Indiana Tech Magazine – Fall 2022

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MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS | FALL 2022
2 Fall 2022 10 HOMECOMING 2022 Abundant sunshine, smiles and good times ruled the weekend during this year's homecoming festivities! 16 BUILDING A CENTURY OF EXCELLENCE Fundraising campaign will help Indiana Tech better serve all students in various ways. 22 EXPANDING OPPORTUNITY The first phase of the Zollner Engineering Center expansion and renovation is complete. FEATURES

INSIDE TECH

04

Letter from Our President

From new learning environments, to new programs to a new capital campaign, we are improving Indiana Tech for our students!

Across the University

06

By the Numbers

Learn about the leadership phase of Indiana Tech's Building a Century of Excellence Campaign, which has been in motion since 2019.

08 Tech Happenings

A Lilly Endowment grant is helping our university increase summer camp and after-school programming for youths in the region.

09

Faculty Update

Learn more about the academic pursuits of our faculty outside of the classroom.

24 College of Arts and Sciences Roundup

For Kelsey Ivers, the first student to earn a biology degree from Indiana Tech, her passion is her priority.

26

College of Business Roundup

New Executive Degree programs give working professionals another flexible way to achieve their educational goals.

Talwar College of Engineering and Computer Sciences Roundup

28

Computer engineering degree program earns accreditation by ABET.

30

Department of Athletics Adds Archery and Competitive Dance as Varsity Programs

Two new Warrior athletic programs— Tech's 27th and 28th—will begin during the 2023-24 academic year.

Path of a Warrior

32 From the Desk of Kristi Jarmus

Director of Alumni Relations is filled with gratitude after the whirlwind of homecoming season ends.

34 Alumni Spotlight: Veronica Papach

How did a small-town girl with little hope of going to college earn an impactful position with Audi? By going at life full throttle.

36 Making a Difference: Ed Ray

This 1968 aerospace engineering grad played a huge role in mitigating the 2011 nuclear power plant disaster in Fukushima, Japan.

40 In Memoriam

ON THE COVER: Indiana Tech students Domanique Douglas, left, and Caiya Wright share the fun of homecoming weekend.

Indiana Tech Magazine 3
28 26
30

Letter from Our President

It was wonderful to see so many alumni, family members and friends on campus this fall for Homecoming and Family & Friends weekend. Once you become a Warrior, you are forever a member of the Indiana Tech family! I hope you’ll all take time to relive the memories of this special weekend in our recap, which begins on page 12.

In addition to bringing together members of the Tech community for fun and fellowship, this year’s homecoming celebration highlighted the impact that so many of you have on the success and achievements of today’s students. Our annual President’s Dinner served as the kickoff of the public phase of the Building a Century of Excellence Campaign. Thanks to the support of alumni and friends like you, the campaign has already raised more than $24 million of our $26,235,000 goal.

The campaign is providing support in four critical areas of our work to serve students: the expansion and renovation of the Zollner Engineering Center; student scholarships; the enhancement of student success initiatives; and excellence in athletics. Learn about this essential campaign for Indiana Tech’s future on page 18.

Work continues apace on the Zollner Engineering Center renovation and expansion project. This fall, the addition to the building opened for classes and labs, while the existing sections of the building closed for renovations. When complete in the fall of 2023, the all-new Zollner will be a state-of-theart 70,000-square-foot center for Indiana Tech’s growing engineering, computer sciences and life

sciences programs. Read more about the opening of phase one of the project and next steps on page 24.

Innovative work at Indiana Tech is not limited to buildings and physical spaces.

New program development is an important focus for all of us at the university as well. Our faculty and academic leadership team have done an excellent job developing new programs that serve both students and employers in a wide range of growing industries. To catch up on all that is happening in Arts and Sciences, Business, and Engineering and Computer Sciences, be sure to check out our college roundups starting on page 26.

New programs at Tech also include new athletic programs. We're proud of our long and successful history in men's and women's sports, and look forward to the launch of our new archery and competitive dance teams in the fall of 2023. Learn more on page 30.

Thank you all for being Warriors and for supporting our students!

Warm regards,

4 Fall 2022

Volume 20, Issue 1

Karl W.

Ph.D. President

Institutional Advancement

Dan Grigg Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Dave Stevens Senior Director of Institutional Advancement

Mary Lasits Senior Director of Institutional Advancement

Jennifer Ross Director of Advancement and Executive Operations

Kristi Jarmus Director of Alumni Relations

Kayla Paz Director of Advancement Services

Erin Johnson Assistant Director of Institutional Advancement and Grants Administration

Marketing

Brian Engelhart Vice President for Marketing and Communication

Matt Bair Director of Marketing and Communication

Jennifer Murphy Director of Marketing, College of Professional Studies

Julie Farison Creative Director

Sarah Suraci Graphic Designer

Elle Helm Graphic Designer

Joel Kuhn, BS ‘12, Web Developer

Randy Smith Director of Photo and Video

Amber Owens, MBA ‘21, Social Media Manager

Indiana Tech online: IndianaTech.edu

Please send comments, news and feature story ideas to: Indiana Tech

attn: Marketing

1600 E. Washington Blvd. Fort Wayne, IN 46803 phone: 260.422.5561 or 800.937.2448, ext. 2250 email: marketing@IndianaTech.edu

The editors reserve the right to edit articles for length and clarity. Articles may be reproduced with permission and proper attribution.

Our Mission: Indiana Tech provides learners a professional education; prepares them for active participation, career advancement and leadership in the global 21st century society; and motivates them toward a life of significance and worth.

Indiana Tech Magazine 5

By the Numbers

During Homecoming Weekend 2022, Indiana Tech’s Office of Institutional Advancement announced the public phase of Building a Century of Excellence: A Comprehensive Campaign for Indiana Tech (learn more on pages 18 through 21). However, Institutional Advancement has been working to generate support for the campaign since its private launch in 2019. Since then, friends and supporters of the university have donated more than $24 million to the cause. In this issue’s By the Numbers feature, we break down where those donations are coming from and how they will support our students.

6 Fall 2022 ACROSS THE UNIVERSITY
TOTAL DOLLARS IN PLANNED GIFTS MADE TO THE CAMPAIGN $2,709,500 TOTAL NUMBER OF PLANNED GIFTS MADE TO THE CAMPAIGN 17 TOTAL NUMBER OF DOLLARS AND INDIVIDUAL DONORS BY GRADUATION DECADE TO THE CAMPAIGN 1940S 1950S 1960S 1970S 1980S 1990S 2000S 2010S 2020S TOTAL $28K 8 DONORS $1.5MIL 112 $6.9MIL 269 $852K 93 $146K 39 $112K 46 $80K 80 $217K 158 $10K 39 $9.8MIL 844

Because of generous support from our friends and donors, Indiana Tech continues to be a lifechanging learning environment that motivates students toward lives of significance and worth, every day. Meet 2019 Presidential Scholarship recipient, Kristen Forti, of St. Joe, Indiana. In addition to being an academic leader during her time at Indiana Tech, the communication major has

Indiana Tech Magazine 7
orchestrated two
There are so many ways you can support students
today
AK 3 AL 16 AZ 32 AR 4 CA 165 CO 92 CT 30 DC 1 DE 4 FL 207 GA 126 TOTAL NUMBER OF GIFTS MADE TO THE CAMPAIGN BY STATE TOTAL NUMBER OF DOLLARS AND GIFTS RAISED FOR THE CAMPAIGN –BY FOCUS AREA ENHANCING STUDENT SUCCESS $763,736 247 GIFTS EXCELLENCE IN ATHLETICS $4,203,390 1,335 GIFTS STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS $5,960,088 1,681 GIFTS ZOLLNER ENGINEERING CENTER EXPANSION AND RENOVATION $7,958,238 4,270 GIFTS TOTAL $24,335,018 13,164 GIFTS THANKS TO YOU HI 7 IA 4 ID 3 IL 283 IN 10,149 KS 4 KY 247 LA 8 MA 100 MD 118 MI 162 MN 28 MO 24 MS 23 MT 2 NC 114 NE 1 NH 15 NJ 55 NM 3 NV 8 NY 61 OH 360 OK 15 OR 94 PA 144 SC 23 SD 5 TN 42 TX 191 UT 1 VA 100 VT 2 WA 26 WI 14 WV 27
campus 5k races to generate support for Fort Wayne’s Community Harvest Food Bank.
at Indiana Tech. Contact Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dan Grigg
to learn how. 260.422.5561, ext. 2440 dggrigg@indianatech.edu

Tech Happenings

As a result of receiving a $1 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. through its initiative, Indiana Youth Programs on Campus, Indiana Tech introduced its STEAM Academy youth program—a home for expanded and new camp offerings for K-12 students and a variety of after-school programs.

Indiana Youth Programs on Campus (IYPC) is a Lilly Endowment initiative designed to help Indiana colleges and universities in their efforts to create new or expand and enhance existing high-quality, on-campus programs for Hoosier youth, ages five through 18. Through this initiative, the Endowment has allocated more than $28 million for planning grants and program implementation grants.

Indiana Tech programs to be supported through the grant include:

• Middle School STEM Camp

• High School STEM Camp

• Girls Who Code (GWC)

• Cyber Patriot Summer Camp

• Indiana Tech Explorers Post 2829

• Kids Robotics Academy

• Creative Expression and Communication Camp

• Investigative Science Camp

Check out indianatech.edu/steam to stay in the loop as more exciting camps and opportunities for kids are developed.

8 Fall 2022 ACROSS THE UNIVERSITY
$1 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to bolster youth programming

Tech recognized as a 2022 Great College to Work For

Recognized

Indiana Tech is one of the best colleges in the nation to work for, according to the latest survey by The Great Colleges to Work For® program. This year’s recognition marks the second time in three years that the university has been recognized for being one of the top college workplaces in the U.S., as it was also named a Great College to Work for in 2020.

This year’s results are based on a survey of 212 colleges and universities nationwide. In all, 68 of the 212 institutions achieved “Great College to Work For” recognition for specific best practices and policies. Results are reported for small, medium and large institutions, with Indiana Tech included among medium universities with 3,000 to 9,999 students.

Indiana Tech is one of only two colleges in Indiana to be recognized this year, along with the University of Notre Dame. Indiana Tech earned honors in four categories:

• Compensation & Benefits

• Supervisor/Department Chair Effectiveness

• Confidence in Senior Leadership

• Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging

The survey results are based on a two-part assessment process: an institution questionnaire that captured employment data and workplace policies from each institution, and a survey administered to faculty, administrators, and professional support staff. The primary factor in deciding whether an institution received recognition was the employee feedback.

L.E.A.D. program garners national recognition

Indiana Tech’s Leveraging Engagement and Action in Diversity (L.E.A.D.) Executive Certificate program, and Lisa Givan, the university’s vice president for institutional diversity, equity and belonging, earned national recognition by HRO Today at its fall Inclusion Summit held in Atlanta.

The L.E.A.D. certificate program was honored as a Program of Distinction in the 2022 Inclusion Awards by HRO Today, an HR industry association and media company. The L.E.A.D. program was among nine finalists during this year’s HRO awards, along with programs developed by nationally known organizations such as Goodyear and Oxford University. To learn more about the L.E.A.D. Executive Certificate, visit indianatech.edu/leadcertificate.

Lisa Givan was named a Leader of Distinction during the association’s 2022 DEI Executive of the Year awards. Givan founded Indiana Tech’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion in 2018, and serves as its first vice president for institutional diversity, equity and belonging. She has been instrumental in the development and launch of the L.E.A.D. Executive Certificate program, working with Drs. Kevin Bottomley and Angie Fincannon of Indiana Tech’s College of Business to deliver this impactful leadership program to managers from a range of regional corporate partners.

Faculty Update

Dr. Said Abushamleh, assistant professor of electrical engineering, published a chapter in and co-edited the book “Antenna Systems.”

Dr. Jonathan Brownlee, assistant professor of English, authored The Cultural Myopia of Postmodernism in the journal Poli-Femo.

Dr. Crystal Karn, associate professor of business, has been accepted as a reviewer for The Scholarly Teacher for 2022-23.

Dr. Susan McGrade, professor of English, presented Awakening Ancestral Knowledge and Discovering (Im)Migration Narratives: Teaching an Interdisciplinary Course on Literature and Genealogy at the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States (MELUS) National Conference in New Orleans.

Dr. Cortney Robbins, associate professor of English, received the Gertrude and Theodore Debs Memorial Fellowship as a history master student at Indiana State University. She also presented Literature, Empathy, and Gender: Pedagogical and Theoretical Considerations for Teaching at the College English Association conference in Birmingham, Alabama.

Dr. Thomas Tran, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, coauthored Comparing Classical and Metaheuristic Methods to Optimize Multi-Objective Operation Planning of District Energy Systems Considering Uncertainties in the journal Applied Energy.

Indiana Tech Magazine 9

HOME COMING

HOME COMING 10 Fall 2022

BRIGHT

SUNSHINE AND PLEASANT TEMPERATURES GREETED ALUMNI AND FAMILIES OF CURRENT STUDENTS DURING THIS YEAR’S HOMECOMING AND FAMILY WEEKEND, FRIDAY, SEPT. 30, THROUGH SATURDAY, OCT. 1.

FESTIVITIES KICKED OFF

in earnest on Friday with the Homecoming and Reunion Welcome event in the Abbott Welcome Center. Alumni relived their time on campus as they thumbed through stacks of Indiana Tech yearbooks and perused a display of memorabilia that was created for the occasion. In addition, campus tours were offered by Indiana Tech students, with the highlight being a walkthrough of the new addition to the Zollner Engineering Center. Phase 1 of the current Zollner expansion and renovation project was wrapped up in August; when the project is fully completed in the fall of 2023, Zollner will be brand new and nearly double in size, giving students an inspiring and innovative learning environment to explore and master their fields of study. All in all, it was a fun start to the weekend as attendees renewed old acquaintances, made new connections and shared stories about their alma mater with other members of Indiana Tech’s current community.

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DURING THE PRESIDENT’S DINNER, THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THREE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS WERE

ANNOUNCED.

Ballman Family Foundation Scholarship

This scholarship was established by Ron and Ginger Ballman. Ron is a 2009 business administration graduate of Indiana Tech. He spent 25 years in aluminum manufacturing prior to founding entrepreneurial ventures, which include Shoals Extrusion, Ballman Metals, RB2 Properties and Adventech, all located in Florence, Alabama. This scholarship is in honor of the Ballman family’s long history of contribution to American industry, during which it has worked to promote entrepreneurship while helping new entrants to industry realize their dreams.

The James K. Spitler Scholarship

James Spitler graduated from Indiana Tech in 1956 with a degree in aeronautical engineering. He spent the majority of his career working for Lockheed Martin, based principally in the Atlanta area. After many years as an aeronautical engineer and enjoying new challenges, Jim transitioned into management and spent the remainder of his career working for Lockheed in management, focusing on defense and government contracts. He retired in 1996 as director of chief structures.

Indiana Tech Alumni Association CPS Scholarship

To facilitate lifelong relationships between alumni, students and the communities we serve, Indiana Tech’s Alumni Board is establishing the Indiana Tech Alumni Association College of Professional Studies (CPS) Scholarship. This scholarship, funded by the Alumni Association, is exclusively designed to provide financial assistance for non-traditional students as they pursue an undergraduate degree at Indiana Tech.

12 Fall 2022
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A few hours later, President Karl W. Einolf and his wife, Maria, hosted the annual President’s Dinner inside the Schaefer Center. As always, the main purpose of this President’s Dinner was to recognize Indiana Tech’s major donors and thank them for their generous support of our students. This year’s event also served as the public kickoff to Indiana Tech’s Building a Century of Excellence campaign, an ambitious fundraising initiative to support students and the university. Read more about the campaign, beginning on page 18.

During the dinner, graduate student Josh Kline, of Monaca, Pennsylvania, spoke with gratitude about all who helped him find his way to Indiana Tech and those who had a positive impact on his life once he got here. Kline, a four-year member of the men’s basketball team, earned an electrical engineering degree from Indiana Tech in May. He is pursuing an MBA in project management at Tech and he has one more year of eligibility with the basketball team.

The day wrapped up in victorious fashion as Indiana Tech’s

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Alumni Awards

Graduate of the Last Decade (G.O.L.D.) Award

Darius Darling

— B.S. Business Administration 2014, MBA 2017

Originally from Detroit, Michigan, Darius chose Indiana Tech for his bachelor's degree program and has been an integral part of the Tech community ever since.

As a student, Darius was active and visible on campus—a regular in student life events. He became so entrenched in university culture, Indiana Tech hired him as its conference services coordinator after he graduated. Now, Darius is part of the human resources team at Brotherhood Mutual Insurance in Fort Wayne.

Darius, a positive force of nature, lights up any room he enters. While working at Tech, he initiated several programs that are still in operation today. He was also involved in the Fort Wayne community with his positive, outgoing, and supportive personality. His departure from Tech in 2019 was both joyful and tearful—the Warrior Nation was sad to see him leave, yet we celebrated that one of our own was moving into an exciting new phase

of his career. Darius continues to be part of the fabric of Indiana Tech by volunteering and taking on leadership roles with its alumni board. In fact, he has been nominated for the position of board president.

One of Darius’ claims to fame is his collaboration with President Karl Einolf to rescore the school song—a fun project that tied together his love of music and Indiana Tech. He has performed our school song at convocations and commencement ceremonies to rousing cheers from faculty, staff and students.

A person of deep faith, Darius combines his dedication to God and his passion for music as an elder in his faith community. He shares his music with the community as an award-winning gospel music artist. We are so proud to watch how he continues to positively impact not only the Indiana Tech community, but the community at large, with his talents and treasures.

Outstanding CPS Alumnus of the Year Award

Ronald Ballman

—B.S. Business Administration, 2009

The word grit comes to mind when describing a College of Professional Studies student. CPS students balance family, career and school as they persist toward earning their degree. It takes serious commitment to reach their goals. Ron Ballman defines this level of persistence. In fact, he takes it to the next level as a leader in the business world of emerging energysaving technologies.

He is the CEO of Adventech, a Florence, Alabama-based company committed to developing innovative technologies. Adventech’s MaxEff motors are industrial motor generators which run at 99.8% efficiency, reducing the need for grid power.

Over the last two years, Ron’s business has donated eight new MaxEff motors to Indiana Tech. Four are located in Indiana Tech electrical engineering labs for students to work with and learn from. The other four were installed in Pierson Hall, where they are being used to pump water throughout the dorm. These motors will save Indiana Tech 25 to 30 percent on its energy bill each year.

In October, Ron hosted 12 Indiana Tech electrical engineering students and faculty on a visit to Adventech. Students and faculty tourned the plant and learn about the innovative work being done there.

Ron also gives of his time and expertise as a guest speaker for several of Indiana Tech’s senior level entrepreneurship classes.

Without question, Ron Ballman is driven to make the world a better place with innovation and share his experience and expertise with the students of Indiana Tech.

Alumni Volunteer of the Year

Alvin Hernandez

—B.S. Electrical Engineering, 1972

This award is given to a graduate of Indiana Tech who has gone out of their way to further the mission of Indiana Tech and serve our students, alumni and friends of the university.

Al has 49 years of transmission and substation engineering, operation and construction experience. He began his career at Florida Power & Light Company immediately after graduating in 1972. He was an integral member of many departments and teams until his departure in 1995.

At that time, Al and his wife, Linda, founded Powerserve Technologies, a company that provides substation and protection and control work throughout Florida and other states. The company has grown and thrived under Al’s leadership, and he continues to serve as its CEO.

For many years, Al has supported the work of Indiana Tech. He has served on the Dean’s Advisory Committee, delivered presentations to students on campus and assisted with the grant application process. He has also donated equipment to the faculty of engineering and traveled to Fort Wayne to personally train faculty and staff on how to use the equipment. His goal is to give students real-world experience and knowledge while still in the classroom.

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Saturday’s events began with alumni, students, family members, faculty and staff joining together for the annual Prayer Service in Wegener Chapel.

A highlight of each year’s homecoming celebration, the Alumni Recognition and Awards Ceremony luncheon, took place in the Snyder Academic Center’s Multi-Flex Theater. Three special awards were presented (see page 16) and members of the reunion classes of 1962, ’72, ’87 and ’97 were recognized (see the list to the right).

During the afternoon, participants enjoyed fun activities at Party on the Square, took in some alumni athletic competitions, played trivia at the National Society of Black Engineers Alumni/Student Trivia Time and got together with old friends at the Black Alumni Meetup.

Fans of Warrior hockey were treated to another chance to revel in an Orange and Black victory as the women’s hockey team downed Miami University, 4-2. Dakota Bowler netted two goals in the win while Hailey Anderson had a goal and an assist.

Back inside the Schaefer Center that evening, the Indiana Tech Athletics Hall of Fame honored its 23rd Hall of Fame Class. Inducted this year were the 2011 women’s lacrosse team, soccer player Mark Baptist, volleyball player Ashley Hamilton, baseball player Josh Judy and men's basketball team chaplain TB Smith.

Attendees had two great ways to end the weekend—trying their luck for fun prizes at the annual Casino Night or partying the night away with music and dancing at the Alumni Social Evening.

If you attended homecoming, tell us what you thought at alumni@indianatech.edu. If you couldn’t make it to campus, be sure to mark your calendar for next year’s homecoming weekend, Friday, Oct. 6, and Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023. As the weekend gets closer, visit indianatech.edu/homecoming for a schedule of events.

Alumni Recognition

CLASS OF 1962

60-YEAR

HONOREES

Peter Dombrowski

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Phillip Montieth

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Frederick Neitzel

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Thomas Noll

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Jerry Pursell

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Joe Smyjunas

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Richard Weymouth

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

CLASS OF 1972

50-YEAR

HONOREES

Terry Dersham

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Alvin Hernandez

B.S. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Krishna Merchant

B.S. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

CLASS OF 1987

35-YEAR HONOREE

Michael Gibson

B.S. ACCOUNTING

CLASSES OF 1997

25-YEAR HONOREE

Sam Haskett

B.S. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Indiana Tech Magazine 15

A COMPREHENSIVE CAMPAIGN FOR INDIANA TECH

Launched in 2019 with a leadership giving phase, Building a Century of Excellence seeks to enable Indiana Tech to better serve all students as they prepare for careers in an increasingly competitive global job market and build lives of significance and worth.

During Homecoming 2022, the university launched the public phase of the campaign, which will seek to raise the final amount needed to reach the campaign goal of $26,235,000. To date, thanks to the generous support of alumni, friends of the university, faculty and staff members, Building a Century of Excellence has already raised more than $24,000,000. Here’s a look at the four pillars of this impactful campaign:

16 Fall 2022

ZOLLNER ENGINEERING CENTER EXPANSION AND RENOVATION

Originally known as the Dana Science Center, the Zollner Engineering Center was expanded in 2002. Given the significant changes in technology, education and career fields in the nearly two decades since, the time is right to reinvent and expand this vital learning facility to meet the needs of STEM students now and well into the future. This project will double the center’s current size of 40,000 square feet, enabling Indiana Tech to better serve existing engineering and computer science programs, and establish new programs, partnerships and initiatives.

The new, updated and expanded spaces in Zollner will include new labs and classrooms, updated lab equipment, new computer lab facilities and modernized student engagement spaces to foster collaboration with fellow students, faculty and industry partners. Just a few of the new spaces planned for the center include:

• Cybersecurity/networking complex

• Engineering innovation and design lab

• Robotics lab

• Power and controls lab

• Fluid mechanics lab

• Digital forensics lab

• Biomedical engineering lab

• Organic/analytical chemistry lab

The new addition to the Zollner Engineering Center opened in August 2022 for the start of the fall semester (read more in our feature story about Zollner on page 24). The renovation of the existing areas of the building began in May 2022, with the entire expansion and renovation project to be completed in September 2023. Learn more about the new Zollner Engineering Center at indianatech.edu/zollner.

Indiana Tech Magazine 17

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS

Indiana Tech works to ensure that a lack of financial resources does not prevent students from pursuing a college education. Scholarships are used to bridge the gap for students whose financial situation might pose barriers to earning a degree. For some students, receiving a scholarship is the only way they can go to college. Other students find themselves in situations where their circumstances change, and they need extra financial support along the way to complete their degree.

Building a Century of Excellence seeks to raise $5 million in endowed and spendable scholarships:

• Endowed Scholarships ($2 million) – An investment in endowed scholarships will provide a steady stream of income to support present and future generations.

• Spendable Scholarships ($1 million) – Spendable scholarships make it possible for these students to enroll at Indiana Tech, stay at Indiana Tech and be successful. The benefit of outright scholarships is immediate impact.

• Last-Mile Scholarships ($1 million) – Many students exhaust their financial aid as they approach graduation. Last-mile scholarships aim to ensure they are able to complete their degree.

• Emergency Fund ($1 million) – Our emergency fund supports students who experience an emergency while at Indiana Tech and could benefit from additional financial resources to help them persist through their hardship.

18 Fall 2022

EXCELLENCE IN ATHLETICS

ndiana Tech student-athletes continue to earn national attention and recognition for their performance in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Through this campaign, we seek to provide our world-class athletes with world-class facilities that will allow them to maintain and improve their performance on the national stage. In recognition of the need for outside resources to remain competitive, Indiana Tech commits to an investment of $5 million dedicated to excellence in athletics. Funds will enable the university to build a new indoor track and field facility, enhance existing facilities across multiple sports, create a sustainable athletics fund for excellence and celebrate our longstanding athletic legacy with a dedicated Hall of Fame area on our main campus.

Indiana Tech Magazine 19 Give to Indiana Tech Cut along the dotted line, complete this form and mail your contribution to Indiana Tech. Indiana Tech thanks you for your generosity. PLEASE DESIGNATE MY GIFT FOR $ $ Student Emergency Fund $ Other MY GIFT check all that apply My check or money order is enclosed (made payable to “Indiana Tech”) I have enclosed my employer’s matching gift form I have named Indiana Tech in my will I would like more information about planned giving to Indiana Tech I want to make a difference, too! Please provide your contact information on the reverse side → You can also donate safely online. Visit giving. indianatech.edu or scan the code below.
Building a Century of Excellence
I
20 Fall 2022 CONTACT INFORMATION First Name Last Name City State Zip Code Phone Mobile Phone Email Indiana Tech 1600 E Washington Blvd Fort Wayne, IN 46803 giving.indianatech.edu 260.399.2831 Indiana Tech does not sell or share donor information with other organizations. Your gift is tax deductible as provided by law. Give to Indiana Tech Cut along the dotted line, complete this form and mail your contribution to Indiana Tech. Indiana Tech thanks you for your generosity.

ENHANCING STUDENT SUCCESS

Today’s college experience requires a broader and deeper approach to student advising and support. This is true for students studying on our main campus as well as those who are online or at a distance from our in-person, on-campus resources. The following initiatives are designed to enhance our student success efforts:

Office of Student Success

This center will continue to serve as a broad-based support system for our traditional undergraduate students and significantly expand the support provided for our non-traditional, online students. Through this campaign, the Office of Student Success will be positioned to help more students persist to achieve their ultimate goal—graduating from Indiana Tech.

Student Professional Development and HighImpact Experiences

In addition to providing an outstanding, careerfocused education, we will expand the number and quality of opportunities for our students to demonstrate their professional readiness. These experiences will give students the opportunity to build a robust portfolio of projects and work experiences, and a professional resume.

McMillen Library Enhancements

In the spirit of continuous improvement, the Richard and Jeanne Sutton Learning Commons at McMillen Library opened on Friday, Nov. 11, enhancing an already great place on campus where students and faculty will want to learn, work and engage with one another. This part of our campaign will drive significant improvements and greater alignment of several important academic and student-oriented resources, including the Teaching Excellence Center, Writing Center and Oral Communication Center.

As the campaign draws closer to reaching its total goal and the individual goals for each of the four main areas, you, too, can make a difference in the lives of our students. To learn more about the campaign, and hear the stories of alumni and friends who are supporting this important initiative, please visit campaign.indianatech. edu or reach out to Dan Grigg, Vice President for Institutional Advancement, at 260.399.2831 or dggrigg@indianatech.edu today.

Indiana Tech Magazine 21

Expanding Opportunity

First phase of Zollner Engineering Center project is complete

22 Fall 2022

The start of fall semester marked an important milestone for the Zollner Engineering Center Expansion and Renovation project—the opening of the new addition to the building. Students and faculty have been engaged in classes and lab work in the innovative spaces found inside ever since.

Alumni and friends of Indiana Tech who visited campus during homecoming weekend Sept. 30—Oct. 1 took part in an engaging talk about the project by Dr. Ying Shang, dean of the Talwar College of Engineering and Computer Sciences, which calls the Zollner Center home. Dr. Shang shared details about project construction; new programs starting this year, including Mechatronics and Robotics Engineering; and the wide array of new equipment that will outfit the building, such as a new 3D metal printer that will be only the second of its kind at a university in Indiana.

Following Dr. Shang’s presentation, visitors were provided a tour of the newly-opened addition to Zollner. The new wing is named the Don Wood Foundation Science, Technology and Engineering Wing, in honor of the foundation’s $1.7 million grant to support project construction and equipment purchases for labs in the new area of the building. Representatives of the Don Wood Foundation joined Indiana Tech President Karl Einolf, alumni and donors at the Building a Century Excellence Campaign Kickoff event on Friday, Sept. 30, presenting the university with a check for the grant during the evening program (see story about the campaign on page 18)

With the new portion of the building complete, the existing center section of the building is closed for renovation through the end of the current academic year. The existing east section of the building is still open for classes and labs, but will close for renovations at the completion of the school year. The entire expansion and renovation project will be complete in the fall of 2023. A grand opening ribbon-cutting event will be held for students, faculty, alumni and friends at that time.

Once fully complete, the new Zollner Engineering Center will span 70,000 square feet across three floors, nearly doubling the size of the current building. The new, updated and expanded spaces in Zollner will include new labs and classrooms, updated lab equipment, new computer lab facilities and modernized student engagement spaces to foster collaboration with fellow students, faculty and industry partners. Learn more about the new Zollner Engineering Center at indianatech.edu/zollner.

Phase 1

COMPLETED AUGUST 2022

New addition to building

Phase 2

COMPLETE IN SPRING 2023

Central section of existing building currently undergoing renovation

Phase 3

COMPLETE IN FALL 2023

East section of building will undergo renovation, starting May 2023

Indiana Tech Magazine 23

Academic Roundup

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

A Road Less Traveled

Tech’s first biology graduate is making her passion her priority

Kelsey Ivers was a student at Indiana Tech for just two years, but it didn’t take her long to make a significant impact at the university, especially on the two people who were most responsible for her landing in Fort Wayne—Indiana Tech women’s basketball coach Jessie Biggs and professor of biology Dr. Julie Good.

After transferring to Tech early in 2019, Kelsey became a dependable bench player and a leader in the locker room for Biggs on outstanding Warriors squads that went 57-7 over the next two years. In Good’s then year-old biology program, she became a tenacious performer, as well. In fact, she made university history in May 2021 when she earned the first biology degree from Indiana Tech.

When Biggs and Good talk about Kelsey’s experience at Tech, they refer to her intensity, grit, independence and willingness to take risks. It’s because of those qualities that they are not surprised by what Kelsey is doing away from the university.

Kelsey has put ambitions for a career in the medical field on hold to pursue a career in mixed martial arts (MMA) fighting. Her first bout was on Saturday, Aug. 14, 2021. Since then, she has two wins and two losses.

“I admire a lot about Kelsey, but one thing that stands out in my mind is her confidence in her independence,” coach Biggs said.

“She is a strong person. She analyzes, plans and stays true to herself and her decisions. She doesn’t settle for the easiest road.”

Good added, “Kelsey is the definition of the word intensity. Whether she was solving practice problems from calculus II across 30 feet of whiteboards or making a steal in the last quarter of a basketball game, Kelsey achieved because she is always intently focused on the end game. She is a strategist fueled by intentionality.”

Kelsey’s passion for mixed martial arts was born in the summer of 2018.

“My father was on a weight-loss journey and asked if I wanted to start going to kickboxing classes with him. Then I got into jiu-jitsu and I just fell in love—I knew I wanted to be a fighter,” Kelsey said. “I like how it’s a grind, as people call it—the training, the preparation, the competition. It’s so satisfying to me.”

Once Kelsey committed to transferring to Indiana Tech, she formed a relationship with Lee Brothers MMA in Fort Wayne and began training there. According to tapology.com, Kelsey is the 10th-ranked fighter in Indiana.

24 Fall 2022
“My father was on a weight-loss journey and asked if I wanted to start going to kickboxing classes with him. Then I got into jui-jitsu and I just fell in love—I knew I wanted to be a fighter.”

Dr. McGrade’s

Now, Kelsey, 25, is striking while the iron is hot. With youthfulness on her side, she is working hard to get better and make a name for herself nationally. A strength and conditioning coach has been integrated into her training regimen, which is making her stronger and more agile while adding new movements into her arsenal.

“There is so much discipline that goes into this sport whether it’s eating properly or showing up to train on a day that you may not feel like it,” Kelsey said. “It’s hard and it’s competitive and it’s aggressive, but that’s what’s great about it. You just have to dive into your gut and drive through it.”

Shakespeare Experience

students return to Stratford

In September, for the first time since 2019, professor of English Dr. Susan McGrade took 17 students to Stratford, Ontario, to immerse themselves in the Stratford Festival. The trip, which is a built-in part of her Humanities 3380-Shakespeare Experience class, was cancelled in 2020 and 2021 because of the pandemic.

The Stratford Festival is North America’s largest classical repertory theater company. It presents, from April to October, several classic, contemporary drama and musical productions, with special emphasis on the plays of Shakespeare.

Students attended five different plays that included histories, tragedies and comedies. The students also took part in a costume and props warehouse tour and engaged in a Q&A session with the festival’s artistic director and a visiting scholar.

“Interestingly, the majority of the students were engineering majors, but they expressed appreciation for the exposure to the arts and gratitude for such thought-provoking performances,” Dr. McGrade said. “In fact, the students’ engagement in the Q&A session led to an invitation from the festival’s visiting scholar to a special session with the actors of one of the plays. In the session, the students again made me proud with their level of engagement, their thoughtfulness about the plays and their openness to new ideas and perspectives. They were incredibly observant, they exhibited tremendous critical thinking skills, and they were attentive to nuance and its significance to the overall meaning of the plays.”

In their free time, students also had time to see other parts of Canada, with some students spending an afternoon in Toronto, and others in Niagara Falls.

SCAN THE QR CODE TO READ ACCOUNTS AND SEE PICTURES FROM STUDENTS WHO ATTENDED THE STRATFORD FESTIVAL.

Indiana Tech Magazine 25

Academic Roundup

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

These new offerings meets the needs of working professionals and business executives looking for a flexible program that meshes with their busy schedule. These programs also work well for international students with F-1 visas as they fulfill Curricular Practical Training criteria from the start of the program. Students must be employed full time to qualify for admissions and must remain employed full time while in the program.

Indiana Tech launches Executive Degree programs

Indiana Tech has created another educational solution for busy, working professionals with its Executive Degree programs.

The programs are delivered in five 16-week semesters comprised of two eight-week courses. Each semester, students will take one course solely online and the second in a hybrid format, which blends seven weeks of online instruction with a mandatory weekend residency.

Students progress through the program as a cohort to maximize opportunities for team-based projects

and the exchange of professional work experiences. As such, they will become better leaders of people and projects in today’s competitive business world. They will learn marketing, finance, accounting and economic principles to reinforce their business acumen.

Four Executive Degree programs have launched to date:

• Engineering Management, Executive M.S.

• Engineering Management –Information Systems, Executive M.S.

• Management, Executive M.B.A.

• Project Management, Executive M.B.A.

To learn more, visit executive. indianatech.edu.

26 Fall 2022

33 years of TWISTing!

Business leaders joined Indiana Tech faculty, staff, alumni and students for the Trask/Walls Invitational Student Tournament (TWIST) on Sept. 18 at Chestnut Hills Golf Club. It was the 33rd year for the event.

Started by two Indiana Tech professors, Dr. Jeffrey Walls and the late Walter Trask, TWIST gives alumni and area employers a chance to network with students and teach them the business side of golf. Proceeds from the event benefit the Moore/Trask Scholarship Fund at Indiana Tech, the Indiana Tech golf program and the Alumni Scholarship Award.

Indiana Tech thanks Custer Inc. (golf towel sponsor), Elevatus Architecture, Innovative Control Systems, LLC, Ravi Talwar and Dr. Jeff Walls for sponsoring this 33rd TWIST outing.

Congratulations to our 2022 winners and thanks to all who joined us this year. Be sure to join us on Sept. 17, 2023, for TWIST XXXIV!

FIRST-PLACE TEAM

Megan Quick, Nicholas Quick, Dr. Jeff Walls, Thomas Kocks

SECOND-PLACE TEAM

Nick Mengerink, Justin Burnham, Josh Ambrose, Josh Puckett

LONGEST PUTT

Dr. Steve Herendeen

LONGEST DRIVE #9 Katie Giant

LONGEST DRIVE HOLE #18

Nick Mengerink

CLOSEST TO THE PIN

Brendan Sidaway (student)

SHRM Student Chapter earns national recognition

In September, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), the world’s largest HR professional society, representing more than 300,000 members in more than 165 countries, honored Indiana Tech’s SHRM Student Chapter with a 2021-22 Superior Merit Award.

The annual Superior Merit Award program recognizes chapters for providing superior growth and development opportunities to its student chapter members. It began in 1972 to encourage student chapters to require ongoing excellence in the following areas:

• Student chapter requirements

• Chapter operations

• Chapter programming and professional development of members

• Support of the human resource profession

• SHRM engagement

“I am very pleased and proud of our students who are part of Indiana Tech’s College of Business SHRM organization. I also appreciate the outstanding leadership of their advisor, Dr. Jeff Walls. his national designation reflects the true quality of our business college, the HR program and the caliber of students in the program,” said Dr. Angie Fincannon, dean of Indiana Tech’s College of Business. “We are grateful for this impressive designation.”

Indiana Tech’s student SHRM chapter, which is the largest student organization on campus, has earned a Superior Merit Award every year since 1998.

27 Indiana Tech Magazine

Academic Roundup

TALWAR

COLLEGE

OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCES

engineering

The number of Indiana Tech degree programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET—the global accreditor of college and university programs in applied and natural science, computing, engineering and engineering technology—continues to grow.

Indiana Tech’s Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering earned ABET accreditation for the first time, while three other Tech bachelor’s degree programs —biomedical engineering, electrical engineering and mechanical engineering—retained their previously earned accreditation. ABET affirmed the recognition in a statement presented to the university and its Talwar College of Engineering and Computer Sciences in early September. All four programs will retain accreditation through Sept. 30, 2028.

Accreditation from ABET assures that degree programs meet standards to produce graduates who are ready to enter critical technical fields that are leading the way in innovation and emerging technologies.

The announcement comes at a time of great momentum for the university’s Talwar College of Engineering and Computer Sciences as its Zollner Engineering Center expansion and renovation project moves forward. The $21.5 million project will be completed in fall 2023. When finished, Zollner will be brand new and nearly double in size, giving students an inspiring and innovative learning environment to explore new and existing programs in engineering, computer sciences, cybersecurity, life sciences and technology.

28 Fall 2022
Indiana Tech’s computer
program is the latest to earn ABET accreditation

New cybersecurity competition for high-schoolers coming in March

Master of Science in Information Systems now available

Indiana Tech has introduced a new Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS) degree, offered both online and in-person at its main campus in Fort Wayne. The program is designed to provide students with in-depth expertise and skills in the design, application and management of sophisticated information systems serving a wide range of organizational needs.

The new MSIS degree is currently available for students who wish to take courses online. For the inperson modality offered on campus, students can enroll for courses that will start in January 2023. Among the key courses offered during the program are Digital Enterprise Systems, Information Security, Data Analysis, Database Management Systems, IT Architecture and Cloud Computing, Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Executive Leadership and more.

“Today, organizations have a great need for skilled professionals who have in-depth knowledge of information technology, business management and analytics. Our new M.S. in Information Systems will help students master these areas and understand how they intersect with one another,” said Dr. Ying Shang, dean of Indiana Tech’s Talwar College of Engineering and Computer Sciences. “Graduates will be well prepared to lead their organizations to new levels of success as a result of what they will learn in our program.”

To learn more about the new Indiana Tech Master of Science in Information Systems, please visit ind.tc/74w.

Indiana Tech will host the first Indiana High School Cybersecurity Competition on Friday, March 24, 2023, at the university’s main campus.

The event will be a fun, engaging and inclusive experience where participants can explore the growing and lucrative field of cybersecurity and develop their skills. It is open to high school-level competitors from across the state.

Participants will be able to select the focus areas in which they would like to compete. Leading up to the competition, participants will be given

reference materials and practice modules based on their selected focus areas. Those areas include:

• Network Analysis

• Password Cracking

• System Exploitation

• Systems Administration

The IHSCC—the first of its kind in the state— was developed to help grow the talent and workforce pipeline for the cybersecurity field. Learn more at ind.tc/djA.

29 Indiana Tech Magazine
“Today, organizations have a great need for skilled professionals who have in-depth knowledge of information technology, business management and analytics.”

COMING FALL 2023

↘ Indiana Tech will compete in the outdoor target discipline; its season begins in spring 2024. Indoor target and 3D archery could be added in the future.

↘ Collegiate archery programs can field men's teams, women's teams and mixed teams.

↘ Collegiate archers can participate in four divisions: Recurve, Compound, Fixed Pins and Barebow.

↘ In competitions, a team consists of three archers. The average program size is 20 archers.

↘ Teams and individual archers compete to earn overall national champion honors in each division at the end of the season.

↘ University of the Cumberlands (Williamsburg, Kentucky) is one of the strongest collegiate archery programs in the country, having won 10 national team titles.

↘ A recurve bow has limbs that curve away from the archer when it is unstrung.

↘ A compound bow uses cables and pulleys to bend the limbs.

↘ Fixed pins refers to the sights on the bow. The archer sets these sight pins for various distances they shoot during a competition.

↘ Barebow is a recurve bow that does not include accessories for aiming or stabilization.

TECH’S DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS ANNOUNCED
IN NOVEMBER IT WAS ADDING ARCHERY AND COMPETITIVE DANCE AS VARSITY SPORTS FOR THE 2023-24 ACADEMIC YEAR. AS THE UNIVERSITY LOOKS AHEAD TO THE LAUNCH OF THESE NEW PROGRAMS,
TECH MAGAZINE PRESENTS A BRIEF SUMMARY OF
ARCHERY INDIANA
EARLY
INDIANA
EACH SPORT.

COMPETITIVE DANCE

↘ A minimum of six and a maximum of 16 dancers must be on the floor during a performance. Routines must be at least 1 minute and 45 seconds in length, but must not exceed 2 minutes and 15 seconds.

↘ Teams must include in their routines elements of these dance techniques: jazz, hip-hip and pom. In addition, each routine must include a squad leap, a squad turn and a squad turn sequence.

↘ Teams are scored based on these categories: jazz technigue, hip-hop technique, pom technique, team turn sequence, staging and transitions, uniformity, choreography, overall degree of difficulty, performance impression, team turn and team leap.

↘ Indiana Tech's dance team will also serve as the university's spirit team during on-campus events.

↘ Indiana Tech will compete in the Wolverine-Hoosier Athletic Conference along with Aquinas, Concordia,

Lawrence Tech, Lourdes, Madonna and Siena Heights, with Aquinas being historically strong in the conference.

↘ On a national level, Midland University (Fremont, Nebraska) and St. Ambrose University (Davenport, Iowa) are historically strong programs.

“From a spectator standpoint, these sports are going to be very interesting and exciting to watch. We are eager to build two championshipcaliber programs that the Warrior Nation can be proud of.”
—INDIANA TECH PRESIDENT KARL W. EINOLF
31 Indiana Tech Magazine Indiana Tech Magazine 31

TIME, TALENTS AND TREASURES

After wrapping up Homecoming 2022, my office was a disaster! Really. Empty boxes, decorations and Post-it notes litter every surface. And, I have switched to my last pair of comfortable shoes.

But, with all the frenetic homecoming activity in the rearview mirror, I have had a few quiet moments to reflect on my interactions and encounters with alumni.

• I am grateful for all of you and how you enrich the Indiana Tech community.

• I thank our outgoing alumni board members for their service and welcome the new alumni board members for what I can assure will be an exciting year.

• I congratulate our three alumni award recipients—Darius Darling, Ron Ballman and Al Hernandez—on their richly deserved honors. All three are generous in the giving of their time, talents and treasures.

I am not the only one who enjoyed meeting and greeting our alumni over homecoming weekend. Our 11 Presidential Ambassadors got in on the act, as well, at the President’s Dinner and Campaign Kickoff event. The Presidential Ambassadors work closely with our first mom, Maria Einolf, to assist

with events that she and President Karl Einolf host. After partaking in countless conversations with alumni that night, these students commented on how much they enjoyed meeting alumni and learning about the history of Indiana Tech. Presidential Ambassador Jerry Walker quipped in amazement, “Did you know they used to have parades? Parades!” I could see his wheels turning and I said, ‘you go for it, Jerry!’

Our Indiana Tech history comes alive during this time of year in the interactions that happen around campus, and we hope our alumni will help continue this magic throughout the remainder of the school year. Alumni are active on campus in the classroom, speaking and networking with students at monthly events. These interactions are so valuable, as they give students the opportunity to network and learn from industry experts. For all who serve in this role, we thank you.

Would you like to give of your time, talents and treasures, but don’t know how? Even if you cannot come to campus, you could be an alumni challenge leader on our online platform for our upcoming Indiana Tech Day of Giving. Reach out to me at kjarmus@indianatech.edu to discuss all possible volunteer opportunities.

32 Fall 2022 PATH OF A WARRIOR
SAVE THE DATE: Homecoming 2023 Oct. 6-7, 2023

Do you have an update you’d like to share with your Warrior Nation? Perhaps you have a new position or earned a promotion. Maybe you tied the knot or your family is growing. Maybe you’ve built something that has changed the world in some small (or not-so-small) way. We’d like to hear about it. Send your stories or questions to Kristi Jarmus at alumni@indianatech.edu. We love to brag about our alumni!

DAN ARENS, MBA MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT, 2002

Dan was hired by Valley Oaks Health (Lafayette, Indiana) as CEO and president.

KAREN GREGORSON, MS ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP, 2010

Karen retired as president and CEO of The Farmers Bank (Frankfort, Indiana)

DANA HOWARD, B.S. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, 2021

Dana was hired by State Bank (Hendricks County, Indiana) as vice president and director of human resources.

MATTHEW KONOW, B.S. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, 2005

Matthew was hired by Concordia Lutheran High School (Fort Wayne, Indiana) as chief advancement officer.

DR. JOSEPH LESTRANGE, PH.D. IN GLOBAL LEADERSHIP, 2015

Joseph was hired by Cardinal Point Strategies (Hamilton Township, New Jersey) as senior advisor for global investigations.

KAREN POTTS, B.S. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, 1999

Karen was hired by Trelleborg Sealing Solutions (Fort Wayne, Indiana) as junior IT project manager.

SHARON VICKNESVAREN, B.S. COMPUTER SCIENCE, 1994

Sharon was hired by Trelleborg Sealing Solutions (Fort Wayne, Indiana) as junior IT project manager.

Indiana Tech Oral History Project Update

The deadline to submit your story for the Indiana Tech Oral History Project has passed, but we want to thank all alumni who participated. The response was overwhelming, and we cannot wait for the finished product.

Speaking of which: If you ordered a project book or Indiana Tech branded items, they will be sent out in spring 2023. That may seem like a long time to wait, but it takes several months to review the stories for grammatical errors and make corrections. After the story reviews have been completed, the stories will be organized into sections and formatted by the publisher. Production of the books should begin in February, with distribution projected for April. So, while the alumni outreach portion of this project is complete, there is much behind-the-scenes work left to do. Thank you for your patience!

For those who are curious about participation in this project, a total of 2,588 alumni responded to the request for verification of contact information and/or shared a brief story. Nearly 2,050 alumni took some time to be interviewed and recorded. Those digital records will be shared with Indiana Tech and become part of our history. Five hundred alumni will be included in the printed book.

Again, we thank all who participated in this effort. If you have questions about the project, reach out to Director of Alumni Relations Kristi Jarmus at kjarmus@indianatech.edu.

Indiana Tech Magazine 33 ALUMNI
NOTES
Dan Arens Dr. Joseph Lestrange Karen Gregorson Karen Potts Dana Howard Sharon Vicknesvaren Matthew Konow

Alumni Spotlight

FULL THROTTLE

Veronica admits she wasn’t a great student. Still, she made up for it by being doggedly determined and highly involved—traits that cling to her like road dust. In high school, she was a three-sport athlete and vice president of her class. But, as one of six children, the idea of going to college wasn’t on her radar until her high school basketball coach sent a highlight video to Indiana Tech, resulting in a scholarship.

Once at Tech, she enjoyed a close-knit community of student-athletes who became lifelong friends and benefited from professors and coaches who invested in her success.

“I don’t think I would have thrived in a larger school where you’re just a number,” said Veronica. “Coaches advocated for me in ways that I would never have advocated for myself at that age.”

Veronica took advantage of every available opportunity— holding nothing back. During her senior year at Tech, she juggled 18 credit hours, worked early mornings at Spiece Fitness, interned with the local arena football team, participated in the work-study program and played basketball. Looking back, she admits she’s unsure how she did it all.

“When there isn’t another option, you can absolutely do incredible things,” said Veronica. “You push yourself. You keep working. You work through it no matter what.”

That mantra has persisted through her burgeoning career.

In 2005, Veronica went home to Hammond, Indiana, and began the circuitous route to her current home in Virginia by way of Chicago, Philadelphia and Washington D.C.

34 Fall 2022
How does a girl from a small town with little hope of going to college land a gig with Audi? The same way she tackles everything. Veronica Papach makes her own path—with her foot on the throttle.
PATH OF A WARRIOR

For nine years, she worked her way up in the fast-paced, 24/7 operation of Caesars Entertainment, learning everything she could about loyalty marketing and how to create a better experience for customers. In 2010, Veronica realized she needed one class to complete her degree. So, while working full-time for Caesars, she took an online course through Indiana Tech, earning her B.S. in Business Administration.

Four years later, she was ready for a change and moved to Philadelphia where she successfully applied her knowledge to make a significant impact at a smaller casino. From there, she made the leap to the automotive industry with Pep Boys, where she helped redesign their customer experience and learned about audience segmentation and data integration.

Then, in March of 2019, just a year before the world shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Veronica’s trademark dogged determination led to her current position at Audi of America. As CRM (Customer Relationship Management) Strategy and Execution Lead, Veronica designs marketing strategy and communication on a national level using data-fueled

intelligence to put the customer at the center of everything they do. She also works closely with Audi of Germany.

“I work for an amazing company that has been supportive in every way,” said Veronica. “I love what I do right now. We have an amazing team.”

Last November, Veronica was exactly where she wanted to be professionally and was focused on her health, even completing her first half marathon. Then in January, at age 38, came the detour she never expected—thyroid cancer. Her response? The same as always—throttle through it.

“Nothing is slowing me down in any way. This is just what I need to do right now,” she said.

Veronica is looking forward to putting cancer in her rearview mirror, taking more of the road trips that she loves, running her next half marathon and possibly traveling to Germany with Audi.

“Everything can be an opportunity,” said Veronica. “It’s all about your perspective. If you’re grateful, it really changes everything. There’s so much growth to be had.”

Keep us connected!

Your stories are what make Indiana Tech proud, and we want to hear from you! Share your successes, update your information, learn about the Alumni Association and find ways to connect with your peers, friends and faculty members on our website at Alumni.IndianaTech.edu. You can also email your updates to Alumni@IndianaTech.edu.

Indiana Tech Alumni Group @IndianaTechAlum Indiana Institute of Technology

Indiana Tech Magazine 35
“Everything can be an opportunity.
It’s all about your perspective. If you’re grateful, it really changes everything. There’s so much growth to be had.”

PATH OF A WARRIOR

Making a Difference

FROM FARM TO FUKUSHIMA

In 2011, when a 9.0 magnitude earthquake off the coast of Japan triggered a tsunami and caused meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, officials called in Ed Ray.

Edhad become an expert in repairing and decommissioning nuclear power plants, which likely would have surprised his younger self.

“My father knew before I did that I was not going to be a farmer,” said Ed. “One day, I tore the tractor apart just for the heck of it. I knew I had to put it back together again and make sure it ran before dad got home.”

Ed and his twin sister and older brother worked the family’s 200-acre farm in tiny, rural Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Though most graduates from his high school were expected to become coal miners, farmers or teachers, Ed became an engineer. And thus began his journey to Fukushima.

In 1968, Ed graduated from Indiana Tech with a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering. Because of his love of airplanes, Ed accepted a job offer at Cessna Aircraft Company in Kansas, where he got his pilot’s license and worked on aircraft of all sizes.

Over the next few years, he found himself working for several companies in the nuclear arena. He tested and designed nuclear fuel assemblies; designed foundations for equipment mounted on ships, including the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, a nuclearpowered aircraft carrier; performed seismic analysis for a land-based, nuclear-powered training submarine; helped design a nuclear power plant; and designed and tested exhausts for aircraft, ships and locomotives.

36 Fall 2022

“The education I received at Indiana Tech was very practical and adaptive to whatever I was doing,” said Ed. “It kept me from being intimidated by the word nuclear.”

In his early 30s, Ed went to work for Westinghouse Electric Corporation, located near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which would be his professional home until retirement. On his first day, he met his wife, Lois. They’ve been married for 39 years and have four children.

Ed spent 31 years at Westinghouse, designing remotely-operated equipment to repair and decommission nuclear power plants worldwide, including some work at Three Mile Island.

“It was nice at Westinghouse. I had a hell of a team with me,” said Ed. “I always told my boss, ‘Give me the problem. Give me a blank sheet of paper. And get away. Leave me alone, and I’ll solve the problem.’ They basically did that for the most part.”

In addition to holding several patents, Ed and his various teams received numerous awards, including the prestigious Edison Award and the George Westinghouse Signature Award of Excellence. He has also been published on occasion—technical papers he wrote for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Nuclear Energy Institute and the American Power Conference.

Ed has an impressive professional legacy. Of everything he has accomplished, Ed is most proud of his work at Fukushima, the final project of his career.

On March 11, 2011, the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in Japan caused a tsunami with 40-foot waves that swept over the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Over the next several days, a series of events resulted in hydrogen explosions and three meltdowns. Ed led a $200 million project to design

equipment that would enable them to remove fuel rods remotely from more than a mile away.

According to Ed, it was a fascinating job involving more than 150 engineers and five countries. The Fukushima disaster is only one of two nuclear accidents classified as level 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale. The other is Chernobyl (Ukraine, 1986).

Ed has spent his life making his mark in the world. He is passionate about ensuring future generations are equipped to contribute as well.

“I truly appreciate the education I received at Indiana Tech. It certainly has helped me grow into the person I am now,” said Ed.

Ed and Lois have established a scholarship for students at Indiana Tech. They are also contributing to the Building a Century of Excellence campaign to renovate and expand the Zollner Engineering Center. Ed encourages other alumni to invest in Tech’s students.

“We as alumni need to help Indiana Tech to stay viable and up to date and to attract more students,” said Ed. “We need to help those who show promise, to do whatever they’re passionate about, so we can all improve this great country and contribute to the wider world.”

Indiana Tech Magazine 37
“The education I received at Indiana Tech was very practical and adaptive to whatever I was doing. It kept me from being intimidated by the word nuclear.”
Ed graduated from Tech in 1968 with a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering. Ed is with Yoshi Sekinuma, a friend he made while working on the 2011 nuclear power plant disaster in Fukushima, Japan. Ed and his wife, Lois, have been married for 39 years. They have four children.

IN MEMORIAM

We have learned of the deaths of the following alumni and friends. If you would like to send a memorial gift to honor someone, please contact Dan Grigg at 800.937.2448, ext. 2440.

1940s Leonard H. de leon Los Angeles, California Electrical Engineering, 1949

Donald E. Fisher Spencerville, Indiana Radio Engineering, 1949

Hugo Kayano

Culver City, California Civil Engineering, 1957

Joseph S. Murcko

Vista, California Electrical Engineering, 1956

David E. Kessler Milton, Wisconsin Civil Engineering, 1954

1950s Wilbur T. Ash Destin, Florida Mechanical Engineering, 1958

Haim Bar-Akiva Pennington, New Jersey Mechanical Engineering, 1955

William E. Barrows Springfield, Illinois Civil Engineering, 1958

Maurice E. Landford Wildomar, California Aerospace Engineering, 1957

Kenneth J. Laufer

Overland Park, Kansas Civil Engineering, 1959

George K. Ozaki

Pacific Grove, California Radio Engineering, 1953

Robert G. Walker

Harlingen, Texas Mechanical Engineering, 1951

Carl J. Weyl

Lompoc, California Aeronautical Engineering, 1951

Leland W. Reid Palmyra, New York Chemical Engineering, 1958

Martin L. Runge Fort Wayne, Indiana Electronic Engineering, 1957

James P. Logue Ocala, Florida Electrical Engineering, 1958

Elvert F. Lombard Hills, Iowa Civil Engineering, 1956

James Cradler Columbus, Ohio Chemical Engineering, 1958

Gregory A. Hyver Soquel, California Civil Engineering, 1956

Nils H. Jensen Fort Wayne, Indiana Civil Engineering, 1959

Kenneth W. Longwell Altamont, Illinois Civil Engineering, 1959

Anatol Rychalski Shorewood, Illinois Civil Engineering, 1954

Jack E. Weyler

Columbia, Missouri Electrical Engineering, 1955

Robert P. Wheeler

Bluffton, South Carolina Civil Engineering, 1952

1960s Robert A. Albright

Allentown, New Jersey Chemical Engineering, 1962

David K. Segawa Orange, California Electrical Engineering, 1958

James M. Takeuchi Honolulu, Hawaii Electronics Technology, 1958

Paul E. Moffett New Albany, Indiana Civil Engineering, 1959

Benjamin R. Vian Fort Wayne, Indiana Mechanical Engineering, 1959

Raul Murciano Miami, Florida Radio Engineering, 1953

Harold E. Vickers

Surf City, New Jersey Aeronautical Engineering, 1957

Wesley A. Arford Warren, Pennsylvania Mechanical Engineering, 1964

Angelo A. Boscolo

Ellicott City, Maryland Mechanical Engineering, 1962

Joseph A. D’Italia

Fort Wayne, Indiana Civil Engineering, 1965

Floyd E. Foust Howell, Michigan Mechanical Engineering, 1964

38 Fall 2022

Vern C. Hearn

Portland, Oregon Electrical Engineering, 1968

Earl H. Hummell

Noxen, Pennsylvania Electrical Engineering, 1962

George R. Irwin Janesville, Iowa Electrical Engineering, 1960

Keith S. Jorgensen

Worcester, Massachusetts Civil Engineering, 1963

Gerald W. Knepp

Loudon, Tennessee Mechanical Engineering, 1960

Stanley R. Mitchell Deland, Florida Chemical Engineering, 1965

Edward J. Paragi New Haven, Indiana Electrical Engineering, 1969

Carl M. Powe

Slidell, Louisiana Mechanical Engineering, 1961

Walter D. Rectenwald

Fort Wayne, Indiana Mechanical Engineering, 1969

Ronald J. Resac Rockford, Illinois Mechanical Engineering, 1968

Ronald R. Rothermel Waxahachie, Texas Electrical Engineering, 1962

Raymond V. Sherley Louisville, Kentucky Mechanical Engineering, 1961

Victor A. Smith Lagrangeville, New York Electrical Engineering, 1964

Robert M. Sordelet Huntertown, Indiana Electronic Engineering, 1961

William A. Strandberg Hollister, California Electronic Engineering, 1961

1970s

Alan E. Baumbaugh Granger, Indiana Physics, 1973

1990s Richard L. Grimes

Yulee, Florida Business Administration, 1996

William P. Farris Grove, Oklahoma Mechanical Engineering, 1974

Douglas B. Foster Spofford, New Hampshire Electronics Technology, 1973

Roger W. Gibbs Clifton Park, New York Aerospace Engineering, 1970

Norman C. Leet

Waynesville, Ohio Aerospace Engineering, 1973

David M. Prough Fort Wayne, Indiana Electrical Engineering, 1977

Merv A. Miller Hamilton, Indiana Business Administration, 1997

Mark A. Roush Lafayette, Indiana Mechanical Engineering, 1991 2000s

Steven L. Richardson Grabill, Indiana Business Administration, 2004

Diana K. Ruble

Rome City, Indiana Master of Business Administration, 2003, and Business Administration, 1999

Robert J. Tiller Marysville, Ohio Psychology, 1977

James R. Vyverberg Gulfport, Mississippi Electrical Engineering, 1963

Roger W. Powell Prescott, Arizona Electronic Engineering, 1960

Thomas L. Wardell Suffield, Connecticut Mechanical Engineering, 1969

1980s William D. McChesney Tabernacle, New Jersey Chemical Engineering, 1982

Jerry D. Stuck Mooresville, Indiana Accounting, 2003 2010s

Carmela Boutte Houston, Texas

Master of Science in Organizational Leadership, 2018, and Business Administration, 2014

Indiana Tech Magazine 39

SAVE THESE DATES

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Celebration

Thursday, Jan. 19, 2023 | 8 a.m. Multi-Flex Theater, Indiana Tech

Indiana Tech 2023 Commencement Saturday, May 13, 2023 | 12:30 p.m. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum 4000 Parnell Ave., Fort Wayne, IN 46805

TWIST XXXIII Golf Outing Sunday, Sept. 17

Homecoming 2023 Friday, Oct. 6, and Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023

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