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Volume I, Issue 2 2014

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Dine & Wine Jamaica Style Gourmet Fitness

with Christian Sweeney

Breakfast in Bed Indulging

with the Rousseau Sisters

'Barra' Time Flour Power


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Taste Is Everything

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CONTENTS


EAT.

DRINK.

LIVE.

LOVE.

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14. How to Make

60. Bushbar at

78. Top 10 Kitchen

Our Cover

Gee Jam

Game Changers

16. Chef Check:

62. Recipes: Miami

80. Pass the Dutchie

Gourmet Fitness with Christian Sweeney

Vice and Wall Banger 64. Cheers to Bartending with Brad Kaplan

Woody’s Burgers

67. Shaken, Not Stirred

Indulgence With Andrew Kaplan

20. Recipe: Singapore Brown Noodles with Ginger Sesame Roasted Chicken

22. An Islander’s Oasis

24. R.S.V.P. The Chef’s Table at Sunset on the Beach

68. The Perfect Bloody Mary

70. Smart Eggs Spiced Rum Crème

72. Decanted: Lapostolle Winery

84. Road Trip: 86. My Jamaican

90. Kitchen Aid: The Heart of Our Home

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96. Breakfast in Bed 98. Indulging With Suzanne & Michelle Rousseau

108. Recipe: Roasted Pumpkin and Figs with Tahini Lime Drizzle and Chadon Beni Oil

110. Recipe: Smoked Marlin & Cream Cheese with Onion Pickle

112. Top 10 Dinnertime Playlists

28. Copperwood

113. Caribbean

Road Hog

Casseroles

30. Moonhill Pizza Magic

36. Flour Power 40. 'Barra' Time 44. Indulge Without the Bulge

48. Dine & Wine Island Style

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IMPORTED FROM “COUNTRY” If you're interested in knowing where your food comes from... If you believe in feeding your loved ones only safe foods and... If your health is important to you, it's our pleasure to meet you. We are Copperwood Pork - The Premium Jamaican Pork

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LEANER. CLEANER. MORE TENDER!


Publisher's Note

Editor In Chief

Michelle Gordon  What a summer it was!

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o say that we are humbled by the overwhelming response to the first issue of Indulge would be an understatement. The positive feedback to the magazine has been incredible and on behalf of the team, I say thank you to those who reached out. We continue to be fascinated with the Jamaican culinary scene. I guess when you put yourself out there and share a little bit of who you are, people are willing to do the same, and great ideas and stories continue to come at us from all angles. So before we’ve even completed the second edition, I’m excited about the third and fourth and... You get the point. My favorite story this time around reminds me of the beauty of living on an island. To see a fisherman display his catch on the side of the road may seem strange to visiting tourists, but for us, it’s just life in the tropics. The ability to buy local, fresh seafood is something we are grateful for. Check out our  ‘Barra’ Time story on page 40.  Unfortunately, another part of life here in the tropics can be unpredictable weather patterns. This summer brought about the worst drought our country has seen in a very long time, affecting the livelihood of thousands of farmers across the island. It’s hard to think of life without the fruits, vegetables, spices and meats that these farmers produce. So the next time you’re shopping for groceries, I hope you can understand why our local produce is a little more expensive at this time, and still continue to support our local industries. Sometimes spending a little more can be the difference between an average and an extraordinary meal. The addition of even a single element has the capacity to completely delight your senses. A fine wine, for example, can make or break a meal. Check out our Dine and Wine Island Style story on page 48 and transform an ordinary Jamaican meal into a spectacular experience. We encourage you to take the time to enjoy every last bite and every last sip of your meals. Take the time to INDULGE! Happy Reading! - Matthew Lyn, CB Group

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Photography Director

Dwayne Watkins

Art Director & Layout Designer

Dwayne Jureidini Creative Consultant

Kimberley Dunkley-Mullings Stylist

Aiesha Panton • Contributors

Ava Gardener Chelsea Taylor Debra Taylor Monique Upton Patrice Wilson-McHugh Alianna Bovell Kimberley Small Natalie Nash Paula-Ann Webber Andrew Kaplan .

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Copy Editor

Danielle Leyow Contributing Photographers

Marc Evans Matt Wilson Galdones Photography • Special Thanks To:

Michele Williams Nasma Chin Jhennelle Townsend Printed in Jamaica by

Pear Tree Press Telephone: (876) 926-5859 Copyright © 2014 CB Foods Limited. All rights reserved. All material in this magazine may not be reproduced, displayed, modified or distributed without the express prior written permission of CB Foods Limited. Taste Is Everything INDULGE

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Publisher's Note

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his year has been a wonderful whirlwind, two issues down and knee deep into the third I keep wondering if there could possibly be enough unique, new and Indulgent ideas to keep things exciting. Instead we have the hard task of selecting what articles to focus on in the next issue and enough ideas to fill another five. Our beautiful island is amazing, I am learning so much on this adventure that I can’t believe that there are so many things I did not know about this place we call home. You will devour the articles in this issue! I have so many favorites it’s impossible for me to choose just one. Dine & Wine Island Style is right up my street; surprise, surprise! Fact: Wine makes food better and food makes wine better. Even a patty you ask? Absolutely! A few years ago while having a patty with our Marketing Manager of Wines, Debra Taylor, she poured two glasses of Nottage Hill Chardonnay. My view on food and wine changed that day. Her philosophy, (and one I subscribe to wholly), is that no matter what the meal is, no matter how simple, you should sit back, relax and enjoy it; wine makes it more enjoyable. Our new feature entitled My Jamaican Indulgence makes me so proud to be Jamaican, again. Andrew Kaplan, right-hand man to international cooking sensation Rachael Ray, shares his views on Jamaica. What Andrew feels is representative of what so many of us love about our island; and it’s what keeps our honorary Jamaicans coming back over and over again, that makes my heart burst with pride. Segue from our honourary Jamaicans, to the bountiful talent of our homegrown Jamaicans that serve to constantly remind us that while we may not be “First World”, we are most definitely “First Class”. This year has been full of surprises, all good. 2015 Bring it on!

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- Tania McConnell, Select Brands

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How to Make Our Cover

CHEF: MICHELE S. WILLIAMS COVER STYLING: AIESHA PANTON PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Ackee & Saltfish Travel the length and breadth of our island and you’ll find our national dish, ackee and saltfish, as the meal of choice for Jamaicans from all walks of life. Ackee is a fruit that’s neither sweet nor savoury and has the tendency to absorb the flavour of its partner food. When combined with one of the sea’s saltiest swimmers, Jamaica’s national dish provides an impeccable yin and yang of food flavours which can be enjoyed at just about any time of day.

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lthough absolutely delicious on it’s own, pairing a light alcoholic beverage with your ackee and saltfish may add some extra pep to your meal. Be sure to check out our Dine & Wine feature on page 48 where we pair traditional Jamaican meals with the perfect wine to take your meal from tasty to tantalizing! Why not pop the cork of your favourite sparkling wine! Add some freshly-squeezed OJ and start your day off with ackee

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and saltfish as a tasty breakfast dish. We recommend Lanson Champagne or Santa Margharita Prosecco for a truly decadent mimosa. It’s a light and refreshing way to start a stress-free day. Give it a try! When having ackee and saltfish as an evening meal, a glass of sauvignon blanc or chardonnay adds a bit more ‘weight’ to this relatively light meal, and is sure to excite your taste buds for more.”

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What you’ll need:

Serves 3-4 Persons

»» ½ lb Saltfish »» 1 Dozen Ackee »» (freshly picked or 2 cans drained) »» 2-3 Plummy tomatoes (diced) »» 1 Medium onion (diced or sliced) »» 1-2 Stalks scallion

»» 2 -3 Cloves chopped garlic »» 1 small green sweet pepper (diced) »» All Purpose Seasoning Powder (to taste ) »» ½ Tsp Garlic Powder »» Fresh Thyme »» Scotch Bonnet Pepper

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(whole pepper pierced with a fork or ¼ tsp chopped) »» Cracked black pepper to taste »» 1-2 Tbsp oil »» ¼ Cup water

Method: Prepare saltfish for cooking by boiling in a pot of water 01 twice and rinsing in cold water. Drain and set aside to cool; remove skin and all bones if not boneless.

Prepare the ackee for cooking by removing the yellow fruit 02 "pod” from the shell. Take out the black seeds and pink lining from flesh of the ackee. Rinse ackee and add to a medium pot of salted boiling water, cooking for 10-15 minutes or until tender (not soft). Drain and set aside.

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Add 2 tablespoons oil to a medium pan or Dutch pot.

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On medium heat, saute the onion, garlic, tomatoes and sweet peppers for a few minutes. Add the saltfish for about 2 -3 minutes and gently stir in the cooked ackee. Season to taste with black pepper, Scotch Bonnet pepper, all purpose seasoning, scallion, thyme, ¼ cup water if needed and allow to simmer on low heat for a few minutes.

Presentation: Place cooked ackee and saltfish on large oval 04 platter or bowl. Garnish with a whole Scotch Bonnet pepper and chopped scallion.

Michele S. Williams • Executive Chef • Moveable Feast Caterers

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Chef Check

With Christian Sweeney .

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There’s a new kid on the foodie block. Well, sort of.  He’s not new, but he’s doing something new. Christian Sweeney is a well-known and respected chef in the industry with more than 13 years of cooking experience under his belt. Most recently, as the proprietor of the much-loved Epic Eats, Christian became Kingston’s go-to-guy for gourmet-styled lunches that satisfied customers with the perfect combination of delicious meals at the right price. But ever the astute businessman, Christian saw the need for a change: a lifestyle change, and is now giving us a new way to enjoy the foods that we love to indulge in. A new and healthier way to eat, every day.

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BREADFRUIT SALAD WITH CAPERS AND FETA CHEESE

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nter Gourmet Fitness: a simple, affordable and accessible option for daily dining. It offers clients a full portion-control meal service, using healthy ingredients such as lean cuts of meat, whole grains and fresh produce, in addition to healthy cooking methods in order to better facilitate a healthy lifestyle and overall better wellbeing. “We never use deep fat frying or fatty pieces of meat in our meals,” explains Christian – whose vision for Gourmet Fitness embraces a fusion of fabulous foods and fit living.  “Everyone is in search of a healthy lifestyle at a time when food, and eating, has become such a high-style, social affair.  Food is extremely

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fashionable, and for those of us who eat out often, it really is not sustainable to do so on a regular basis and still remain healthy.” You can indulge in Gourmet Fitness meals everyday without the guilt. “Based on past restaurant experience and a whole lot of nutrition research, we are utilising healthier practices that should be adopted into our lifestyles.” Gourmet Fitness offers an expansive menu, and Christian remains true to his belief that the feast begins with the eyes. As a trained Food Stylist, he ensures that all meals remain visually appealing while being deliciously appetizing.  “The eyes are the windows to the soul-food,” he laughs.

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SRIRACHA LIME CHICKEN WITH BLACK BEAN AND BROWN RICE PARFAIT

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ourmet Fitness offers lunch and dinner, Mondays to Fridays, and will soon expand to offer breakfast and weekend meals. The menu for the upcoming week is posted each Saturday and meals for the entire week may be ordered using a free online account. Registration is simple, and once you create your private online account, it tracks your caloric and nutritional history from the first meal you order. “Portions are controlled so you never over-eat. Every time you buy a meal, it’s the same amount of starch and the same amount of protein, and you get larger portions of vegetables.” Ordering can

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be done online at  www.gourmetfitnessja.com or by phone and email. Meals are made fresh and delivered to your home or office. So whether you’re a fitness buff or if you’re simply interested in developing and maintaining wholesome and healthy eating habits, give Gourmet Fitness a try. All practices are based on a 2000-calorie diet and special needs and diabetic clients are welcome. Contact Executive Chef Christian Sweeney at Fuzion Foodservice (c) (876) 815-6131 (o) (876) 924-6131

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SINGAPORE BROWN NOODLES WITH GINGER SESAME ROASTED CHICKEN

CHEF: CHRISTIAN SWEENEY STYLING: CHRISTIAN SWEENEY • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

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Serves 6-8 Persons You Will Need: »» 1/4 pound brown rice vermacelli (soba noodles are also suitable) »» 4 boneless skinless Caribbean Broilers chicken breasts »» 2 cups bean sprouts »» 1 red bell pepper julienned »» 1 yellow bell pepper julienned  »» 1/4 lb green beans sliced »» 1/4 lb sugar snaps or snow peas picked

You Will Need:

»» 2 carrots julienned »» 2 scallions sliced »» 3 tsp minced ginger »» 1/4 cup water or chicken broth »» 1/2 tsp soft brown sugar »» 1/2 tsp salt »» 1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper »» 2 tbsp canola oil »» 1 1/2 tbsp curry powder

GINGER SESAME GLAZE

»» 1 tbsp sesame oil »» 3 tbsp light soy sauce  »» 1/2 tsp minced ginger

»» 1 tsp sugar  »» 1 tsp sesame seeds for garnish 

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Method of Preparation Stir-fry the vegetables, beginning with 01 Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F 08 the carrots. Add the bell peppers then the Prepare the rice noodles based on specific green beans and sugar snaps. Stir in the bean 02 instructions on the packaging. Drain, set aside sprouts. Stir-fry for about 20 seconds and then and oil lightly

stir in the green onions

oil. Place in oven and roast for 15 to 20 mins

the sauce

minutes or until slightly reduced

the seasoning , adding more sugar, salt, pepper or curry powder as desired

Season chicken breasts lightly with salt 03 09 Pour the sauce over the vegetables, tossing and pepper and glaze slightly with sesame the ingredients so that they are absorbed with In a medium saucepan mix glaze 04 10 Add a bit more water or chicken broth if ingredients together and simmer for 10 the mixture becomes too dry. Taste and adjust When breasts come out of the oven, using 05 a pastry brush glaze the breasts generously.

Prepare the sauce by whisking together 06 the water or chicken broth with the brown sugar and salt and pepper. Set aside

11 Cook until the sauce is absorbed Place mixture in a serving dish or place 12 sliced chicken over the noodles. Garnish with sesame seeds

Heat the 2 tbsp of canola oil in the wok. Serve hot 07 13 When the oil is hot, add the curry powder. Stir-fry for about 30 seconds, then add the ginger and stir-fry until the ginger is aromatic.

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Scotch bonnet peppers can be added to this recipe to kick it up a couple notches if you wish. Enjoy!

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An Islander’s Oasis

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BY ALLIANA BOVELL

t’s October in London, and that means rain. Actually, if it’s any month in London that means rain. Londoners casually slip on their ‘wellies’ and rain jackets, not too saddened to be puddle-hopping. However, for all islanders alike living here, this is a time of misery and utter melancholy; rather than puddle-hopping, we would prefer to be boat-hopping at Maiden Cay (down the Islands, or any other island’s equivalent) on a sunny Sunday. But with a splash of water from a big red bus (not to be mistaken with a red canoe) that has just driven past, those daydreams are quickly washed away, along with everything else holding any resemblance to summer and sunshine. That was true until what seemed like a mirage appeared while walking along All Saints Road in Notting Hill on a particularly rainy Sunday afternoon.  Through the rain and grey skies, the bright yellow and white striped awnings seemed almost out of place. As you walk through the doors leading to The Rum Kitchen, the wellies start to feel like a pair of Havaianas, and the rain jacket is only a towel loosely hanging off your shoulders. The colouful lights and painted planks of wood on the walls are nothing short of a street-side shack straight out of Jamaica. But, for the skeptics who question the authenticity of a little colour on the walls and a few Bob Marley tunes playing in the background, it is the Menu stacked with true yard dishes, from Curried Mutton to Saltfish Fritters, along with the bar shelf stocked with bottles of Wray & Nephew’s Overproof Rum, that make you an avid believer in this true islander’s oasis.

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We went all out, and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves; a group of Jamaicans, all born and grown on the beautiful island herself. So let there be no mistake about whether we know what a real home-cooked meal is supposed to taste like. We Came. We Ate. We Indulged.

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2 Our Meal

3 The Rum Kitchen is a Caribbeaninspired beach shack restaurant and cocktail bar with two locations nestled in Soho & Notting hill. The spaces showcase the vibrant spirit of the West Indies and have hidden cellars housing over 100 varieties of rum. 6-8 All Saints Road, London (Notting Hill location) 1st Floor, Kingly Court, London (Soho location)

1. Saltfish Fritters 2. Jerk Fried Chicken Burger (served with scotch bonnet garlic mayo, and a side order of sweet potato fries) 3. Jerk Chicken Supreme - Grilled breast, sweet potato, rice & peas, sautéed Callaloo and Spinach, with jerk gravy. 

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The Chef’s Table at Sunset at the Palms, Negril

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Named by Trip Advisor as one of the top ten most romantic resorts in the Caribbean, Sunset at the Palms tops our list as one of the most unique and romantic settings for an incomparable sitting at The Chef’s Table. Traditionally, a chef’s table is a distinctive table often located in the kitchen of a restaurant and reserved for VIPs and special guests. Patrons have the honour of enjoying a themed tasting menu prepared and served by the head chef.

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t Sunset at the Palms however, you’re not seated at the kitchen counter. Instead, you’re ensconced amongst the lush greenery of a tropical forest, hedged by warm tiki lights and swaying to the beat of island idyllic rhythms. Yet…you’re still a stone’s throw away from two miles of white, sandy beach, hailed as the most blissful beach in Jamaica. While your chefs are busy preparing your meals, you are free to enjoy exquisite wines, poured by your personal table waiters for the evening. With a maximum seating of 3 tables with 8 persons at each, this intimate unique dining experience features a daily menu of chef ’s inspiration and creations. Now entering its eleventh month, The Chef ’s Table at Sunset at the Palms is a reservation-only offering to diners, who often join a soldout guest list. It’s presented 3 nights each week (Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays) and features authentic local cuisines with a Mediterranean twist. All produce used is from their gardens. Sunset at the Palms is an adults only all-inclusive resort, which features a trendy, new design, sumptuously appointed guestrooms, new amenities and lush landscaping. All guestrooms are “treehouse-style” and stand amidst a ten-acre tropical garden, praised by Architectural Digest. For Reservations call Sunset at the Palms 1-876-957-5350 www.sunsetresortsjamaica.com

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The Road Hog

PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

Revolutionising food and creating new and exciting ways of preparing our favourite meals is vital to improving Jamaica’s culinary landscape. Food is community; food is a language that crosses boundaries, the centre of a table that brings us together. Innovating not just how we cook, but how we experience food, can do amazing things, and it is a devotion to this experience of food that led to the launch of The Road Hog by Copperwood Pork. .

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he Road Hog is a pit master’s dream, and its commanding appearance is truly a functional work of art. Equipped with a mini-fridge for chilling beer on a hot day, a working sink, and a generator big enough to power your music and get the vibe going while you grill, this smoker is a head-turner wherever it goes. This one-of-a-kind mobile smoker is a fusion of the traditional and unconventional; built by Chin’s Construction, it features a three-chamber (vertical and horizontal) cast-iron hybrid grill on an imposing 15-foot, black and stainless steel frame. Of course the Road

Hog could cook anything, but given it’s the Copperwood Road Hog, it only eats pork, and it can prepare up to 400lbs of it. It’s of 100 per cent local design, was built to completion in six months, and is what they call in the business a ‘double pass smoker’. The Road Hog is completely self-contained and uses a unique smoker design to maximise its efficiency: the heat and smoke flow through a portal into the cook chamber where they circulate around the food and exit through the chimney. This flow of hot air and wood smoke is one of the defining features of the offset smoker, producing ribs and pork shoulders with deep red smoke rings and briskets

with exceptionally crisp crust. To help bring out the meat’s natural flavour, the cooking process starts with the meat smoking, allowing the fragrant spiced smoke, coming from the coal and wood mixture, to permeate the pork, resulting in a more tender and flavourful meat. The road hog is fed a variety of woods depending on the desired flavour and the pork can then be dipped in a special sauce of choice and grilled until the characteristic char marks appear. Interested in having The Road Hog at your event? Email Copperwood Brand Manager Tina Hamilton at Tina. Hamilton@mycbgroup.com

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Moon Hil Magic “When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie….that’s amore. When the world seems to shine like you’ve had too much wine, that’s amore...”. I think if Dean Martin sang this song with actual pizza in mind, the Pizza by Moonlight at Moon Hill could easily have been his inspiration. It’s a fall-in-love kind of place; a perfect first-date, relaxing, get-to-know-you kind of place, where your only competition for attention is the moon…but I digress, let’s get back to the pizza. They say imitation is the greatest from of flattery. If that’s the case, then the pizza may be the most flattered food in life! If you’re a pizza lover, and feel like taking a trip to the home of pizza in Naples, Italy, then head up to Jack’s Hill in Kingston, Jamaica for the next best thing – a little pizza magic at Moon Hill. .

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M IT’S AN ECLECTIC BLEND OF

Local and Spanish ” Influence

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oon Hill has taken the simple concept of easy dining and made it their trademark. For pizzalovers, this concept is truly magical. Instead of ordering and eating one type of pizza, you get to enjoy from a selection of different pizzas, all night, for one price – and that also includes delectable appetisers like Caprese salad, Chick Pea Empanadas, Tuna Empanadas, Ham and Chicken Croquettes, Steak Quesadillas and Stamp & Go. It’s an eclectic blend of local and Spanish influence, paying homage to owner Oliver Hill’s new homeland Jamaica, and his Spanish origin. Then comes the pizza. Guests are treated to a variety of pizzas, from which they choose by the slice throughout the evening as they come hot out of the oven. All are authentically tasty and worthy of mention, but with a story rooted in the annals of pizza history, Moon Hill’s Margherita pizza wins every time. The Margherita pizza was so named in honour of the wife of King Umberto I, who visited Naples in 1886. Royal Chef Raffaele Esposito created the now trademarked pizza, representing the colours of the Italian flag using tomatoes for red, mozzarella

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cheese for white and basil for green. Pizza makers in Naples, who are credited with inventing pizza, have now received the honour of ‘official EU protected status’ as a mark of distinguishing their Neopolitan pizzas as ‘the real deal’. While a small pizza kitchen nestled in the hills of Kingston, Jamaica may be a tad different from its counterpart in Naples, the homemade pizza pies are nothing short of delicious. With fresh local ingredients and potted homegrown herbs, Moon Hill’s pizzas bring a distinct island flavour to the Italian table. Specialty toppings such as smoked marlin, ackee, shrimp and lobster create a burst of flavour with Chef Jermaine Baker’s special sauce. “Perfection is all in the details of flavour combinations and ratios,” explains the chef, who takes great pride in knowing that his culinary masterpieces have become

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a Wednesday night beacon to genuine foodies and pizza-lovers across Kingston. With an all-inclusive charge of J$1000 (for appetisers and pizza only), there simply is no better deal for great-tasting pizza. To great food, add an atmosphere under the stars (and moon no doubt), that seems to strip away the weight of a just-concluded hump day and re-ignite you for the rest of the week ahead. Whether you’re out for a romantic date, or a lyme with friends, pizza by moonlight is an ideal option for a great time. You can’t just show though. Call ahead and reserve your spot, mark it on your calendar, and go fall in love with pizza, slice by slice, over and over again. For reservations: Email events@Moon Hilljamaica.com Call 294-3615 or 620-8259

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BY CHELSEA TAYLOR

As Caribbean people, we love a dumpling; fry it, boil it, spin it, it nuh matta; we just love it. Flour is an ubiquitous ingredient in our local cuisine as well as cuisine around the world. We indulge in breads, dumplings, festival, fried foods, fritters, cookies, bun and other pastries. For the most part, our flour of choice in Jamaica is the classic white flour or all-purpose flour. It’s relatively inexpensive and completely filling, making it a staple, in various forms, at many dining tables across the Caribbean. ISSUE 2 • 2014

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A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE DOES NOT NECESSARILY MEAN THAT WE HAVE TO

sever all ties with our local ” traditions.

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ith the recent increase of persons seeking healthy lifestyles, many will argue that although flour is delicious, it may not be the healthiest source of starch in our diets.  After removing the bran, many nutrients are lost from what is commonly known as all-purpose flour, and many of us end up cutting out flour-based foods altogether. However, white flour is not the be-all and end-all to our diet. There is a plethora of healthier and gluten-free alternatives to white flour. Here are a few. .

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Almond Flour Made from ground almond, almond flour is perfect for coating chicken, fish or meatballs; even crab cakes. Almond flour can be used in any situation that you would use bread crumbs. Use it to  replace up to one-fourth of the white flour in cakes, muffins, pancakes, and cookies. Almond flour is also a good source of vitamin E, protein, monounsaturated fats and antioxidants.  This variety of flour also contains high amounts of calcium, iron, and dietary fiber; simple everyday nutrients that people sometimes lack.

Soy Flour Made from ground soybeans, soy flour delivers calcium, fiber, and more than triple the protein of white flour. Soy flour is best used for thickening sauces, gravies, or soups, or swapping in (up to one-third the amount) for white flour in non-yeasted recipes.

Quinoa Flour Quinoa was a staple food for the South American Indians living in the high altitudes of the Andes Mountains and was recognized for its superior nutritional qualities. The flour is made from first baking quinoa then grinding it into a fine powder. It is best used for the same purposes as all purpose flour.

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Barley Flour

Made by grounding whole barley wheat, this is best used to make pancakes, biscuits, and breads, and can be used as a replacement for white flour.

Bun

Spelt Flour Spelt flour has a slightly sweet, nutty taste and bakes up lighter and softer than  regular flour. Spelt flour is best used for baked goods, pizza crusts, and breads. Unlike some other flours (soy, quinoa), spelt can be substituted for white flour using a one-to-one ratio without changing the consistency of the end product.

Cassava Flour Cassava flour is made by cooking, drying and grinding cassava root into a fine powder. Cassava in its pre-made form can be used as a healthy substitute for bread. It is best used for baked goods such as cookies, breads, and muffins and can also be used to thicken sauces and anything else in which you would use traditional all-purpose flour. A healthier lifestyle does not necessarily mean that we have to sever all ties with our local traditions. For the sake of being health conscious, with a few twists and turns here, and a little subtraction and addition there, you can still indulge in all baked goodies and comfort foods that you grew up on and loved. This shortlist of alternative flours provides you with viable and tasty options to keep on cooking up a storm of cookies, cakes, dumplings and more! When using alternative flours, be conscious and take the time to research the ratio necessary to successfully replace white flour in order to perfect your new recipes. With that done, your culinary audience will likely not even notice a change in your dining delights!

Fritters

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Festival

Bammies

Whole Wheat Bread

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Fried Dumplings

Grotto

A selection of flour-based Jamaican favourites ISSUE 2 • 2014

Hardough Bread

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‘BARRA’ TIME

One of the things I love most about Jamaica is the ease with which we can get things done. (Not to be confused with the ease that can frustrate the hell out of you. But that’s another story…) The ease to which I refer is the one that says “no problem mon”, and literally means that “everyting aw-right”. That would be the same ease that caused an eleven pound barracuda, seasoned to perfection, to end up on a roadside grill, all in under an hour.

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he impromptu lunch started with a simple statement. “I wonder what kind of fish that is…” I didn’t develop my love for fish until I was an adult preparing my meals on my own. After a few episodes in the kitchen, I quickly learned that the ‘less is more’ principle also applies to the seafood we enjoy; after all, it comes with a naturally delicious flavour provided by the ocean. The truth is I never had the time or the aptitude for meal prep (as recommended by all the nutritionists), so I always winged it, and I found that fish and other foods from the sea were always responsive to my last-minute seasoning, no matter how sudden the process. So call me a connoisseur of convenience, the ‘ease’ of preparing fish had me hooked from the get-go!

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‘BARRA’ TIME

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y question to the fish vendor was a genuine one since I’m not very familiar with the variety of fish that our island is blessed to have. “Barracuda dis baby, Barracuda.” Preparations were completed and followed immediately by the most lively lecture I can ever recall receiving. “Dis is di most (h)angriest, most crossest, most miserable fish in di sea.” “Really?” I was truly puzzled. “Not even shark wicked suh!” With his animation adding validity to the very sharp teeth I was looking at, the popular Jamaican term “likkle but tallawah" came to mind. I selected an 11 lb beauty. Sleek and slender, and every bit deserving of the reputation of being one of the fastest swimmers in the sea. Poisonous? “No problem man”: demonstrating that the worldrenowned term is not just reserved for tourists. “If it have een poison, den no ants naah come roun’ it.” Simple. It may not be a scientific strategy, but countless fishermen the world over use and abide by the principle that if insects aren’t attracted to the fish then something must be wrong with it. I chose the smallest of the three fish that were ready for sale – I wasn’t sure I was going to like it, so decided to be as conservative

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as possible. “Dem barra here small! You waan si when we ketch di big one dem…tall like me, but dem likkle one here eat good!” I was impressed with the skill and precision that it took to transform my upcoming lunch from the almost scary-looking sea creature that hung before me, to the glistening work of art that lay on the metal table; bottle-cap scaled, gutted and evenly sliced…just for me. Our fisherman continued to thrill us with stories, explaining that smaller barracuda generally presented less of a threat of poisoning - they’re smaller and they’ve had less exposure to harmful sources simply because of their age. Barracuda is widely known as a poisonous fish that can cause marine toxic illnesses such as ciguatera. Several health administrations may caution against eating it, however with confidence in your source, there are many ways to prepare and serve barracuda. We grilled ours, and it was delectable! Check out these simple steps and give it a try for yourself.

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Gril ed Garlic Barracuda Steaks Ingredients:

»» 6 barracuda steaks (cut into 1” steaks) »» 1/3 cup olive oil »» 4 large limes (or ½ cup bottled lime juice) »» 5 cloves garlic, minced »» 1 onion »» 4 Scotch Bonnet peppers »» 1 bunch Escallion »» 1 teaspoon salt »» 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions:

01 Scale and clean the barracuda 02 Cut evenly into 1 inch slices Mix lime juice, peppers, scallions, 03 garlic and oil, and let sit while preparing

other ingredients

In a bowl, combine the salt and pepper 04 and rub the fish on all sides

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Marinate the steaks in the mix for 30 minutes, adding oil-based and dry ingredients together

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Place the fish on a hot grill until cooked thoroughly. The meat should be an opaque white, fresh and flaky, and should come apart easily. For a genuine Jamaican experience, serve with traditional ‘food’, and be sure to include pumpkin – a great neutralizer for spicy or peppery dishes. Enjoy!

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Indulge Without The Bulge

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BY AVA GARDNER

You know that bulge you sometimes get when you eat? Well, you’re not supposed to get that. Those bulges are as a result of multiple problems ranging from poor eating habits to lack of sleep.

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If you’re still losing the battle with your fork and haven’t lost the weight you promised yourself you’d lose this year, it’s time to try something new. Now, I’m a not certified dietician, but by changing my diet and eating habits over the last fourteen months, I have transformed me!

First of all, a diet is forever. You hear it all the time, “I’ll start my diet tomorrow”. While you may have your ‘cheat days’, your diet is forever. So by declaring you’d eat healthy for 2015, your plan will be short-lived because eating healthy exceeds one year. By choosing to eat healthy you’ve entered into a covenant with yourself to do so for the rest of your life. There’s not much point in starting if you’re going to stop, because your bulge will return.

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Don’t eat anything you cannot pronounce. Unless you’re eating Quinoa, the holy pseudo-grain from the Andean gods. I’m talking about chemicals, synthetic and processed foods. It’s funny how we are so busy counting calories, not chemicals. Indeed, nothing beats a balanced diet, but some things don’t even belong in the equation. Unnatural foods, additives and preservatives, in comparison to natural foods, are not as easily broken down by the body, thus creating a bulge.

Say no to gluten. Gluten comes from the Latin word for “glue”. Gluten is a protein that gives foods elasticity and can be found in most wheat products like breads, pasta, and yes, pastry. The big food companies don’t care about your muffin-top. Some folks will say that they are not sensitive to gluten, however gluten will do what gluten does. Ever handled wet dough before? That’s what g l u t e n-f i l l e d products look like

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internally and well, that’s your bulge. The body’s digestion is bottlenecked when trying to break down this once-yummy sludge. So how are you going to indulge without the bulge? It’s very simple. Eating healthy is not intended to be boring, but rather to make you more food conscious and creative. Eating healthy is all about substitution. So instead of ‘fake food’ and GMO foods, eat real food. Substitute gluten-free flour cupcakes for wheat flour cupcakes. Coconuts can be made into flour, so try coconut flour cupcakes.

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ducate yourself about food and don’t forget that food is a science. Learning about the effects of food is important if you want to combat the bulge and still indulge. For example, bananas create water retention; raisins make people gain weight; animal fat simply makes you fat; and, not drinking enough water makes you pudgy, as water is needed to create digestive enzymes. Get familiar with your kitchen by preparing your own food. Fast food and your bulge will become things of the past when you know the quality ingredients in your meals; and the bulge in your purse or wallet will become something of the future. .

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on’t buy in bulk; it’ll only increase your risk of overeating or overindulging. Chances are, if you don’t buy it, you won’t eat it. At dinner parties, strategize what you will eat. Your last meal will determine your next, so try to cut back on sugar and eat low-glycemic foods. Satisfying your sweet tooth occasionally is fine, and low-glycemic and fibrous foods will release energy or sugars into your bloodstream at intervals. They’ll also keep you filled for long periods. Remember too that alcohol is sugar, so you really shouldn’t be on a 24-hour champagne diet. Lastly, don’t eat after 7pm – you’re not feeding your dreams. Trust me, this is the time you should be getting ready for bed. So get out of the kitchen! You’ll thank me later…on a beach, or somewhere like that!

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J A M A I C A S T Y L E BY DEBRA TAYLOR AND MICHELLE GORDON • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS • FOOD: THE MOVEABLE FEAST • STYLING: AIESHA PANTON AND MICHELE WILLIAMS

Our Jamaican fare is a smorgasboard of dishes and flavours that have stimulated our tastebuds from time immemorial. These meals remain timeless; from our beloved ackee and salftish for breakfast to a hearty oxtail stew for dinner, and a patty in between.  Of course we have a beverage with each meal, but have you ever thought of how pairing with a glass of wine would enhance the experience? INDULGE your tastebuds and you’ll discover a few delightful wine pairings to take your already delicious Jamaican meals from ordinary to extraordinary. Enjoy!

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Fried Chicken

This all-time favourite dish for Jamaicans is always on the menu, and even the most health conscious of us can’t resist the allure of this delightfully, comfortingly, indulgent dish. 

Perfect pairing: The ripe fruit flavours and roundness of Blackstone Chardonnay give the right balance to this crispy, juicy dish. A contrasting experience, the crisp acidity of Lapostolle Casa Sauvignon Blanc will cleanse the palate beautifully, helping to minimize any greasy aftertaste. It’s tropical fruit lushness accentuates the flavours.  

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Jamaican Beef Patty This popular Jamaican favourite is one of the island’s staple dishes, appealing to just about everyone. With its original filling of ground beef, the patty presents an already-balanced meal of spicy meat filling for protein and crispy, flaky crust providing starch - combining beautifully to make one forget the calorie count.

Perfect pairing: Create an instant gourmet meal by pairing your hot-outthe-oven beef patty with a full-bodied chardonnay such as Hardys Nottage Hill. Chill your wine to perfection and you’ll be surprised how much more zesty a patty can be once your taste buds are awakened. If you’re a die-hard red wine lover, try with a medium-bodied red wine such as Robert Mondavi Private Selection Pinot Noir. It’s a great balance between the weight of the spicy meat, and the aroma and flavour of the wine.

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Oxtail & Butter Beans

The intensity of flavours in a good oxtail stew is nothing short of mouth-watering. From the browning to the robust flavours of the fresh seasonings, this dish has so many complex layers that, when pressured to perfection, can elicit all sorts of oohs and aahs. We’re talking about the meat that slides off the bone and melts in your mouth. You know it: the same oxtail bone that holds so much flavour it’s enjoyed just as much as the meat itself! You may have thought it a challenge to pair but alas, we've found the perfect complements.

Perfect pairing: If the pepper is hot, you may want to pair with a sweet red or a moscato. Sweet and bubbly always pair well with hot and spicy. A hearty, meaty dish is nicely complemented by a hearty and full-bodied wine. If the flavour of the pepper is not hot, then it pairs beautifully with the Alamos Malbec or Chardonnay. For another experience, have a glass of crisp, cold Hogue Riesling. Not sure which to choose? Try them all!

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Red Peas Stew (Stewed Peas)

Many of us enjoy this Jamaican favourite with pig's tail, and as we get more health-and-calorie-conscious, many are opting to have it ‘ital’, i.e. without pig's tail. No matter what’s inside, this comforting stew is sure to satisfy the most discerning palate. Stewed Peas has a distinct earthy taste contrasted by the natural sweet spice of the pork. If you add spinners (mini dumplings) in your pot, you’ve just introduced a neutral element that will balance each forkful of this tasty, filling dish.

Perfect pairing: With or without pigs tail, an earthy glass of pinot noir is sure to complement the rich legumes from the red pea base for this meal. The smoky aroma of a pinot noir is just what the doctor ordered for your rich, vitamin C-laden serving of this Jamaican favourite.

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Curried Goat

Some like it hot and others like it hotter, while some prefer it with no pepper at all. But one thing is for sure, Jamaicans love their curried goat. Curry is a naturally strong spice, and goat is a very textured meat, unlike its chicken counterpart (another favourite for Jamaicans to curry). Textured meats hold spice and flavour extremely easily, providing a simple and uncomplicated foundation for pairing.

Perfect pairing: Pair this robust meat with a very cold glass of Santa Margherita Prosecco or Banrock Station Moscato; you are sure to have a really gastronomic experience. Your mouth will experience incredible sensations when the bubbles of a Prosecco soothe your tongue, or the sweetness of a Moscato tame the spices. If red is your wine of choice, a medium-bodied merlot such as Montes Merlot is the one!

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Jerk Pork

If you’re a pork lover then chances are you’d enjoy this peppery pig whether or not you had a beverage in hand. Best served hot, or best served cold, jerk pork is one of those iconic dishes that need absolutely nothing on the side, except the coldest possible glass of our perfect pick for pork!”

Perfect pairing: If an ice-cold Stella Artois Beer doesn’t tickle your fancy, then a glass of Prosecco or Riesling is the ideal style of wine to temper the spiciness of most jerk pork dishes. Here again is a common combination for spicy Jamaican foods. Sweet balances spicy; sweet and effervescent combined with spicy? Well that’s just pork-fect!   Food provided by Michele Williams at www.moveablefeastcaterers.com

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Bushbar

BY MONIQUE UPTON • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

If ever a name described its destination perfectly, Bushbar does. It’s a bar. And yes, you guessed it; it’s in the bush. But Bushbar is not your average bar.

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ith a rotating menu that changes every 2 to 3 days, you’re guaranteed to enjoy your selection, even if you placed your order blindfolded. Chef Nigel Thompson prides himself on preparing every single meal with the same passion that led him into the kitchen in the first place. 7 years on at Bushbar’s jungle hideaway, he continues to challenge himself to wow each guest. “I love the look on the faces of our guests when they start eating. Seeing them satisfied means the world to me.” Meanwhile, resident bartender and Restaurant Manager Jason Brown tends to your drinks with the precision and care of a surgeon. Temperature, taste and presentation scoring 10 out of 10 each time, these folks have it down to a science, and breathe a breath of fresh air into what service ought to be. It can’t be an easy task to strike the perfect balance between simplicity and opulence; however employing the ‘less is more’ principle, Bushbar succeeds effortlessly at making each guest feel like royalty at home, because that’s just what it feels like. Home. Yours may not look like Bushbar, but the sentiment of comfort and security still applies. Maybe it’s the picture of the forest touching the ocean that inspires calm. Or perhaps it’s the lush greenery surrounding you. Whatever the reason, it’s a bucket-list kind of place to be. No wonder it is home (away from home) to discerning residents and international celebrities who frequently make the trek to this Porty hideaway in search of respite from it all.   Indulge.  Take a sip, close your eyes for a moment, and lose yourself in the beauty of Bushbar. .

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Enjoy Bushbar by making reservations at 876-993-7000

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Miami Vice You’ll Need: » One jigger or 5 ounces of 151 rum » 8 ounces of piña colada mix » 8 ounces of strawberry daiquiri mix » 1 ½ oz scoop of crushed ice » Blender » Mixing glass or large cup

Make Your Drink:

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Start by putting 1½ scoops of 01 crushed ice in the blender. Throw in

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2 ½ ounces of the 151 rum. Add Piña Colada Mix then blend for 30 seconds. Pour into large mixing glass.

Prepare the strawberry daiquiri 02 mix then repeat the first steps again,

replacing the piña colada with the strawberry daiquiri mix. Layer the two mixes, pouring carefully so that the red strawberry mix will not combine with the white piña colada mix.

Wall Banger You’ll Need: » 1 oz. vodka » 4 oz. orange juice » 1/2 oz. Galliano liqueur

Make Your Drink: Pour vodka and orange juice into an icefilled collins glass. Stir. Float Galliano on top by pouring gently over the back of a spoon. 

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Bar Basics

Sometimes you want to go Where everybody knows your name, And they’re always glad you came; You want to be where you can see, Our troubles are all the same; You want to be where everybody knows your name.

Cheers to Bartending M  

with Brad Kaplan

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-Theme song from 1980s sitcom Cheers 

any young children dream of their lifetime careers from the days when a career is still a long way off. Many see themselves in the traditional and expected roles  that their parents may dream of; medicine, law, teaching and such. But when you have a young boy who, during his tender teens, knows without the shadow of a doubt that he wants to become a bartender, you may want to take heed.  “When I was younger, I had been into a bar at an early age. I was immediately struck by something - there were two types of people there that everyone wanted to know; one was the guy at the door – so you could get in and not get kicked out, and the second was the bartender who had everyone’s attention. I sat there and I watched the bartender work, and I thought that someday, that’s what I was going to do,” explains Brad Kaplan, Head Flair Bartender at Denver Colorado’s popular sport’s bar Dave & Busters.   Though not a stranger to Jamaica, Brad’s third visit to Jamaica earlier this year was his first as a professional bartender, and saw him at the helm of a training seminar for local premium labeled bartenders at Kingston’s Regency Hotel Bar. Regency has established itself as a superior watering hole, and the go-to destination for fine service of top-tier liquors, cocktails and eats for Kingston’s ever-growing list of entertainment seekers.  Here you’ll find the best of the best where your bartender is not your run-ofthe-mill drink server, but rather ladies and gentlemen who take great pride in the preparation, presentation and delivery of just what you want. .

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artending is an art.  It’s not just about preparing and serving a drink, it’s about accommodating and serving a guest. This (bar) is a ‘chill spot’ for many, and a good bartender becomes the host to his guest, essentially becoming responsible for his care for the duration of his visit. To all this customer service, Brad adds an impressive skill that often mesmerizes and entertains his guests. Flair bartending is just one tool used by a bartender as part of the evolution of bartending as entertainment.  It involves personality, professionalism, know-how, skill and guest interaction.  It’s a great tool to have and use, but there’s so much more to being a great bartender. “I work in bar where there’s lots going on.  We have to compete with gaming machines so it’s very loud, so I have a great opportunity to develop the skill of communication,” says Brad. He further explains that the success factor of any

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bar lies in the ability of its bartenders to satisfy customers. There are several key components to remember when it comes to dealing with bar customers. Remembering a customer's drink is secondary to remembering his or her face and name. Recognizing a face and associating that face with a particular name makes a person feel special. Remembering what they drink comes next, and often, it’ll come naturally.  Just as with any other aspect of a service industry, Brad notes with importance that anyone who wants to become a bartender needs to understand how to serve. Literally and figuratively.  It’s not just about giving someone a drink. It’s all about developing the right attitude and approaching service with a genuine desire to attend to someone’s wants and needs. “My very first job I had to wait tables. It’s not a glamourous job, but it’s all a part of the process. And in the long run, it helps you to gains confidence to serve well.”

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Shaken, Not Stirred

Fresh Mint Martini

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You will need: »» 3 oz gin or vodka »» 1 tablespoon lime juice »» 1 teaspoon granulated sugar »» 3 or 4 mint leaves

Directions: Combine mint leaves, 1 tablespoon lime juice and 1 teaspoon sugar in a shaker and crush with a pestle or spoon. Add 3 ounces gin or vodka and fill with ice. Cover and shake, then strain through a sieve into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with mint leaves.

3 Steps to Building a Better Bartender: Words of advice for an aspiring bartender?

If you want to be a bartender, don’t focus on the bar, focus on doing what you’re doing really well. Take a bartending course first off. Then know your business, take care of your guests, and never stop learning.

Drinking on the Job:

Do you taste everything you make?

I used to, but not so much anymore.  Although everyone’s taste is different, a good bartender needs to know the balance of perfection in a good drink; sweet, savoury, spicy…being able to identify and create all these blends is essential. Practice

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makes perfect!

Solving Problems

Good bartenders are part psychiatrists.

Guests come to unwind, and that sometimes comes with lots of talking. Listening to guests and having the ability to respond appropriately is very often as important as the drink they’ve ordered.  There’s a difference between being inquisitive, and being attentive. A good bartender knows how to strike that balance.

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The Bloody Mary .

BY PATRICE MCHUGH-WILSON

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The Bloody Mary is a tasty mixture of tomato juice, vodka and various spices. Yet very few of us are familiar with its history. With several claims of responsibility for the invention of this popular cocktail, George Jessel and Ferdinand Petiot are most often credited with its invention. Ferdinand Petiot, a bartender at the New York Bar in Paris, is credited with inventing the Bloody Mary in 1920 at the request of Vladimir Smirnov. George Jessel concocted a similar creation in 1939, though Petiot claimed responsibility stating in a 1964 article in The New Yorker, that “George Jessel said he created it, but it was really nothing but vodka and tomato juice when I took it over”. Jessel additionally claims to have named the drink after his friend Mary Geraghty, who had spilled the drink on herself while Petiot credits Mary, one of his frequent customers with the inspiration for the drink. She would often wait at the bar for her lover who never came. Her isolation and loneliness caused her to be likened to Mary Queen of Scots, who was condemned to solitary confinement in The Tower of London. Yet no matter who invented it or how its name came about, the Bloody Mary has endured numerous changes over the years before becoming the rejuvenating drink we have come to know today. With all the work that’s gone in to perfecting the recipe, we recommend you give it a try!Ingredients:

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»» 1 ½ ounces Stoli Vodka »» 2 dashes Worcestershire »» 4 dashes Tabasco »» Pinch of salt and pepper »» ¼ ounce fresh lemon juice »» 4 oz. Tomato Juice

Preparation: Combine all ingredients in mixing glass and roll back and forth to mix. Strain into an iced goblet. Garnish with a wedge of lemon and lime on a side plate. A dash of celery salt is a nice touch.

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25 0 m g

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Spiced Rum Crème  

PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS • STYLING: KIMBERLEY DUNKLEY-MULLINGS

» 2 Cups Milk » 1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract » 1 Cinnamon Stick » 1 Star Anise (optional) » 1 Tsp Freshly Grated Nutmeg » 1 Clove » 4 Smart Egg Yolks » ½ Cup White Sugar » ¼ Cup El Dorado Dark Rum » 2 Sachet of Powdered Gelatin » 300 ml Heavy Cream

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Remove from heat 08 and cool.

01 In a medium saucepan, add milk, 02 In a bowl, whisk cream until 09 vanilla, cinnamon, star anise, nutmeg soft peaks form. Place a bowl in the freezer to chill.

and clove.

Remove chilled bowl from freezer 10 and strain cooled custard mixture into

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Place over a medium heat and simmer until just before boiling point.

the bowl. Fold in the cream in stages until fully incorporated.

Remove from heat and let infuse 04 for a least an hour.

In a mixer, beat Smart Eggs yolks, 05 sugar and rum together until pale and thickened.

Add Smart Eggs mixture to 06 infused milk and place over low heat;

Dive mixture into 6 glasses 11 and chill until set, about 5  

hours. Enjoy!

keep stirring for about 4 minutes.

When warm, add powdered gelatin 07 and stir until dissolved for another couple minutes. Mixture should be a thick, custard-like consistency.

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From The Vine

BY DEBRA TAYLOR

I remember seeing a photograph a long time ago of a wooden barrelshaped winery tucked into the side of a hill. I didn’t know where it was, but I was captivated by the image. A wine barrel, emerging from the hillside as if it were an appendage, seemed strangely natural to me, though my intellect told me it was not. The picture conjured up a distinct intrigue and led me to do some research. Having never been there, I discovered that I had fallen in love with the Lapostolle Winery in the Apalta Valley in Chile, and knew instinctively that I would visit. Someday.


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hat day came in April of this year when I stepped into the pages of a sweet, indulgent history book. The Lapostolle Winery was founded by Alexandra Marnier Lapostolle and her husband Cyril de Bournet in 1994. The Marnier Lapostolle family, founders and owners of the world-renowned liqueur Grand Marnier, is famous for producing world-class spirits and liqueurs. With more than 150 years of rich family tradition, the family approaches winemaking with the same quality, authenticity and style on which their reputation was built. The Chilean property includes the Lapostolle Residence, an exquisite hotel where a team of dedicated chefs create menus for meals specific to each wine produced at the vineyard, further enhancing the Lapostolle experience. In creating Lapostolle, the family has pursued the same uncompromising approach to quality that made Grand Marnier a global success. Its objective is as simple as it is ambitious: to create world-class wines using the perfect combination of French expertise and the superb terroirs of Chile. And it has been successful. In 2011, The Lapostolle Winery won the double gold medal for excellence and has been named the best organic wine from Chile. In an era when winemaking is at its most competitive stage, Lapostolle has remained true to its mandate to produce the finest wines under the most environmentally responsible conditions.

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t’s simply fascinating that all Lapostolle vineyards are managed organically and biodynamically. All of their vineyards are certified 100% organic by CERES, the governing international board that advocates for global sustainability leadership. From production and packaging to recycling and export, Lapostolle practices ‘green’ across the board, with energy conservation listing high on their list of priorities. The Lapostolle Winery enjoys the benefits of a 75% reduction in cooling requirements just from their innovative underground construction and the implementation of a range of other natural and smart conservation methods. The eco-friendly winery is 100% gravity-fed, spanning six

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levels, four of which are buried into the granite of the Apalta hillside to provide a natural cool temperature environment for cellaring and ageing. This was the building in the photograph that started my love affair in the first place. The Lapostolle winery is known for incredible architecture with beautiful views of the Apalta valley. The rare vertical design allows the wine to flow naturally downward during every stage of the production, avoiding the need to pump, which can adversely affect the subtle flavours of the wine. Grapes are hand-harvested at night and brought to the highest level of the winery where they are 100% hand de-stemmed, a labour-intensive technique performed by only very few wineries throughout the world.

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Fermentation takes place in 21 small French wooden vats, of which size corresponds to a parcel of Apalta vineyard, ensuring the enhancement of the personality of each of their terroir plots. The wines are produced in two wineries where they use established work systems and focus on quality to achieve results that minimize their impact on the environment.

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oday, Lapostolle owns 370 hectares in three different vineyards and produces a total of 200,000 cases comprising Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Carmenère, and Syrah under the labels Lapostolle Casa and Lapostolle Cuvee Alexandre. Their revolutionary Clos Apalta winery is solely dedicated to

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the production of Lapostolle's world-class icon wine, Clos Apalta. After two years of ageing in two different barrel cellars, the wine is bottled and either departs from the base of the winery, or joins the underground library in the heart of the winery. Lapostolle wines continue to win industry-respected awards year after year from Wine Advocate and Wine Spectator, among the myriad of industry accolades. I invite you to indulge in the quality and passion of these fine Chilean wines.

HISTORY LESSON Chilean Wine 101 Let’s give thanks to the Spanish missionaries, who were the first to

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bring wine grapes to the Americas in the 1500s. Brother Francisco de Carabantes is credited with bringing the first vines into Chile in 1548. Via the port of Concepción, he brought with him the Paísgrape, which is similar to California’s Mission grape. Upon discovering that the vines successfully adapted to Chilean soils, vineyards were quickly planted throughout the country, from the Limarí Valley in the north to the Bío-Bío Valley in the south. In the burgeoning capital city of Santiago, the 16th century residents clamoured for more wine with which to quench their thirst, whet their appetites and satisfy their spiritual needs. Fortunately, the surrounding Maipo Valley proved to be a tremendous source of red wine, and thus Chile’s first wine boom began in earnest.

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ver time, maritime transportation improved, making cross-Atlantic travel possible for those who could afford it. Being newly emancipated from Spain in 1810, Chilean residents yearned for knowledge of their wider European roots. Thus, members of the country’s wealthy families embarked upon intercontinental pilgrimages that would profoundly change Chilean life, culture, and wine forever. France was a popular destination, and soon French customs flourished in Santiago - from food to clothing to architecture and fine wine consumption. It did not take long for the first new French-style wineries to appear on the outskirts of the city.

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n e h rs e c g t i n K a h ame C B Y N ATA

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LIE NASH

There is a big difference between the time you roast your first undercooked chicken, and when you host your first fabulous 5-course dinner. In between those times are trials, effort and a lot of gadgets and gizmos that had once seemed like great ideas. Before you buy that ice-cream maker that you will never use, here’s a list of the top ten kitchen tools that will take your cooking game from amateur all the way up to the pro-leagues.

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K ni ves

Cut ting Board

Garlic Press

Microplane Grater

The Spoon-ula

Your game cannot be changed, because your game has not begun. A great knife is the single most important tool in your repertoire and the first sign that you’re ready to take the next step on your culinary journey. Like with toothpaste or birth control, quality matters, and sometimes you have to pay a little more for that quality. Don’t cheap out on your knife – it ’ll be one of your best investments. With a sharpening tool accompanying your purchase, your knife will pay for itself in no time.

Once you’ve spent as much as you have on a great knife, don’t go around ruining it. Retire your pathetic little plastic cutting board and get yourself a nice big sturdy wooden one. Not only is it better for your knife, it ’s more hygienic than plastic.

If you don’t think you need one, you’re not cooking with enough garlic – and if you are cooking with enough – I know you enjoy hand-peeling each of those tiny cloves, right? No! I didn’t think so. Get out of the dark ages and stop that pre-historic living– you don’t need to use your hands!

Before you retire your box grater, know that it has its uses. You certainly will not be grating coconut on a microplane. However, for just about everything else, this grater will be in easy reach. Whether you’re zesting a lime or grating parmesan, this is what you will use everyday.

They made spoons and they made spatulas – but genius married ingenuity when they put them together. Durable enough for thick doughs and flexible enough for jar corners – waste not a bit of that specialty organic gourmet pepper jelly that you spent far too much money on in the first place.

Digital K itchen Scale and Thermometer

The Cof fee Grinder

The Dutch O ven

Emersion Blender

Before all the non-coffee drinkers get up in arms, coffee grinders are not only for connoisseurs. Coffee grinders make excellent spice mills, and if we cannot agree on freshly ground coffee, we most certainly can on the superiority of freshly ground spices. I could just get a spice grinder, but if I did, where would I make powdered sugar in a pinch, or chopped nuts, or cut up my dried herbs, or make my own specialty tea blends?

Cast iron or ceramic, choose well and, outside of a few nicks and discolouration, this pot will be in your family for generations. They go from stovetop to oven, from popping popcorn to slow cooking short ribs – frying chicken to poaching eggs. There is not a whole lot you can’t do with your Dutch oven, but there is surely a lot you won’t do without it.

The emersion blender is truly next level. Small and ergonomic in design and decidedly powerful, the list of dishes you’ll use your emersion blender for is capped only by your imagination. Creamy soups to homemade mayonnaise, vinaigrettes to the softest mashed potatoes, pasta sauces to blended cocktails. This is the kind of tool you will ask yourself how you lived without.

Standing Mixer/ Food Processor

Accuracy is key my friends and all the want-tobe and think-they-are bakers can attest; using volumetric measurements are extremely inaccurate. If you plan to give up store bought presents and go straight for your go-to sweet potato pie, its time to get efficient. You don’t need a bunch of measuring cups; place your bowl directly on your scale and measure as you go.

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My friends we have arrived, we are committed to the cooking cause and we have our game faces on. If you’re a baker at heart and your hands are covered in flour more oftentimes than not – the standing mixer is your shiny beacon of hope leading you into a future of baking greatness. If you’re a pot and fire lover, there is no better partner on the court of cookery than a top-notch food processor.

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BY PAULA-ANN WEBBER • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

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A few days before my grandmother passed away, she insisted that I take her well-used, but oh-so-precious Dutch pot. I was hesitant for two reasons. One: I felt that if I accepted her gift, it would be tantamount to me bidding her farewell, and two: I knew that I would never, ever be able to do justice to any meal that I tried to prepare in it. If that Dutch pot could talk…the stories it would tell. That pot was the source of too many meals to mention, all cooked to perfection, and devoured in reverence and awe. I remember as a little girl spending time in the kitchen with Grams. She once told the story that her Dutch pot was the same one used for the ‘feeding of the five thousand’. It certainly looked old enough, so I believed her. She swore by her Dutch pot.

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hile I had a different it and continued comfortably using my wok and saucepan, skillet vessel for each type and stockpot, my non-stick frying pan, and the list goes on. The of meal, (I was very truth is the Dutch pot intimidated me. How could something proud of a recently so simple… ancient almost, yield such amazing dishes? Clearly purchased Cuisinart the cook had something to do with it, but I know that pot was set), I knew there was partly responsible. A few weeks later, my Grams would have some sort of magic in my Grams’ one pot that produced the most been very proud of my first solo attempt in her Dutchie. I kept delicious fried chicken, boiled yams and dumplings, pork roast, it simple, and truly authentic – a scrumptious ackee and saltfish baked cornmeal pudding, stewed pork…yes, all from the same pot. in her honour! When it was all gone, just as she had taught me, Dutch pots have long enjoyed the status of being hand-me- I rinsed my pot clean with plain hot water, and ‘seasoned’ it once down items, being listed on the wills of slaves dating back to the again with a little oil before returning it to the cupboard. My 18th and 19th centuries, giving credence to the term ‘Pass the Dutchie indoctrination had begun. Dutchie’. (Not to be confused with the popular 1982 song Pass The Dutch pot, or Dutchie, is a staple in many Jamaican the Dutchie by Musical Youth, which was a politically correct kitchens. It is able to create so many different kinds of meals. representation of the previously recorded Pass the Kouchie by The Dutch pot can deep fry, broil, boil, roast, stew, bake and do The Mighty Diamonds). Different meanings altogether. every other possible form of meal preparation. It was imported by I took the pot that day, but only because I knew my grandmother Dutch traders from Holland in the Netherlands, hence its name. would have been offended if I had not. I was not yet ready to use In it’s original form, the Dutchie was made from aluminum scraps

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NO WHOLE HEAP OF ALUMINIUM TO

Poison yuh ” Food. .

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and river sand. Today, in Jamaica, the Dutch pot is made of heavy cast iron. On a recent trip that took me through St. Mary, I sat with a wise old man whose life has been centered around making these versatile utensils. “This is the safest pot to cook in,” explains Chappy, “No whole heap of aluminum to poison yuh food.”  He refers to the low levels of aluminum in the production of iron-made Dutch pots and reiterates what countless investigations and reports have cited in the past. Safety issues about aluminum cookware have been a concern from as far back as the 1960’s, when speculation was rife about a link between high levels of aluminum in Alzheimer’s patients, and the prevalence of the popular containers used for cooking. The potentially poisonous properties in all-aluminum pots enter the food when heated, while iron pots contain considerably less quantities of the harmful element. Aluminum pots gained popularity in the 1970’s with the introduction of the Teflon-age where ‘instant’ was the order of the day.  They were less expensive, lighter in weight and easier to replace. So, if that’s the case, what’s the beauty of having a Dutch pot? Several reasons. »» The melting point of cast aluminum is lower than that of cast iron, so there’s a slower reaction time between pot and food for foods cooked in an iron pot. 

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»» A cast i r o n pot and an aluminum pot of the same size and thickness will prove the iron pot to have better temperature stability. During cooking, heat is uniformly distributed around and throughout the pot, minimizing burning and uneven cooking. »» The same iron mineral that we ingest as a tablet or liquid vitamin is transferred in very small doses to our food during the cooking process. Persons with hemochromatosis (too much iron) should avoid using Dutch pots. »» The more you use your Dutch pot, the more seasoned it becomes, and nothing sticks to a well-seasoned Dutch pot! Looking for an authentic Dutch pot? Visit Chappy in St. Mary, who makes Dutch pots with his own two hands. No fancy brand, but Chappy has 36 years of experience and scores of satisfied customers. His pots in a variety of shapes and sizes adorn the wall of his countryside workshop and sales room, and continue to attract buyers from all across Jamaica in search of that magical healing all-purpose cooking vessel.

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Drapers District, Por t Antonio

Road Trip

Woody’s Burgers

 

If you’re driving too fast through Drapers District, on the main road heading toward Trident, Portland, you’ll miss it. It’s fairly non-descript, looking more like a typical Jamaican main street countryside house. And it kind of is, yet not. The warm welcome you’ll receive feels more like you’ve entered a friend’s home instead of a restaurant. Cherry Cousins and her husband Charles, (aka Woody) make you feel as if you’ve just returned after a long vacation away from home, and not like the first-time customer that you really are.

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o, we ventured out on a road trip in search of what scores of Trip Advisor reviews rate as ‘the best homemade burgers in Jamaica'.  After a meal of burgers so fresh you actually say ‘Mmmm’, surrounded by a world of history and sound advice adorning her walls, we concurred. Woody’s is a burger bar, but unlike most burger places, your meal is not served with a 5-minute guarantee. There’s no mistaking that Woody’s is not a fast food restaurant. Each meal is cooked to order. So if you’re in a hurry, I’d suggest calling ahead, ordering your meal and letting Cherry know what time to expect you. You’ll be glad you did. “I cook for my customers the same way I cook for my family,” Cherry makes it clear that it’s not a one-size-fits-all operation. “If you want yours a little spicier, just tell me. I’ll fix it right for you.” They specialize in homemade burgers with an interesting choice of options, all seasoned with herbs and homegrown spices from their garden in the back.  Their menu offers traditional Jamaican dishes like curried goat and jerk chicken, but hey, we came for the burgers. The vegetarian burger and their full-house, complete with fried plantains, sweet peppers and cheese, emerged as the day’s favourites; and washed down with Cherry’s homemade ginger beer, was close to perfection. Should you need to check out the restrooms, you’ll have no trouble figuring out which is which. The signs above the doors are self-explanatory, especially if you understand patois. “Dis a Fi Eve – Nuh Let Een Adam” and vice versa.  Cute. With tummies full and appetites sated, we hit the road once again. Cherry waves and shouts “Hurry up and come back.” Soon come, Cherry. Soon again.

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Woody’s Low Bridge Place – Drapers District, Port Antonio Telephone: 436-5624

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My Jamaican Indulgence

With Andrew Kaplan By Andrew Kaplan

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y love for Jamaica is palpable. For a country so small, you’d think it was massive by the traditions and love the locals have for their home. The people, the food, the music, the beaches, and simply the land itself. The offerings are rich. And you’d better be prepared to decide whether you’d like a rum punch or a Red Stripe soon after you step off the plane. After that, you’re on Jamaica Time. I feel like I know Jamaica a little differently than the average person visiting on vacation. I may be a white Jew from the suburbs of Chicago, but I talk about it like it’s my own country. My love for Jamaica came shortly after my first visit when I was 22 years old. Since then, I’ve been fortunate to work with Jamaicans, attend school with Jamaicans, dine with Jamaicans, travel with Jamaicans...My Jamaican friends call me an honorary “Jewmaican”. My first visit was with my two older brothers and a group of their friends. We stayed on the beach in Negril, some of us in the cliffs. Our mornings were spent talking about who was going to find the best jerk chicken stand on the street for lunch. By 10am, it was drink in hand, usually a Dirty Banana. Every bartender has their own recipe for the “best” Dirty Banana, just like every chef in the States makes the best burger or fried chicken. We walked the beaches, talking to the locals and seeking out the best Jamaican patty made by the woman using a wine bottle as a rolling pin and the best juice made by the woman who has been juicing by hand for so many years. (Though my brother brought her a juicer as a gift so she could increase her business.) We ate our way through huts and roadside stands and restaurants. Mornings were spent with feet in the sand, sipping Blue Mountain coffee. I wasn’t a coffee drinker, but suddenly I had a love for it. Ackee and saltfish and festival in the AM and brown stew and curries in the PM. .

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I lived in North Miami and worked with an office filled with lovely Jamaicans. Jamaican food three times a week for lunch was the norm, and I liked it. When lunchtime came around and it was me suggesting Jerk or Brown Stew, my colleagues-turned-friends would perk up. Many years later I went back to Jamaica to be a guest judge at a National Pan Chicken Competition. Rough work, I know. It took place in Kingston, on the waterfront. “You’re going to KINGSTON,” my Jamaican friends would say to me. I soon was proud to see where they grew up and share it with everyone. I explored all around Kingston, from the more touristed Bob Marley house to Devon House Ice Cream, and had dinner at The Market Place, eating everything from Japanese to Indian and Chinese – what a concept! I could eat those salt and pepper ribs and salt and pepper shrimp – not to mention the Chicken with Capitol Sauce – for days. We took a drive out to Hellshire Beach one day for some fried fish and steamed fish and it was one of the best I’ve ever had. We climbed Dunn’s River and explored the farms of Walkerswood, learning about their produce and the magic that goes into their sauces and marinades. We drove through the beautiful Fern Gully. We ate at Kingston’s finest, Guilt Trip restaurant, and had plenty of fresh coconut water straight from the coconut (and the jelly, of course).

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Most recently, I was thrilled to have my fiancé join me for her first visit to Jamaica and experience first-hand the place I had been telling her about for so long. We stayed at the incredible GoldenEye resort, just outside Ochi. We ate with the locals, spent time walking around the villages and even cooked with new friends we met along the way. We of course had some patties from Juici (sorry to the Tastee lovers). I cooked with the chef at the hotel, who lives down the road. I am now a Brown Stew Chicken Master! I just can’t get enough of Jamaica and the love and pride that its people have for their country. They stand by each other, and with one another. Maybe one day, I’ll be standing there, too. Peace and Ting, Andrew “Kappy” Kaplan Andrew “Kappy” Kaplan loves food. A professionally trained chef, by day he runs Yum-o! yum-o.org, Rachael Ray’s charity focused on kids and cooking, and keeps special projects running smoothly for her. By night he hops course to course, place to place, all across the country. He’s Rach’s own personal dining guide! You can also follow Kappy on Twitter to see what’s On Kappy’s Plate @onkappysplate in real-time! Andrew Kaplan is the Director of Rachael Ray’s nonprofit organization, Yum-o!, where he is responsible for managing its core initiatives and day-to-day operations. Andrew developed a lifestyle at a young age that involved cooking and appreciation for food. That lifestyle inspired him to create a charity that celebrated his passion for cooking and his desire to share his knowledge of the culinary world with children. After spending time with Rachael Ray, the two realized they had both grown up with a similar admiration for the culinary world and decided to launch Yum-o!. Andrew is also the Director of Special Projects for Rachael Ray/Watch Entertainment where he is involved in managing various projects and appearances for Rachael. He also served as an Associate Producer for Rachael Ray’s daytime television show, Rachael Ray.

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The Heart of Our Home BY MICHELLE GORDON • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS

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he kitchen is the heart of the home. It is where tummies are filled, stories are told and life unfolds. In the movies and on television, the kitchen is where families convene for just about everything; from late-night indulgences to private meetings to everyday family meals. It’s the place from where sustenance comes, connecting families through food, fellowship and conversation, which ultimately create memories and legacies that mean so much more than a simple meal. The thought and attention paid to creating a kitchen that presents such a magnetic space, makes this room that much more special for those who use it. Mother of 3 boys, wife and business woman, Shelagh Jardim welcomed Indulge into her exquisite Montego Bay home and shared with us the vision and inspiration behind her beautiful kitchen. “Family is very important to me,” starts Shelagh. “With three boys, a husband and lots of friends and family, we’ve always had reason to entertain. It was

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only natural that our living spaces, especially our kitchen, was not just practical and comfortable, but also very beautiful. At first glance, the Jardims’ home is clearly defined by time and space, and yet somehow, it remains completely seamless. Not an easy task by any standard. But with an extreme passion for design, Shelagh Jardim combined years of experience living in apartments, townhouses and single-family homes, with a plethora of design publications, which led to knowing exactly what their preferences are. “We had a lot of amazing professional help from our local architect Kevin Bryan and designers Puente Associates out of Miami. It was a wonderful collaboration.” In search of large open spaces, Shelagh opted for comfortable oversized rooms with high ceilings, doorways, lots of windows and sliding doors that disappeared, bringing inside the home the beauty of outdoors. “Kevin and Martha were able to take our vision and help us create spaces that flowed in harmony,” she continued.

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It’s Time for the Kitchen You’ve Always Wanted! From cabinets to kitchen sinks, we can create the perfect kitchen for your home.

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Shop: Cabinets • Granite, Quartz and Marble Countertops Faucets • Tiles • Mosaics • Sinks • Knobs • Pulls • Lighting

Available Colours

Cherry

Honey

Espresso

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very beautiful kitchen begins with some sort of inspiration. Shelagh’s inspiration? Magazines. “I poured over lots of home and kitchen publications for ideas and created a file of images that appealed to me.”  Knowing that a large space where family and friends could ‘hang out’ and relax together while meals were being prepared, was just as important as having a workable, comfortable and well equipped kitchen that would make preparing for large parties and entertaining a breeze. The Jardim kitchen is cleverly divided into two sections, separating function and ‘fun’.  How did they achieve this balance? With careful planning and creative combinations. The prep station is outfitted with it’s own stovetop, sink and fridge to handle the majority of the heavy and messy cooking during entertaining. This leaves the main area free for lighter prep.  The adjoining high top seating is perfect for breakfast onthe-go, or a light dinner – an ideal space to ‘hang out’ while preparing less formal meals, and of course with a television installed, everyone can watch their favourite cooking show or sports event! The kitchen is large enough to host a culinary

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showdown, but it emits the warmth of a much smaller and cozier space. The large island, which has two levels, breaks up the space beautifully. The lower level is all-encompassing with an extensive counter top, sink, below-counter veggie chiller and dry drawer for handling food preparation. The upper level, which is bar-top height, has high stools putting family members and guests at the perfect height to enjoy a good bottle of wine, while still sitting at the kitchen counter.  Big baskets of fruits and flowers, the piped music system and the television once again, all contribute to the warmth felt throughout the kitchen. When you’re a connoisseur of beautiful décor, it’s virtually impossible to select any single detail as a favourite. “Our kitchen is a true sum of its parts. I love everything about my kitchen. Choosing one element is almost impossible. ATL recommended and outfitted a first class range of appliances - double Viking ranges, convection oven, warmer drawers, veggie crisper, side by side Gaggeneau fridges and freezers, Bosch dishwasher, wine chiller, ice maker - even an above stove pot filler! Our kitchen is truly a dream kitchen! I’m a very lucky lady,” concludes Shelagh.

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An Everyday Thril

Breakfast in Bed BY NATALIE NASH • PHOTOGRAPHY: DWAYNE WATKINS • SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE JAMAICA PEGASUS HOTEL

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a lmy beach evenings, candlelight dinners and chilly nights under the stars; these are the stuff romantic dreams are made of. It’s what comes to mind when we think of indulging our inner goddesses, relaxing our minds, and rekindling passions. But special moments shouldn’t be limited to special occasions. It’s time to inject a little sexy into your everyday. The morning routine has lost all its glamour. It is caught up in rush hour traffic and quick shots of caffeine, but morning is one of the most serene and beautiful times of day and it’s about time we all slowed down to appreciate it.  The birds are singing, the sun isn’t ready to blast us with its full zenith of heat and there’s still a whole lot of potential left in the day. Make the most of this potential by starting your day

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Toad-in-the-Hole by Jamaica Pegasus Chef Mark Cole

off right. Whether you’re an early riser or you can play hooky and sleep in, breakfast in bed is a way to steal a few hours to rejuvenate and treat the senses. Throw on your most comfortable “ jammies”, rock your bed hair and head into the kitchen. All you need are a few ingredients that are probably already in your pantry. Once you’ve put together your menu, take it back to bed and savour the moment. Take the time to snuggle deep into your linens, enjoy the flavours playing on your tongue, take a deep breath of the crisp morning air and bathe yourself in light sunshine. It’s easy to forget that the simplest way to show appreciation to a loved one or yourself is just to slow down and take the time to do something deliberate. Caring is one of the sexiest looks you can rock. Put together the perfect breakfast in bed with this easy four-part formula. Something savoury, something sweet, something rich, and make it all neat. For the savoury, we suggest the interesting Toadin-the-Hole. Some fresh fruit salad or banana flambé will cover your sweet, and finish with a cup of strong Blue Mountain coffee to satisfy your taste buds with its velvety richness. Finally, take a moment to arrange it with care on a beautiful tray with crisp flatware, to tie together all the senses you’ll use to enjoy the meal in a neat bow. This small favour to yourself and/or a loved one will leave you feeling like royalty. Your energy renewed, your senses indulged, your mind peaceful and your body relaxed. By the end of this little experiment you’ll be convinced that any problem can be solved by a little ‘B and B-ing’. Try it…you’ll be glad you did. .

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f you Google the names Suzanne and Michelle Rousseau, you’ll find no shortage of stories on possibly Jamaica’s most famous culinary siblings. Theirs is less a story of fortune favouring the brave, and more of water finding its level, as we say here in Jamaica. Call it destiny maybe, or perhaps the manifestation of hard work and determination. But whatever you call it, it was bound to happen. And whatever you call it does little to change the fact that these ladies have built a solid foundation in Jamaican culinary circles, and are now taking the international food media industry by the horns. Suzanne and Michelle have established themselves as reigning culinary ambassadors. Celebrity catering business - Check. Successful gourmet restaurant - Check. Awardwinning chefs - Check. TV Show - Check. International book deal - Check. And the list could go on, energizer bunny-style. Not bad for a pair of island girls, right? With so much out there about what they do, we wanted to know more about the ladies behind the brand. Now, I’m no doctor, but after spending time with these ladies, I’ve come up with a diagnosis. I think it’s safe to say that Suzanne and Michelle have ELAF - an extreme love affair with food. This is not to be confused with simply liking to eat, or caring about how to serve a special dish. Having ELAF refers to an overwhelming passion for all aspects of gastronomy. Take a read here as we...

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Indulge with Suzanne & Michelle Rousseau By Michelle Gordon • Photography: Dwayne Watkins • Makeup: Angelie Spencer

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We’re always together, we’re one of a kind. Three words describe us – partners in crime - Unknown

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it with these ladies for a few moments and you’re soon struck by an energy that flows from one sister to the other. It’s interesting actually that their closeness manifests itself in much the same way that best friends, or longtime married couples do. It’s the finishing of each other’s sentences, and the hysterical laughter at apparent nothingness that’s clearly something, that captivates you. They’re connected, and their connection commands attention. They speak proudly of a childhood lived in unison. “We’re only 2 years apart, so for the most part, we did everything together,” says Michelle, who is the younger of the two. “Our relationship was never one of rivalry. Yeah, we squabbled as much as any other set of siblings, but nothing ever lasted beyond the moment itself.”

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his must be their secret formula; living in the moment, and recognizing that relationships require synchronicity and maintenance. This is the magic that gave birth to lemonade stands and roadside pizza sales at age 8, to the emerging empire now before us. “We have always been playmates,” offers Suzanne. “Our play prepared us for the moments we live today.” Michelle laughs, “It sure did! All the trouble we got into…well, let’s just say that we’ve always been there for each other. Suzanne has a crazy idea, I say no; it happens anyway, and we suffer the consequences together. Suzanne made me late for school every day. I’d do my homework right after school, Suzanne would wait until the morning. We are polar opposites, but we wouldn’t have it any other way.” From running away, to stealing out the car…we

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know how to support each other!” Suzanne jumps in, recounting Michelle always having her toy cash register. “Yes, she’s always been the disciplined one; the keeper and treasurer.” Suzanne gets semi-serious for a moment as she tells of their days at the University of Western Ontario. They got a golden opportunity to re-energize the Caribbean student body on campus – a fun project

for both ladies, but one that also helped to formalize their working partnership. Having had at that time some 18 years of togetherness – a solid foundation by any standard, working together at school further prepared them for an imminent partnership.

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well – Virgina Wolf

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et’s put aside the fact that Suzanne and Their most indulgent meal? You know, the one Michelle have catered to heads of states, where you say “…screw it, we only live once!” Both celebrities and royalty - indulgent meals sisters agreed hands down on one memorable week for indulgent tastes. Clearly, they have an of celebrating food on the northern coast of Italy in idea about what fine dining ought to be. But when it’s Forte Dei Marmi. The city is home to families of their time, what is the favourite thing for these ladies aristocracy, including Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli and to eat? What’s their ‘soul food’? With little hesitation, Giorgio Armani, and continues to grow in popularity they paint a picture of a simple Italian foodscape; a thin as a destination of global celebrities who travel not crust Italian pizza, fresh salad and wine for Suzanne, for traditional tourist vacationing, but for luxurious and throw in a well-made, hearty traditional Tuscan family-style, old-world traditional vacations, where pasta, set outdoors, and these sisters are in food heaven! food is often at the heart of all gatherings. These ladies have childhood memories steeped in rich Coming closer to home, I wanted to know where traditions of fairy-taled picnics under the Tuscan sun. rated high on their list for fine Caribbean dining. Their youthful holiday indulgences included European “St. Maarten has some of the finest restaurants in the escapades seasoned with Mediterranean magic. “A Caribbean. Jamaica had our number one choice in bright and colourful salad is simple in its presentation, Blue Mountain Inn, which remains unparalleled. Men has the ability to excite both my tastebuds and my had to wear jackets; you enjoyed your coffee by the eyes! Isn’t that what it’s all about?” says Suzanne. Food fireplace and a brandy in the library. Dining should be doesn’t have to be theatrical to be appealing… but as much about the experience as it is about the meal.” drama and fanfare definitely has its place. .

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Good food is very often, even most often, simple food - Anthony Bourdain According to Wikipedia, a foodie is a gourmet, or bedroom. One week of swiping enough After 8® a person who has an ardent or refined interest in food chocolates, marmalade, Carr’s Water Crackers, black and alcoholic beverages. A foodie seeks new food grapes and stilton cheese to fete a small army of dolls experiences as a hobby rather than simply eating out and stuffed animals. Needless to say their midnight of convenience or hunger. The Rousseau sisters are snack was indeed a fancy feast, followed by an even ‘foodies’ by this or any culinary standard, and they’ve fancier punishment 4 days later when the leftovers been seeking fun foodie experiences from as far back (left over in the said pram,) began to reek of old-age! as they can remember. They recall a time more than I’ll give you two guesses as to whose idea that was! 30 years ago, long before book deals and television Now there’s an appreciation for food if ever I saw series were a part of the plan, to a summer visit with one. How many 8-year-olds even like stilton cheese? an aunt in England. Always on the adventurous Suzanne tries to contain her laughter, and continues. beat, the sisters were keen to enact a scene from their “Understanding and appreciating food is about having storybook where a midnight feast was all the rage. It an exposed palate. Appreciating what food brings to took Suzanne and Michelle almost a week of stealing an experience; understanding and identifying flavours, food from the kitchen and hiding it in a pram in the and evolving your taste. Irrespective of the meal being

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bun and cheese or foie gras, an elitist approach to food is the opposite of what a foodie is.” Michelle adds, with perfect timing, “ Food for us is about a sense of passion, joy and absolute pleasure.

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It truly is enjoyment coming from our souls.”

People who love to eat are always the best people – Julia Child

heir approach to food mirrors so much about themselves. There’s an innate passion for the beauty all around them. We sit in the exquisitely decorated living room of Michelle’s small apartment, but somehow, I feel transported to a wrap-around balcony overlooking rolling hills and unending meadows. The influence of travel is evident, but the feeling is still comfortably Jamaican. It’s this fusion of tastes that reflects in their vision for the future of local cuisine. They hope for a more authentic representation of food using local ingredients and staying true to the environment in a sophisticated way. They look forward to the eventual launch of a vibrant restaurant incubator that will help Jamaican start-ups. “We have such a rich tradition of food here in Jamaica; we need to focus on what’s natural and authentic to us, and to that we must

Quick Bits:

add an elevated standard of service so that the dining experience is not marred by poor and disappointing service.” The sisters’ passion for the industry is not confined to just the final product of food. For them, it’s all aspects of food service that need to be addressed. A consistently high standard must be maintained throughout, and every detail of service training must be covered; from the cook shop on the side of the road to the finest dining experience available on the island. Education of restaurant management and wait staff is key! The good thing about these two dynamos in the food industry is not just that they’re excited about it, but they’ll do just what they say they’ll do. And all of us looking on, are waiting with bated breath for the next move from Suzanne and Michelle. .

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Tell us 3 things on your Food Bucket List?

Oooh… definitely less about what food we’d like to eat and more about where we’d want to eat. India, Thai food in Thailand, Braai (Afrikaans for barbecue) in South Africa.

You’re stranded on a desert island and have the fortune of wishing for 3 things to have with you. What are they?

Michelle: Music, fresh fruits and vegetables.

Suzanne: Literature and poetry, music, delicious food.

Other than food, what are your passions?

Michelle: Anything cultural. I love languages. At some point in my life, I’d wanted to be a simultaneous interpreter. I also love film. Maybe I’d have become a director!

Suzanne: I love fashion and art. I could see myself as a curator. Or combining my love for travel and fashion. Ooh, also dance. Yes, I could have been a dancer! I love reading poetry. Wow…I love so much!

What’s next?

Building on the brand. Represent the cuisine and culture outside of Jamaica. Another book.

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One on One: For Suzanne: You’ve said previously that your passion for fine foods has stemmed from a childhood filled with fantastic world travels. Are your boys also budding foodies?

I would not say my boys are foodies yet, but they do know good from bad food, and are quick to say it, and they understand the components of a good meal. For me a great meal is always about the experience at the table... the environment, the people sharing the meal, the quality of the conversation, the music, the wine and of course the food, whether in a restaurant or home setting, and my boys definitely understand and appreciate these elements, and they know what they like.

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What’s your favourite recipe from your book? And why?

Any recipe from the Ladies Lunch chapter... because those were the recipes from our Cafe Bella years. It was the start of our food business when we ran a small, quaint cafe on Hillcrest Avenue that had a rocking lunch crowd. It was fabulous - great music, lovely people, a breezy veranda and Mich and I cooking every day. It was a fun and happy time. .

It’s Friday night at home. What’s happening in your kitchen?

Friday nights are usually the nights we order in and do not cook unless I have someone coming to dinner. You are far more likely to find wine, a cheese board, and some nuts happening on a Friday night chez moi.

For Michelle: What’s your favourite recipe from your book? And why?

Roasted pumpkin and figs with tahini sauce because it reminds me of living in Fort Greene Brooklyn and all the fresh produce at the weekly farmers market - this is where I came up with this recipe as the produce always inspired me. Also, it’s vegan fresh and tasty. Delicious with roasted sweet potato and a fresh salad.

It’s Sunday afternoon. What’s happening in your kitchen?

I live alone so if I’m cooking for myself its always super simple and very fresh and usually vegetarian - even on a Sunday. A great pasta with a fresh tossed salad is common. If I want traditional Sunday lunch I just go to Sue’s, then it’s all out roast pork, rice and peas, plantain, pear, salad, you name it.

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Suzanne on Michelle: Tell us something about how you feel about Michelle that she probably doesn’t know.

There’s not a lot Michelle wouldn’t know about how I feel, as I tend not to withhold my emotions, and she knows me very well. She may not know that I think she is a great writer, and her brain is as sharp as a whistle.

If you had to choose one thing you love the most about Michelle, what would it be?

Her quirky sense of humour. And that she’s more like a fairy than a human! Michelle is always in the clouds floating somewhere. I love it!

This journey had to be with my sister because…

We create magic together and always have, and we get each other in ways that no one else does. Most importantly we not only amuse the hell out of each other, we laugh and laugh and laugh. There is no point to the journey unless it’s joyful. .

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Michelle on Suzanne Tell us something about how you feel about Suzanne that she probably doesn’t know.

That she is the strongest and probably one of the most creative and intelligent people I have ever met - she possesses an uncanny ability to immediately discern the truth of any situation and make a clear and informed decision of how to proceed.

If you had to choose one thing you love the most about Suzanne, what would it be?

Her sense of humour and the way she laughs at everything, especially when she’s stressed. Her unapologetic honesty and the way she says exactly what’s on her mind and voices the one thing that everyone in the room is thinking but is afraid to say.

This journey had to be with my sister because…

We make each other laugh like crazy! Plus she’s the only one who completely gets me - especially the quirky parts - it’s made the whole thing so much fun - we keep each other grounded.

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Michelle's Favourite Recipe

ROASTED PUMPKIN AND FIGS WITH TAHINI LIME DRIZZLE AND CHADON BENI OIL CARIBBEAN POTLUCK FROM THEIR

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Yields 6 Servings

 

BOOK

» 4 pounds pumpkin, peeled and chopped » 8 fresh figs, quartered » ½ red onions, sliced » 8 cloves garlic, whole » bunch of fresh mint, chopped » ¼ cup olive oil » sea salt » freshly ground black pepper » Chadon Beni Oil » Tahini Lime Drizzle

For the Tahini Lime Drizzle » 4 tablespoons tahini » 4 tablespoons hot water » juice of 2 limes » 1 teaspoon honey » 1 teaspoon ginger » 2 tablespoons mint, chopped » 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped

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 For the Chadon Beni (Culantro) Oil [makes about 1 cup] » 1 cup olive oil » ½ cup fresh chandon beni (cilantro) or cilantro leaves » 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice » 2 teaspoons sea salt

Heat oven to 400° F. Toss pumpkin, figs, onions and 01 garlic in olive oil and mint. Season well with salt and freshly

ground black pepper. Roast in oven for about 20 minutes till caramelized.

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Whisk lime juice, honey, hot water and tahini together. Add ginger, mint and cilantro. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, and thin with a little more water or olive oil as needed. Blend all ingredients for Chadon Beni Oil in a blender till smooth.

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When finished roasting, assemble vegetables on a platter and drizzle with tahini sauce and Chadon Beni Oil just before service. This sauce also makes a great dressing or dipping sauce.

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AUTHENTIC. EXCLUSI VE. UNIQUE. .

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AND F UN!

150 wines & spirits • 60 delicious cheeses & gourmet foods • scrumptious menu • ideal gifts

CHEESE • WINE • BISTRO • SPECIALTY FOODS

Shop 2, Sovereign North

. 29 Barbican Road, Kingston 6, Jamaica . 876.632.5500 . delicious@uncorkedjamaica.com


Suzanne's Favourite Recipe

SMOKED MARLIN AND CREAM CHEESE WITH ONION PICKLE A LA CAFÉ BELLA CARIBBEAN POTLUCK FROM THEIR

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Makes 4 Sandwiches

 

BOOK

» 4 small yellow onions, very thinly sliced » 4 tablespoons capers, drained » 1 cup distilled white vinegar » ¼ cup sugar » 1 pound cream cheese, softened at room temperature » 1 cup sour cream » 1 tablespoon fresh dill or cilantro leaves, chopped, plus more for garnish » sea salt and freshly ground black pepper » 8 slices crusty whole-grain bread or baguette » 8 ounces smoked marlin (or another smoked fish, such as smoked trout) » 4 lime wedges

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In a small bowl, combine the onions, capers, vinegar and sugar and let sit for at least 1 hour. The pickled onions can be refrigerated for up to 1 week; you can simply keep adding fresh onions to the marinade.

In a small bowl, combine the cream cheese, sour cream, 02 dill, and pinches of salt and pepper and mix well with a wooden spoon. (Alternatively, you can blend in a food processor.)

Toast the bread and spread 1 tablespoon of the cream 03 cheese blend on each slice. Layer the marlin thinly on top

of the cream cheese on all 8 slices. Top with freshly ground black pepper and a squeeze of fresh lime. Serve open-faced, garnished generously with the pickled onions.

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Top 10 Dinnertime Playlists

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usic they say, is food for the soul. It creates a mood, sets the tone and enhances the moment. Ever sat to dinner and noticed just how loud and distracting the flatware can be? That’s probably because there was no background music filling the silent moments. Here’s an easy fix. Depending on the evening planned, you can simply create several custom playlists that you can use at different stages of your dinner party. But before you hit that play button, you should probably consider the following: .

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Know Your Guests – In an intimate setting, knowing your audience is very helpful when trying to choose the right music. Keeping the evening’s music age and taste appropriate is an effortless way to ensure that your guests have an enjoyable evening. Time to Dine – Keep the volume low enough so that conversation will still be audible and comfortable. Endless Love – Keep your playlist going and going and going. You don’t want to have to be breaking your conversation in order to keep the vibe going, so be sure to create an extensive playlist to last well into the night.

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Date Night (Modern)

Date Night (Old School)

»» All of Me -John Legend

»» Let’s Get It On -Marvin Gaye

»» Sky Full of Stars -Coldplay

»» Fly Me To The Moon -Frank Sinatra

»» Rude - Magic

»» Popsicle Toes -Michael Franks

»» Stay With Me -Sam Smith »» Someone Like You -Adele »» Best You Ever Had -John Legend »» It Will Rain -Bruno Mars »» Brooklyn -Bruno Mars »» You’re Beautiful -James Blunt »» Beautiful -Junior Gong

»» The Closer I Get To You -Roberta Flack »» The Sweetest Taboo -Sade »» Overjoyed -Stevie Wonder »» Always and Forever -Heatwave »» Sukiyaki – A Taste of Honey »» More Than Words – Extreme »» Baby Ima Want You -Bread

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Island Dishes Casserole: a large, deep dish used both in the oven and as a serving vessel.

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hen it comes to entertaining and setting a gorgeous table, it takes little more than a bit of creativity and some greatlooking flatware. I came across these great pieces; very colourful, well-made and the best part? They’re made and designed by Caribbean belles! Trinidadian Celebrity Chef Alicia Powell and Jamaican Artist Karlene Torey share with us pieces from their new collections. With the holidays just around the corner, and entertaining being a part of our DNA here in the Caribbean, take a look at these useful pieces and don’t forget to Indulge!

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Basia St y le Cooking Caste Iron Collection The new Basia Style Cooking Caste Iron Collection is a sure hit. There’s a sexy sturdiness about these pots that commands attention and will prove to be one of your favourite cookware sets when guests are on the way. The collection is built for cooking, and beautiful enough for serving at your dining table. With vibrant Caribbean colours, you’ll add the perfect dash of joie de vivre to any table setting. Every kitchen should have one! Available in the US and Trinidad & Tobago. For more information visit www. basiastylecooking.com $69.95

Hand Painted Heliconia Ceramic Dishes From al fresco lunches to sumptuous evening feasts, these handpainted casserole dishes, saturated in lush tropical blooms, will elevate all your culinary creations. Relish in the beauty of exuberant tropical flowers, all hand-painted by talented Jamaican artists. Ideal for any Caribbean table, regardless of whether or not the table is actually here in the Caribbean. 10” Round Casserole Dish USD $120 Oval Casserole Dish USD $70 Manufactured in Jamaica by CREOLE. Available at Craft Cottage and Island Art & Framing, Kingston, Jamaica

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Indulge Issue 2 - INDULGE in Jamaica