story suggestions daily so there’s no shortage of fascinating aviation content. We do personally

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Brass Bancroft Continued from Page 24 given credit for; and, let’s face it, it is tough to take him out of context at all and judge him strictly as a performer and forget he was the President. Again, these films are a reminder that Warner’s has a tradition of making solid entertainment even operating on a low budget and, for what it is worth, Reagan looks particularly dashing in his aviator gear. (This tile is available at www.wbshop.com)

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answer each and every email and would love to accept all the invitations we get but shoots require time to plan and budgets to execute so if we can’t get to your event this year perhaps we can start planning for your next one. There’s always a way to ensure that every good story has a chance to be told! We’ll be filming at various venues in cities throughout North America over the spring and summer. So if we end up somewhere near you, we’d love for you to come by and say “hello.” Stay tuned!

info@PCAS.ca


April 2011

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The Secret Lives of Gliders

Duo-discus glider with Cumulonimbus clouds in background. (Steve Brockman) Continued from Page 14 certificate. (For all the details of these medical requirements, refer to CFR Part 61.23 (b) (3); and CFR Part 61.53 (b).) At Hollister Soaring Center LLC (HSC), we occasionally provide flight training to students as young as 12 years of age, and we’ve become proficient in the strategic placement of booster cushions for some of our smaller pilots-to-be. The parents of these youngsters are usually very supportive and often spend the lesson time observing and learning about the training process. HSC is also involved in providing Young Eagles discovery flights in gliders to a few lucky boys and girls during this once-a-year EAA event held at the Hollister Airport. And in this same spirit of exposing young people to the excitement of flight, many Civil Air Patrol (CAP) chapters across the U.S. have a cadet program which gives interested boys and girls a chance to work toward a solo flight in a glider. Usually, a first solo glider flight by a 14 year old is sufficiently newsworthy that a local newspaper or TV station will run a story on this unique achievement. (This is almost guaranteed if the student is a young woman!) If I were in a position of authority within the FAA, I’d lobby for a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would require all pilots to obtain a glider rating before allowing them to obtain any powered ratings. This is how strongly I feel that glider flying skills are beneficial to overall pilot proficiency and judgment. In a recent interview, well known test pilot, air race pilot, and Designated Pilot Examiner Dave Morss is quoted as saying: “Absolutely, glider pilots make better all-around pilots…” And Dave, a more than 26,000-hour professional pilot should know because he earned his Private Glider Certificate when he was 16 at the old Fremont glider port in the San Francisco Bay Area. After accumulating several thousand hours flying and instructing in gliders, Dave succeeded in his career as an air racer, and as a test pilot in dozens of different airplanes. In

addition to his current aviation endeavors, he’s part of a project to race rocketpowered aircraft which actually become gliders after the rocket engine has exhausted its fuel. Yes, another untold aspect of the “Secret Lives of Gliders” is that the skills learned in flying a glider will be useful no matter which direction your aviation interests take you. Those of us who possess a pilot certificate know that we’re required to have a flight review every 24 months in order to exercise the privileges of that certificate (this used to be called a biennial flight review or BFR). There are many ways in which a pilot can meet the requirements for the flight review as specified in the Federal Aviation Regulations, but one way is to obtain a new certificate or rating. And one of the most rewarding ratings a pilot can obtain is to add a glider category rating to his or her certificate. A pilot who is already certificated as a private pilot can add a glider category rating without taking an FAA knowledge test. Similarly, a pilot certificated as a commercial pilot can add a private or commercial glider category rating to their certificate, and neither require an FAA knowledge test. (Only an upgrade from a private to a commercial certificate requires an additional FAA knowledge test.) Many of the power pilots (though not all) who look to obtain a glider rating mistakenly think that, because it doesn’t have an engine, flying a glider must be simpler and require less dedication and skill than a powered aircraft. They are soon encouraged to think otherwise. Continued on Page 32

Cumulus clouds showing good vertical development. There is good lift under these clouds. (Steve Brockman)

Rear view from modern sailplane showing clouds for good soaring. (Steve Brockman)

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THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE IN BOSTON SHOWCASES THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF AVIATION AND SPACE TRAVEL By S. Mark Rhodes here is a well-known painting by Charles Wilson Peale from the 19th century called The Artist in His Museum. The painting has the subject (Peale himself) dramatically throwing aside a curtain revealing a cornucopia of exhibits, which seem to be of endless variety and stretch well into the background of the painting. The imagery of this painting came up time and again to me as I wandered through the Museum of Science in Boston. The variety of exhibits is breathtaking and seemingly knows no bounds. A few examples: The Butterfly Garden Exhibit which is a tropical oasis where exotic butterflies swirl around visitors with a nice view of the frigid (at least when I was there) Charles River; the Charles Hayden Planetarium, recently renovated, is the most technologically sophisticated facility of its type in New England; as well as live presentations where patrons can get an up close look at how lightning works, or what a boa constrictor looks like. Most important, however, for an aviation enthusiast is the way the museum manages to touch on the history of avia-

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Top: NASA and Mercury capsules are popular parts of the Museum of Science landscape. (Lynn Rhodes), Left: Author Mark Rhodes exits the simulator after a wild ride in (virtual) space. (Lynn Rhodes), Right: Author Mark Rhodes and granddaughter Sloane take in the popular butterfly exhibit. (Lynn Rhodes)

tion and space exploration. By far the most fun aviation oriented exercise is found on the “simulator experience” where you can step into a full-motion simulator (vaguely reminiscent of a spaceship in its design) and take an immersive trip as a vintage aviator or see what it might be like to travel through space as intrepid as Flash Gordon. On a smaller scale is the rather unassuming exhibit/commemoration of Robert Goddard’s experiments with rocket science. A number of Goddard’s key early experiments and writings were done at nearby Worcester and the museum pays tribute to Goddard’s visionary experiments which paved the way for man to go into space decades later. The Goddard exhibit is a nice segue into the museum’s popular To The Moon exhibit created in 2009 to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the moon landing. The exhibit features full-scale, authentic looking models of both Mercury and NASA vehicles which can be accessed by museum visitors, indeed, a particularly cool feature of this exhibit is that kids (and adults) can watch a replay of the moon landing from one of the NASA Continued on Page 32


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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

April 2011

The Secret Lives of Gliders Continued from Page 29 While it is true that the control surfaces on a glider operate essentially the same as on an airplane, the mastery of glider flying requires more precision and planning than most common trainers or four-place GA airplanes demand. The long wings of a glider mean that adverse yaw is much more pronounced than in common airplanes, so the precise use of the rudder is required. This relearning of rudder coordination takes some time for most transitioning airplane pilots to get the hang of. Also, if one is using an aero tow as their means of launch, this requires flying in formation with the tow plane while attached to a tow rope 200 feet behind the tug. Mastering the tow will require between ten and 15 flights or more in the early part of the training. If a pilot is flying an airplane sloppily all over the sky, they’ll usually never see their mistakes. But when flying a glider while on tow, your skill level will be made apparent to you immediately, and for every fraction of a second thereafter. You will learn precision flying very quickly, and probably be a bit humbled in the process. The training will also require you to fly a box pattern around the tow plane’s prop wash, as well as maneuvering the glider to initiate turns

both left and right. Yet another skill that is taught is how to smoothly remove slack which might develop in the tow rope for one reason or another. On a typical training flight, when you’ve attained a few thousand feet of altitude, you’ll release the tow rope and face a new set of challenges. Gliders on the whole have canopies which offer very good visibility, and your eyes will be outside 90 percent of the time. Pitch attitude is very important, and visual attention to this gives precise airspeed control. Coordination is also very important because when “thermaling” in lift, glider pilots roll into and out of circling turns hundreds of times more often than do “straight and level” airplane pilots. This constant rolling into and out of steeply banked turns, and doing so with good coordination, is sometimes a major challenge to airplane pilots. To help us in this task, gliders have done away with the inclinometer ball that airplane pilots use to coordinate turns. Instead, gliders use a small length of yarn called a “yaw string” which is attached outside and directly in front of the pilot’s view. By glancing at the yaw string, the glider pilot can keep his aircraft streamlined and coordinated while keeping his gaze outside. Keeping

Paul Jennings pulling 9Gs(!) in his Swift glider as he cartwheels half-way through his signature “JackKnife” Unlimited maneuver. (Suzanne Jennings) Paul kneeling by glider. (Paul Jennings) the eyes scanning outside is extremely important for glider pilots as collision avoidance and “clearing the turn” is stressed from day one. When there is a good thermal working, there may be several gliders all stacked up in the thermal together, and watching outside is of the utmost importance to keep a safe distance from the other gliders. Two other skills that are learned and refined in glider flight training are:

One – the development of a very precise kinesthetic body sense, or “seat of the pants” feel, which any VFR pilot can use to fly coordinated without staring at a visual indicator. Two – the use of one’s sense of hearing to detect very small changes in wind noise as an indicator of airspeed. This nuanced art is unavailable to airplane pilots where engine noise masks the sounds of the air, but is a large Continued on Page 34

The Museum of Science Continued from Page 31 capsules. Finally, the museum pays tribute to the fantasy of aviation and space travel with its striking prop (amid a myriad of striking props) of an X Wing fighter from the Star Wars film (the museum had a popular and well received exhibit centered around Star Wars and its relationship to real world technology and science). As is the case with many of these museums there is a real sense of the inspiration that museums can impart, particularly with young people. In this way, the MOSB is a particularly valuable resource for preserving and perpetuating the rich history of 20th century flight (and beyond). For more on the museum see www.mos.org

Author Mark Rhodes’ grandson (and future astronaut) contemplating the universe at the Hayden Planetarium. (Lynn Rhodes)

A Star Wars fighter hovers over the Museum of Science inspiring future aviators. (Lynn Rhodes)


April 2011

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54TH ANNUAL AEA CONVENTION AND TRADE SHOW CONCLUDES IN RENO

• • • • • • •

Attendees and Exhibitors Depart Following Four Productive Days of Activities The city of Reno, Nev., brands itself as “The Biggest Little City in the World,” and it was definitely a little bigger as nearly 1,400 avionics manufacturers, dealers, installers and other general aviation professionals gathered March 22-25 at the 54th annual Aircraft Electronics Association International Convention & Trade Show at the Grand Sierra Resort.

exams to attendees, in partnership with the National Center for Aerospace and Transportation Technologies (NCATT). • Lowell Gaylor Memorial Golf Tournament, which raised new dollars for future academic scholarships to be awarded to students through the AEA Educational Foundation.

The four-day event featured: • More than 30 new avionics products and systems being introduced. • More than 75 hours of technical and business management training sessions. • An Exhibit Hall filled with the latest avionics technologies. • The latest regulatory updates with international agency personnel. • More than $100,000 in scholarships awarded to avionics and aviation maintenance students. • Unique social events and networking opportunities with industry col leagues. • Recognition of Ron Hall, former employee of Duncan Aviation, as the recipient of the 2011 AEA Lifetime Achievement Award. • Recognition of Gunter Hemmel of Avionik Straubing GmbH, recipient of the 2011 AEA Member of the Year Award. • Recognition of Garmin as the recipient of the 2011 AEA Associate Member of the Year Award. • Annual Awards Luncheon with special guest speaker John Nance, aviation analyst for ABC World News. • Live streaming across the Internet on the AEA website of the New Product Introductions session and Exhibit Hall live coverage, courtesy of the AeroNews Network. • Free Aircraft Electronics Technician (AET) certification and endorsement

“Our members reported definite signs of improved business activity,” said Paula Derks, president of the AEA. “The general aviation industry has not been immune to the economic realities facing our country and the international community. However, our member government-certified repair stations, avionics manufacturers and distributors had a very positive and productive four days networking and sharing new ideas on how to grow their businesses. The mood throughout the week was very positive across the board in our training sessions, the Exhibit Hall and our social events. The new products introduced this week are wonderful news for the general aviation industry, and I expect we will see an improved economic environment in the months ahead.” The AEA convention is the preeminent venue dedicated solely to the general aviation avionics industry. Not open to the public, the event’s primary focus is to provide avionics professionals with educational and marketing opportunities between equipment manufacturers, distributors and government-certified repair stations. The general aviation avionics community knows the AEA International Convention & Trade Show is a mustattend gathering for growing their businesses, training their technicians and meeting with their customers. The AEA convention moves to the East Coast next year, as the event will take place in Washington, D.C., April 36, 2012, at the Gaylord National Resort

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

34

The Secret Lives of Gliders

execute a landing with a very precise touchdown point, much as an airplane would do using flaps and engine power. So it’s obvious that there are no “go arounds” in a glider, but the lack of such an option doesn’t fluster a glider pilot. That’s because the precision developed in flying and landing a glider results in the pilot getting it right the first time, every time! Any pilot who, for the completion of a flight review, is handed a new certificate by their examiner for a glider category rat-

Continued from Page 32 part of the mastery of glider flying. When they’re receiving flight training, student glider pilots are kept within easy gliding distance of their home airport. And as the glider descends lower, the pilot will eventually fly it to an entry point for a traffic pattern, much like an airplane traffic pattern. But a glider comes in slightly higher than it needs to be and bleeds off this extra altitude during the descent using controls called airbrakes or spoilers. This enables the pilot to plan and

April 2011

ing, knows and feels a sense of accomplishment and renewal of flying skills that comes from piloting a new type of aircraft in a challenging environment. The ranks of glider pilots and enthusiasts are filled with the most amazing and varied individuals that you’ll ever come into contact with amongst the aviating populace. All of them have been drawn by the challenge and sense of personal fulfillment that is the reward for successfully mastering the art of glider flying and soaring. Some pilots are cur-

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rent or retired airline or corporate jet pilots, while others have no experience at all in powered craft, nor do they have any desire to. There are grandmothers and teenagers, astronauts and test pilots, and some who seek a spiritual experience in the quiet world among clouds and soaring birds. Still others seek to engage their competitiveness and work toward such goals as: badges issued for incrementally more difficult flight accomplishments; extremely difficult contest glider flying; besting personal or local distance or altitude marks; or setting verifiable international records for speed, distance or altitude. A small but enthusiastic group of glider pilots pursue aerobatic training and then continue flying aerobatics for fun. And for the more competitive pilots out there, they can fly in aerobatic contests just like their powered counterparts. At the pinnacle of this progression, some pilots even go onto become professional glider air show performers. These air show routines can involve very high “G” loading of the glider, just like in a powered aircraft, as well as spectacular tumbling maneuvers, spins, smoke trails, etc. There’s just no end to the fun and excitement available to those who wish to explore the world of powerless flight. Another fun and fulfilling way for an airplane pilot who desires to be a part of this world, without actually flying a glider, is to work toward becoming a tow pilot. For many airplane pilots, towing gliders is their first true commercial flying job, and it’s a great way to build time and experience. The job of towing gliders requires very good stick and rudder skills, as well as the ability to think constantly and plan ahead for both the tow plane and glider. A busy tow pilot can do between 25 and 35 tows on a busy day, so it’s also a great way to get in lots of landing practice. In the May issue of In Flight USA, we’ll look at opportunities for non-pilots to be involved in the adventure of the soaring world by volunteering to “crew” for glider pilots who set out on long cross-country flights or competitions. And we’ll also take an in-depth look at how cross-country soaring in gliders differs significantly from those types of flights in airplanes. We’ll see why this type of flying is one of the most challenging – if not the most challenging – forms of aviation any pilot can embark upon. In this next issue we’ll answer the question: “What do you do if you can’t get back to the airport?” in the third part of this series titled: “Cross-Country Soaring, Glider Racing, and the Exotic Realms of Unpowered Flight.” Fly safe, stay in the lift, and happy soaring!


April 2011

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THOUSANDS GATHER FOR GA RALLY Wichita’s General Aviation Manufacturing Leaders Joined by Secretary LaHood, Governor Brownback, Senator Moran, and Congressman Pompeo On March 21, more than 2,000 general aviation workers, state and local officials, and industry leaders gathered in Wichita for a general aviation (GA) rally. The event, held at Cessna Aircraft Company, was organized by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) in partnership with Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Bombardier Learjet and general aviation suppliers throughout Kansas. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood, Governor Sam Brownback, Senator Jerry Moran, and Congressman Mike Pompeo recognized general aviation’s tremendous impact on the state of Kansas as each spoke to the large crowd. The GA industry contributes more than $7 billion annually to the state’s economy and GAMA member companies employ more than 17,000 Kansans. Ray LaHood, U.S. transportation secretary, said, “For America to compete and win in the 21st century’s global economy, our businesses need to out-innovate and out-build the rest of the world. That’s exactly what is happening here in Wichita, where thousands of aviation workers are designing the next generation of aircraft. The general aviation industry already supports 1.2 million jobs across America and contributes more than $150 billion to the nation’s economy. And I believe the industry’s efforts are crucial to President Obama’s goal of doubling exports within five years – just as they’re essential to keeping America on trajectory toward economic recovery.” Jack Pelton, chairman, president and CEO of Cessna, added, “It is vital that industry and government work together to ensure that laws and regulations promote manufacturing, resulting in greater economic stability, industry investment and jobs. We are appreciative that these

national leaders have come to view the tremendous products built here in Wichita and meet thousands of Kansans who produce them.” Hawker Beechcraft’s Bill Brown, executive vice president of Global Operations, stated, “Our industry is a powerful source of over 1.2 million highpaying, technical jobs with thousands of those right here in Kansas. The area’s highly skilled work force and our high quality, diverse positions have proved a successful combination for the local and state economy. As the economy recovers, general aviation will continue to be a source of great jobs for Kansans.” David Coleal, vice president and general manager of Bombardier Learjet, said, “Bombardier Learjet is proud to contribute to Kansas’ number one ranking in U.S. general aviation exports. Even during a severe economic downturn, the GA industry remains one of the only sectors in U.S. manufacturing that still contributes positively to the balance of trade. This underscores the critical role that general aviation can play in growing U.S. exports.” Pete Bunce, president and CEO of GAMA, concluded with, “The Kansas rally today served as a tremendous opportunity to showcase our industry to the Administration. The fabric of general aviation touches thousands of communities across North America and is rapidly expanding to all parts of the world. This industry is an economic engine of growth and needs to be promoted and nurtured by our elected officials at every opportunity. It is very important to general aviation that Secretary LaHood, Governor Brownback, Senator Moran, and Congressman Pompeo recognized GA’s tremendous impact in Kansas.”

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Safe Landings Continued from Page 27 The following morning, I reset the EMS (Engine Monitoring System) fuel counter to “full.” The location of the fuselage fuel filler does not allow for a visual inspection and the fuel sight tube, located behind the seats, is difficult to read (clear fuel in a clear tube). When full, the fuel level is out of sight. I looked at the top of the tube for confirmation and, anticipating a full fuel indication, I misread no visible fuel as an indication of a full tank. I

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did not inspect the lower portion of the tube that was probably reading a partial fuel situation. …Nearing [my destination], the engine gave signs of fuel exhaustion so I requested assistance from Approach who vectored me to an uneventful landing. After refueling… I departed and landed at my next stop where I spent the night thinking about what I had done wrong and how very lucky I was.

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

36

OODIES AND ADGETS

April 2011 One of the truly great things about being an aviation buff is the number of “Goodies and Gadgets” available to play with. Here In Flight USA has collected a few new ones worthy of your consideration.

New Interlocking Drip Pan Design from DripPansUSA Protects Floors Better Than Ever

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There’s nothing quite like oil, fuel or other drips to ruin a shop floor or worse yet, cause a safety hazard. Minneapolis-based DripPansUSA offers their new, interlocking drip pans for $29.95. Whether used for truck fleets, busses, in public works buildings or aircraft hangars, the interlocking design allows users to join multiple drip pans along their edges, protecting floors in an infinite arrangement of shapes and sizes. The sturdy, yet lightweight drip pans are easy to set up and clean up. The drip pans are made of black polyethylene and are available in two sizes. 18” x 48” and 24” x 30” sizes. Each is approximately .125” high and they are light and durable. “By far, DripPansUSA are the best drip pans. I’ve owned an aircraft hangar for years and haven’t found anything that protects my hangar floor quite like our drip pans,” said Greg Herrick, pilot, inventor and owner of DripPansUSA. DripPansUSA guarantees customer satisfaction or they will refund the purchase price. They are made in the U.S.A. and available at www.DripPansUSA.com or by calling 800/461-0294.

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The Flight Sound X is an adapter that allows you to connect your aviation headset to a computer through a USB connection. Flight Sound X is designed for ease of use - no additional software, batteries or external power sources needed. The unit connects with one standard USB cable (supplied), which provides plug and play operation. Pilots, gamers or any aviation enthusiast can use their aviation headset with any computer. When finished using the Flight Sound X, simply unplug it and the computer reverts to the original audio settings. Flight Sound X allows the user access to Flight simulator programs, iTunes or even Skype. The adapter comes in either GA 2 connector version (PJ-068 & PJ-055B, $82) or helicopter version (U-174, $92 ) single connector. This adapter is available wherever DRE Headsets are sold. For more information visit www.drecommunications.com.

New Teledyne Alphabeam Led Landing and Taxi Light The AlphaBeam LED Landing and Taxi Light is FAA-PMA approved, and it meets all of the environmental requirements of RTCA DO-160-F. Maintenance costs are reduced with this unit as there is no need to modify the existing incandescent mounting on the aircraft. It has a significantly longer life than traditional incandescent bulbs with a rated life of 5000 aircraft hours! The patented optical design of the AlphaBeam prevents any dimming or loss of intensity across voltage ranges of 11 VDC to 30 VDC, all the while drawing less power and using less LEDs than other LED based bulbs. These units incorporate optimized LEDs and drive electronics for maximum life and brightness. The AlphaBeam LED Landing and Taxi Light is ruggedized for aircraft shock, vibration, and temperature ranges. The AlphaBeam LED Landing and Taxi Light is a drop-in replacement for many traditional PAR36 incandescent lights (4313, 4509, 4591, 4594, 4595, 4596, Q4631, Q4632). The AlphaBeam LED Landing and Taxi Light is priced at $325.00. Volume pricing is available. For more information contact Aircraft Spruce at 1-877/477-7823 or 951-372-9555 and reference part number 11-08459. Or visit www.aircraftspruce.com. Continued on Page 37


SPECIAL FEATURE: SUN ‘N FUN REVIEW

37

THE OFFICIAL WORD FROM SUN 'N FUN: ALL SAFE, PROPERTY DAMAGE EXTENSIVE As of In Flight USA’s deadline on Friday, April 1, there were only minor injuries suffered by people on the ground, however, damage to aircraft and property was extensive following a severe weather system that ravaged the Lakeland area on Thursday, March 31. The Sun 'n Fun International Fly-In & Expo, took place Tuesday, March 29 through Sunday, April 3 at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport in Lakeland, Fla. The region experienced severe weather on March 31 that caused significant damage to an estimated 50 exhibitor and privately-owned aircraft as well as a large number of tents and other temporary structures. No major injuries were reported, although 15 people were treated for injuries at Sun ‘n Fun’s on-site medical hospitality center. Seven of those were subsequently transported to Lakeland Regional Medical Center. A national media outlet erroneously reported that a major building containing 70 people collapsed on site. Sun ‘n Fun officials quickly sent out a news bulletin clarifying that was not the case.

Sun ‘n Fun officials suspended the balance of the scheduled afternoon and evening activities at 3 p.m. on March 31 to enable attendees and exhibitors to vacate the site in order to permit a safe and efficient clean-up of the grounds and prepare the campus for its scheduled 8 a.m. opening on Friday, April 1. This effort required an around-the-clock effort by Sun ‘n Fun’s corps of volunteers and professional support from City of Lakeland and Polk County emergency response personnel. Friday morning, the event opened on schedule to blue skies. The U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels military jet demonstration team arrived and the U.S. Air Force’s high-tech front-line jet fighter aircraft, the F-22 Raptor, also made its return appearance Friday morning. The Raptor made its public debut at the 2006 Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-In and Expo. Both were featured Sun ‘n Fun air show performers on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, April 1- 3.

WILD WEATHER AT SUN ‘N FUN By Ed Downs Photos Courtesy of EAA his April edition of In Flight USA is going to press just as information is being received regarding a severe storm, now being reported as an F1 Tornado that hit the Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In and Air Show site at Lakeland’s Linder Regional Airport. It is now known that some 15 attendees and/or exhibitors received injuries ranging from minor scrapes and abrasions to broken bones. Forty to 50 aircraft were seriously damaged or destroyed. These aircraft included

T

those on display by vendors and many visitor airplanes, including homebuilts and classics. Numerous vendor tents and displays were destroyed. The staff at In Flight USA wishes to extend our best wishes for a speedy recovery from personal injuries and a successful financial recovery from the enormous financial strain such a disaster places on all affected. Our April cover, the Legend Cub, an S-LSA manufactured by American Legend Aviation of Sulfur Springs, Texas, represents a snapshot of the courage and tenacity of the vendors who Continued on Page 41

The before (above) and after (below) shots of Zenith Aircraft’s display. The damage was extensive but fortunately no one was injured. (Zenith Aircraft Company)


SPECIAL FEATURE: SUN ‘N FUN PREVIEW

38

Editor’s Note: As In Flight USA prepared this April edition, Sun ‘n Fun events were mid-stream. We have reported breaking news as we have received it. Some press information was forward-looking and after further investigation, we have published news as authorized by event or company officials, respectively. In the unforeseen event that information changes after our press time, we will update on our website, www.inflightusa.com.

SUN 'N FUN HIGHLIGHTS ROLE Missionaries who take their work to remote locations of the world – most accessible only by aircraft –shared their remarkable story at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In & Expo, which will be held March 29 - April 3 at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport in Lakeland, FL. The “Mission Aviation” exhibit was located in Sun ’n Fun’s Southeast Exhibit area and featured seven mission aviation organizations: Agape Flight, Venice, FL; Harvest Aviation, Wauchula, FL; Hobe Sound Bible College/Clearflight, Indian Town, FL; Jungle Aviation And Radio Service (JAARS) Waxhaw, NC, which

serves as the technical support arm of Wycliffe Bible Translators; Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) Nampa, ID; Mission Safety International in Tennessee; and New Tribes Mission (NTM) Sanford, FL. More than 35 missionary pilots were on hand to provide first-hand insights into the challenging world of mission aviation. Aircraft on display within the exhibit included a Helio Courier (an aircraft that cannot be stalled), a twin-turbine Bandeirante (the “Bandit”), and a Robinson R44 helicopter. Attendees were also able to operate a three-axis flight simulator, which features

CEREMONIAL RIBBON Officials from the Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In, Florida Air Museum (FAM), Polk County School Board (PCSB) and their “partners in education” cut the ceremonial ribbon on the new $7.5 million, state-of-the-art Central Florida Aerospace Academy (CFAA) building which is now the new home for an aviation-oriented high school/career academy already located on the SUN ‘n FUN campus. The new 58,000-square-foot facility, which will house up to 500 high school students at CFAA when it reaches full enrollment, broke ground during last year’s Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In and began actual construction in August 2010. The CFAA, which was formerly housed in existing Florida Air Museum (FAM) facilities on the Sun ‘n Fun campus, included a renovated building and several portable class-

FOR

OF

'MISSION AVIATION'

an approach to a very challenging airstrip in Indonesia. “Mission Aviation began in earnest after World War II,” said John Hoke, who coordinated the group’s presence at Sun ’n Fun. “It evolved from the need of missionaries to reach people who lived in the world’s most remote places. Highlyskilled missionary pilots fly their aircraft – usually small, single-engine models – in order to access isolated areas that are unreachable by other, more ordinary means. This is a remarkable story of people helping people through aviation.” In addition, this year Moody Radio,

NEW CFAA BUILDING CUT

rooms and was approaching its maximum capacity of 175 students. The new CFAA building was made possible by a $7.5 million grant to Sun ‘n Fun from the Aviation Education Foundation, a Naples-based not-for-profit organization founded by James C. Ray. The Aviation Education Foundation donated additional funds to PCSB toward the purchase of furniture, fixtures and equipment for the new CFAA building. “It is my belief that teaching young people the discipline required to learn the science of flight builds character and confidence,” Ray said in regard to the new building and its curriculum. “The experience of solo flight teaches them that they are independent and free-thinking individuals who are fully capable of being in control of their own life. I hope this building serves as a

launching pad for CFAA students to become more actively involved in aviation and, in doing so, build a pathway for successful careers and successful lives.” Ray, a pilot with 70 years of flying experience, is a successful businessman with a background in ranching, oil and gas exploration, real estate development and investing. A B-17 “Flying Fortress” pilot and Major in World War II, Ray has provided start-up funding for more than 300 businesses, including aviation enterprises such as Eclipse Aviation and Cirrus Design. The Aviation Education Foundation and Mr. Ray have a long history of philanthropy, especially to aviation-oriented youth education programs and institutions that, in addition to Sun ‘n Fun, include the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) in Oshkosh, Wis., and EAA’s “Young

91.1 FM, broadcasted live from the “Fly4Life” feature site, located in the Southeast Exhibit area. Moody is a Christian talk-radio station, featuring a dynamic mix of programming, including Bible teaching, news, call-in shows and music. Moody’s footprint reaches a potential six million people throughout the Tampa Bay area, as well as central and southwest Florida. There are over 160 mission aviation organizations and this is just the tip of the iceberg of what is to come.

AT

Eagles” program; the University of North Dakota Aerospace programs; the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Wash.; and the Future of Flight Aviation Center and Boeing Tour in Everett, Wash. “Sun ‘n Fun is ecstatic to have such significant and inspirational support for an educational facility of this magnitude that underscores our organization’s core values and is in lock step with our educational focus and mission,” said Sun ‘n Fun Board Chairman Bill Eickhoff. “We sincerely appreciate Mr. Ray’s generosity as much as we admire his vision for our nation’s young people and his commitment to building and supporting aviation-oriented youth education programs like those that we offer here at Sun ‘n Fun and at the CFAA.”

SUN 'N FUN COMMEMORATES 10TH ANNIVERSARY Sun ’n Fun commemorated the 10th anniversary year of the events that will forever be remembered collectively as “9/11” during this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In & Expo, which was held March 29 – April 3 at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport in Lakeland, Florida. Sun ’n Fun’s commemorative activities focusing on the events that occurred on September 11, 2001 lead up to – and were part of – the afternoon air show on Sunday, April 3. They were highlighted by a parade of emergency vehicles prior to the air show that day; an airport aircraft rescue and firefighting (AARF) vehicle on static display with attendant firefighters during the air show; a “Missing Man” formation and fly-by of World War II-era aircraft during the air show; and the playing of “Taps”

as part of the “Missing Man” formation. “Most people over the age of 16 remember where they were when the events of September 11, 2001 occurred,” said Sun ’n Fun President and Convention Chairman John Burton. “Like the Kennedy assassination almost 40 years prior, it is an event that has been indelibly etched into our nation’s collective consciousness. By commemorating its 10th anniversary, we remember those who were victims of the 9/11 attacks and especially the responders who selflessly and courageously answered the calls for help. Many responders perished in their valiant attempts to save others.” The Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In & Expo benefits from participation and support provided by area police, fire and

medical responders including the Lakeland Police Department, Lakeland Fire Department, Polk County Sheriff’s Office, Polk County Fire Department, Polk County Emergency Management, Polk County Emergency Medical Services, Hillsborough County Fire and Rescue, A-C-T Environmental Solutions, Florida State Fire Marshall, Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. On September 11, 2001, a series of coordinated suicide attacks were carried out on several high-profile targets by terrorists associated with the group “al-Qaeda,” which claimed responsibility for the attacks. That morning, 19 al-Qaeda operatives hijacked four commercial airliners and intentionally crashed them into targets that included the

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“Twin Towers” of the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. A fourth airliner destined for another target in Washington crashed in a field outside Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after a group of passengers and surviving crew members attempted to regain control of the airplane. There were no survivors from any of the four flights. Nearly 3,000 victims – most of them civilians – died in the attacks. Of the 2,753 victims who died in the attacks on the World Trade Center alone, 343 were firefighters, 60 were police officers from New York City and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and eight were emergency medical technicians or paramedics from private emergency medical service companies.


April 2011

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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LETTER

TO THE

April 2011

EDITOR

Re: Insurance Issues March 22, 2011 I read Ed Downs’ article on LSA insurance (March 2011 In Flight USA) with great gusto. As near as I can figure, aviation insurance is the most misunderstood facet of general aviation, way ahead of confusing regulations and airspace with letters that used to be described by meaningful nouns. I always include ten minutes of insurance information for my students at Flight Review time. The simple stuff is easy to explain. Let’s start with the caveats – I am not an insurance expert, and not a broker. I merely make sure I am covered, and that my students are covered to the extent of my ability to guide them. The first simple misunderstanding is – who exactly is covered by your personal policy. The answer is you, and generally nobody else. When it says that instructors, maintenance personnel, and any licensed pilot with a current flight review and medical, and fifteen hours in type are covered, it means that if they screw up, your insurer covers you and you alone, and then goes after whoever was flying your aircraft. Next is naming your buddy on your policy. Everybody thinks that means

your buddy is covered. The shocking truth is that he or she is not covered. You are covered when he or she borrows your aircraft, but they are on their own, and your insurer can go after the person you so carefully had named on your policy. The only way out of this one is to have your buddy named insured. If you do not see those two magic words together, then your buddy is simply not covered. But if you do manage to get your best friend on your policy as named insured, you should be aware that now your insurer gets to split your limits: Half for you and your defense, and half for your buddy and his defense. Think an injured bystander will only name the pilot? If your buddy borrows your aircraft and injures somebody, the plaintiff will name both of you and that is not a good thing, even though your insurer provides funds for both of your benefits. Next on the list of horribles is – will your insurer provide your defense without the fees for attorneys, expert witnesses, court costs and on and on coming out of that million dollars coverage you have paid for? The answer depends on your insurer. Mine has promised me that I will be defended forever, even after they have settled with one or more parties and used up my entire million bucks of coverage that I paid for. Most insurers simply stop

when they have paid out the limits. Normally, that will not be a problem, but if, say, you land on a freeway and there are multiple injuries in multiple vehicles as a result of some negligence on your part, this small issue could become a very big deal. And there are a few insurers that take the fees out of your limits. You should probably stay away from them. Are you a flight instructor? If so, any normal insurance you may have associated with a renter’s policy, or that goes with you as a result of an insured aircraft, simply stops when you are instructing. For instance, my Decathlon is covered to $52,000 for hull and a million dollars for liability. If I take my buddy’s Super Cub up and roll it into a little ball, his insurance pays him and then goes after me. Then my insurance steps up and covers the first $52,000 of hull and any liability I have incurred. However, if he was with me, then I am acting as instructor, and my insurance is no longer in effect for that flight. Instructors need at least a CFI liability policy, and if an instructor wants to give instruction in something expensive, like a Cirrus, the only way to be sure that the Cirrus owner’s insurer will not nail you is to get, from the insurer, a waiver of subrogation. An instructor can buy hull coverage, but it is simply not available for aircraft worth more than

125 grand. The Cirrus comes in at $633,000, and even a lowly Cessna 172 can be worth a quarter of a million dollars! So, instructors beware. As of right now, an instructor needs to be a member of a flight instructor organization to even have access to adequate insurance – assuming that adequate means an instructor is still covered when his or her solo student causes damage. This is getting long. Let me end by addressing quickly the LLC form of aircraft ownership. If you and your buddies own an aircraft in an LLC or some simiContinued on Page 41 In Flight USA Comments from Staff Writer Ed Downs Mr. Turner expresses interesting points of concern. It should be noted that insurance companies, like many manufacturers of consumer goods, tend to produce a “product” (the insurance policy) that is designed to serve most customers under most conditions. But, that “product” can vary from one insurance company to another. A specific term or expression of coverage on one policy may seem the same as another policy when first read, but can differ greatly between companies, depending on how they analyze their market. The real key here is to work with a knowledgeable and trusted agent, and then “spill the beans” to that agent. Tell your agent exactly what you want your policy to do for you, in simple pilot talk. Do not try to use insurance terms that you, yourself, do not understand. Your agent can customize your policy to do just about anything, if they clearly understand your needs. You do not have to purchase only the product that is offered. For example, this writer has ferried many airplanes and specifically requested that the owner of the plane I am flying list me as a named pilot on his policy. But, I make sure the policy now treats me the same as the owner, and that every feature I would want on my own policy is now attached to the policy of the plane I was going to ferry. I some cases, this required special riders and extra cost, but I was covered. One simply needs to be working with people that you trust who will do as you ask, and not simply sell you what is setting on the shelf. Mr. Turner is correct, be sure you fully understand what you are purchasing.


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Wild Weather at Sun ‘n Fun Continued from Page 37 have been hit hard by this storm. Dave Graham, Director of Marketing for American Legend, commented, “We knew storms were on the way and secured everything the best we could. When it did hit, there was little warning. Our team rushed inside our display tent and hung on for dear life. I can now say that I have soloed a tent!” When asked about specific damage, Dave added, “our tent survived, more by accident than planning, but both of our display planes received fabric damage. While recovering will be needed at the factory, temporary repairs will allow us to fly home. We still have three show days left, and everyone is pitching in to help all of us make the best out of a bad situation.” Pat Hartley of DRE Electronics was in vendor building “D” when the storm hit. According to Pat, “we got a last minute warning to close the buildings doors and took cover as the winds roared outside. A few minutes later we opened the doors to a landscape that looked like a battle field.” This reporter’s conversation with Pat was cut short when he suddenly yelled, “do you hear that!” and hung up. What this reporter heard was the sound of violent rain thundering against the metal

roof of building “D”. A later call to the show site discloses that all inside vendors had fared well. Early photos of the destruction are heartbreaking. Speaking from this reporter’s personal experience, insurance will not cover all of the physical damage cost incurred by the industry folks who work so hard to display their products to aviation enthusiasts. Readers should be mindful that the cost of show space, personnel lodgings, delivery of airplanes from far off destinations and other administrative costs are seldom insured and can range between $20,000 and $40,000, in some cases much higher. In Flight USA wishes to open our pages for editorial comment from those who have experienced losses at the 2011 Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In. Let us tell your customers how you are doing and what your customer base can do to help. Send us news announcements regarding your recovery or special sales you may implement to recover lost resources. Individual attendees who lost aircraft are also invited to share their experiences through our publication. In Flight USA has long held to our basic mission statement, “Your Partner in Aviation.” Let us be just that.

(Photos courtesy of EAA)

What’s Up Continued from Page 26 home in the East, I keep wondering what he must have been thinking. He was getting into a very wet and tired airplane and was heading out over the water, not much water, after all it’s just a bay. He began his take off roll and in a few minutes got to 50 miles an hour and off he went. He made a right cross wind turn and headed East. Before he could get uncomfortable he was upside down in our muddy bay. He crawled out and walked away. I don’t think any more needs to be said, you get the picture and I don’t have a clue what happened after that. I would have had a hard time offering any help and keeping a straight face at

the same time.

Next Month! It was my hope to have a look towards the future of flight training, but space is running out so I will address this subject next month. However, I’ll end with this very important suggestion for our friends in Southern California. SoCal pilots, draw your swords and get cracking, Santa Monica Airport needs you. Los Angeles City Council proposes Santa Monica airport changes? Los Angeles City Council members continued their battle against Santa

Monica Airport in Santa Monica, Calif. Two council members proposed a resolution to make it official policy to pursue changes at the airport, including shutting down six flight schools and changing a flight path. Santa Monica Daily Press (Calif.) (3/11)

ingful holiday. I also urge you to remember our troops and also to get those checks in the mail before the 15th. I’ll end with this request that you find a minute to pray for Amanda and Kyle! That’s Thirty! “Over”

OK! Let’s Eat Again! I love food holidays and we’ve got a few coming up this month. How can you go wrong with Easter and Passover? If you play your Matzo and Easter Eggs right you can have both. It comes down to tradition and family, and that trumps all else. I wish you all a fulfilling and mean-

Larry Shapiro is an aircraft broker, aviation humorist and fulltime grandfather. He’d love to have you share your thoughts and ideas for future articles. Palo Alto Office: (650) 424-1801 or Larry@Larry Shapiro.com

Letter to the Editor Continued from Page 40 lar form of legal entity, remember two things: First, if you are an LLC only to avoid paying insurance, courts will often pierce right through your organizational status to find the shareholders liable. And second, if your LLC carries the insurance, get yourself a renter’s policy in addition. An injured plaintiff will sue your LLC and sue the pilot - possibly you!

If all that sounds scary, I apologize. But I think pilots should be aware of what they are paying for, and hopefully some of the above will raise some little red flags. If you lend your airplane to your buddy, be sure you know that he or she has a current flight review and a current medical, even if you are lending your “sport pilot” J-3 Cub to him or her. That way, at least you are covered if they do something that injures a bystander.

Oh – and one more thing: those sublimits! If your policy says one million dollars each occurrence and $100,000 each person, you will need to injure ten people on the ground to reach a million payout. If this bothers you at all, look for a policy with a sub-limit that says per passenger! I do not guarantee the accuracy of my comments. They are pretty much opinions, based on conversations with

my insurance agent and other knowledgable folks. But I do guarantee that most pilots never even consider the above problem areas, and are often quite possibly operating at great risk. Keep your eyes open, both in the cockpit and as you write the insurance check. Bob Turner San Diego


Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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HAI, EAA PARTNER Helicopter Association International is partnering with EAA to establish a new, dedicated “home away from home” for the international helicopter community at EAA AirVenture 2011 in Oshkosh this summer. The partnership unites the producer of Heli-Expo, the world’s largest trade show dedicated to helicopters, with the organizer of the world’s largest general aviation event, AirVenture, to be held July 25-31, 2011. “HAI is dedicated to advancing the international helicopter community and

TO

CREATE HELI CENTER

we are proud to partner with EAA, which is committed to nurturing the spirit of flight throughout the world,” said HAI President Matt Zuccaro. “AirVenture Oshkosh provides an excellent opportunity to promote the unique contributions vertical flight offers to society and will complement our growing success with Heli-Expo, as well as our other exhibit, and outreach efforts around the world.” “We’re excited to welcome HAI and its Heli Center to EAAAirVenture beginning this year,” EAA president Rod Hightower said. “Helicopters are an

In addition to the customer demonstrations, HAI staff and volunteers oversaw the safe flight of 39 helicopters into the show on March 2-3 and out of it March 8-9 via a separate, temporary heliport set up in a parking lot behind the convention center building’s north end. (The other helicopters at the show arrived by truck.) “Heli-Expo 2011 is solid proof of the international helicopter community’s strength, which is built on the helicopter’s ability to meet the diverse needs of society,” said HAI President Matt Zuccaro, “HAI’s members meet those needs safely every day, as we demonstrated with this year’s fly-ins and fly-outs at the show.” In addition to announcements of new and upgraded aircraft by helicopter manufacturers and many new orders that they, other manufacturers and vendors report-

GAMA HAILS COMPLETION The General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) welcomes the completion of the final step required for implementation of the landmark U.S. - EU Aviation Safety Agreement. Following an exchange of diplomatic notes earlier today in Brussels between the U.S. and the European Commission, the agreement will enter into force on May 1, 2011. GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce stated, “It has been a long and sometimes challenging road toward implementation, but today is a very good day for the U.S. and European aviation industries. It would be difficult to overstate the importance of this agreement for

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exciting and innovative part of aviation and are a passion for thousands of aviators. We’re glad to be welcoming more of those helicopter owners and pilots, and their aircraft, to Oshkosh through HAI’s Heli Center.” Under the partnership, HAI will set up and operate the Heli Center, a pavilion on an 80- by 200-foot site close to the flight line and show center at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wis., home to what has come to be known as “The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration!” AirVenture draws more than 500,000

HAI LOGS RECORD HELI-EXPO Helicopter Association International produced a fast-paced, record event with the 63rd edition of Heli-Expo, held at the Orange County Convention Center in March. At Heli-Expo 2011, manufacturers conducted more than 90 customer demonstration flights from the convention center’s own private heliport, which HAI oversaw during the show. A total of 625 companies and organizations exhibited at the show and registrations were on track to reach or exceed 20,000, both records. More than 50 helicopters were displayed on the show floor and a wide range of training and operational forums were conducted. Heli-Expo, the world’s largest trade show dedicated to helicopters, occupied roughly 1-million-square-feet of exhibit floor and meeting space in the convention center’s North/South Building, more than any of HAI’s past shows.

April 2011

IN

attendees from North America and around the world, and more than 10,000 aircraft to Wittman Regional and other airports in east-central Wisconsin, including more than 2,600 show planes. The Heli Center will provide a central location for helicopter-related exhibitors to highlight their products and services to those attendees and reintroduce many fixed-wing fans to the helicopter. HAI also will become a named sponsor of AirVenture’s Forums Building and host helicopter-focused presentations and discussions there.

ORLANDO

ed, Heli-Expo 2011’s highlights included: • Honorary HAI memberships presented to industry legends Frank Robinson and Sergei Sikorsky for their “efforts directed toward the advancement of the international helicopter community.” • The 50th anniversary of HAI’s awards program and the presentation of nine Salute to Excellence Awards to honorees from Alaska to Nepal. • Keynote addresses to the annual HAI membership breakfast by Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) and to the Salute to Excellence Awards Dinner by Victoria Cox, the FAA’s senior vice president in charge of the Next-Generation Air Traffic System and Operations Planning. Lee told attendees, “The helicopter industry is on the cutting edge of the economy. You might say you are the tip of the spear.” • The first Heli-Expo General

Aviation Association CEO Forum, at which the leaders of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, the National Association of State Aviation Officials and the National Business Aviation Association joined Zuccaro in discussing how they collaborate on issues of common interest. • The world premiere of HAI’s latest video production, “Spotlight on Women in Helicopter Aviation,” and • The live broadcast of key HeliExpo events via the Web at www.rotor.com/heliexpolive. Next year’s show will be held Feb. 11-14, 2012 in Dallas, Texas. Companies interested in exhibiting at Heli-Expo 2012 should contact HAI at 703-6834646 or visit www.rotor.com.

U.S.-EU AVIATION SAFETY AGREEMENT

the continued health and vitality of general aviation and for international aviation safety cooperation between the Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency.” Implementation is vitally important to the entire aviation industry. Specifically for manufacturers, it will streamline transatlantic regulatory cooperation on certification, continued airworthiness and maintenance. The agreement creates the ultimate “one-stop shop” by reducing redundant certification activities through validation and acceptance of design approvals and repairs between all 27 European Union (EU)

member states and the U.S. Moreover, as the European Aviation Safety Agency’s (EASA) authority is extended to areas not currently covered under the agreement, the two sides will be able to negotiate new annexes to the bilateral agreement that will cover important areas such as pilot licensing and training. In addition, implementation will provide a mechanism to resolve the longrunning dispute over unfair certification fees assessed by EASA on U.S. manufacturers. With this major step completed, GAMA strongly urges the FAA and the European Commission to move prompt-

ly on the vital next steps. First and foremost is the establishment of the institutional mechanisms and implementation procedures called for in the agreement, but also a list of priority items for followon action, such as a new annex on licensing and training and another on operations. “GAMA congratulates the many dedicated aviation safety professionals from both sides of the Atlantic who worked hard to bring this important agreement to fruition,” added Bunce.

Sell Your Airplane Fastwith an In Flight USA Classified Ad. Turn to Page 62 for details or call (650) 358-9908 to use your Visa/MasterCard


April 2011

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Garmin GMA 350 Audio Panel Makes Flying Easy with Voice Recognition and 3D Sound Garmin International Inc., the global leader in satellite navigation, has announced the GMA 350 and GMA 350H audio panels. Designed for fixed wing and rotorcraft, respectively, the GMA 350 and 350H have industry-first features like voice recognition, 3D spatial audio processing, advanced auto squelch, and ambient noise based volume adjustment so that pilots’ workload is decreased while increasing their situational awareness. “As the GA industry’s first truly all digital audio panels, we’re able to provide pilots many capabilities that have never been available in the cockpit,” said

Gary Kelley, Garmin’s vice president of marketing. “And the expandable architecture means we’ve laid the groundwork so that pilots will likely see new capabilities added via software updates, rather than hardware updates that are often times cost prohibitive.” The GMA 350 is a digital audio panel with marker beacon that has a new, patented voice recognition feature so that pilots can use their voice to control certain aspects of the audio system. For example, pilots can select COM 1 or COM 2 by simply stating “COM 1” or Continued on Page 44

Goodies and Gadgets Continued from Page 36

Ez-Clear Cleaning Kit-Garmin and AOPA Recommended The EZ-Clear Cleaning Kit product meets the Garmin G1000 Pilot Guide specs for cleaning, and it is safe to use on glass panels. This kit provides a safe, effective way to remove fingerprints and dust from glass panels, instruments and more. The kit contains three EZ-Clear cleaning packs and one polishing cloth. These items have been specifically paired together to ensure safe and effective screen cleaning. Per the instructions, the user wipes the surface with the cleaning pack and then dries the area with the polishing cloth. The cleaning packs are ammonia free, aviation-grade and will not remove or damage any anti-reflective coating. The polishing cloth is washable. This kit will last between three to four months depending upon frequency of use. The EZ-Clear Cleaning Kit is available for $12.95. For more information, please contact Aircraft Spruce at 1-877/477-7823 or 951/372-9555 and reference part number 09-02394 or visit www.aircraftspruce.com. Aircraft Spruce’s complete product line is available on their website where you can request your complimentary copy of the company’s free 800 page catalog.

Adel Pliers Make Easy Work of Installing Padded Clamps to Secure Wires and Tubes Adel clamps are used to secure wires and tubes to engine mounts and the airframe, avoiding chafing or interference with moving parts. The clamps are metal strips that are drilled at both ends and the inside of the clamps are lined with rubber. Unfortunately, they can be very difficult and time consuming to install. With a set of Adel pliers, however, the perspective changes and the task of installation becomes quick and easy. The tool securely and simply clamps the entire assembly together and leaves the hardware holes lined up for bolting. Wicks Aircraft Supply is offering Adel clamp pliers for $35 a set. To order visit www.WicksAircraft.com or call 800/221-9425; overseas call 1-618/654-7447. Contributors are welcome. Simply send a description of your item, where it can be purchased, and a photo to ed@inflightusa.com.

ONE

MAN HAS THE POWER

...

“Eddie flies the Stearman like no other Stearman pilot out there. He’s Extreme.” Wayne Handley, Pilot, Winner, Art Scholl Award for Showmanship Explosive Maneuvers in the Commanding Yak-9 “Barbarossa”

Look What’s Coming in 2011

Eddie Andreini Airshows

650-726-2065


Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

44

April 2011

AVIATION ARCHAEOLOGY/WRECKCHASING SYMPOSIUM SLATED FOR APRIL 29-MAY1

Aviation Archaeology and wreckchasing enthusiasts will gather April 29May at Nellis AFB, Las Vegas, Nev., to discuss historic aircraft crash sites, their recording, and preservation. The third annual symposium is sponsored by the Aviation Archaeology and Heritage Association, and registration is $58 for the three day event. On April 29, the group will head to a trio of 1940s and 1950s aviation crash sites located on public land near Las Vegas, followed by two days of informational talks and educational sessions. The symposium will be moderated by Brian D. Richardson from the North American Institute of Aviation Archaeology (NAIAA – part of the Colorado Aviation Historical Society).

Historic aircraft crashes will be the subject of the third annual symposium hosted by the Aviation Archaeology and Heritage Association. The April 29-May 1 event will be held at Nellis AFB, outside Las Vegas, Nev. Pilot David Fellows walked away from the crash of this North American P-51D, serial number 44-73412, in the Nevada desert near Nellis AFB on July 29, 1949. (Craig Fuller Collection) Speakers for the symposium include: G. Pat Macha, author, historian, and host of the History Channel’s Broken Wings documentary will discuss the hun-

dreds of aircraft crash sites he’s visited and the closure he’s brought to many families by either returning found personal artifacts or taking members to a loved-

one’s crash site. • Craig Fuller, archaeologist and proprietor of Aviation Archaeological Investigation and Research (www.aviationarchaeology.com), will discuss the state of the hobby, as well as a number of crash sites recently visited. • Marin Municipal Water District Ranger Matt Cerkel will cover the laws protecting aircraft crash sites, how to protect these resources, and how to interpret the sites and educate the public and other government bodies. Other speakers will be added as they are confirmed. Advance reservations are required and the symposium fee is $58. For additional details, please contact Brian D. Richardson via email at aviator_b@msn.com.

Garmin GMA 350 Audio Panel Continued from Page 43 Voice based commands can be used to

control most aspects of the audio panel that would normally be done with a but-

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ton or knob. The GMA 350 also includes 3D spatial processing or “3D Audio,” which mimics the way people process sounds and conversations. Humans have the ability to focus their listening attention on a single talker among a mixture of other conversations and background noises, ignoring other conversations. Garmin has leveraged this ability by simulating 3D sound with stereo headsets. For example, if the pilot is monitoring air traffic control on one radio and the weather, such as ATIS, on another radio, the GMA 350 will separate the two conversations by placing air traffic control towards the pilot’s left and the weather towards the pilot’s right. This enhances the pilots’ ability to understand one or both conversations that are happening simultaneously. Another new feature of the GMA 350 is “blue-select mode” that makes entertainment audio distribution independent so that pilots can distribute audio for passengers and crew appropriately. Having the ability to control volumes, muting and entertainment audio distribution, makes this panel ideal for audio aficionados. Pilots can connect up to two dedicated music sources and a telephone to the rear connector. The pilot can override the rear telephone input at any time by plugging in a device (e.g. MP3 player or mobile phone) into the 3.5 mm front jack. Entertainment audio volume can then be controlled by turning the volume/squelch knob and using the volume bar display. Cursor control and the volume indi-

cator bar allow the pilot to visually adjust volume for marker, AUX, TEL, music, speaker and the intercom. Controlling volume is easy and intuitive. Muting modes, such as muting passengers on COM reception, can be enabled/disabled by pressing and holding keys or by voice command. The GMA 350 can optionally advise the pilot of the current mode. Passengers can also toggle their intercom isolation state, so that passengers no longer need to tap the pilot on the shoulder before they can talk with the pilot on the intercom. In addition to the new features, the GMA 350 includes capabilities such as pilot, copilot and four- or five-passenger stereo intercom system; support for two stereo music inputs; and a front panel jack music input. It has dual COM, NAV and AUX audio inputs. In addition, five unswitched audio alert inputs are provided for connection to external warning tones. Also included is a clearance recorder that supports playback of the MIC selected COM. Pin-compatible with Garmin’s GMA 340 and many competitors’ audio panels, it is easy to upgrade to a GMA 350 or GMA 350H. The GMA 350H has the same core features as the GMA 350, but it also has three COM support, night vision compatible green annunciation and backlighting, and new split-COM modes (1/3 and 2/3). The GMA 350 and GMA 350H are expected to be available in the second quarter of 2011 for an expected retail price of $2395 and $2695 respectively.


April 2011

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Marilyn Dash’s

The Pylon Place

GRATITUDE riting this column is a labor of love and has brought an enormous amount of joy. When I receive a letter from a regular reader, who is a fan of the Air Races and knows me through my racing and my column – it really adds something and makes the effort each month worth it. I received just such a letter after last month’s column about Women Air Racers at Reno. A gentleman from Modesto, CA named Bill Rose reminded me of a group of women I had forgotten. He also enclosed a wonderful letter and a wealth of information which I will go into in future months – but first I wanted to say “Hello!” and “Thank You!” to Bill Rose. He and Gary Williams from Phoenix, AZ both have contributed to my knowledge and passed along their firsthand accounts of the early days. And, I appreciate the sharing enormously. What I missed… Bill reminded me of the Women Stock Class Races at Reno from 1964 to 1969. I have seen it incorrectly stated that all the women flew Cherokees, but the details I have been able to piece together show this to be untrue. The aircraft included Bonanzas, Meyers, Bellancas, Pipers, Cessnas and even a Navion. Judy Wagner, the first woman to win a Formula 1 race started in this class back in 1964. More on Judy, she was born in Ohio and watched the Cleveland Races when she was a kid. She went on to earn her pilot’s license and became a pylon racer herself. She also served as the President of the National Women’s Pylon Racing

45

AND

GOSSIP

AND

NEWS

W

Czech Mate – the little Yak that could.

Unlimiteds lining up to race. Association. She is on the list of women I wish I had the honor of meeting while they were still around. Every person I speak with about her says remarkable things. I apologize to all of the fans and to the women who raced in the Stock Races. I wish there was a place to find all of this data, besides the back of someone’s hangar in a dusty old box. But, until we put a definitive database together, I will take any bits of data I can put together, including the files in the back of those hangars. Keep them coming!

Updates So, things are already progressing towards an exciting year at Reno. Strega has been spotted out flying and getting

(Tim Adams)

(Tim Adams) small tweaks, so we know she’ll be ready. Voodoo’s crew has been working steadily to make their racer a competitor again this year. Great news on the Rare Bear front – yes, the old crew is back. If you are a Rare Bear fan, you’ll know what I mean. Otherwise, just suffice it to say that things will be competitive in the Rare Bear

camp this year. And, hopefully we will actually see the racer in the pits this year, and not hiding a mile away from the action. Czech Mate is being tweaked by Mad Scientist borrowed from Skunkworks. They are working to make her not just faster, but stronger structurally. That little beast will be back and will be competitive again. Spirit of Texas could be back this year also. The word is there is a new engine on its way to her location. Will Fury be back? We hope so! The entire Texas row of Howard Pardue, Nelson Ezell and Stu Dawson were missed last year. Stu was there with the Tigercat, but it wasn’t the same. I know I miss stealing the Gorilla – I mean hearing about people stealing the Gorilla. I would never do anything like that myself, of course. The Galloping Ghost should be back again. Can’t wait to see what she can do. Last year was just a teaser, since we were Continued on Page 46


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April 2011

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Kyle Franklin and Amanda Younkin Franklin, a young husband and wife wingwalking team, were seriously injured following an accident at the Air Fiesta 2011 airshow in Brownsville, Texas, on March 12. Both received serious burn injuries when Kyle, who was the pilot of the aircraft, performed a forced/emergency landing following an engine failure in his highly-modified Waco biplane. The engine failure occurred while Amanda was on the top wing of the aircraft. As Kyle maintained a wings-level attitude to avoid stalling, Amanda was able to climb off the wing and back into the front cockpit of the aircraft seconds before impact. As of In Flight USA’s press deadline, both were being treated at the U.S. Army’s Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. Kyle is listed in stable condition. Amanda is in critical condition and her recovery and rehabilitation process is likely to take many months. Amanda is suffering from numerous broken bones and 3rd degree “full thickness” burns over 70 percent of her body.

(Photo courtesy Franklin Airshow) Kyle’s father, Jimmy Franklin, and Amanda’s father, Bobby Younkin, were both killed on July 10, 2005 when they were involved in a fatal mid-air collision while performing together at the Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. Kyle and Amanda, who had known each other since childhood and were dating at the time of their fathers’ accident, were married just a few months later in October of 2005. They have been performing their wingwalking act together since the summer of 2009. For more information, including established funds to help the couple, can be found at www.franklinairshow.com.

The Pylon Place Continued from Page 45 unable to race on Sunday. If you remember, Jimmy wasn’t able to get a qualifying time, which meant he started at the back and had to progress from Medallion to Bronze, to Silver, and then Gold. Jimmy had us all on the edge of our seats watching him peck away at the traffic during each race – only to be put on hold by Mother Nature on Sunday. Furias should be ready this year and Dreadnaught and Argonaught will round out the team from Ione. What else will Chuck Greenhill bring? Will we see Lou IV or Geraldine? Steadfast will be there likely with John Maloney flying again. And John Curtiss Paul will be bringing both P-40s and their newest entry, their P-51 the Boise Bee. And, of course – what will Rod Lewis bring? Last year he brought the two Tigercats and Rare Bear. This year, we keep hearing rumors about more… Can’t wait to see which toys he brings! That should keep you Unlimited Fans happy… for now.

What’s up with Super Sport? As the fans know, Super Sport has been the most promising and the biggest disappointment these past two years.

Spirit of Texas from the Valley of Speed. (Tim Adams) Such drama, such anticipation – so much for that… RARA will no longer support a separate race for Super Sport this year. So, the Sport Class will go with Gold, Silver and Bronze based purely on speed. And, the Sport Class will now conform to Super Sport rules to accommodate both groups.

Recruiting If you have an interest in becoming an Air Racer and don’t know how to go about it, get in touch with me and I’ll lead you to the right people. All of the classes are looking for new racers and even crew members. More to come, so stay tuned.. Until then, remember to fly low, fly fast and turn left.


April 2011

www.inflightusa.com

VINCENT BURNELLI: THE LIFE

OF A

GENIUS FAR AHEAD

By Alan Smith n the aviation industry just having some bright ideas is not enough. You need lots of other skills too, like the ability to manage people, and present new ideas to manufacturers without making their executives feel that the ideas they already have are stupid. Mark Twain once said that any man with a new idea was considered a crank – until the idea proved successful. This was the fate of Vincent Burnelli, a self taught aeronautical engineer who focused on one thing: to make every component of an aircraft contribute to lift. Of course this included the fuselage and that made his designs look a lot different than anything being built by established aircraft manufacturers between 1920 and 1960. Born in Temple, Texas in 1895, his interest in airplanes and aviation began when he learned about the Wright brothers at school in 1903, and began designing and building flying model airplanes. The family moved to New York and he continued learning from his models and won many contests. In 1915, he formed his first company, the Burnelli Aircraft Corporation, and, with his friend John Carisi, built his first airplane. It was a little single seat pusher biplane that he hoped to sell to the military. He was concerned about the first World War. The sale to the U.S. Signal Corps didn’t happen, but the New York City Police department did buy it. By 1920, Burnelli’s idea of having all parts of an aircraft contribute to lift and the idea of the airfoil fuselage was born. He joined with a friend, T.T. Remington to build the RB-1, a twin engined biplane transport with the first lifting fuselage, a 20 foot wide cabin with the engines mounted side by side in the leading edge of the airfoil shape. Pilot and copilot were in an open cockpit above and behind the engines. Twin rudders and the horizontal stabilizer and elevator were mounted at the trailing edge. It was estimated that the fuselage provided 40% of the total lift of the airframe. Two RB-1’s were built. The first seemed to be underpowered and was sluggish in shallow banked turns. It was lost on Staten Island in 1923 when a severe storm soaked it in salt water and ruined it. The second was built later in 1923 and powered with two 420 hp Liberty engines. It had close to a 500 ft per minute rate of climb. The fuselage area was just over 500 sq. ft and could accommodate 32 passengers in comfort. Its cruising speed was 95 mph. The following year, another

47

I

The Burnelli CBY-3 Loadmaster almost made it into production in Canada. (Photo supplied by Peter Bowers from David J. Gauthier memorial collection)

UB-14 over Newark, New Jersy in 1934.

(Photo provided by Alan Smith)

version, designated the RB-2 was built, and the fabric covered wings of the RB-1 were replaced with duraluminum skinned wings. After test flights were carried out, the engines were replaced with 650 hp Rolls Royce Condors to increase load carrying capacity. Now the cabin had room for 25 passengers or could be stripped to carry 8,000 lbs of cargo. The RB-2 weighed 10,000 lbs empty. Both RB’s were built at Roosevelt field on Long Island. The RB-2 was demonstrated at Curtiss Field and to the Army Air Corps at Mitchell Field. It was now estimated that the airfoil fuselage was providing 50% of the total lift. In 1927, Burnelli designed and built a twin engine lifting body transport for a bank executive. It used the same side by side front mounted engines like the RB’s, blended the wing smoothly into the lifting fuselage and was the first transport with retractable landing gear. The closely paired engines made single engine handling very simple in the event one engine had to be shut down. Designated the CB16, it could maintain altitude at full gross weight on one engine. During the same period, he built another twin engined lifting body aircraft intended for competition in a contest for safe aircraft held by the Guggenheim Group. Although it arrived too late to participate in the com-

petition, it was demonstrated. Among its unusual characteristics were a variable camber wing, full span flaps, and tip plates at the wingtips. It was capable of 350 foot takeoff and landing distances and a landing speed of approximately 30 mph. Named the GX-3 (the “G” was for Guggenheim) it was also labeled the UBSS on Burnelli”s own records. Among its pilots was Jimmy Doolittle. At this point, it’s important to note that Burnelli’s design configurations provided a significant characteristic that enhanced passenger/crew safety. The engines, landing gear and any mechanical systems were well separated from the fuel supply. This greatly reduced fire danger in the event of a landing or takeoff accident, and the wide lifting fuselage also made impact survival more possible. This was actually demonstrated during a test flight takeoff crash of one of Burnelli’s UB-14 prototypes. A wingtip dug into the ground, the aircraft cartwheeled through the crash, shredding wings and tail assembly until the fuselage skidded to a stop. The crew were shaken but unhurt and were able to walk away from the accident. Burnelli had gotten a definite if unwanted demonstration of the strength of his flying fuselage design. The cause of the crash was found to be control system failure caused by bad

OF

HIS TIME

maintenance that crossed the aileron activating wires. Throughout the years, Vincent Burnelli had attempted in the United States, Canada, and Europe to get his ingenious and proven designs into production. Part of his difficulties stemmed from rocky economic conditions. For example, in 1930, Burnelli won a ten year struggle to get a patent for his UB20 transport design. He set about in 1931 and 1932 to get the airliner into production but, due to the deepening depression, no orders were forthcoming. Discouraged by his North American experiences, he then proposed a transatlantic flight in 1935 for his UB-14. That didn’t work out, but Burnelli still wanted to do business in Europe. He had the UB-14 diassembled, crated, and shipped to England hoping to do business with the Scottish Aircraft Company. They had shown strong interest in manufacturing it. Then he found himself walled in by British customs service who kept the crated airplane locked up in customs at Southampton for months. By the time he got it released and reassembled. Scottish had gone into bankruptcy. Nevertheless, in December 1937. Clyde Pangborn, the famous adventurer pilot who had been working with Burnelli some time, was able to make a demonstration flight at Hatflied, England. The flight, which demonstrated load carrying ability and STOL performance, made good impressions. Hugh Cunliff Owen had formed his own aircraft manufacturing company and decided to build a Burnelli European transport. Designated the OA-1 and named the Clyde Clipper just one got completed at the breakout of World War II. All British aviation production became devoted to fighter and bomber aircraft. The Clyde Clipper wound up in the hands of the Free French and was used during the war as Charles DeGaulle’s personal transport. One must also admit that although outstanding in innovation and technology. Must of Burnelli’s designs were not beautiful or stylish in any way. There is no doubt that this led to resistance on the part of conventional airline transport manufacturers when they compared a Burnelli design to what their passenger market was accustomed to looking at. They also felt they had insufficient need for STOL capability when they were having runways a mile, (and then two miles) in length being built at the 500 plus terminals in use by airlines in this country. It’s true that this writer, along with Burnelli, sees a Boeing jetliner as “a bus with Continued on Page 48


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FAA ISSUES RESIDENTIAL THROUGH-THE-FENCE POLICY The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued its interim policy on residential through-the-fence (RTTF) access agreements at federally-funded airports. The policy outlines the requirements that airport sponsors must follow if they wish to continue RTTF agreements at federally-funded airports. These agreements allow people who own residential property with aircraft storage facilities near an airport to access the airport from off-airport property. These properties are sometimes known as “hangar homes.” The interim policy requires airport sponsors with existing agreements to develop an airport access plan that outlines how the airport will meet its obligations to operate as a public-use airport. The plan must detail how the airport sponsor meets standards for control of the airport, safety of operations, self-sustainability, and nondiscriminatory airport rates. The policy also amends one of the

conditions of federal funding, called grant assurances, to prohibit new RTTF access to a federally-funded airport. RTTF agreements that are not consistent with the FAA’s new policy may introduce safety risks by creating direct access to runways or taxiways, impede a sponsor’s ability to collect appropriate fees, or limit the airport’s ability to address future growth. RTTF agreements also may restrict airport access for all general aviation pilots because of noise concerns and hours of operations since residences are nearby. The FAA has no objections to these agreements at privately owned airports, if they do not receive federal funds. This interim policy is effective as of March 17, 2011. The FAA will conduct another policy review in 2014. To view the interim policy, go to Electronic Public Inspection Desk–Federal Aviation Administration Rules.

CESSNA ADDS FLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOLS TO CESSNA PILOT CENTER NETWORK Cessna Aircraft Company, announced at the Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-In & Expo in Lakeland, Fla., that it has added three flight training organizations to its global network of more than 250 Cessna Pilot Centers. The newest members of the CPC network are: Integrated Innovation, Inc., dba Stinson Flight Training Center, San Antonio, Texas, Springbank Air Training College, Ltd., Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Exploits Valley Air Services, Gander, Newfoundland, Canada

CPCs are flight training affiliates that use the new Cessna Flight Training System and Cessna aircraft and offer customers an array of services including flight training. “We continue to look for the best quality additions to our CPC network as part of the company’s effort to make flying more accessible and to re-energize pilot training,” said Julie Filucci, Cessna CPC manager. For more information, go to www.Cessna.com.

Vincent Burnelli Continued from Page 47 wings” (In his case, he said “streetcar” but remember he spoke almost 75 years ago, referring to the Douglas DC-3). Some think that some of his sixty patents may have been infringed upon either before or after his death in 1964. Despite a lengthy search, I was not able to find any definite allegations on this matter, much less any statements of fact. I did find some interesting images that the reader may compare with interest and draw his or her own conclusions. He worked on variations of the lifting fuselage concept all his life and seemed always able to find financial partners that let him continue. No matter what, there is no doubt that Vincent

Burnelli RB-1 - The first lifting body aircraft reduced to practice by Vincent Justus Burnelli. (Photo provided by Alan Smith) Burnelli was a genius, and also no doubt that he was indeed far ahead of his time.


April 2011

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49

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

Flying With Faber START COOKING AND PROTECT YOUR FAA MEDICAL STATUS Stuart J. Faber and Aunt Bea or this issue, Flying with Faber becomes Cooking with Faber. I have spent my life chasing a variety of passions – my favorite, of course, involves being at the controls of any flying machine that will get off the ground. Engaging in the culinary arts would be a close second. Generally, if I am not in an airplane, I am in a kitchen somewhere in the world where I am operating “right seat” or second in command to some great chef who allows me, as a food journalist, to steal a few of his or her culinary secrets. Whenever I am home, I spend a significant amount of time in my kitchen which is equipped with more gadgets than the cockpit of my airplane. I am a strident devotee to cooking from scratch with the exclusive use of the freshest and best ingredients I can find. I shun such things as farm raised fish, packaged vegetables (or, for the most part, packaged food of any kind), inferior cuts of meat or store-bought pie crusts. I don’t own a microwave. On those rare moments when I will indulge myself in a slice of bread (my “drug of choice”), I will gather my flour, yeast, instant-read thermometer and bake a loaf of artisan sourdough.

F

Home Cooking Saves Money and Extends Your Health I want to emphasize that I am neither a physician nor a professional nutritionist. I have read numerous treatises on healthy eating and have worked with my trainer at the gym, who has had some formal training in nutrition. As a result, I have developed some sense of right-andwrong when it comes to what foods I should or should not put in my body. I am, however, the first to admit that I don’t always follow my own advice. More than once, I have been caught redhanded downing a 24-ounce rib eye steak and ushering it through my esophagus with a hunk of buttered bread. I love to make my own pizza dough, cover it with

tomato sauce made from scratch and throw it on a hot charcoal grill. I have been known to lick clean a plate with my homemade blueberry crumble pie next to which is a scoop of French vanilla ice cream made by me with the use of heavy cream and more eggs than a chicken could lay in a week. In the past few years, I have discovered that I can indulge myself with these occasional treats if I do so in moderation. I have learned that the first few bites of the pie ala mode taste much better than the last few – so I savor the first few and share the balance. As I understand, that is the philosophy of some of the more popular diet programs such as Weight Watchers. This practice seems to work for me. At this point in life, I am closer to my entrance into the octogenarian club than I care to admit. Yet, I am on no medication, my numbers are all within the range of normal, my weight and body index are just a few points outside of the normal range and, every two years when I present myself for my third class medical, the doc grudgingly tells me that I am healthier than he is – and he is over 30 years younger than I. My conclusion is that I must be doing something right. My secret is neither original nor esoteric. I try to eat correctly. I religiously visit the gym at least five times a week. I have discovered that the exercise of my will power is much easier at home than in a restaurant. At home, I simply don’t keep tempting foods in the house. When I open a menu in a restaurant, the ability to control myself decreases with each turn of the page. My attention to the salads is quickly circumnavigated to the steaks and macaroni with three types of cheese. As I read the menu, the waiter places a basket of breads with a tub of freshly whipped butter within my reach. Before I know it, the basket is empty. Sound familiar? As a consequence, unless I am reviewing a restaurant for one of my columns, I cook at home. A combination of these two dining venues has worked for me. Again, I want to emphasize my disclaimer – I am not professionally qualified to impart dietary or medical advice. I am merely describing what has worked for me and suggesting that you discuss

these tips with your own health care person or persons and determine if a similar program would work for you. I can assert the following: cooking is fun, not time consuming, relaxing and extremely rewarding. The only thing I can think of as providing more satisfaction than seeing a luscious, juicy roasted mahoganycolored chicken come out of the oven is to observe the first lights of an ILS runway as I break out of the clouds just a few feet above the DH. As many times as I have engaged in each of those exercises, the thrill never decreases in intensity.

The Right Equipment is Essential A good pilot would not consider installing cheap equipment in an airplane. The reliable, yet more expensive stuff always costs less in the long run – plus it could save your life. No one wants a cheap tire to disintegrate during a fierce cross-wind landing. I will admit that there have probably been no deaths or serious injuries reported from the use of cheap cooking equipment. But I can assure you that great culinary achievements are much more commonplace with the use of the best equipment available. The most expensive is not always the best, however. Over the years, I have purchased and thrown away more pots and pans than I can count. Through the process of trial and error, I have gathered a number of favorite items. I have scores of pots, pans, knives and gadgets in my pantry, but I keep using the same items over and over again. Saucepans, the workhorse of the kitchen, come in a variety of shapes and sizes. A classic saucepan has straight sides and a flat bottom. One should have both two-quart and three-quart sizes. Most saucepans come with a cover. A saucier pan is a fancy name for a pan, which is more rounded. The width of the top is greater than the width of the bottom and the sides flare from bottom to top. I suggest a two or three court size. Whatever you select, be sure they are heavy and made of stainless steel. A heavy bottom is essential because it will retain more heat with less chance of burning the contents. The best models of pans (and skillets as well), have a bottom com-

posed of two layers of stainless steel with a copper layer between them, or with copper as the bottom layer. The handles are also stainless steel and relatively cool to the touch. Even the rivets are important. They should also be made of stainless steel and as flush with the interior of the vessel as possible. Skillets or pans should also be fashioned of bonded stainless steel. One important item, however, is an old-fashioned cast iron skillet. I have a 12-inch model that I acquired in college. The older they become, the better they are. They require some maintenance, but they have no equal when it comes to retaining heat and searing a steak or filet of fish. A household should have at least three skillets in sizes from 7” through 12.” A nonstick 12” skillet is a great investment. Just make sure that you use rubber or silicone spatulas with it so that you don’t scratch the nonstick layer. Two other important cooking vessels are Dutch ovens and baking pans. Dutch ovens (the French call them French ovens) are big pots with handles on each side. The come in either oval or round configurations in sizes from about 5quart to 13-quart and sold with covers. I love my 13-quart model, which I use for huge batches of chili. I have a cast iron model, plus a few enameled cast iron models. The advantage of the enameled Dutch ovens is that they are easier to maintain. Plus, on windy days, I often think of using my huge Dutch ovens as tie-down anchors. Or, they can be used as ballast if, after packing your plane, you have some CG issues. A baking pan should be heavy and large. I use a 13 x 9-inch for roasting chickens, prime rib or meatloaves. Again, I suggest the enameled cast iron variety. Not only do they retain the heat, but after the roast is cooked you can place the pan on the stovetop and make gravy. Many chefs consider the All-Clad brand as the gold standard of saucepans and skillets. I have several pieces in my collection and I agree that each one is excellent. However, I have gravitated to Le Creuset and Staub for both stainless steel and enameled cast iron products. Staub has a wide variety of enameled Dutch ovens, saucepans, sauté pans and Continued on Page 51


April 2011

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Cooking With Faber Continued from Page 50 other pots. You can see their entire line on www.staubusa.com. Le Creuset offers Dutch ovens, baking pans and other items in enameled cast iron as well as saucepans and skillets in stainless steel and stainless steel with nonstick interiors. Le Creuset operates stores in outlet malls where I have found many bargains. For example, I latched on to a $300 twelveinch nonstick stainless skillet for $90. The item was a discontinued model, but that did not bother me. I use this skillet at least three times a week. You can find an outlet in your neighborhood at www.lecreusetoutlet.net. Another important item is a high quality, well-balanced chef knife. This is the general utility knife used for everything from cutting up vegetables to slicing a roast. Sizes range from a 7 inch to a 12 inch blade. I prefer the 8 inch size. Again, you can spend from $10 to several hundred. I suggest either a Henckels or Wustof brand for under $100. I would shy away from all celebrity brands such as Emeril or Martha Stewart. In my opinion, you are paying for the name. I have

CHINO AIRCRAFT SALES

and worth every penny. They can be purchased directly at www.thermoworks.com.

Healthy Recipes

Salmon and Lentils – Healthy and Delicious. had my knives for more than 15 years. I keep them sharpened and never lay them on a hard surface. As soon as I am finished with them, I wash them and put them away in a special protected container. These knives are as good today as the day I purchased them. The last item which is essential for most cooking missions is a high quality

BOB CULLEN BOB@CHINOAIRCRAFT.COM

(909) 606-8605 (951) 264-6266 CELL (909) 606-8639 FAX See our inventory @ www.chinoaircraft.com

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY high interest paid 90 day deals secured with clear aircraft titles

1979 WARRIOR, 161, 800 SMOH, new paint. $39,500.

1978 SENECA II 1700 SMOH, full de-ice, Garmin 420, 4400 TT. $79,500.

1961 F33 DEBONAIR, 260 HP, 104 gal., D’Shannon mods. Slope W/S, new paint, $52,500.

PIPER ARROW, 1720 SMOH, NDH, IFR, all records, new strip/paint, 3 blade prop, $42,500.

1978 SENECA II, Narco, Cent. III AP, 12 SMOH L/R, new glass new P&I & annual. $139,500 OBO.

1973 ARROW, 200HP, IFR, loaded, A/C, $54,500.

1961 Nice AZTEC, here and ready to go.Good trainer/time builder. $39,500.

1969 C150, square tail, 358 SMOH, $16,950. 1981 152, 1150 SMOH, new paitn & interior. New annual. $29,500. 1977 C172, 1450 SMOH, late paint, IFR. $37,500. 1977 172N, 676 SMOH, new P&I, IFR. $47,500 will finance.

1961 COMANCHE 250/260, fueld injected, 1310 SMOH, 4400 TT, no AD on propeller, tail SB complied with, NDH. $49,500 must sell! 1962 FORTUNE 500 G-18 hi-cabin tail dragger, 350/350 SMOH, new int., Custom paint. King IFR, AP, 2 blade Ham Std. Trade. $125,000 OBO.

1973 TURBO AZTEC, 1150 SMOH, fresh annual, MX20, Garmin 430 SL3, STEC 55, AP, $84,500 1967 680V TURBINE COMMANCDER $149,500. Will finance. 1977 LEAR 24, 2500 hrs to TBO, all records RVSM, LR fuel, Part 135 air ambulance.

1977 C172, 180HP , IFR, 700 SMOH, $57,500.

1976 BEECH DUKE, low time, new P&I, Garmin 530/430, STEC AP, loaded. $189,500.

1978 C172N, 5320 TT, 3 SMOH, IFR, P-mod engine, will finance, trades OK. $49,500

1968 CESSNA 310N, 100 hrs. Colemill conversion. Best offer/trade.

FOUGA MAGISTER, nice, custom Blue Angels paint job, mid time engine. Show ready $39,500 OBO. Will trade.

1979 C172N, 8270 TT, 0 SMOH, $56,000. New Paint. New annual, low down, will finance.

1973 C340, 950 SMOH recent P&I, Air/boots. 800 SMOH, RAM II engines, Low down, $149,500.

Look us up at www.chinoaircraft.com E-mail Bob@chinoaircraft.com

1981 C172P, 1000 SMOH, new paint, IFR. $52,500

1969 C401, STEC55 AP, new leather, call for details. Low engines. $129,500.

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1961 C175, 700 SMOH, new annual, $34,500.

1977 C402, 700/700 SMOH, spar mod done IFR.

SPECIAL FINANCING – big down/minimum credit on learn to fly aircraft. 150s & 172s available.

2002 CIRRUS SR22, 500 SNEW, dual Garmin 430, EMAX, CMAX, Dual EX5000. $165,000

1968 C421, 350/350 SMOH, available new annual. $99,500.

1979 TOMAHAWK, in license $17,500 OBO.

1973 C421B, 125/125, new annual, good boots, new fuel cells, mid time engines, rec. leather, vortex generators, air, King Silver Crown, HSI, ice, AP. Lease 1 yr min w/pilot. 179,500 sale.

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1979 TOMAHAWK, 1310 SMOH, low price, offer.

1956 CESSNA 310 - $80/hr.

1961 COMANCHE 180, 0 SMOH,IFR, AP, $54,500. 1974 C421B, 300/1100 SMOH, loaded. $165,000.

1960 CESSNA 310 - $100/hr. CESSNA 340 - $250/dry

instant thermometer. Hands down, the best you can buy is a Thermapen by Thermoworks. It is reliable to within one degree and provides a temperature in just under four seconds. I use mine for everything from testing the temperature of candy (which requires more than 300 degrees), to the temperature of a roasting chicken or grilled steak. The cost is just under $100

1980 BE77 Beech Skipper, 1130 SMOH, excellent radios. $28,500.

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(Stuart Faber)

For this column, I will offer a few of my tried and tested recipes, one healthy, and the other not quite as healthy. Most of my recipes require an expenditure of little more than 30 minutes in both preparation and cooking time. The roast chicken requires about 15 minutes prep time and about an hour and a half cooking time. The most important advice I can provide is that you do all the initial prep at one time, not as you go along with the project. Lay each item out in the order of use and you will save volumes of time. The French refer to this as “mise en place.” Let’s call it “pre-flight.” Below is one of my favorite fish recipes. Most fish contains omega-3 oils and most experts agree that these oils reduce the risk of heart disease and colorectal cancer. Ask your doctor, but I read about this in the Mayo Clinic website and that’s good enough for me. Continued on Page 52

1975 WARRIOR,680 SMOH, IFR, $37,500. 1967 TWIN COMANCHE, 300 SMOH, 69,500.

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April 2011

Cooking With Faber 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt Continued from Page 51

Salmon and Lentils Lentils, a member of the legume family, are surprisingly easy to prepare. They are loaded with protein, dietary fiber and Vitamin B1. Salmon, full of omega fatty acids is one of the world’s leading fish for good health. Meals like this should help you pass that next FAA medical exam. A few tips: Chop the vegetables to about the size of a two-inch square. For chicken stock, the best is homemade, but a store-bought low sodium brand will do fine. One of the few times I used canned vegetables is when I use tomatoes. Good, ripe fresh tomatoes are hard to find. Most great chefs use San Marzano Italian canned tomatoes. They can be found in Italian markets. Coarse salt is sold in markets and is called kosher salt. Most great chefs use kosher salt. 1 cup dry lentils (preferably Lentils du Puy) 1 medium onion, chopped 2 stalks celery, chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 cups chicken stock 2 cups water 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes, juice included 1 6-ounce can tomato paste 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme or 1 teaspoon freshly chopped thyme 1 bay leaf 4 (4 to 6 ounce) salmon filets Rinse lentils and set aside. In a large, heavy skillet over medium-heat, cook onion and celery in 1 tablespoon of olive oil for about 5 minutes until soft. Do not brown. Add garlic and carrots and stir for 1 minute. Watch garlic closely so that it does not burn. Add lentils, chicken stock, water, tomatoes, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, thyme and bay leaf. Stir ingredients together and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to medium low, cover and simmer for about 20 minutes or until lentils are tender but not mushy. They should be slightly al dente. Remove bay leaf. While lentils are cooking, place a heavy 12” skillet over medium high heat and heat for 5 minutes. Do not use a nonstick – ovens are not good for them. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. The secret to beautifully seared salmon is high heat. Rub extra virgin olive oil over both sides of the salmon and season generously with coarse salt and freshly ground pepper. Do not remove the bottom skin. Place filets in the skillet and sear on one side for 3 minutes. Do not move the filets for this period. Flip the filets and place the skillet in the oven and cook for 5-8 minutes until the filets are

Roast chicken an potatoes in Le Creuset baking pan. medium rare. Spoon a generous mound of lentils on the plate and place a filet over the mound.

Fabe’s Bistro Roast Chicken With Potatoes In high school, kids called me “The Fabes.” I have revived the name and use it in many of my recipes. This one-pot chicken dinner is always a hit. The instant thermometer is a must in this recipe. You don’t want to serve medium-rare chicken. Serves 4 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 6 tablespoons olive oil 2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled

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and cut into 1-inch pieces 1 green or red bell pepper cut into quarters 1 whole (3-5-pound) chicken 1 tablespoon each of coarse salt, freshly ground black pepper & paprika 1 onion, chopped 4 sprigs fresh rosemary 4 sprigs fresh thyme 1 head garlic, halved crosswise Directions: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Butter a medium roasting pan with 3 tablespoons butter and 3 tablespoons oil. Place potatoes in a single layer in roasting pan. Mix salt, pepper and paprika together and season chicken inside and out. Rub the seasonings all over the chicken. Place rosemary, thyme, and garlic inside cavity of chicken; using kitchen twine, tie legs together to enclose. Rub chicken with remaining 3 tablespoons each of butter and oil. Place chicken on top of potatoes on one of its sides. Transfer roasting pan to oven and roast for 20 minutes. Turn chicken onto its other side and continue roasting 20 minutes more. Turn chicken, breast side up, and add 2 tablespoons water to pan; continue roasting until juices run clear and the internal temperature reaches 170 degrees on an instant-read thermometer, 10 to 20 minutes more. Carve chicken in roasting pan allowing the juices to combine with the potatoes. Serve from the roasting pan, spooning pan juices over potatoes. Notes: I rubbed the chicken with the butter and oil before I seasoned it. That way, the seasoning stays on the chicken. I also moved the potatoes around the pan so that they had a layer of oil. If you want some green vegetables with this dish, drizzle some olive oil over a half pound of fresh green beans or fresh asparagus and throw them on top of the potatoes for the last 10 minutes. Gravy: Remove chicken and pota-


April 2011

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VAN NUYS B-17 STOP TO HOST THE FIRST EAA “AVIATION EXPERIENCE 2011” Includes Grassroots Pilot Tour, Young Eagles flights, Sully Sullenberger Appearance EAA’s 2011 B-17 tour, which launches April 1-3 in Phoenix, Arizona, will also feature a new kind of aviation event at several other selected tour stops sites throughout the country. Aluminum Overcast’s visit to Southern California’s Van Nuys Airport April 15-17 marks EAA’s inaugural “Aviation Experience 2011,” an expanded offering of aviation activities centered on selected B-17 tour stops. Along with the B-17 appearance, flights, and ground tours will be Young Eagles flights and unique aircraft exhibits. The Van Nuys stop will also feature EAA President/ CEO Rod Hightower’s Grassroots Pilot Tour presentation and a special appearance by EAA Young Eagles Co-Chairman Sully Sullenberger. Members and others are encouraged to bring the whole family, friends, fellow pilots, and non-pilots. Have a friend who’s always wanted to fly? Or a young person (ages 8-17) who’d like to take a Young Eagles flight in a GA airplane? Bring ‘em along. Two special drawings are also planned, one for a Sunday flight in Aluminum Overcast and the other an Continued on Page 59

Cooking Continued from Page 52 toes from pan. Drain off all but 4 tablespoons of drippings. Sprinkle about 4 tablespoons of flour (no Wondra, please), over the grease and stir to make a roux. A roux is a combination of fat and flour. Mix until you can no longer see bits of flour. Then, scrape all the browned bits of stuff (called the fond) from the bottom of the pan. Mix with the gravy – this is the best source of flavor. Add about 1 to 2 cups chicken stock and bring to a boil. Stir constantly until it thickens up to just under a sour cream consistency. Season to taste. It will probably be salty, so don’t add salt until you taste it.

EAA President/CEO Rod Hightower is looking forward to meeting you and your aviation-minded friends in the coming months during his Grassroots Pilot Tour, hosted by EAA Chapters throughout the nation. Check below for a site near you and to RSVP for this free event open to all pilots, and their friends and families. Each Grassroots Tour stop is a fun, informative evening where Rod will talk about the leading aviation issues of our time, and what EAA is doing to grow participation in aviation and inspire the next generation of aviators. Admission is free, so bring a friend and your questions! Gastonia, NC, Host: EAA Chapter 309 Host: EAA Chapter 1189 Upcoming Stops: Social hour: 6:30 p.m.Presentation: 7:30 Coffee and rolls/social time: 9 a.m. Monday, April 4-Jacksonville, Fla. Presentation: 9:30 a.m. Craig Airport/Jacksonville Executive p.m., www.eaa309.org eaa1189.com (KCRG), Generations of Flight Hangar Saturday, April 16 – Van Nuys, Cal. 855 St. Johns Bluff Road Wednesday, August 17 – Columbus, Van Nuys Airport (KVNY) Jacksonville, FL Ohio area 7435 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys, CA Hosts: EAA Chapters 193 and 1379 McConnell Arts Center Social hour: 6 p.m., Presentation: 7 p.m. Host: Clay Lacy Aviation Social hour: 6 p.m., Presentation: 7 p.m. 777 Evening Street, Worthington, Ohio eaa193.org Host: EAA Chapter 9 Monday, April 18 – Sheboygan, Wis. Social hour 6:30 p.m., Presentation 7:30 Tuesday, April 5-Atlanta area Sheboygan County Memorial Airport p.m., eaa9.org Peach State Airport (GA2) Area airport: Ohio State University (SBM), Aviation Heritage Center Candler Field Museum (KOSU) N6191 Resource Drive 349 Jonathans Roost Road Sheboygan Falls, WI Williamson, GA Thursday, August 18 – Medina, Ohio Host: EAA Chapter 766 Hosts: EAA Chapters 690 and 468 Social hour: 6:30 p.m., Presentation: Social hour: 6 p.m., Presentation: 7 p.m. Medina Municipal Airport (1G5) 2050 Medina Road, Medina, OH www.eaa766.org 7:30 p.m., peachstateaero.com Host: EAA Chapter 846 Social hour 6 p.m., Presentation 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 6-Charlotte, N.C. area Saturday, May 21 – Starkville, Miss. eaa846.org George Bryan Field (STF) Gastonia Municipal Airport (KAKH) 120 Airport Road, Starkville, Miss. 1126 Gaston Day School Road

Complete Propeller & Governor Service

••••• If my editor allows, I will devote some future columns to some of my other favorite recipes from juicy standing rib roast with Yorkshire pudding to fresh sour cherry pie. In the meantime, I am due for my FAA physical. I hope that my doctor, age 55, is still alive. Last time I saw him, he was overweight.

Mike Baird

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

HOW DO WE MEASURE SUCCESS? JOE LOCASTO - AUTOMOBILES By Herb Foreman e is entering his 83rd year on Planet Earth. One might think it is time to retire, sit back and savor a lifetime of accomplishments. He is the holder of four World Speed Records at Bonneville. He has almost completed a 3/4 scale “Scratch Built” Curtiss P6-E Hawk, U.S. Air Force front line fighter of 1934 vintage using a set of model airplane plans. Locasto welded the steel tube fuselage, cut, sanded, and varnished all the wing ribs, and did all the fabric work, exterior paint and art work. He modified an aluminum block Oldsmobile F-85 engine that originally boasted 180 h.p. “By stroking and scoping” it and adding a reduction gear and accessory case, he expects to gain an additional 50 cubic inches to the engine putting out 225 h.p. He estimates a speed of 145 mph. He recently sold a Volks plane that he constructed to a pilot in Florida. He has built a number of specialty automobiles too. Two 1936 Auburn Speedsters, a 1927 Buggatti and has a street legal Indianapolis race car ready for wheels. It sports a 1965 Oldsmobile 442 engine that has been bored, ported and balanced with polished heads. It has four Weber 48 IDA carburetors and Hunt Racing Mags putting 750 H.P. For a number of years, he served as Maintenance Officer for the Civil Air patrol chapter that was based at San Carlos. His favorite plane was the Helio Courier, but he loved the deHavilland Beaver too. He served as PIC on a number of search and rescue missions. This is only a small part of his accomplishments. I own a 1935 Ford V/8 Roadster that seemed to be always ailing. Joe was an expert mechanic and shop foreman for Kollenberg Cadillac in San Francisco. Over the past 29 years, has has made my Roadster into a functional, every day driver. I watched him pull a 1946 engine from it that I sold to a man in Sweden. On the floor of my garage, he overhauled a 1935 V/8 engine I found in Michigan and plunked it into the Roadster as if it was an every day occurrence. He installed new brakes, a new clutch and even a new gas tank. Joe tells a story that is indicative of his character. He was born in Chicago and learned to drive in the flatlands of

H

Illinois at an early age. His father had a 1933 Chevy Roadster that he was very proud of. Joe took it for a joy ride one day at age 13 and put a rod through the engine. When he told his father what he had done, his response was, “You broke it, you fix it.” Joe procured a manual and began to learn everything about the car. He sold some model airplane engines he owned and bought a short block from a junkyard for $25. It took him several months to overhaul the engine with new rings, valves, etc. and get it back on the road. In the meantime, his father walked the six miles to work and home each day. Can you imagine the scene today? After army service in Korea, where he served in an engineer unit as a First Sergeant, Joe came home and moved to Los Angeles. He established five brake shops and began the racing career that led to the World Speed Records. His first record was at Roanoke, Virginia in 1959, where he drove a dragster to 195 mph and became first in the nation. This was followed by three more records. Again, in 1959, he became the first in the world to exceed 200 mph in stock car bodies clocking 205 at Bonneville. In 1960, in a chopped top 1953 Studebaker, he did 220.994. One year later, he broke his own record in the same car at 230.587. Four in a row. I watched Joe rebuild the landing gear and wing of Gail Turner’s Marquart Charger after a hard landing. Take a look at the picture. The paint scheme and colors were so well matched, the aircraft looked factory fresh. He completed the annual inspection and other maintenance too. The quality of his work is impeccable. Joe has given technical assistance to Jeff Short regarding the Star Duster II that shares hanger space with the Hawk/Charger. For eleven years, Joe was the sop foreman for vehicles operated by the City of San Mateo. His responsibility was to see that all 275 vehicles were kept in likenew condition. He purchased and sold vehicles as needed also. He prided himself to stay within or below the yearly budget, a “Class Act” that others could mimic. Joe married Sandy, one of San Mateo’s excellent teachers and helped to raise Gianna, another success story.

AND

AIRPLANES

Young Joe stands by chopped 1953 Studebaker, world record holder at 230.587 mph.

Joe rebuilds the 1935 V/8, 90 H.P. engine.

The 1935 Ford nose-to-nose with the Curtiss P6-E.

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April 2011

REMOS GX SOARS HIGH AFTER 25,000 MILE INSPECTION The shining star of The Flight for the Human Spirit has been the Remos GX Light Sport Aircraft that was chosen for the mission. When it was manufactured, there was no idea or clue of the ultimate fate that lied before this small unmodified aircraft. But destiny would prevail as it would become another reason why these machines constructed of carbon fiber are beginning to turn heads. This aircraft named Hope One has successfully flown over 25,000 miles with a goal to inspire over 50 million people to follow their dreams. Pilot Michael Combs has logged over 155 landings since taking off from Salina, KS last April and has reported very few problems with the aircraft including only a flat front tire, and replacing a GPS unit. But the ultimate test of its endurance would be conducted by the Remos Technicians during the required annual aircraft inspection which would reveal how the most “ road tested” Light Sport Aircraft off the factory line would endure after more miles and harsher operating conditions in a year than most during a lifetime. Unlike most historic flights, Hope One was completely unmodified for The Flight. In fact, it was actually a demonstration aircraft for its first 42 hours, then outfitted with a parachute, autopilot system, and assigned to its place in aviation history where it would become the first LSA to fly into all fifty states. Also noteworthy is

Above: Hope One in Flight (Remos) Right: Michael Combs adjusts camera before his flight. (Remos) the fact that Combs had received his Sport Pilot’s License only less than six months before taking off on his epic journey. But the question remained…” How did Hope One hold up?” After the Remos team inspected every inch of the aircraft, Hope One only needed tires, brakes, rotors, spark plugs, and a new battery. The Rotax engine had no leaks and the cylinder compression tests were better than ever registered in other aircrafts that had logged fewer hours. In essence, to observe this aircraft up close, it still looks new on the outside…but as well, the engine, flight controls, and electronics equally are performing as though this aircraft just rolled off of the factory floor. “ This just proves how important it is

to conduct the scheduled maintenance,” said Remos technician Nick Williams. “ This is the kind of aircraft that we enjoy working on. You just look at it and how well kept it is, and you know that there won’t be any major problems.” “ I think that it’s a testimony to the fine quality of workmanship that Remos puts into their aircraft,” said Combs. “ I mean, Hope One still looks and feels brand new…we even have fans say that she should have more battle scars, but it has held up very, very well. For a small aircraft that has flown further than around

the world and has logged so many different airports and flight conditions, I am extremely pleased. Yes, I’ve taken care of her as best as anyone possibly could on a crazy trip like this, but this aircraft has certainly been flown and not babied. She’s done well.” This inspection and The Flight for the Human Spirit not only are evidence to support Remos, but have brought attention to Light Sport Aircrafts and to the General Aviation industry as a whole. Combs has inspired future pilots to begin flight training, and others to climb back behind the stick after years of time out of the cockpit. Through aviation he is encouraging others to follow their dreams no matter what they are. Out of his original goal of landing in fifty states, he has flown the Remos into 49…only Hawaii remains. His plan is to attract sponsors and raise the necessary capital to complete his mission. Combs will be working with schools and bringing his message to as many as possible while endeavoring to set several world records this summer. For more information on The Flight for the Human Spirit including live satellite tracking, Facebook and Twitter updates throughout The Flight, go to: www. FlightHS.com Sponsorship inquiries should be directed to media@FlightHS.com

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April 2011

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WAI, INTERNATIONAL 2011 SCHOLARSHIPS TOTAL NEARLY $700,000 A total of 76 scholarships valued at $691,750 were distributed to WAI members at every stage of life from university students to mature members seeking a career change to aviation. These scholarships were awarded during the 22nd Annual International Women in Aviation Conference held recently in Reno. The scholarship total includes not only cash for academic study, but scholarships for technical training, flight training scholarships for licenses, ratings and typeratings as well as cash awards for specialized aviation activities, including recreational flying. “WAI's scholarship program is the foundation of our activities,” says WAI President Dr. Peggy Chabrian. “Since our very first scholarship, we have provided $7.4 million to our members.” Both women and men qualify for Women in Aviation, International scholarships. In addition to the specific requirements of each scholarship, the only qualification to apply for a scholar-

ship is that you must be an active WAI member. “The diversity of the WAI scholarships represents the diversity of our membership. We have a scholarship to match whatever stage in their careers our members may be,” added Dr. Chabrian. “In flight training alone, we have a scholarship for a recreational pilot's certificate through an airline-appropriate typerating. Additional scholarships are offered in the fields of maintenance, engineering and management.” [A complete list of all scholarship winners is posted on the WAI.org website at www.wai.org/education/scholarship_winners_2011.cfm] Scholarships available for 2012 will be posted at www.wai.org in mid-July 2011. These scholarships will be awarded during the 23rd Annual International Women in Aviation Conference at the Hilton Anatole in Dallas, Texas, from March 8-10, 2012. For more information, visit www.wai.org.

USA AIRCRAFT BROKERS NETWORKS TO GET THE JOB DONE USA Aircraft Brokers uses the latest technology to promote the sale of its’ aircraft, including an interactive website that uses audio messages from brokers to promote their aircraft and email campaigns to all of the FBOs in the country whenever a new aircraft is listed. “We try to reach the market any way we can after we list an aircraft. Using our internet ad program and time-honored methods, like our quarterly newsletter that goes out to more than 8,000 FBOs and high performance aircraft owners nationwide, we can guarantee our clients the best possible exposure for that aircraft and sell it at top retail dollar,” said owner Keith Latour.

Established in 1991, USA Aircraft Brokers is the oldest and largest network of aircraft brokers in the USA. The company is not a franchise or franchisor. The company is a licenser, selling a license to own and operate an aircraft brokerage under the name USA Aircraft Brokers. They offer comprehensive training and support to allow you to start working successfully as a broker within a two-week period. For more information on becoming an aircraft broker, fill out the “Become an Aircraft Broker” application on the USA Aircraft web page at www.usaaircraft.com.

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April 2011

HELIFEST! A new name, new look and new feel for Vertical Challenge! After 11 years, the Vertical Challenge Helicopter Air Show is getting a makeover. This June 18 and 19 marks the debut of HeliFest at the Hiller Aviation Museum. Instead of a single, one-day event, HeliFest gathers several festivals into a two-day, super fun weekend. HeliFest is not an airshow but in keeping with the original theme of Vertical Challenge, HeliFest showcases military and commercial helicopters on display and open to the public for two full days. HeliFest also features fabulous food, wine and the Bay Area’s finest microbrews. And returning this year is the popular Kid’s Zone that includes slides, rides, face-painting and fun activities that kids love. Why these changes? Increasingly strict federal regulations regarding air shows combined with the economic challenges faced by commercial and government helicopter operators, at both the local

Highlights of HeliFest:

People flock to the Helicopter event. and state level, have made it necessary to modify Vertical Challenge. Also, with new event partners, food-providers, brewers and other participants, the opportunity

(Hiller Aviation Museum) exists for creating a unique event never seen before on the San Francisco Peninsula: The result is HeliFest!

EXTREME AEROSPORTS NEW U.S. AGENT Extreme Aerosports of Corvallis, Oregon is pleased to announce that it has been named US agent for XtremeAir’s Sbach series of aircraft. Jim Bourke and Doug Jardine of Extreme Aerosports are ready to serve aerobatic pilots as suppliers of the finest aerobatic aircraft available today. Pilots can choose between the single seat Sbach 300 or the two seat Sbach 342 models. Both are fully capable of aerobatic competition in the “unlimited” class. The two-seat model also doubles as a speedy cross country touring model, with a range of more than 900 miles and a cruise speed of more than 200 mph. Extreme Aerosports made the announcement after Jim and Doug returned from their trip to Cochstedt, Germany, where they visited the

XtremeAir factory and met with designer and test pilot Philipp Steinbach. Said Jim Bourke, owner of Extreme

SBACH 342 ExtremeAir GmbH has announced that on March 22 they received EASA Type Certification for their Sbach 342 two-seat aerobatic aircraft. The Sbach 342 can claim many firsts, first certified all-carbon fiber aerobatic aircraft, first subjected to full occupant crash testing, first with the main fuel tank located in a separately vented com-

IS

FOR

Helicopter Festival – We welcome commercial operators and the United States military with their big helicopters, available and open for the public to explore. Microbrew Festival – Enjoy some of the best Microbrews that the San Francisco Peninsula has to offer. Wine Festival – For those who enjoy wine with their whirlybirds, this is for you! Food Festival – We feature some of the best Bay Area food vendors for your dining pleasure. Kids Festival – The little ones will have plenty to do getting face paintings and playing on giant slides and rides. HeliFest is June 18 and 19, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for youth (5-17) and seniors (65+), kids 4 and under are free. No VIP passes or discount coupons accepted for HeliFest.

SBACH AIRCRAFT

Aerosports: “The folks at XtremeAir have done an outstanding job in designing this aircraft. I was very impressed

with the size of their operation and their commitment to delivering airplanes. These aircraft are in hot demand in Europe, but have not been available in the US until now. European certification is completed on the 342 model and expected in late 2011 for the 300. We expect brisk sales.” The famous red, white, and black prototype “Thunderbolt” Sbach 342 will serve as the US demonstrator model. It is currently stationed at Extreme Aerosports HQ in Corvallis, Oregon where Jim and Doug are preparing for the 2011 competition season. Pilots interested in purchasing an Sbach aircraft in the US should turn their attention to www.extremeaerosports.com or contac sales@extremeaerosports.com.

EASA TYPE CERTIFIED

partment away from the cockpit, first with full airframe fatigue testing, first Type Certificate issued to a new aircraft manufacturing company since EASA’s inception, which when all combined makes the Sbach 342 the best and safest aerobatic machine to take to the skies to date. So far 19 of the Sbach aerobatic are

flying and are already starting to achieve success in local and international aerobatic competition. Sbach aircraft have become the choice of many respected competition and airshow pilots including World Champion Eric Vazeille, multiple British Aerobatic Champion Gerald Cooper, French Aerobatic Team members Kathel

Boulanger (Vice European Champion on Sbach 342) and Mikael Brageot (9th overall on 2010 EAC on Sbach 342), and top British Formation Team “Matadors,” Paul Bonhomme and Steve Jones. For more details on this aircraft visit www.xtremeair.de


April 2011

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59

HALF MOON BAY’S WORLD-CLASS CELEBRATION OF MAGNIFICENT MACHINES 21st Annual Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show, May 1, 2011 at Half Moon Bay Airport It’s time to get revved up for “The Coolest Show on Earth.” Whimsical, fascinating, amusing, educational, curious, and unique are a few words that describe the Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show, Half Moon Bay’s massive annual celebration of mechanical ingenuity, power and style. World-class cars of every era and style, Model T fire engines, vintage buses, custom motorcycles, tricked out trucks, sleek streamliners, one-of-a-kind antique engines and tractors and historic military aircraft will be among the mesmerizing displays. The spectacular 21st annual show takes place on Sunday, May 1 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Half Moon Bay Airport, located in the picturesque seaside town of

Half Moon Bay about 20 miles south of San Francisco. The show benefits the Coastside Adult Day Health Center. Hundreds of aviation wonders are expected to be on display – stylish homebuilts, classics from the 40s and 50s, exceptional vintage warbirds, and sport and ultralight aircraft. Headlining is the aviation design wonder “Flying Wing,” designed by Northrop as a long-range bomber with two wings and no fuselage. See a special display of magnificent military aircraft including the Estrella Warbird Museum’s historic Douglas C47 (regarded as the World’s Greatest Aircraft of its time), P-51 Mustangs (America’s premier World War II fighter), a massive U.S. Coast Guard C-130 transport aircraft and an impressive array of T-

33, T-6 and T-28 military fighters and trainers. Many will be doing spine-tingling fly-overs during the show. Thrilling rides will be offered in everything from helicopters and vintage bi-planes to a T-6 military trainer and P-51 Mustang – rides range from $40 to $600. Spectator admission is $20 for adults, $10 for age 11-17 and 65 and over, and free for kids age 10 and under. Tickets are available at the gate only. Half Moon Bay Airport (9850 N. Cabrillo Highway) is located on Highway 1, 20 miles south of San Francisco and five miles north of Highway 92. For information, call 650-726-2328 or http://www.miramarevents.com/

The "Flying Wing" will be among the special attractions at the Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show, Sunday, May 1, 2011 at Half Moon Bay (CA) Airport

DYNON AVIONICS AND VERTICAL POWER, INC. ANNOUNCE SKYVIEW SUPPORT FOR THE VP-X Dynon Avionics announced they will be adding integrated support for the Vertical Power VP-X Pro and VP-X Sport electronic circuit breaker systems within their SkyView Glass Panel displays. The VP-X system will enable pilots to monitor and control their entire electrical system using a SkyView display. The VP-X pilot display appears as a window along with the SkyView Engine Monitor, Primary Flight Display and GPS Moving Map. Pilots will be able to monitor the health of their electrical system, view and control the status of individual circuits,

and respond to circuit faults using the SkyView display. Further, trim and flap position via the VP-X is displayed on the SkyView. The VP-X Pro provides more than 30 power circuits, including trim and flap circuits, to provide enough capacity to wire almost any two or four place experimental or light sport aircraft. The VP-X replaces older mechanical components with modern, solid-state technology to increase reliability, reduce weight, and simplify wiring. Robert Hamilton, Director of Sales and Marketing for Dynon, stated: “Many

SkyView customers are asking for VP-X support; it is one of our most highly requested features. We are excited to put this on our development schedule. We share Vertical Power’s high quality standards and appreciate the innovations they are bringing to the experimental market with the VP-X.” “The VP-X offers a tremendous amount of capability at a very affordable price, and we’re excited to be working on this integration with Dynon,” said Marc Ausman, President of Vertical Power Inc. “The VP-X is based on the same fieldproven technology used in hundreds of

Vertical Power systems flying today.” Dynon plans to license the VP-X SkyView application for $275, with availability by the end of 2011. Customers can configure and test the VPX system using Vertical Power’s free Windows PC-based Configurator application. For more information about SkyView and the VP-X system, please visit the Dynon Website at www.dynonavionics.com/VPX, or at the Vertical Power Website at www.verticalpower.com/VPX.html.

Van Nuys B-17 Stop to Host the First EAA “Aviation Experience” Continued from Page 53 AirVenture VIP Package including two weekly wristbands and parking, VIP air show seating, one-day golf cart use, behind-the-scenes site tour, and two seats at the First Wing/Lifetime Dinner. Free Young Eagles Flights-If you’ve got kids in your family who want to fly, bring them to EAA Aviation Experience 2011 for a free Young Eagles flight, available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Unique Aircraft Exhibits - Aluminum Overcast isn’t the only warbird you’ll see on the ramp Saturday and Sunday. Other interesting aircraft may include P-51 Mustangs, T-6 trainers, a DC-2, or an F-7-F Tigercat, as well as a Learjet and assorted homebuilts. Meet Captain Sullenberger-Stop by and meet heroic “Miracle on the Hudson” pilot and Young Eagles CoChairman Captain Chesley “Sully”

Sullenberger on Saturday, April 16. From 6 to 7 p.m., Sully will sign his New York Times bestseller Highest Duty, which will be available for purchase.

Rod Hightower’s Grassroots Pilot Tour Everyone is invited to join EAA President/CEO Rod Hightower and local California EAA chapters for a fun,

informative evening. A casual social hour starts at 6 p.m. with Rod’s Grassroots Pilot Tour presentation at 7 p.m. He’ll talk about today’s leading aviation issues and what EAA is doing to grow participation in aviation. Those planning to attend should RSVP by going to the EAA website at eaa.org or by linking directly to. http://secure.eaa.org/apps/grassroots/

Sell Your Airplane Fast with an In Flight USA Classified Ad. Turn to Page 62 for details or call (650) 358-9908 to use your Visa/MasterCard


Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

60

OUT

OF THE

Five years ago Cathy Mighell launched a flight training, maintenance and aircraft sales program at Arlington Airport. Her operation grew and she has since upgraded to a Part 141 flight training operation, added a Part 135 charter operation and her newest venture was to sign on as a Remos Aircraft Light Sport Aircraft dealer and as head of a Remos Pilot Center. “We’ve seen strong potential in this area for Sport Pilot licensing and ownership,” said Mighell. “Twenty students have already completed their licensing requirements and are now enjoying adventure flights around the Pacific Northwest. We think we now have more to offer in the LSA world than any other

BLUE AVIATION JOINS

THE

April 2011

REMOS TEAM

Remos Aircraft is now featured in the flight training program at Out of the Blue Aviation in Arlington, WA. operation in the Northwest.” Mighell has seven CFI’s on staff and two mechanics who are trained for Rotax

maintenance. She also has a busy schedule designed to attract the public, like a Light Sport Expo and “Burger Burn” on April 16,

an Airport Appreciation Day on May 7, a Learn to Fly Day on May 21, a Poker Run and Feast on June 11 and she participates in the annual EAA Arlington Fly-In which begins on July 6 this year. Her activities appear on a well-designed website, www.OutoftheBlueAviation.com, which features bios of her CFIs and a flight school blog that is entertaining and informative. “We are excited about featuring a Remos in our Sport Pilot training program,” said Mighell. “It’s the best out there for training and for recognizing the incredible versatility of Light Sport flying.” Cathy can be contacted at 425/8706335. For more about Remos visit www.Remos.com.

DE-ICING EXPERTS HELP AVIATORS BEAT BIG FREEZE One of the founding inventors of the TKS in-flight ice protection system is helping the general aviation sector overcome another challenging winter season. Kilfrost – the ‘K’ in ‘TKS’ – has seen a significant increase in demand for its range of in-flight ice protection products and has recently revamped its online shop at www.kilfrost.com/online-shop/ to make it easier for aviators to stock up their supplies in convenient pack sizes, including 2.5 and 5 gallon containers, 30 and 55 gallon drums and 250 gallon totes ahead of any outbreaks of cold weather. Patrick Strasburger, Senior Vice President of the Americas for Kilfrost, said: “This has been another very chal-

lenging winter season for aviators and we’ve worked hard to keep supplying fluid throughout the worst of the weather. Indeed, we’ve seen demand for our TKS fluids double over the past year. We are delighted to be working together with the general aviation sector across the Americas – and the rest of the world – to deliver supplies to our customers at the right place at the right time.” Kilfrost pioneered the original TKS in-flight ice protection system alongside Tecalemit and Sheepridge Stokes in 1942, and has since worked closely with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to ensure its ever-expanding range of products meet – and in many cases

exceed – safety and regulatory requirements. Along with TKS 406B, the industry benchmark globally for in-flight ice protection fluids, Kilfrost also produces R328 and TKS80, which are readily biodegradable fluids that provide protection at temperatures down to -60°C, while it has recently launched TKS sustain, the world’s first TKS fluid based on glycol from a renewable and sustainable source. For more than 75 years Kilfrost has led the global de-icing and anti-icing sector and is proud to work closely with customers in more than 50 countries on five continents. With facilities in the UK,

Europe, North America, China and Japan, Kilfrost is able to deliver its safety critical products to the General Aviation, Commercial Aviation, Ground De-icing, Rail and Heat Transfer Fluids sectors. Its world-renowned Research and Development facility continues to produce groundbreaking new products, and the company is continuing to invest heavily in the innovation of ever-more environmentally-friendly de-icing and anti-icing solutions. For further information please visit www.kilfrost.com, email info@kilfrost.com / usa.sales@kilfrost.com or call +44 (0)1434 321500 or 877/854-5376 for more information.

WINGX PRO7 VERSION 5 ADDS ADS-B IN-FLIGHT WEATHER, TERRAIN-ENHANCED VFR SECTIONALS AND IFR ENROUTE CHARTS Hilton Software LLC has announced an upgrade to its award-winning WingX Pro7 iPad navigation system with the addition of ADS-B in-flight weather, terrain-enhanced VFR sectionals and IFR low/high enroute charts, and WAAS-enabled GPS capability. WingX Pro7 Version 5’s new moving map also adds pinch-to-zoom, extremely high-resolution terrain, and TFRs. Further enhancements include the ability to display dual moving maps with overlaid terrain and ADS-B NEXRAD including geo-referenced approach charts with FAA-certified data for exceptional situational awareness. Dr. Goldstein, founder of Hilton Software LLC says, “WingX Pro7’s moving map engine has been re-engineered to take full advantage of the iPad 2’s new dual-core A5 processor. We con-

tinually strive to be on the leading edge of mobile aviation technology and our latest release is a great example of that. We are shifting the mobile paradigm away from $3,000 plus dedicated systems with high annual subscription fees.” “We have been listening to our users,” continues Dr. Goldstein, “WingX Pro7 can print approach charts, rotate charts, dim the moving map with a simple-to-use brightness control, and find airports even if the user makes a typo in the airport name or city name. We have also achieved exceptional database compression to reduce download times and memory required. The most requested feature after VFR and IFR enroute charts has been in-flight weather. WingX Pro7’s ADS-B integration includes NEXRAD, METARs, TAFs, PIREPs, NOTAM-Ds, AIRMETs, and more – all in real-time

while flying. An ADS-B receiver is required, but there are no monthly charges – a big step in our quest to make flying safer and more affordable.” WingX Pro7 Version 5 is available now on the Apple App Store and is iOS 4.3 and iPad 2 compatible. WingX Pro7 Version 5 is a free update for registered users. WingX is available on iPhone, iPad and iPad 2, iPod Touch, Android, BlackBerry, and Windows Mobile devices. See company website for complete feature set list by platform and a list of compatible ADS-B receivers. WingX for Android is available from the Android Market and from Hilton Software’s mobile page: http://mobile.hiltonsoftware.com. For additional information about Hilton Software LLC or its products, call 866-42-WINGX or email support@hiltonsoftware.com.


April 2011

www.inflightusa.com

CESSNA ANNOUNCES A 14-AIRCRAFT ORDER TO HAO HAI GENERAL AVIATION COMPANY Cessna Aircraft Company announced at Asian Aerospace in Hong Kong that Hao Hai General Aviation Company Ltd will add 11 Grand Caravan utility turboprop aircraft to its existing fleet of two Grand Caravans. Additionally, Hao Hai will take delivery of three new Citation Encore+ business jets. Hao Hai is a wholly-owned subsidiary of a major logistics provider in China. Deliveries of the aircraft are expected in the first half of 2011. The Grand Caravan can take off from airfields as short as 2,420 feet, has a range of 917 nautical miles and has a maximum cruise speed of 184 knots true airspeed. The first Grand Caravan was delivered in 1990 and Cessna has now delivered more than 1,500 of the aircraft type. The Encore+ has a range of 1,785 nautical miles and travels as fast as 428

Pictured left to right in front of a Citation Encore+: Martin Lin, president, Textron China; Ching Pu Wang, president, Hao Hai General Aviation; Ching Hai Wang, chairman, Hao Hai International; and Robert Hollander, regional sales manager, Cessna. knots true airspeed. It features twin Pratt and Whitney Canada PW535B engines equipped with dual-channel Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FAD EC) and the Collins Pro Line 21 avionics suite.

CESSNA RESTRUCTURES GLOBAL SALES TInternational EAM and domestic teams continCessna Aircraft Company has announced it has restructured its aircraft sales team to better represent the full spectrum of transportation products including new propeller, new and previously owned Citation turbine aircraft and on-demand transportation options from CitationAir. "Cessna is the only company in the world offering a full range of business and general aviation transportation options from Cessna piston aircraft through the full line of Citation business jets to the many on-demand or aircraft management programs offered by CitationAir," said Mark Paolucci, senior vice president, Cessna Sales and Marketing. "With this restructuring of our sales group, we will be better able to respond to customer requirements for business mobility and the customer will have a single Cessna contact for a more seamless experience." Effective immediately, formerly separate Cessna propeller and Citation sales teams are merged to one team responsible for either domestic sales in the United States or international sales.

ue to report to Paolucci. Tim White, based in Wichita, has been promoted to vice president to head the new domestic U.S. team, with Bill Harris taking responsibility for Citation sales as western division sales director, Dave Armstrong heading Citation sales as eastern division sales director, and Mark Patterson as director responsible for all U.S. piston and Caravan aircraft sales as well as administration of Cessna Pilot Centers. Trevor Esling, based at Cessnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s European office in Farnborough in Great Britain, remains vice president, International Sales with added responsibility for propeller aircraft sales. Peter Griffith, also based at Farnborough, is division director and will head the new integrated sales team responsible for Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Bob Gibbs, based in Wichita, has also been named division director and will head the team responsible for Central and South America, Japan, China, Australia, India and the rest of the Pacific Rim countries

61

American Aircraft Sales Co. HAYWARD AIRPORT 50 YEARS SAME LOCATION

1977 Grumman Tiger AA5B

1978 Piper Warrior II

3179 TTSN, 1600 SMOH, KING IFR, GPS, A/P, NDH ..............................................$39,950

1285 SMOH, 7502 TTSN, King IFR, DME, A/P, Nice paint and interior .......... $32,950

D

L SO

1979 TR182 Cessna Skylane Turbo RG

1979 Beechcraft F33A

3150 TTSN, 1039 SMOH, 15 STOH, Recent Paint/Interior, IFR, NDH, One Owner ............................................$69,950

287 SMOH, 3200 TTSN, Garmin 430 GPS, S-Tec 55 A/P, NDH, ....................$139,950

Two Cessna Skyhawks

1969 Mooney Chapparal with Lasar 201 speed mods 750 SMOH, 3500 TTSN, King digital IFR, A/P,.................................................$54,950

1980 Cessna 172 N 250 SFRMAN, 5600 TTSN, King Digital IFR, DME, Garmin Transponder, Original Paint and Interior. NDH.....................................................$39,950 1973 Cessna 172M Skyhawk 3650 TTSN, 1950 SNEW Engine, King Digital IFR, GPS, long-range fuel tanks...........................$24,950

1977 Cessna 172N

1976 Piper Archer II 181

180 HP with Constant Speed Prop, STOL KIT, 3100 TTSN, 900 SMOH, Apollo IFR, Color moving map GPS, S-TEC Autopilot, new paint and interior, NDH...........$59,950

King Digital IFR, Garmin 150 GPS, 2000 SFRMAN, 7400 TTSN, NDH ........$33,950

1967 Piper Cherokee 140

1973 Piper Cherokee 180

3745 TTSN, 1496 SMOH, 371 STOP, Color GPS, S-Tek 20 A/P, Well Maintained, NDH, Hangared............................................$24,950

15 SMOH, 3948 TTSN, King IFR, Autopilot, NDH...............................................$39,950

LD

SO 1962 B33 Debonair

1978 Cessna 152

IO-550 300 hp, 950 SFRMAN, 5100 TTSN, KING DIGITAL IFR, GPS, DME, A/P.....$54,950

Digital IFR, 2400 TBO, 12000 TTSN, May Annual, NDH..................................$12,950

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Subscribe to In Flight USA today for home delivery of your source for aviation news, information and features.

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(510) 783-2711 â&#x20AC;˘ fax (510) 783-3433 21015 Skywest Drive, Hayward, CA 94541

www.americanaircraft.net


Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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April 2011

InFlight USA Classifieds (All ads run for 2 months) 00

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Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

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SPECIAL FEATURE: SUN ‘N FUN REVIEW

Left: A Douglass Skyraider as the storm front rolled in.

65

(David Witty) The Blue Angels arrived as scheduled. (U.S. Navy Blue Angels)

AOPA REAFFIRMS SUPPORT FOR SUN ’N FUN; ANNOUNCES PLATINUM LEVEL SPONSORSHIP FOR 2012 SHOW In the wake of a powerful storm that swept through the grounds of the Sun ‘n Fun air show, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) President Craig L. Fuller on Friday, April 1, announced that the Association has signed on to be the Platinum Sponsor of Sun ‘n Fun for 2012. It will be the fourth year in a row that AOPA has sponsored the show at that level. “Sun ‘n Fun is the traditional start of the year’s flying season, as winter gives way to spring and better flying weather,” said Fuller. “Thursday’s storm doesn’t change that, and we want to assure the professional and volunteer staff at the show and the entire aviation community that AOPA stands with them – both as they clean up this year and as they plan

for next year’s show.” “We are especially grateful to AOPA for this strong show of support,” said Sun ‘n Fun President John Burton. “Knowing that AOPA stands behind and with Sun ‘n Fun in such a concrete way provides a real boost. The support of our exhibitors and the entire general aviation community, the work done by our almost entirely volunteer staff, and the support of local first responders has been humbling. We appreciate it more than you can know.” According to Burton, the storm damaged some 40 to 50 aircraft, including several of the aircraft on static display, and knocked down exhibitor tents across the grounds. But crews and volunteers as well as local health and safety

officials worked through the night to ensure that the show grounds were safe and ready to open first thing Friday morning. With the show grounds and airport itself open and much better weather forecast for the remainder of the weekend, Burton anticipated a great air show, including demonstrations by the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels team. “From shows like Sun ‘n Fun and EAA’s AirVenture and the AOPA Aviation Summit to less well-known regional airshows to local fly-in pancake breakfasts, these gathering opportunities are vital to general aviation,” concluded Fuller, “not only because of the opportunity to build community, but because

Splash-In 2011

F-22 Raptor (Photos courtesy of Lockheed Martin)

According to reports, the severe weather damaged 40 to 50 aircraft. (EAA)

(Cindy Coleman)

they are a great way to showcase this activity we love for the non-flying public.

Splash-In 2011

(Cindy Coleman)


Celebrating Twenty-Seven Years of In Flight USA

66

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April 2011 In Flight USA  

In Flight USA is the magazine that serves general aviation throughout the United States. with aviation news, features and monthly columns co...