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Volume I, Issue 7 2016

Raise the Bar at Cellar8

The Ultimate Retreat .

at Spa Retreat

Fusing Food, Art & Community with Chef Brad Kilgore

Decanting 101


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CONTENTS


EAT.

DRINK.

LIVE.

LOVE.

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10. Chef Check:

40. Raise The Bar:

50. Check Inn: The

84. Sweet

Kitchen Chronicles

Wine Brings People

Spa Retreat in Negril

Indulgence Recipe:

with Montego Bay’s

Together at Cellar8

Christina Simonitsch

45. Decanted:

58. One Stop Driva: Enjoy a Pit Stop at Café

Christina Simonitsch’s Plantain Tart

17. Simon Levy’s Artisan

Demystifying

Blue in Irish Town, St.

88. Lise-Ann Harris’

Hams

Decanting 101

Andrew

Brittle Crunch

20. How To Make Fresh

62. Road Trip: A Picnic

90. Royally Yours

Pasta with Chef Andre

in the Park at Holywell

with Sandals Royal

Sewell

68. On The Farm:

25. Recipe: White

Woodford Market

Wine Sauce

Garden

26. Tables & Cheers:

74. My Kitchen

at Negril’s Chic Italian Café

78. Fusing Food Art & Community with

32. Healthy, Delicious,

Celebrated Chef Brad

Versatile: Peas in a Pod

Kilgore

34. Recipe: Curried Chicken Channa Alloo

35. Recipe: Gungo

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Plantation’s Executive Chef Lij Heron

98. Indulging With Chef Colin Hylton

104. Recipe: Sweet Potato Roulade with Almond Praline by Chef Colin Hylton

106. How To Make Our Cover: Christina Simonitsch’s Vanilla Sugar Palmiers

Peas & Rice

36. Out of Many: Sora Japanese Restaurant

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Publishers' Note Editor in Chief

Michelle Gordon Photography Director

Dwayne Watkins

Art Director & Layout Designer

Dwayne Jureidini Creative Consultant

Kimberley Dunkley Stylists

Aiesha Panton Kimberley Dunkley •

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Contributors

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s year 3 of Indulge comes to a close, you may notice that something is a little different. If you’ve been counting, you’d realize that this issue makes it the first time, we’ve published 3 issues in one calendar year! It’s another step on our journey and the progress we’re making is a testament to the hard working production team, our contributors, our advertisers, our partners and of course all the positive feedback from you – our readers. A sincere thank you to everyone who continues to make Indulge a part of their lives. We’re one step closer to achieving our long term goal – a quarterly publication, distributed internationally to the diaspora, but published, produced and printed right here in Jamaica. If you can’t tell, optimism runs high with this team, and so it is with keen interest that we’ve read the “5 in 4 Plan” put together by the Michael Lee-Chin led Economic Growth Council. It’s a bold initiative and a massive undertaking that we should all pay attention to no matter

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where we live, what profession we are in or how we voted. There are many great points in the plan, some old, some new, but in our opinion it’s success will not lie in the merits of the “8 Growth Initiatives”, but in us, as a people, buying into the plan, joining the efforts and putting it into action on the mutual understanding that if we want different results, we need to do things differently. Whether you like it or dislike it, whether you agree or disagree, wouldn’t it be better if we simply rallied around a single strategy? We’ve asked ourselves, “How are we playing our part?”. We’re asking you the same thing. Keep Indulging! ML and Tania

Ayesha Yhentl Ava Gardner Donna Noble Natalie Graham Brandon Ferguson Yhuli J Contributing Photographers:

Robyn Noble Andre Rattigan Kaelen Cohen

For Advertising and Marketing information Contact:

Joelle Lodenquai joelle@indulgethemag.com 876-924-6000 Copyright © 2016 CB Foods Limited. All rights reserved. All material in this magazine may not be reproduced, displayed, modified or distributed without the express prior written permission of CB Foods Limited.

PS: admittedly, it’s a little more to chew on than the normal F&B banter , but just think, the “5 in 4” may just be the best recipe mentioned in this mag!

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CHEF CHECK

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Kitchen Chronicles

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with Christina Simonitsch - Simo’s Bread and Catering PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

I’d been hearing about Christina Simonitsch for a while. “She’s the lady from Montego Bay who makes the most amazing breads”, everyone seemed to say, and “if you haven’t yet ordered from her, then you’re missing out.” Being one who doesn’t like to ‘miss out’, I did what any inquiring mind would do – I searched her up on social media. Christina’s Instagram page shows a collection of food images that were enough to whet my appetite and so the story unfolds…

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“THIS IS WHERE

all good things flow from – THE KITCHEN.” .

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hristina grew up in the kitchen; and not just any kitchen. Hers was a kitchen that belonged to Heinz Simonitsch, of Half Moon Hotel fame – perhaps one of the Montego Bay’s most prolific tourism and hospitality stalwarts. Heinz is Christina’s father and mentor to perhaps hundreds of individuals who regard his influence in Jamaica’s tourist industry as iconic. This includes his eldest daughter Christina, who remembers dinner parties, both large and small, being routine in her home. “Our kitchen was always

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abuzz with activity and our home a mecca for entertainment,” Christina recalls. If children live what they learn, then the Simonitsch kitchen was a great teacher. When Christina was 8 years old, she knew that she wanted to pursue a career in the kitchen. Summer holidays were spent learning at the heels of her aunt and grandmother in Austria, and back home in Jamaica, every opportunity in the kitchen saw Christina’s siblings serving as muses for just about all of her cooking experiments. “I must have been doing something right, because they lived to tell the tale,” she laughs, as she speaks about her enduring love of cooking.

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Christina is a resolute, no-nonsense kind of lady. I was able to determine that before our very first telephone conversation had ended. It’s no surprise that such definitive decisions were made while she was so young. At 14, when most children are formulating their academic journey, Christina was packing her bags with the certainty of securing culinary success at the prestigious Villa Blanka Hotel College in Innsbruk, Austria. Christina is fluent in German and English, she’s competent in Italian and speaks a little French – all useful skills while living on the continent. There she earned expert instruction in the profession she so loved, and ultimately the respect of reputable practitioners in Europe’s highly demanding and competitive culinary industry. Simo’s Bread & Catering is Christina’s hobbyturned-business. Being bored earlier this year while deciding between re-entering the workforce, or returning to Europe, Christina began catering small and intimate gatherings for mostly friends and family. But word-of-mouth, a magnetic social media page and a demonstration of her proficiency demanded more. When pates, palmiers and pestos flood your timeline, you’re left with little choice but to surrender! Less than six months in, and Christina has her hands full to overflowing with a full-service catering operation that includes her specialty breads and pastries, gourmet selections and her private label condiment line, bottled and retailed locally. For now, she is working from home and proudly bringing back that joie de vivre to the Simonitsch kitchen. “I love it when a home smells of the kitchen,” Christina says very matter-of-factly.“ “This is where all good things flow from – the kitchen.” Like the dough she so expertly kneads, Christina has been prepared and molded by diverse culinary influences. Now, baked at the optimum temperature, she his risen as an independent force, creating a legacy that those along her journey are certainly proud of. .

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Follow Christina on Instagram and never miss the opportunity to place your order. @simosbreadandcatering

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"A Passion for pork…

IT BEGAN WITH FIRE... NOTHING ELSE"

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Simon Levy’s Artisan Hams

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BY AYESHA YHENTL

It’s the smell that first gets you, traps you, and entices you. You can’t resist it and if you’re honest with yourself, you don’t want to. It’s the sweet, cinnamon crunch of the glaze that is perfectly balanced by the spiced savoury flavour of only the finest cut of ham. This isn’t your average run-of-the-mill honey glazed, pineapple and cherry garnished ham. This one is different; here simplicity is key and otherness is the tie that binds you.

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hen I first spoke with Simon, his natural warmth and welcoming tones exuded through the telephone. I had never met him before but I knew of his brand from numerous culinary encounters. When we finally met in person to chat about my favourite white meat, pork, it was evident that he was the real deal; a passionate chef, an authentic charcutier and an avid businessman. “It began with fire... nothing else. A simple means for Friday night entertainment. Steak & potatoes turned into a herb crusted crown roast & risotto. Chicken soup transformed into hand-made noodles and a 12-hour Tonkotsu stock. Pork chops matured

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into home-cured Italian Lonza... it's ok, go look it up.” As Simon describes it, his love for the kitchen has been an everlasting one, but his fascination with the world of charcuterie (the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, such as bacon, ham, sausage, terrines, galantines and pâtés) started out of Friday night fun. "I started with a friend Darshan Young doing Friday night barbecue-ing and grilling." A fun ‘experiment’ catapulted the two into the world of catering for friends and family, entering grilling competitions and most notably creating the wildly famous and extremely delicious Bad Dawg Sausage. Through word of mouth, great reviews and recommendations, the business grew to one of the Taste Is Everything INDULGE

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most sought after local brands in Jamaica. Now, some 9 years after the initial fire, we have ‘Roast’, a one-man brand providing artisan meats to foodies everywhere, most notably a Christmas ham unlike any other; a true artisan delicacy. “The brand Roast was born catering intimate dinners to music festivals and everything in between.” Simon’s initial plan was to prepare a simply delicious slab of ham that could hold its ground without the usual trimmings. Over the years, two separate recipes have morphed into one delectable ham. His process is simple, he states without divulging too much of his secret. He buys fresh cuts of pork from CB Foods, and uses his specially formulated brine, a secret recipe perfected over the years, to cure the cuts of meat for approximately 2 weeks. Using his own smoker, Simon then smokes the meats for 5-6 hours, ensuring precision. A man of seemingly simple yet precise tastes, he then delicately glazes each ham in a sugar and cinnamon coating that is divine. Unequivocally, his hands-on stance regarding the preparation of his hams, speaks to his passion for perfection. For Simon, Roast is about delivering quality hams (and meats) that have been hand-touched from beginning, to the tables of his customers without the need for excess trimmings and fancy garnishes. The hams speak for themselves and the absence of the fancifulness allows for authentic pork lovers, the opportunity to indulge our palates in the juicy goodness of what can only be described as perfection. “It’s an artisan product, quality over quantity. I wanted to provide a ham that was different from the normal ham with pineapple and cherries; something different from the process to the texture and flavour. A product that is hand touched every step of the way.” Simon Levy has traversed his artisan delights unto the tables of many Jamaican homes. The quality of the meats and the delectable taste is a testament to what Simon has coined as his secret ingredients … time and attention or simply, love. A love for what he does and a passion for pork, that can be tasted in the delicate balance of the sweet and savoury flavours of his ham. .

“This isn’t your average run-of-themill

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HONEY GLAZED, PINEAPPLE

AND CHERRY GARNISHED HAM” ISSUE 7 • 2016

Simon Levy, Roast Meats Phone: (876) 867-2002 • Instagram: @RoastMeats Email: splevy@gmail.com

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How To Make Fresh Pasta

with Chef Andre Sewell PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

It is no secret that Jamaica has an undying love affair with food - and not just our own homegrown foods. We embrace other cultural influences and apply the same fervor when preparing meals indigenous of other lands. Pasta, native to traditional Italian cuisine, has found great favour in our eyes and is one of the most versatile staples with over 600 variations. Just as many, if not more dishes, have been created using the tasty carb. Chef Andre Sewell indulged our starchy craving with an incredibly simply pasta dish that he whipped up without a mixer and a pasta machine. We opted for tortellini as a quick one-pot dish and Chef Sewell took us from the pantry to pasta heaven in under an hour. According to Sewell, tortellini is a labour of love because it requires precision for good-looking shells in the end. It is however, still relatively easy to make. .

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“WITH THE RIGHT INGREDIENTS AND A LITTLE TIME ON YOUR HANDS,

fresh homemade pasta is significantly better THAN READY-MADE, BOXED PASTA.”

– Chef Andre Sewell

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You’ll need:

» A rolling pin tter » Ci rcu lar cook ie cu ter) (2-3 inches in dia me » Pastr y br ush oz ./390 g.) » 2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 se flour, unbleached all-pur po eded plus more flour as ne lt sa » 1/4 tsp. fine sea om temperat ure » 4 large eg gs, at ro » 2 tsp. olive oil

the flour. Mix 2 cups of the flour and Create a flour mound. Use your hands 1theMix 2 salt. Keep the extra flour in case you need to to make a mountain of your flour mixture, .

adjust the consistency of the dough later on.

scooping out a hole in the centre.

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3 Add the eggs and oil.

Flour your work surface. Dust 5a clean work surface with flour and

then use your hands to flatten the dough into a disc.

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Mix the dough. Slowly mix the dough to avoid creating a cloud of flour. The dough should come together in a loose ball and feel moist but not sticky.

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the dough. Using the heel of your hand, push the Let the dough rest. Shape the dough into a ball, wrap in 6doughKnead 7 down and away from you, fold in half back toward plastic wrap and let rest for 15 minutes before you roll it out. .

you, rotate and repeat the kneading motion in small turns for about 10 minutes until the dough is smooth and pliable. .

8 Roll the dough as flat as possible.

Form your tortellinis into 11 neat ring shapes

Fill your tortellinis with your choice of stuffing. (We did a cheese filling:Â 1/2 9 Cut your circles using cookie cutter. 10 cup mozzarella, 1/2 cup cheddar, 1 whole egg + 1 egg yolk, 1/4 tsp salt & pepper.)

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White Wine Sauce » » » » » »

1 medium onion, finely minced 1 1/2 cups dry white wine 1/2 cup white-wine vinegar 1 cup cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs, such as tarragon, basil, parsley, and chives.

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Combine onion, wine, and vinegar in a pan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium, and simmer until liquid is reduced to a third. Turn heat to low and whisk in butter, 1 tablespoon at a time, adding a piece as previous one melts. Don’t allow sauce to become too hot. For a smoother sauce, strain through a fine sieve, if desired. Season with salt and pepper and keep over a bain-marie. Stir in herbs just before serving.

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R.S.V.P.

Italian Café

PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Six years after opening its doors, Negril’s Italian Café continues to welcome scores of locals and tourists alike, all in search of good, Italian food. Speculation may have been rife when ‘doubting Thomases’ questioned the viability of an Italian restaurant being run by a Jamaican. But Devon Johnson, owner and head chef, never doubted. “I was confident of two things - one, the need for alternate cuisine in Negril and two, my ability to deliver true Italian meals prepared with passion and authenticity,” he says. .

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JAMAICANS AND ITALIANS HAVE SEVERAL THINGS IN COMMON, WITH ONE OF THOSE THINGS BEING A

passionate love affair with food. .

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Zesty Bruschetta

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talian Café has become one of Negril’s popular dining destinations, cited as ‘a refreshing step outside of the typical Jamaican dining box’ – especially in Negril, where jerk and seafood – albeit delicious, are the order of the day. Louisa Rivard, visiting from Saskatchewan was eager to interrupt our interview offering, “It really is good Italian food.” The sentiment is shared by her party of 5, and countless others who have dined at the laidback trattoria-style eatery. Sitting with Devon, we chat about the how, when and why of his first restaurant – a brave venture by his own estimation that makes him prouder as the days go by. At the time he opened his restaurant, Devon had already worked in tourism for more than 20 years. His experience spans the gamut of an industry that has given him a wealth of information, which broadens his knowledge base to represent the two countries he loves most - Jamaica and Italy. Kenny, as he is popularly known, occupied a myriad of positions within both small and large hotels in Ocho Rios and Negril and honed his cultural engagement while running a destination management company for European visitors to Jamaica. Devon’s marriage into an Italian family was undoubtedly the catalyst for his Negril-based restaurant. However, his inherent love for food is what started it all. “My first meeting with my wife was immersed in food and we’ve never looked back since then,” he explained. Jamaicans and Italians have several things in common, with one of those things being a passionate love affair with food. In both countries, your welcome to someone’s home is often heralded by an offer of food, even before the offer of something to drink. With a solid foundation in the kitchen during his formative years in Cordwell, Hanover, the new challenge of learning Italian – both the language and the cuisine, was icing on the proverbial cake. Devon’s wife remains his most influential teacher, but living in Italy and devoting many hours to learning the art of Italian cooking, helped to set the bi-cultural foundation that precluded his return to Jamaica.

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Banana Nutella Pizza

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Penne Pasta

IT’S THE WAFT OF

fresh basil and thyme THAT GREETS YOU

INITIALLY...

Thin Crust Hama & Mushroom Pizza

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Italian Café’s outdoor terrace is conspicuously located on Norman Manley Boulevard in Negril. Close enough to the town’s main thoroughfare to maintain connection to the hustle and bustle, yet just far enough away to provide the privacy of an intimate dining experience. Negril’s sweltering heat seems to dissipate into the street nearby and almost enchantingly, you’re embraced by a cool, airy atmosphere that invites guests for lunch, dinner, drinks or all of the above. Self-contained cabanas offer the seclusion needed for an intimate evening for two or the privacy desired for a small group gathering. Either way, the aroma helps you to focus on why you came there in the first place – you were hungry. It’s the waft of fresh basil and thyme that greets you initially, then the discovery of a menu that offers old world Italy as a mere order away, boasting authentic Italian classics, offered by wait staff obviously indoctrinated in both Italian cuisine and culture, and superior customer service. Johnson has managed to carefully combine Jamaican warmth with the hospitable charm of Italian dining culture. Think handcrafted pastas, home-grown herbs, genuine Italian spices and fresh meats and seafood. The calm daytime vibe is eclipsed by an evening allure made perfect by warm lighting and creative cocktails, served well cold; Jamaican style. Pop in any time of any day, but you’ll be warned to call ahead and reserve your table on the weekends when dining out for Italian in Negril, is always in. The Italian Café, Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril, Jamaica Phone: (876) 957-4032 • Email: italiancafeja@gmail.com

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Healthy, Delicious, Versatile W

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Peas in a Pod. PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

hen we think of beans and peas more often than not, warm savoury dishes come to mind, such as red peas soup, gungu rice and peas, pelau or oxtail & beans. As one of the most multifaceted of the food groups, it can be easily argued that the legumes family “get in where they fit in”. Known for being a meat substitute, these seemingly small foods provide the perfect balance between healthy and tasty. Packed with antioxidants, proteins, fiber and what is known as complex carbs, beans and peas offer the most balanced levels of nutritional benefits. Due to the high fiber and water content found in beans and peas, they are highly recommended as dietary staples as they are said to digest slower which gives the feeling of being fuller for longer. This plays an especially important role in the diets of vegetarians and vegans who don’t eat meat, but also in those of persons seeking ways to pack more healthy carbs

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into their diets. In the Caribbean we have found unique ways to use these power packed proteins, as a part of our diets without the feeling of being restricted. From garbanzo and kidney beans to green peas and gungu peas, beans and peas are used in all the Caribbean islands as a compliment in a dish or meal. From the tantalizing flavours found in rice and gungo peas, or the rich savoury flavours of peas soup, the incorporation of beans and peas onto our plates and palettes are seamless and unending. Undoubtedly, peas are an essential product in preparing some of the more unique and tantalizing dishes known in the Caribbean culinary sphere. A household essential which best embodies the statement “we likkle but we tallawah”, it has proven its ability to adapt and compliment almost any flavour it is combined with. Having found their way onto our dinner tables and into hearts, literally, they have proven themselves to be an indispensable pantry essential.

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Curried Chicken Channa Aloo (Barbados) Ingredients: » » » » » » » »

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1 lb boneless chicken breast 1 can chick peas (about 2 cups) 1 1/2 tablespoon curry powder 1/2 scotch bonnet 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 tomato 1 teaspoon caribbean green seasoning 2 tablespoon veg oil

» » » » » » »

1/4 teaspoon black pepper 3 cloves garlic 1/2 small onion 2 tablespoon cilantro (or shado beni | culantro) 2 cups water 1 large potato 2 slices ginger (optional)

Directions: the cubed (1 inch pieces) chicken in a bowl 1andPlace season with the chopped tomato, salt, black pepper,

the 2 cups of water to the same bowl you marinated 4the Add chicken in to pick up any remaining marinade. By this

heat the oil on a low heat, then add 2the Indiceda deeponionsaucepan and garlic and cook (low heat) for about 3

Stir well, add the water, ginger and bring to a boil. As 5it comes to a boil, reduce to a rolling boil and cook with

Caribbean green seasoning, chopped scotch bonnet (no seeds) and diced tomato. Mix well and allow to marinate for 30 minutes. Remember to wash your hands with soap and water after handling such hot peppers.

minutes. Then add the curry powder (your fav) and cook for another 3-4 minutes on low. This step we’re cooking the rawness of the curry and highlighting the spices which make up the curry blend. heat to med/high and add the seasoned chicken 3piecesTurnto the the pot and stir well. The idea is to deglaze the bottom of the pan to pick up all the curry goodness. Cook for about 5-7 minutes, stirring often. The chicken will spring it’s own juices.. That’s natural.

time the liquid in the pan will start burning off and you’ll start seeing the oil we started off with. Add the cubed potato (large pieces) and chickpeas (be sure to wash and drain).

the lid slightly ajar for about 25 minutes. Basically until the pieces of potato are tender and you have a thick gravy.

salt and adjust if necessary (remember we only 6addedTastesaltforwhen we seasoned the chicken) – that was enough for me. If by chance you find that your gravy is too thin, use the back of your cooking spoon to crush some of the chickpeas and potato and it will thicken things. Top with the chopped cilantro (or shado beni) and enjoy (with rice or roti)!

http://caribbeanpot.com/curry-chicken-with-chickpeas-potato-channa-andaloo/

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Gungo Peas and Rice Ingredients: » 1 can (19oz) gungo peas (also called pigeon peas), including liquid » 19-oz water » ⅓ pkg creamed coconut » 1 small onion or 2 stalks scallion, chopped » 2 cloves garlic, chopped » 1 tsp dried thyme » 1½ to 2 tsp salt, to taste » 1 tsp pepper » ½ cup water » 2 cups long grain rice (rinsed and drained)

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Directions: Empty canned gungo peas and liquid into a large 1saucepan.

2 Fill empty can with water and pour in saucepan. 3 Add chopped onion, garlic, thyme, salt and pepper 4boil.Add creamed coconut and ½ cup water and bring to a 5 Add rice and boil on High for 2 minutes. Turn heat to Low, and cook covered until all water is 6absorbed (about 15 to 20 min). 7 Fluff with fork before serving. S"v$: 6 to 8 ISSUE 7 • 2016

http://cooklikeajamaican.com/gungo-peas-and-rice/

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SORA JAPANESE SKY CUISINE A REVIEW

BY NATALIE GRAHAM • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Facebook kept insisting that I should try Sora Japanese Sky Cuisine. So one lunchtime, I did. I parked my car, followed the arrows to the foot of their stairs, and started up. And up And up And up. Totally explains the SKY in the SKY Cuisine. .

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resting the final stair, I was greeted by a stunning view of their outdoor setup- a gorgeous lounge and dining area, complete with bar. I imagine sitting out there would have been amazing, but it was raining so I headed inside. Politely ignoring my wheezing, the staff opened the door and ushered me into the very elegant space with a clear Japanese minimalist aesthetic, from the wooden beams and natural-fiber lighting fixtures, to the bird-and-flower paintings throughout the space. After getting glasses of water, and more importantly, glasses of wine, we began working our way through the menu, finally selecting a roll platter featuring the uncooked California and Philly sushi rolls and the Pork Ginger Hot Plate. Before the pork dish even settled on the table, we knew we had chosen a winner. We were so right. The pork was tender without being too soft, and rich without being overwhelming. It was easy to pick up with either chopsticks or fork, and lingered for exactly the right amount of time before graciously dissolving on the tongue. The sauce was savoury, almost

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approaching salty, just before the sweet ginger notes swung back to dance with the other spices in the dish. Pork platter perfection! Now, for the new and/or the nervous, Sora has several cooked options, rolls and sushi included. But if you want to try uncooked sushi rolls, try these. The rice was perfectly cooked, sticky yet firm- and expertly wrapped to keep everything nice and tight inside the roll. With the cream cheese element of the Philly rolls there was even less need to dip or dress the roll at all. While I’m not sure I ultimately enjoyed the flavour personally, I definitely appreciated the textures at play. Smooth salmon, creamy cheese, sesame seed crunch on the outside, that alone made it enjoyable. And because it is my fervent belief that every good meal needs dessert, and all desserts should have chocolate, we tried the Oreo Rare Cheesecake, which simply means it’s no-bake. As just a casual cheesecake-eater, I thought it was pretty good. As a committed chocoholic: that super chocolaty Oreo crust was a triumph. Together, they gave me a dessert that melted in my mouth in a divine smooth, creamy, chocolate and vanilla wave. So that’s Sora, one of the newer entrants into Jamaica’s blossoming multicultural food scene. And I’m HERE for it! They’re generous with their flavours, their portions, and their attention. I really enjoyed it, so thanks Facebook! Interested? Go for it! Grab a friend, maybe do some warm ups in the parking lot, then let some seriously tasty times roll!

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RAISE THE BAR

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WINE BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER BY AVA GARDNER

Stowed in Upper Manor Park is Kingston’s newest wine bar and bistro, CELLAR8. Managed by Christine Gordon, CELLAR8 is a venture between both local and international hospitality and food and beverage industries professionals, who have now pooled their collective interests, experience and passion to create this new exciting restaurant.

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Pork Belly Sliders

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lthough the space is relatively small, having worked with interior designer, Elizabeth Ewart and Omari Wright of Wright Cut and Chin’s Construction, they skillfully maximized and transformed the space of a once clothing store into a luxe and functional restaurant and cocktail lounge. Maintaining the look and feel of a loft, their design team opted with rafters, high shelves, painted brick walls, warm Edison lights for windows and rustic butcher block wood for the bar. Down to the floor tiles, which make a bold statement against the modular seating, every detail was carefully selected, co-owner Nasma Chin explained, all elements adding warmth and character to create the cozy feel of a cellar. “CELLAR8 is unique as we offer our guests a wine bar, bistro and cocktail lounge all in one place”, Gordon added. Above the main dining room is The C8 Loft. A little more private, this lounge caters to about fifteen persons. This area is ideal and may be reserved for groups celebrating birthdays or any other special event. Indeed, CELLAR8 is the perfect spot for Friday wind-downs with your friends or date night with your significant other. Moreover, with an equally pairing menu, CELLAR8 is not your typical bistro. “Food and wine are a natural pairing”, Chin said. “We found ourselves in an exquisite space with a superb chef, wellappointed kitchen and a foodie’s dream menu.” With presentation to match, its detailed menu items centered on fusion dishes such as oxtail tacos, consist of rich ingredients, delicious cheeses and house condiments. I’m not over-exaggerating when I say you’ll want to order everything off the menu. “The wine and food purveyors worked very closely with our CELLAR8 team to make recommendations that provided the framework for our food and wine menu options”, Chin added, “having looked at .

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the proposed menu of our creative and dynamic, Chef Ramesh Maragh and his team, and the wish list of our owners and partners, we set about the task of procuring the best ingredients and wine available locally, in order to take our dream from concept to reality.” From Tuesdays to Sundays, CELLAR8 is open to fulfill your quaffing desires. Order a bottle or two from the bar, or choose from the WBTG (wine by the glass) menu. Guests can even indulge their artsy side with CELLAR8’s ‘Pop Up’ shops. CELLAR8 looks forward to hosting more fun gatherings and Pop Ups in the loft on Sundays during the upcoming Christmas season. “We believe that life gets complicated. So here at CELLAR8 we keep things simple, with great food paired with cheerful wines for whatever type of day you’re having. You can celebrate, reconnect or relax. We only ask that you take a moment and enjoy life here with us!”, Chin closed. .

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Lamb chops

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Oxtail Tacos

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DECANTED

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DECANTING 101 decant

d1'kant/ verb gerund or present participle:Â decanting gradually pour (wine, port, or another liquid) from one container into another, typically in order to separate out sediment.

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s a wine enthusiast and aspiring connoisseur one quickly learns that indulging in a glass of wine is much more than buying an expensive bottle. Rather, you learn that the entire experience from smell to taste is art

in motion. The Art of Decanting is not a practice that the average wine drinker will place great importance on, but its value is immeasurable for an enthusiast who aims to enjoy the fullness of a great bottle of wine. Simply put, decanting is the art of pouring the contents of one vessel into another, for the purposes of isolating any sediment which may be present in an aged wine, or to expose the wine particles to air, allowing for greater enjoyment of the flavours in the wine. As wine ages, especially full-bodied red wines such as a Syrah, Malbec or Cabernet, the need for decanting increases. This in no way suggests that decanting is limited to only one type or varietal of wine. These full-bodied red wines often leave particles

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over time that develops as a consequence of the aging process. The act of decanting allows the wine the opportunity to not only aerate, which ensures a smoother more refined taste on the palate, but is a means of separating the sediment from the wine. Light is always an important part of the decanting process, as it allows you to see the wine clearly when it is being poured. The flame of a candle has been arguably stated as being the best source of light for the process, but the truth is, priority should be placed on being able to see as clearly as possible. It is recommended that one gently tip the decanter when pouring the wine. This allows a clear view of the wine as it enters the decanter and also allows for the wine to be exposed to air particles. Try to avoid tilting the neck of the wine bottle back upwards in the case of pouring an aged wine with sediment during the decanting process - this will cause the wine to flow back into the bottle making it difficult to separate. Take your time when pouring the wine; go slow and be as gentle as possible, after all this is a delicate art form which

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requires precision. In instances of aged wines, once the clear part of the wine has been separated from the sediment left in the bottle, the process is complete. If you are able, ‘prepare’ your bottle of wine ahead of time – a day or so before is perfect to give ample time for sediment to descend to the bottom. They say there’s an art to drinking wine, while some refer to it as a science. Either way, there’s something to learn. Make sure your decanter is clean and particle-free and then follow these easy steps below for our ‘cliff notes’ version of what to do to decant in 3 simple steps.

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Hold a light under the neck of the 1bottle so that you have a clear view of

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its contents.

movement, 2gentlyUsingpourslowtheandwinesteady from the bottle

into the decanter, stopping only if you see sediment in the wine. Continue even slower as you near the end.

for about 30 minutes (for 3olderWaitwines) and up to an hour (for

younger wines). The experts and connoisseurs will debate right from wrong when it comes to this process, but experimenting for yourself and figuring out what suits your fancy, is a fun way to indulge while calling on your inner wine aficionado.

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The Spa Retreat, Negril

BY BRANDON FERGUSON * AERIAL PHOTO BY KAELEN COHEN • ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY DWAYNE WATKINS

Negril is known as a playground for those with time on their hands. Whether you’re there to party then unwind, unwind before you party, or for a mix of the two – you’ll find all the right elements in the once-sleepy town with the magical sunsets. .

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y 53rd Jamaican Independence celebration was spent at the Spa Retreat Boutique hotel on the west end of Negril. Each year, as we acknowledge our liberation as a nation, I follow suit by taking my patriotic self someplace that inspires me to disconnect from the hustle and bustle of the corporate world, and submit to the beauty of this land we love. I had long been eager to visit the property that I recently learned was the winner of

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America’s Hotel Awards for both ‘Best Spa Hotel, Americas’ and ‘Best Small Hotel, Caribbean’ for two consecutive years - 2013 and 2014. And if that wasn’t enough, my curiosity was further piqued by their 2014 Travellers’ Choice Award from Trip Advisor. I rarely declare my love for a resort so passionately. I guess I’ve become somewhat of a hotel critic over the past few years and I’m always searching for somewhere that has that little bit of extra sparkle; you know – the ‘it’ factor that makes one stand out above the rest. Within fifteen minutes of arriving at Spa Retreat, I knew that I’d found it. The normally mundane yet necessary process of checking-in ‘hit me for six’ when I was expecting nothing more than a single run. That’s cricket terminology for ‘surprise’. I really didn’t expect the shoulder rub that ensued. The refreshing scented cold towel – yes. The thirst-quenching welcome drink – yes. But an 8-minute massage? No. Definitely unforeseen, but perfectly well timed. It was as if Kerry (my masseuse) knew exactly where my anxiety was pooled and she was intent on relieving it. It didn’t take much to convince me to book a full session, which I enjoyed the following day. I had a busy party schedule set for the weekend,

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with an unplanned plan to eat and drink at random spots in the town known for quick and tasty roadside bites. However, after dining at Blue Mahoe Restaurant that evening, I made up my mind to have all my meals on property. Executive Chef Shane Austrie who went above and beyond to ensure all his guests were satisfied, checked in on our table with the right amount of frequency for timely feedback. Over the course of the next few days, I tried everything on the menu. Ok, not everything, but I did try many things. Chef Austrie’s meals were acutely Jamaican by flavour, yet international by appearance. Creative cocktails flowed and I’m 100% guilty of overindulging in the winner of my weekend – the Spud Cooler, a coconut infused rum lemonade served in a converted-to-a-cup, husked sweet potato. Delicious!

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he Spa Retreat features 18 thatchedroofed cottages in an environment ideal for relaxation and meditation. Think edge of the world calm, where the only disturbance comes from your thoughts. All the amenities that you expect are on hand – those are the tangibles as I like to call them, but it’s the non-tangibles that create the ‘it’ factor. How does an atmosphere

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inspire renewal and inner strength? Ask Christine Cohen. She’s the owner of Spa Retreat, Negril and visionary behind her growing business in Ottawa, Canada where she has two Day Spas of the same name. “We remove all the factors on the outside that prevent restoration on the inside - that’s what Spa Retreat is about,” says Christine. As an aesthetician, she knows about inspiring beauty from the inside out. With over 20 years of experience in the industry, her Negril property is a celebration of the holistic spa experience through good food, relaxation, rejuvenation and the chance to be taken care of from sun up to sun down. Christine’s right hand, property manager Heather Hamilton concurs and adds, “It’s our duty to exceed expectations here at Spa Retreat and we do that each day by paying attention to every minute detail.” Christine has been running the oasis property since the day they welcomed their first guest and she prides herself and her team on being able to anticipate needs and wants and deliver with timely appropriateness. .

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Chicken pesto wrap

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Blue Mahoe snapper fish cakes

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Spud Cooler, a coconut infused rum lemonade served in a husked sweet potato.

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intentionally left my watch in my room. I left my phone as well, so you understand how serious I was about getting some ‘me-time’. I wanted time to stand still as I thawed into near oblivion on the deck of the salt-water pool. As with most boutique hotels, the Spa Retreat concierge will curate your entire experience, including organizing any tours you may want to take. There is plenty to do in and nearby the area, but truth be told, leaving this property was the last thing on my mind. I took a dip in the ocean and made a mental note of the rocky terrain beneath my feet. Using underwater gear was an option, but I chose to go without. With no sand between my toes, I slowly negotiated my way out into the deep blue while being thankful for my childhood swimming lessons. Back on deck some time later, and basking in the warmth of midday sun, there were no sounds other than the crash of the waves against Negril’s rocky cliffside below. I barely recall drifting off while trying to make the important decision of where to enjoy my massage. Open-air by the sea I choose, though I had the choice of enjoying my spa treatment in the privacy of my room. I had 4 days and 7 parties on my roster of activities when I arrived at Spa Retreat days earlier. I left the resort property as scheduled, having attended only one of the parties, but more importantly, I discovered the true meaning of the word retreat. I finally experienced the marvel of actually resting while on vacation. Sometimes, you really don’t know that you need rest and rejuvenation until it’s handed to you on a silver platter, infused with a double dose of Jamaican sunshine and a perfectly chilled glass of champagne on the side.

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ONE STOP DRIVA

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Café Blue, Irish Town

A mere twenty minutes into a northbound journey up Jamaica’s iconic Blue Mountain range, you’ll encounter a lovely coffee shop on the right of the road, embedded in the corner with a most glorious view of north rural St. Andrew. Perched on a hill and moderately reminiscent of Jamaica circa 1962, Café Blue sits on the cusp of Kingston’s sultry metropolis. You’re not very far away, but far enough so that it takes a stretch of memory to recall that you’ve just departed a smorgasbord of a city a few miles below.

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ith 3 locations island wide and branded products appearing on retail shelves, Café Blue is no secret to Jamaica. It is one of the island’s fastest growing coffee brands, having revolutionized the modern social habits of Jamaica’s trendsetting Generation X-ers over the past 15 years. While coffee-loving workaholics may flock to the brand’s Kingston and Montego Bay locations, Café Blue’s Irish Town spot has definitively

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created a time-out space for solace seekers. If you’re lucky enough to have Mother Nature favour your visit, the crisp air that descends from above will entice you to take a ‘one stop’, sit, sip and savour. It’s medicinal almost; like taking a deep breath from an oversized Ventolin inhaler – just what the doctor ordered. There’s something about having a freshly brewed cup of Blue Mountain Coffee that makes you want to grasp your cup with both hands, close your eyes and savour the aroma – you know, like in the movies. The menu at the recently expanded artisanstyled café offers ‘brain juice’ lovers just enough options to satisfy your need for caffeine injection, and a lite bite should the need arise. Who wants to be confused when it’s time to recharge? But just in case you’re not sure what to have, a Café Blue barista will help you to make the right choice. The deck that now wraps the extent of the building, gives more of everything; more space, more fresh air and a desire to spend more time enjoying the surroundings. I’ve heard of oases in the desert and I suspect the feeling of relief and recharge is similar to the experience here. Your stop at Café Blue in Irish Town, whether intentional or not, is sure to satisfy. Whether you want a latte, cappuccino, single or double espresso to go with your extended green valley view down below, taking your time to decide may be the calm you need to face or close your day – whichever the case may be. .

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Walkerswood One Stop Pork Chop Ingredients

(4) - Copperwood Pork Loin Chops (2 Tbs.) - Walkerswood Jerk Marinade (4 Tbs.) - Walkerswood One Stop sauce

www.walkerswood.com

Method

Use our Walkerswood Jerk Marinade to season your pork chops and allow half an hour for flavours to penetrate Place Chops on hot Grill and allow to sear on both sides, then cook for a further 6 minutes each side, basting with our Walkerswood One Stop sauce until cooked thru.

#RealJerkComesfromJamaica

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ROAD TRIP

As a lover of childhood stories and classic fairy tales, I would say that I’ve long been a fan of fields with knee-high grass adorned with butterflies fluttering gently by and picnic baskets filled with fruits and cheese. The picture in my mind’s eye is a scene from the movies – very Sound of Music-esque, if you know what I mean. When was the last time you packed a basket and took to the road? I am guilty of not enjoying my ‘backyard’ and was abruptly reminded of this during a recent first-time visit of friends to Jamaica. In just over a week, they enjoyed the length and breadth of our island and had the photos and stories to show for it. Being fully patriotic and partly jealous, I decided to remind myself of what my friends had recently discovered.

A Picnic in the Park W .

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BY MICHELLE GORDON • PHOTOGRAPHY BY DWAYNE WATKINS

e head due north, north, east, winding left then right then left again. We leave hustle and bustle of Papine Square and within minutes begin a tranquil drive up the hills. I’m not quite ready to break out into my rendition of ‘The Hills Are Alive’ – that moment will come soon enough, as I anticipate my Julie Andrews cameo coming on strong. The hillside has enjoyed bountiful rains in recent weeks and is not bashful in showing off her lush splendor. According to Google maps, we’re about half way to our destination. I’m more curious than I am hungry, but we yield to the temptation to stop for a cup of coffee along the way. (Check out our One Stop feature on page 60) The day is near perfect and as we ascend the mountains, the air becomes noticeably lighter and cooler, and the hot Blue Mountain coffee stirs the excitement of the rest of the journey in front of us. It’s the one thing that we forgot to pack – coffee. But with our tummies warmed and satiated, we would have timed perfectly our readiness for our lite al fresco lunch ahead. The wine would be perfectly chilled by the time we arrive and our fruits and sandwiches would still be fresh.

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Hol y well Park

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ust like in the storybooks that fueled my love of picnics, the roads are strewn with wild orchids and lilies. While my inner child wants to get out and skip along the road with basket in hand, I heed the warnings to not pick the flowers along the road, no matter how beautiful they look. It’s all part of community effort at environmental conservation and sustainable development. So if flowers are a part of your ambiance, be sure to buy your bunch of flowers before heading up. With the changing of the weather being almost as common as that in London, be prepared for fluctuation from cool to warm to hot to cold – all in the same day. After all, we are some 3,500 feet above sea level. Up here, frequent temperature change is

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the norm and visitors are well advised to dress accordingly. The dense fog we find ourselves driving through clears just in time for us to read the sign that welcomes us to Holywell Recreational Park. We’re immediately in awe of the view below and marvel at the beauty our tiny island possesses. We’re merely 700 feet below the highest point in Jamaica and I enjoy a quick shiver of delight as I cherish the thought. We choose a spot with an endless view of rolling hills and lay our picnic blanket at one of Jamaica’s most beautiful parks. In fact, it’s Jamaica’s first National Park, protected today by Jamaica’s Natural Resources Conservation Authority in collaboration with other environmentally charged organisations such as the Jamaica Conservation and Developments Trust and

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the National Environment & Planning Agency. You can spend a day or night or just a few hours – everything about Holywell is well worth the journey. With the most incredible views, a beautiful waterfall and thousands of acres of unspoiled land, it’s only an hour outside of Papine, Kingston, or less than 20 minutes if you brave the Norbrook trail. If you prefer a heavier meal for your picnic excursion, just pack accordingly. Remember that Holywell provides you with a beautiful nature park, devoid of most modern amenities. So bear this in mind when you’re packing for your day out. Spits for fires are located around the grounds, but you are responsible to provide all the elements needed to get your fire up and running. Don’t forget to carry garbage bags so that you leave nothing

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behind. Enjoy your trip responsibly and observe all the warnings issued by the park rangers – they’re there for just that reason. Dress warmly, pack everything you’ll need and have a great time!

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PACK FOR A PERFECT PICNIC (at Holywell)

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ew things are more frustrating than heading out for a day of fun and frolic, then arriving at the perfect spot only to discover that you’ve forgotten one simple essential tools – you know – like the corkscrew for your wine or the matches to ignite your fire! Holywell may be relatively close to Kingston, but its still too far run home to pick up those last few items. Avoid having to get creative by carefully planning ahead using our picnic list as a guide.

Make sure to write a list of what you want to eat 1during your day out and actually check it before diving out. Makes no sense looking forward to crackers and cheese and then forgetting the cheese. Note in detail what you want and then create sub-lists for each item.

going all out with ‘big cooking’ as we say 2hereIfinyou’re Jamaica, be sure to carry all the things that will

fuel your fire – matches, kerosene, old newspapers and dry wood. Holywell is often damp, so finding dry wood can sometimes be challenging. on your list? Make sure you have the tools to 3openWine up and get it down. If you’re like me, glasses are

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a must when having wine, so pack one for each winedrinking guest so that no one has to suffer in plastic silence.

to take water and ice. You can get the 4largerDon’tgallonforgetbottles and be sure to pack your cups right beside them. Small individual water bottles make for easy use and you can keep these chilled on ice, in your cooler. Remember to keep ice of consumption packaged separately from ice for chilling. along some warm clothing! Yes, we may be in 5sunnyBringJamaica, but you could be in for a cool surprise when Mother Nature decides to bring on the chill that comes with being 3000 feet above sea level.

& Tarpaulins. First spread your tarpaulin on 6the Blankets grass, because there is nothing cool about lying on a

wet spot. Then layer your blanket and bask in the beauty above and around. Chances are you haven’t done that in a while. #JustDoIt And last, but not least – bring garbage bags. #NuhhDuttyUpJamaica

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ON THE FARM

Woodford Market Garden is nestled in the cool hills of St. Andrew’s Blue Mountains. Noted as Jamaica’s first purveyor of packaged salad greens for the retail market, Woodford remains a leader in the organic marketplace which 20 years ago was still considered a local novelty. Donna Noble and her husband Paul started the farm out of a passion for themselves and their family to live healthier lifestyles. Donna is extremely proud of Woodford Market Garden, as she should be. “Initially, we simply wanted to provide our family with a regular supply of chemical-free, leafy greens, but today this has evolved into a growing business enjoying a loyal customer base that supports the development of organic and sustainable farming in Jamaica.” Donna shares her story in her soon-to-be released book Salad Days. Look for it next year in 2017, but be sure to indulge in this excerpt here in the meantime. .

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Woodford Market Garden BY DONNA NOBLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBYN NOBLE

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rowing up in the 60’s, our Jamaican table consisted of meat with hills of coconut rice & peas, rich macaroni & cheese, glorious fried plantain, and thick delicious gravy. In my family, masses of pure heavenly protein and carbohydrate was the standard response to the question ‘what’s for dinner?’ Chicken, pork, beef, or fish were followed by the much loved starch, no mention of anything green although the ubiquitous steamed callaloo or boiled string beans and carrots usually made an appearance, but if they didn’t, nobody missed vegetables and certainly nobody talked much about a balanced diet in those days. We ate what tasted good and was traditional, deep-fried, sugar sweet, white and refined. Especially bread! As a child I remember the bread van would deliver soft, doughy, comforting white hardo-bread, which we would spread with butter, or margarine, which was then considered ‘more nutritious’. In those days, the word ‘salad’ was usually attributed to very large ripe red tomato and with the addition of a little shredded

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cabbage or iceberg lettuce, a touch of grated carrot and a slice of cucumber. It was usually left on the plate. Although greens didn’t seem important, herbs like fever grass and peppermint and fruits were always in abundance as my father made sure our large garden was self-sufficient and we enjoyed whatever was in season from avocado pear, breadfruit, ackees, starapples, otaheiti apples, sweet-sop, sour-sop, cherries, limes, almond, bananas, guavas and oranges. Dad also enjoyed cooking, and we certainly got a weekly fix of greens with his soups. His oversized pots of superbly seasoned ‘Satday’ soups packed with callaloo, cho-cho or pumpkin and yams, red peas and coco are legendary, so my love of home grown and eating from garden to table began with my father, but it wasn’t until the 90’s, after a 20 year romance with the idea of growing our own, that my husband and I got serious about an edible garden, and probably the one thing we were certain of was that we would not be using the prescribed chemicals and fertilizers.

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We craved a new kind of eating experience, to feed our family healthy vegetables, to know how the food we were eating was being grown and as a budding food stylist, I was beginning to enjoy the pure beauty of fresh produce and herbs needed for my styling projects. We started with several types of lettuces, herbs other leafy greens, varieties which were not then available on the Jamaican market. Along with gourmet lettuces with red frills and the brightest green curls, unusual greens like arugula, swiss chard, Asian kyona, radicchio, and a full list of herbs, dill, rosemary, tarragon, sweet basil and mint, we had curly parsley, flat parsley, cilantro, plus some of those round red ‘salads’, leeks, sweet peppers radishes and more. What evolved was a delightful kaleidascope of colours, textures, and amazing flavours. I was hooked, and super excited about the beauty of home grown veggies. Nothing compares to the taste of a freshly picked tomato, ripened in the warm sun, or a sweet crisp lettuce leaf plucked straight from the earth and onto the table. So there we were, munching away at our salad leaves, thinking it was the best thing since that warm hardo-bread and as most first time gardeners will tell you, we grew far more than we could eat or give away, leading to a serendipitous moment, and the thought that surely everyone would love to have these greens washed and ready for their salad bowl. We packaged our first lot of 20 bags of mixed greens, added an edible nasturtium flower for colour and courage, and drove them into town. While talking our way through the supermarket back doors, answering questions like ‘whey yu goin wid all dis bush bush?’ we fought for a prime spot, where the yams and hefty watermelons wouldn’t roll over and damage our precious beauties, such were the challenges. But people did pickup our bags of greens, and would call when they didn’t see them and were really loving the unusual varieties and selection of the mix, and Woodford Market Garden’s gourmet packaged salads was born. Over 20 years later, our certified organic Super Greens Salad Blend is still a well-loved product on the supermarket shelves and one of our most satisfying achievements is that perhaps we have made it easier for people to enjoy their greens everyday. .

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Donna Noble is a professional Food Stylist and founder of Woodford Market Garden, Jamaica’s first certified organic salad greens company. Website: www.woodfordmarketgarden.com Phone: (876) 750-8259 email:Donna@woodfordmarketgarden.com

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MY KITCHEN

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Our Kitchen BY YHULI J. • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Someone once said, “In the childhood memories of a good cook, there’s a large kitchen, a warm stove, a simmering pot and a mom.” I don’t know how true this is but I do know that an efficient kitchen does make for unforgettable meals and a plethora of great memories. And this kitchen delicately finds the balance between efficient and cozy, two of the foremost ingredients in making any domain homely.

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he kitchen, often titled as the nucleus of the home, undoubtedly pulls the family together. A concept that is implicit in the design of, what can only be coined as, ‘neo-conventional’ kitchen. For the Portico

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Architects Team, designers and conceptualizers of the McNair family kitchen, it was important for the kitchen to connect with the rest of the home in flow, look and energy. On entry into this illusively capacious domain, the feeling of warmth, light and homeliness unequivocally resonates from its core. This is a family kitchen, where a lot more is shared than food.

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Inherent in the design of the space is the contrast between the classic kitchen style and the use of contemporary fixtures. The center island in the kitchen and countertops, maintain a solid granite finish that is efficient for kitchens heavily used. The cabinetry features a modern provincial minimalistic design, in all white. “The owners wanted a modern kitchen that tied into the rest of the home, without creating a cold feeling. It’s the place where most persons first flock to, so it needed to feel warm and inviting,” explained Doris Gross of Portico Architects Limited. Distinctive is the importance of light in creating a spacious and open feel to the area. Two seemingly large glass windows, allow for the easy transmission of light and warmth into the area. Most interesting is the use of recessed lighting to compliment the natural light that beams through the windows during the day and supplements lighting during the night. This type of lighting source, seemingly unobtrusive and subtle, is quite uncommon in standard homes, thus adding to the unique contemporary flair of this classic kitchen. Here the lighting design is nestled comfortably between wood panels, a delicate contrast to the black floor tiles. In this kitchen the effortless dance between light and dark creates an enigmatic feel of belonging.

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“We wanted to create an airy light, happy feeling. We wanted the space to really connect with all aspects of the home.” – Doris Gross, Interior Designer & Architect, Portico (Architects) Limited. The focal point however is the cove. A quaintly designed concave arched seating area formed just by the larger of the two windows. With a breathtaking view of the pool deck and back patio of the house, the décor in this area is minimalistic yet charming. Decorated for both comfort and practicality, the perfect balance was found. This neo-classic styled kitchen radiates light and warmth. With very little ornamentation the simplicity in the natural design shines through, creating magnetic warmth that can only be found at home. Design Company: Portico Architects Limited Architects: Doris Gross and Elizabeth Newman Contact: (876) 969-4720 Email: portico@porticoltd.com Website: www.porticoltd.com

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Brad Kilgore:

Food, Art & Community

BY AYESHA YHENTL • PORTRAIT PHOTO BY DWAYNE WATKINS • EVENT PHOTOS BY ANDRE RATTIGAN

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ulia Child once said, “Find something you’re passionate about and keep tremendously interested in it.” That was exactly what Brad Kilgore did. A seemingly unassuming, modest and easygoing guy at first glance, you’d never guess that 30-year-old Brad is the Executive Chef of two of Miami’s Wynwood Arts District’s most exquisite restaurants. You’d never guess he has over 10 years’ experience in some of the most highly esteemed restaurants and has just been voted Food and Wine’s Best New Chef of 2016. Brad can easily strike you as the simple guy next door, who may or may not even know how to turn on a grill. But once he gets into chef mode and puts on his apron, Brad morphs, superhero style into Chef extraordinaire. Taste his plated masterpieces and you’ll quickly learn that he is driven by an unspoken love and avidity for food. As I interviewed the Kansas City native, I learned more about his unbridled love for food and how he has managed to use food to fuel his career and influence his community. An underlying message was purported repeatedly: ‘I was born to do this.’ From a young age Brad recalls his intrigue with food. “I started working restaurants when I was 11. Dishwashing, sneaking in with the cooks and stuff like that.” It was no surprise then when Brad Kilgore went on to enroll in culinary .

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arts classes at The Broadmoor Technical Center, under the tutelage of his mentor Chef Bob Brassard. Being from a family of artists only bolstered Brad’s drive to become a chef. “I saw food as art, and being from an artistic family but not being able to draw to save my life, food became my art.” Seeing food as art has been the platform which has propelled Brad’s career leaps and bounds. “I’m from a family of artists and I can’t draw or paint to save my life. Food is my medium.” In 2015, Brad Kilgore opened the doors of Alter in Miami’s artistic Wynwood District. This was momentous for Kilgore in more ways than one. If you are familiar with the famed Arts District, then you’re aware that it acts as an artistic metropolitan hub of sorts, but this wasn’t always the case. In recent years, the Wynwood District underwent a period of gentrification which saw a remodeling of the community into an art-centered metropolis, encouraging brands and businesses to invest in the development of the space. For Brad, a restaurant which focused on delicious yet appetizing dishes was exactly what the area needed. There the restaurant has made a name for itself as Executive Chef Kilgore continues to astound patrons with his unique twist on famed American cuisines. In just under a year, Kilgore and his team propelled the restaurant to a 4 star rating, an honour bestowed by the Miami Herald

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exclusively to Alter in 2015. In 2016, Eater, the American food publication, named Alter restaurant of the year with Kilgore at the helm, also receiving the esteemed Chef of The Year award. On September 30th, the doors of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts opened its doors to patrons revealing the newest addition to its family, Brava by Brad Kilgore. The restaurant housed inside the Downtown Miami Theatre, which features epicurean cuisines styled with a balance of American and European flair. But how does he do it all and still manage to stay grounded, while keeping his meals dynamic? For Brad, he shares his success with his team. “I have an incredible team at Alter. And my Sous Chef Leah Jones is great. She’s from Kingston.” At Alter Brad has maintained a standard of perfection with his dishes by creating a work standard for his meals. “Everything is weighed to the gram. Having a level of perfection helps and always remaining humble.” A mantra that Brad has held close and one he often shares with others. “Stay humble and work hard. That’s the secret. It won’t be easy to do it alone, so find a group of people with a common goal in mind.” Recognized for his ability to not only create delicious meals, but also his extraordinary talents in plating his dishes masterfully, CB Foods, the principals behind the Jamaica Food and Drink Festival hosted Brad as their featured international chef, at the second staging of the annual event. Brad Kilgore and his Sous Chef, Leah Jones, originally from Jamaica, paired up with the Pink Apron team to take patrons on a delectably spicy journey on the 4th night of the festival at Picante. Ambrosial; being worthy of the Gods is the only way to describe a pork tenderloin that was simply impeccable. Without a doubt Chef Kilgore’s station saw most patrons and fellow featured chefs at the event complimenting the divinity .

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“I’M FROM A FAMILY OF ARTISTS AND I CAN’T DRAW OR PAINT TO SAVE MY LIFE.

Food is my medium.”

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of the dish and of course asking for seconds. “Businesses rely on events like this for future business. Chefs meet and share ideas. Businesses [and the community] can prosper directly and indirectly from it.” – Brad Kilgore on JFDF Events such as Jamaica Food and Drink Festival or CB Foods’ annual PAN competition are the platforms for Chef Kilgore, to not only express his own passion for the fusion of art and food, but to encourage other chefs to use food as an avenue to bolster their community and live their dreams. Events such as Jamaica Food and Drink Festival or CB’s Pan Chicken Festival, are the platforms that Brad is referring to. Food has always been a catalyst for change because of its dynamism and importance. Accessing good food can create socio-economic changes in a community that encourages growth. These socio-economic changes resonate in countless positive ways, often creating niche markets, building local brands and improving the cultural richness of an area. It’s a reciprocal relationship that sees all the players benefiting from a cycle of risk, return and reward. If you’re one to sit back and observe you’ll note that there’s a distinctdifference between persons who can cook and those who have a passion forcooking. Likewise there is a difference between persons who can draw andthose who are true artists. That difference lies in the details. Keen observation of Chef Kilgore reiterated this sentiment and solidified my initial thoughts; Chef Kilgore is driven by passion. The presentation of his dishes should alwaysbe a topic of conversation. The use of all white china is comparative to thatof an artist’s white canvas- allowing for a clean slate on which to createmasterpieces. Gastronomy has become his way of expressing his art; hebelieves and holds strongly to the belief that food can build a community,creating a multiplicity of opportunities. “I am always trying to reinvent myself. And I am inspired by art all around. My job is to make food taste good and the fun part is to make it look good. If it doesn’t look nice, you haven’t completed your job.” .

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Alter 223 NW 23rd Street Miami, FL 33127 (305) 573-5996

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Sweet Indulgence Simo’s Plantain Tart BY CHRISTINA SIMONITSCH Make the puff pastry on a cool evening at least the night before using. It also freezes well once it’s done.

PLANTAIN FILLING » 300g ripe plantains » 75g brown sugar (less if desired) » 2.5ml cinnamon

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» 5 ml vanilla flavoring » 3.5ml salt (season to taste) » 15g butter and 5ml oil

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PUFF PASTRY » Ingredients: (makes one sheet - approx. 15” x 10”) » 2 cups all-purpose flour, plus 1 tablespoon » 1 teaspoon salt

» 2/3 cup ice water » 8 ounces unsalted butter, cold

inches wide. Fold the top third over the bottom third, and the bottom over the top third, like a letter.

Make the lean dough: Mix the flour with the salt, then turn out onto your work surface in a pile. Run your fingers down the center to create a trough. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of water into the trough. Quickly fluff the dough with your fingers, keeping your fingers loose and using a scooping motion. Gather the flour into a mound, create a trough, and add another tablespoon of water. Continue sprinkling and fluffing until the flour clumps together in large pieces and holds together when pressed.

pastry scraper to gather it up again. Sprinkle with another teaspoon of flour, pound flat, and repeat. Add one more teaspoon of flour, then continue pounding and gathering, until the butter is very pliable and does not break when you fold it over on itself.

Chill the dough: Press the dough into a square and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Wrap the butter in the dough: Place the square of butter on top of the dough at a 90-degree angle to the dough. Fold the corners of the dough over the butter so they meet in the middle. Pinch to seal.

Do two more turns: Repeat rolling out and folding the dough two more times. The dough should feel much more smooth and pliable at this point. If you notice any butter popping up through the dough, pat it with a little flour.

First turn: Flour the work surface lightly and flip the butter package over so the seams are down. Roll it out to a rectangle roughly 12 inches long by 6

Chill for 30 minutes: Mark 4 divots in the edge of the dough to remind yourself that you’ve done 4 turns. Wrap in plastic and chill for 30 minutes.

Prepare the butter block: Cut the butter into a few large pieces and sprinkle with a teaspoon of flour. Begin pounding the butter with a French rolling pin to soften it, sprinkling flour on your rolling pin as needed. Pound the butter flat, then use a

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Chill the butter block: Once the butter is pliable, shape it into a 4-inch x 4-inch square, wrap in plastic, and chill for exactly 10 minutes. Remove the dough from the fridge and roll out to a roughly 7-inch square.

Second turn: Rotate the folded dough so it looks like a book about to be opened. Roll it out again into a rectangle 12 inches by 6 inches. Fold it again. Chill for 30 minutes. Mark 2 divots in the edge of the dough to remind yourself that you’ve done two turns. Wrap the puff dough in plastic and chill for 30 minutes.

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Perform two final turns: Repeat rolling and folding the dough two more times for a total of six turns. By this point, the dough should feel completely smooth and be easy to roll out. Chill for 1 hour or overnight: Wrap in plastic and chill for a final 60 minutes, or overnight. Roll and cut the dough: When ready to bake, begin the oven preheating to 425°F. Roll out the puff pastry dough to between 1/4 and 1/8 inches thick. Use the dough as is to make a large tart, or cut the dough into whatever shapes you need. Transfer them to tart pans or baking sheets. If the dough feels very soft and warm at this point, chill for another 30 minutes before baking. Preheat oven to 400•F. Dice plantain as small as possible. Heat a pan - add butter and oil then add diced plantain. Get them to

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caramelize a bit then add salt, cinnamon & sugar. Turn the heat down and stir as needed. It will become soft. Add vanilla flavoring. Taste and see if more sugar/ salt is needed. Leave to cool until needed to fill tarts. Remove the pastry from the fridge or freezer (if from the freezer it will take a few minutes to become pliable). Cut into 6 squares approximately 5” x 3.5” - take approx. 40g of filling and put into the middle of each square. Brush edges with water (or egg wash) and bring them together - press down then use a fork to close tightly by pressing into dough. Place onto a baking mat or parchment paper on a baking tray. Bake at 400F for 10 minutes then turn down temperature to 375F and bake another 10 minutes or until dry, crisp and golden brown. Remove from oven, cool & enjoy! Stores well in a cool place or in an airtight container for up to 4/5 days.

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LISE-ANN'S LOVE IS IN THE

‘Sugary Sweet Nuttiness’ OF HER MOTHER’S PEANUT BRITTLE. .

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Brittle Crunch PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Brittle ˈbrɪt(ə)l/

Adjective hard but liable to break easily. Noun a brittle sweet made from nuts and set melted sugar. “peanut brittle”

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ictionaries do a good job of explaining words, but experience brings those explanations to life. Think gooey, sticky, crunchy, sweet and savoury all in the same breath. Peanut brittle is one of the oldest candies enjoyed by many generations of Jamaicans. Going down history lane, it was one of those sweet treats that was easily made at home – often a Sunday indulgence that rarely made it through to a Monday treat. While several counties wish to stake claim to the origin of this confection, there is no doubt that Jamaica has enjoyed a long-standing love-love relationship with this sweet and crunchy, ‘peanutty’ confection. A love that entrepreneur and founder of Treat Confectionery Jamaica Limited, Lise-Ann Harris has delicately redefined, modernized and now delivers to the pleasure of many Jamaicans. “Peanut brittle is something that I grew up making at home – a family tradition of sorts,” shares Lise-Ann, as she recalls making the sticky favourite as a child. While cooking and baking were activities done often and together at home, LiseAnn’s love lay in the ‘sugary sweet nuttiness’ of her mother’s peanut brittle. Taking a

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good thing and making it better, Lise-Ann experimented with peanut’s cousin, the cashew and today, finds herself at the helm of a growing confection business with her adding a creative twist to the norm. Brittle Crunch offers a ‘lightness’ unlike that which is typically expected of peanut brittle; no stickiness, no gumminess, yet with all of the flavour intact. How is this possible? “It’s our trade secret!” Lisa-Anne laughs. Of course it is! Consistency in production is the key to maintaining the standard of her brittles, which also include Peanut Brittle and Spicy Cashew Brittle. Treat Confectionery raises the ‘brittle bar’ with the addition of ‘spicy’ to the crunchy offering with a peppery ‘kick’ that is winning over ‘sweet teeth’ one bite at a time. Her products are made from premium local ingredients and Lise-Ann asserts that her brittle is made from a base of crispy caramel candy, while traditional brittle is more of a ‘nut cake’. Brittle chic packaging greets shoppers as they check out at most major supermarkets, pharmacies, hotels and specialty shops across Jamaica. Treat Confectionery was recognized as a 2016 Best New Product Nominee by the Jamaica Observer Table Talk Awards and can be found in select corporate area supermarkets, Contact: Lise-Anne Harris 469-3091

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ROYALLY YOURS

SANDALS ROYAL PLANTATION’S LIJ HERON

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Photography: Dwayne Watkins

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hen Lij Heron decided to return to Jamaica after an 11-year sojourn in the Middle East, he did so with great intent and purpose. “I have gained a wealth of knowledge and I feel obligated to share what I learned here at home.” Lij speaks about an industry that he believes has limitless opportunity for development, in a country whose people are blessed with an inherent passion for food. Lij is a proud Jamaican who flew high the flag for his country in the land known for excessive indulgences. Creating culinary experiences for patrons whose royalty, wealth and celebrity are conventional, has no doubt helped to lay a foundation immersed in lavish dining experiences and exotic presentations. Lij’s return to the nation of his birth is significant at a time when so many of his colleagues are in search of the international exposure that he already has at the age of 36. His resume is an impressive read of culinary successes across the globe. Just prior to ‘coming home’, as he proudly states, Lij was the Executive Chef at the world famous Burj Al Arab Hotel in Dubai. Before that, he spearheaded the culinary team at other fine-dining restaurants in the United Arab Emirates including Ras Al Khaimah, The Lexington Grill Steakhouse, The Camelia Lounge and The Rib Room at Jumeirah Emirates Towers. His culinary arts degree from the Culinary Institute of America in New York is the foundation on which Lij continues to build an extraordinary career marked by an insatiable desire to be named among the best. Being a chef is an art that like most other disciplines requires the perfect balance of skill, passion

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“An enjoyable meal is so much more THAN SATISFYING A HUNGRY TUMMY.” .

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and tenacity. Fortunately, Lij proves mastery of this discipline by excelling in an environment where the challenge of preparing and cooking is intensified by the art of eating when your audience demands precision in dining. Lij explains the art of eating. Tasting the elements of your meal in the ‘correct’ order allows you to discern the different flavour profiles and enjoy the experience on a deeper level. For the diner who may not yet be aware of the levels in culinary experience, Lij, and those under his wings, make it a point of duty to impart this knowledge to those who sit at his table. “An enjoyable meal is so much more than satisfying a hungry tummy.” Lij is keen to explain that part of his role as an Executive Chef is guiding the patron on a culinary journey as he advises on how best to maximize a gastronomic experience. “It’s knowing which foods to eat when and with what, that intensifies the whole experience,” he explains. "I help you to appreciate the difference between simply having a meal and experiencing one."

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Scotch Bonnet Ginger Pan Seared Shrimp and Seared Scallop with Watermelon, Avocado, Mint, Quinoa, Cucumber

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Eating a four-course meal from appetizer to dessert requires balanced, well considered portions that are inviting, indulgent and for good measure – healthy. “My goal is not for my guests to leave stuffed; I want them to leave satisfied.” Lij recommends sensitizing your appetite with foods of an eventempered flavour and then gradually increase in intensity. For this evening’s meal, Lij suggested to start with the scallops and quinoa, then introduce the palate to more spice with the shrimp. He likes dishes that embrace the simplicity and originality of its ingredients. Having worked and traveled extensively, Lij references the ability for high-end restaurants to offer gourmet

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dishes while using and supporting Jamaican farmers and producers. As a lover of Jamaica’s iconic scotch bonnet pepper and an advocate for 100% local produce, Lij favours green scotch bonnet, which he suggests has a more intense flavor than the red or yellow variety of the beloved spice. Add that to the ginger and you get a super spicy combination, which is gently tempered by the avocado and then paired with the watermelon for further spice abating. The refreshing coolness in your mouth readies the palate for the next set of flavours as the end of one course gives way to another. Lij is admittedly excited when presented with challenges. “I

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Your Trusted Caribbean Seafood Supplier .

The largest variety of fresh quality Seafood from across the globe, right to your table.

@rainforestseafoods

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Smoked Marlin and Roasted Red Beets with Orange, Granny Smith Apple

Breast of Chicken and Potato Gnocchi with Pimento Berries and Crumble, Mixed Mustard Greens

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like to take run-of-the-mill stuff, rethink and re-invent.” And having honed his craft in the global melting pot that is Dubai, Lij has perfected the art of pleasing varied cultural appreciations. For him, it’s knowing exactly how much spice to add or how long to marinate – knowing that guest palates differ depending on where they’re from. Here is where both skill and experience take centre stage and become valuable in multicultural environments such as Jamaica’s tourism industry. Today Lij heads the culinary team at Sandals Royal Plantation – Ocho Rios, widely known as the hotel chain’s most premium property. Lij is ‘at home’ here, and brings to the table a high level of comfort and an intricate knowledge of thinking beyond the traditional and the expected, to give innovation and the extraordinary.

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INDULGING WITH...

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"After you have been taught the rules you must break them.

THAT IS THE ONLY WAY TO STAND OUT IN THE CROWD. " .

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Chef Colin Hylton BY MICHELLE GORDON • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Entertaining is an art that requires a flawless balance of the components needed to satisfy the soul of the enthusiast. The canvas allows for effective flow and ebb of the brush. The proper brushes ensure that the artist conveys his message with precision and detail and the paint delivers the message through the final work of art viewed by the art lover. For the venerable chef Colin Hylton, the kitchen and dining area are his canvas. The brushes are his kitchen tools, the paint is his ingredients and the experience presented is his work of art.

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e is one of Jamaica’s most celebrated chefs; confident in his craft and unapologetic about his style. Everything has to be right for Colin. The temperature of the food, the position of the plating, lighting in the room to the fabric design on the chairs – no element is spared his critical eye. Your dining experience with Colin considers all aspects of what a dining experience should be. And then some! I mean really…who has a dining room in their bedroom? Colin has. If you’ve ever dined with Colin, whether in one of his restaurants of old, or in the space of his private dining affairs, you will understand the magic that ensues when he decides to serve. “People think I’m extravagant, but I really am not; I simply love sharing the bounty,” he smiles coyly. Colin is a perfectionist,

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who brings to the table an insatiable appetite for a fusion of culture, class and excellence. For the past 30 years, Colin has sated the appetites of global food aficionados with creative and ambrosial feasts. Presently, Colin is sharing more than just the bounty of his tasty spreads. He is one of Jamaica’s most sought-after consultancy chefs offering training and advice to hoteliers, restaurateurs and colleagues who stand to gain unassailable counsel from Chef Hylton. He is very proud of where he is today, noting that between his consults and private events, he is even busier today than when he had his brick & mortar restaurants. I sit with Colin long enough to enjoy the Pumpkin Roulade and fresh Blue Mountain coffee that he had so kindly prepared.

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What inspires Colin Hylton?

Other cultures inspire me. It’s all about the spicing of their food. Most cuisines have similar methods of cooking. We all steam, roast, fry, barbecue and bake, but it's really the spicing that separates them.

Which chef has had the most influence on you?

Without a doubt Jean-Georges Vongerichten. My first visit to Vong in the mid eighties transformed my life. He threw caution to the wind and gave a multicultural experience. I can still recall a fabulous luncheon with Norma Shirley at another of his restaurants in New York called Jean Georges. His Roasted Squash with Olives blew my mind! .

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You can be credited with revolutionizing Kingston’s fine-dining scene in the early 2000’s. What were the key factors that created this social change?

Travel and the Food Network are integral to this change. Disposable income for many was also much more liquid and chefs were akin to rock star gods. I became one of the original “celebrity chefs” where the largerthan-life style coalesced with the cuisine. People were looking beyond the basics and wanted a more “colourful” experience when dining out.

On your downtime, it is rumoured that you generously cook for friends and family. What is your favourite meal to prepare when company is coming over?

My Thai-Style Chicken & Pig’s Tail is always requested to the point where I’m like “really guys unnu nuh tyad a it?” Oxtail Lasagne is also a favourite and “Run-dung” Codfish with Fava Beans.

Do you think being a great chef is a natural talent, or is it something one can learn?

It is a God given talent that the receivers of this gift hold dear to themselves. Well, at least I do. I can taste in my head some of the zany combinations even before execution. I tell all young chefs the same thing. After you have been taught the rules you must break them. That is the only way to stand out in the crowd. My young friend Brian Lumley is testament to this. His sojourn to Qatar will only strengthen this notion.

What is the most adventurous meal you’ve ever eaten?

I will confess I have travelled to a certain part of the world where dogs and cats are staples to some menus. I ate both willingly and without incident. In Norway, I had Reindeer Sashimi; which was incredible, however, I could not find the courage to swallow the Roasted Whale that was offered. It had a strange, rank odour and texture that led me to put my fork down.

What is the one food that you absolutely hate? Okra and Snails.

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Where do you see dining in Jamaica in the next 10 years?

Hopefully more evolved and welcoming to change. We are now in a backlash and a rut, as diners no longer require restaurants to be adventurous. Somehow we have retreated to a safe zone. It’s very demoralizing to the likes of mad-cap me, but I’m trying to encourage the next generation of chefs to push the envelope.

How has Colin evolved over the years?

I’ve gotten better at reinterpreting familiar indigenous ingredients. In an odd way I have nothing to prove other than sticking to my guns of inclusiveness. This will never abate as creative souls get bored and must feed the greedy beast of creativity.

You have an unspoken love for books. (Every square inch of his home is decorated with books of all genres). When will we see one authored by Colin Hylton? Every year I’m pressured to do a book. It takes a laser sharp focus to do that and a big chunk of time. The ideas and recipes are there, I just need to get off the treadmill for a bit. Hopefully the book will happen before I croak. It better!

What is your greatest indulgence?

Leisure. It’s the ultimate luxury in our modern over-exposed and chaotic existence. Time with friends is invaluable.

What advice would you have for a young chef aspiring to walk your culinary journey? Be fearless.

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Sweet Potato Roulade with Almond Praline .

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BY CHEF COLIN HYLTON

Plain Sponge (Oven 400°) Ingredients: » 6 eggs » 1 egg white » 5 ozs white sugar » ½ tsp salt » 6 ozs cake flour » 2½ ozs melted unsalted butter Method:

flour and line 1oneGrease, (1) 12”x 9” rectangular tin

Put first four 2ingredients in the top of

double boiler and heat until hot whipping constantly

to cake mixer 3andTransfer beat until fluffy & light

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5 Fold in melted Butter into pan. Bake 6aboutPour15-20 mins allow to cool

Sweet Potato Filling Ingredients: » 2 lbs Orange Sweet Potato peeled and cubed » ½ cup Sugar » 1 tsp Ginger Powder » 1 tsp Cinnamon » ½ tsp All Spice » ½ tsp Cardamom » 2 ozs unsalted Butter » ½ cup Heavy Cream » ¼ cup Rum Method:

together first seven 1(7) Mix ingredients and place on a cookie sheet. Cover with foil

in a 350° oven and 2roastPlace for 35-40

Uncover and roast for 3another 15 mins or until fork tender

slightly then mash 4withCool the ½ cup of Cream and ¼ cup Rum

Almond Praline Ingredients: » ¾ cup granulated Sugar » ¼ cup blanched Almonds » Pinch of Cream of Tartar Oil Method:

melt sugar until 1amberGently in colour Stir in Almonds and 2Cream of Tartar

Pour out onto an oiled 3cutting board. Allow to cool then chop to use

Assembly Place sponge cake on 1a slightly damp tea towel

with longer side facing you Spread ¾ of Sweet 2Potato Filling all over

Cake. Sprinkle half of chopped Praline over the Sweet Potato Filling reserving the rest for late night snacking or otherwise. Roll up Cake leaving seam side down in plastic and 3chillWrap for at least 4-6 hrs

from fridge. 4TakeRemove off plastic and place

on a platter then cover with the remaining filling which is now serving double duty as frosting. Keep Cake refrigerated

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How To Make Our Cover .

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Christina Simonitsch’s Vanil a Sugar Palmiers

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You’ve read about Christina’s mastery in the kitchen on page 11. She’s a gifted baker and chef who is well-known for the attention she devotes to creating her spmealsreads. Her vanilla sugar palmiers may just be the lightest, flakiest and tastiest we’ve ever had. According to Christina, recreating this delectable treat at home is as easy as 1-2-3. Save for her prized puff pastry – which she painstakingly makes from scratch, Christina is happy to share the secret to her version of this classic French pastry.

Mak$ 24 P'mi( Ingredients » » » »

60g granulated sugar 10g vanilla sugar 4g teaspoon kosher salt 1 sheet puff pastry 10” x 15”

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Directions

1 Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. 2 Combine the sugar and kosher salt. sugar/salt mixture on sheet of puff pastry - spreading it evenly. 3ThisPour is not about sprinkling, it’s about an even covering of sugar. the sides of the square towards the center so they go halfway 4to theFoldmiddle. Fold them again so the two folds meet exactly at the

middle of the dough. Then fold one half over the other half as though closing a book.

to brush with egg wash or water and press together. You 5willImportant have 6 layers.

Slice the dough into 1/2” slices and place the slices, cut side up, on 6baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Slice and arrange on baking sheets lined with parchment.

the cookies for 6 minutes until caramelized and brown on 7the Bake bottom, then turn with a spatula and bake another 3 to 5 minutes, until caramelized on the other side.

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Profile for Indulge Magazine

Indulge Issue 7 - INDULGE IN YOU  

INDULGE IN YOU (Indulge Issue 7) INDULGE the Magazine, is a celebration of Jamaica's culinary landscape. Enjoy issue 7 - Taste is everything...

Indulge Issue 7 - INDULGE IN YOU  

INDULGE IN YOU (Indulge Issue 7) INDULGE the Magazine, is a celebration of Jamaica's culinary landscape. Enjoy issue 7 - Taste is everything...

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