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Five Insights A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want College of Business

Jim Schaffer, Ph.D. 2012


Contents The Five Insights on Leadership Coaching you will find inside:

1 2 3 4 5

Insight One: The Biggest Challenge Coaching Can Help You With. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Art of Leading Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

The

Who Took Our Survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Biggest

Selecting Your Coach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Challenge . . . . 1

Leading Is a People Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Leading

Insight Two: Leading The Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

the Business. . . 13

Leading Others. . . . . 19

Success — How Do You Decide?. . . . . . . . . . .16 Insight Three: Leading Others. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 How To Package Your Coaching? . . . . . . . . . . 15 Leadership In A Borderless World. . . . . . . . . 24

Leading by Personal Example. . . . 25

Insight Four: Leading By Personal Example . . . . . . . . 25 Getting Peak Results with Positive Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Important

Insight Five: The Most Important Benefit From Coaching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Benefit. . . . . 29

Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Most


Five Insights insight One: The biggest challenge coaching can help you with

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

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Insight one: The Biggest challenge coaching can help you with Overview Dealing with complexity is the primary challenge executives face according to the Center for Creative Leadership. Our survey found the same results with executives and managers telling us the #1 challenge

51%

Want help responding to ongoing change and complexity

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they are facing is: •• Responding effectively to change and complexity These same professionals tell us they most need help with: •• Increasing my individual performance •• Increasing the performance of my employees


Overall our respondents tell us this:

With what challenges or difficulties would you most want a coach to help you find solutions? (choose two answers)

Responding effectively to change and complexity

51%

Achieving more results with fewer resources

34%

Building authentic commitment and accountability among team members

34%

Increasing the team’s collective focus and attention on bottom-line results

30%

Building honest, trusting relationships among team members

29%

Improving the team’s ability to deal with conflict constructively

14%

Other (please specify)

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

7%

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Insight one: The Biggest challenge coaching can help you with

Overall our respondents tell us this (continued):

4

How do you think coaching could help you in your professional development?

(choose two answers)

Increase my individual performance

53%

Develop my management/leadership competencies

40%

Increase the business results for my area of responsibility

34%

Develop my emotional intelligence, personal awareness and interpersonal skills

27%

Develop my core leadership values and servant leadership perspective

27%

Accomplish a specific goal I’m working on

12%

Help me solve a specific problem I’m struggling with

9%

Help me “deal with” a specific person I’m struggling with

5%

Five Insights


How do you think coaching could most help develop your team?

(choose two answers)

Increase the performance of my employees

49%

Increase the morale and satisfaction of my employees

42%

Increase the teamwork of my employees

42%

Increase the engagement of my employees

29%

Increase the talent management of my employees

27%

Increase the retention of my employees

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

11%

5


The Art of Leading Change Dr. Arthur Snyder Indiana Tech President Change leadership is the wave of today and of the future. Our world and the organizations in it are in a state of constant modification. Much of the change is driven by technological advancements, but shifting customer expectations are another factor. Think about it—just 100 years ago Henry Ford told us we could have a new Ford in any color…as long as it was black! Oh how times have changed. Businesses and organizations that want to be successful must be responsive to a consumercentered marketplace, and that often means embracing change. John Kotter, a well-known management educator, advises us that while change is dynamic and non-stop, we are not very good at leading it. So what does it take to be a leader of change? For one thing, it is not to be confused with change management. Leadership change is mainly focused on the future and the vision thereof. Management of change is much more process and operationally oriented. Interestingly, it could be compared to the difference between strategy and tactics. Strategy is visionary and concerned with the “what will our future look like.” Conversely, tactics address the “how to get to the future,” with an action orientation.

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Leading change has so much more to do with the future of the organization and the constituency served. We have learned that the fastpaced world in which we live is often chaotic and unpredictable. For this reason we need leaders that are both thoughtful and actionoriented. Tom Peters, the management guru, stated in his book (Thriving on Chaos, 1987), “We must learn to love change, as much as we have hated it in the past.” Indeed, this is easier said than done, but excellent leaders of change are fearless. They deal with risks and uncertainty in a calm and confident way. People around them sense this confidence, and they follow with energy and enthusiasm!


Who took our survey Over a 15-month period in 2009-2011 an internet based survey was sent to 1,200 business and professional leaders. In total 222 people responded. Their answers to these questions will help you understand who they are.

What is your current level of responsibility? Executive Level Management

25%

Key Staff Member

22%

Middle Management

17%

Senior Level Management

16%

Other

11%

First Level Supervisor or Team Leader

10%

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

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Who took our survey Other

Administration

11%

Engineering Research & Development

3% 4%

Marketing

6%

Finance

In what function do you currently work?

2%

Systems/IT

2%

Sales

21%

7%

14%

Human Resources

Operations

15% 15% General Management

In which of the following age groups do you belong? 18–25 years

1%

26–35 years

17%

36–45 years

31%

46–55 years

29%

56–65 years

21%

Over 65 years of age

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Five Insights

2%


What is the size of the workforce of your organization? Less than 100 employees

44%

100–299 employees

15%

300–499 employees

7%

500–999 employees

7%

1,000–2,999 employees

7%

3,000–4,999 employees

3%

5,000–9,999 employees

5%

10,000 or more employees

13%

What is your gender? Female

52%

Male

48%

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Selecting your coach Recommendations from others in the organization along with recommendations from friends and colleagues are the main approaches leaders take when selecting a coach. They also put high importance on face-to-face interviews with coaches.

The business professionals also tell us this.

Which approaches would you prefer to use in selecting your coach? (choose two answers) Face-to-face interview(s) with the coach

55%

Recommendation from outside friends and colleagues

49%

Recommendation from others in my organization

47%

Through my own research (online etc.)

21%

Recommendation from Human Resources

20%

Phone interview(s) with the coach

10

Five Insights

9%


48%

Want coaches with related business or coaching experience.

What criteria would you use in selecting a coach? (choose two answers)

References and recommendations

56%

Related business experience

48%

Related coaching experience

48%

Professional coaching certification

19%

Appropriate academic training such as a master’s or Ph.D. in psychology, counseling or related field

17%

Psychology or counseling work background

14%

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Leadership is a People Activity Dr. Jeff Zimmerman Bringing out the best in others is the core of effective leadership. Even in this age of technology, the people side of leadership continues to be the key to organizational success. Today’s technology, in all its shapes and nuances, has made possible much of what we do on a daily basis. Recognizing technology’s importance however does not take away from the fact that people drive business – and bringing out the creativity, competence and commitment of people is what great leaders do best. Above all else, leaders lead people. While this statement may not stretch the imagination, an appreciation of the nuances and softer side applications of what lies behind these words will help to ground your leadership in reality and keep it “people focused and people friendly.” Effective leaders are also effective followers. This is especially true when organizational goals can be accomplished more effectively by another. In these times an insightful leader will fall back into the group and be led by another member of the team. Doing so may not only be significant for efficiency of goal attainment, but it can also add credibility to the team and serve to validate the importance placed on its members. Of course, to fall back into the group

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Five Insights

and become an effective follower, a group must have been created to begin with. Many competencies make up the people side of leadership and one of the most important is the ability to develop the next generation of leaders. A truly effective leader brings out the leadership potential in others and comfortably turns over the leadership reigns to another, thus becoming free to lead somewhere else. It’s all about bringing out the best in others today and shaping the next generation of leaders for tomorrow.


Five Insights insight two: leading the business

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

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Insight two: Leading the business

Overview Executive Dimensions® is a 360-degree assessment developed by the Center for Creative Leadership which measures 16 competencies key to the success of senior leaders. In a similar

71%

Want help with strategic planning, getting results or leading change.

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Five Insights

and independent manner this survey asks how coaching can help with: •• Leading the business •• Leading others •• Leading by personal example


We found that executives and professionals most want help with: •• Building credibility •• Implementing strategic planning •• Communicating effectively Specifically with leading the business, our respondents tell us coaching could help them develop these competencies.

Business Perspective

12%

Sound Judgment

12%

Strategic Planning

Leading the Business

30%

22%

Results Orientation

5% Global Awareness

19% Leading Change

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Success — how do you decide? How important is coaching for you and your organization? How do you decide if it is successful? Our survey tells us the most important measures of success are these: •• Increase in the business results for my area of responsibility •• Impact on the performance of my employees The executives and managers who took our survey also tell us this:

In terms of your personal development, how would you want your organization to measure the success of coaching? (choose two answers) Increase in my individual performance

46%

Increase in the business results for my area of responsibility

45%

Increase in core leadership values and servant leadership

36%

Increase in emotional intelligence, personal awareness and interpersonal skills

36%

Increase in management/leadership competencies

35%

56% 16

Five Insights

Want the success of their coaching to be based on the performance of their employees.


65%

Say a return on investment calculation is important.

In terms of the development of your team, how would you want your organization to measure the success of coaching? (choose two answers) Performance of my employees

56%

Impact on employee morale and satisfaction

53%

Impact on employee teamwork

35%

Impact on employee engagement

24%

Impact on talent management

17%

Impact on employee retention

12%

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Success — how do you decide? In evaluating the success of your coaching how important are these measurements? •• Pre and post test assessment •• Return on investment Here is what

Pre and Post Test Assessment

we learned:

Very Important

30%

Important

39%

Somewhat Important

20%

Slightly Important

9%

Not Important

2%

Return On Investment Calculation Very Important

25%

Important

40%

Somewhat Important

22%

Slightly Important

10%

Not Important

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Five Insights

3%


Five Insights insight three: leading others

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

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Insight four: leading others

Overview Inspiring commitment and empowering teams are critical for leadership success. We asked “How could coaching better help you find solutions to more effectively lead others?� Here is what we learned leaders most want

57% Want help communicating effectively.

help with.

Leading Others Inspiring Commitment Communicating Effectively

Forging Synergy Emotional Intelligence

Five Insights

57%

Developing and empowering Leveraging Differences

20

35%

51% 12% 14% 15%


How to package your coaching? Leaders from general management, finance , engineering, marketing and others gave us their thoughts on how they want coaching packaged. 62% were executives, senior managers and middle managers. Here is what

In what method would you prefer to receive coaching? (choose two answers)

they tell

In person at work but someplace other than in my office

44%

In person at the coach’s office

21%

In person in my office

21%

us:

On-line by e-mail or real-time chat

6%

By telephone

4%

By video conference

4%

50% A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

Want coaching to be part of an integrated training and development program.

21


How to package your coaching? How would you like your coaching experience to be “packaged”? As one part of an integrated training or development program

50%

As a “stand-alone” development experience

34%

As the primary part of a training or development program

16%

With which type of coach would you prefer to work?

22

External coach — a professional coach from outside your organization

72%

Internal Coach — a professional coach who is an employee of your organization

28%

Five Insights


If you were to receiving coaching, how long would you want your coaching to last? 0–3 months

34%

3–6 months

31%

6–12 months

24%

More than 1 year

11%

How would you prefer to work with a coach? A combination of both individual and group sessions

50%

Individually

44%

As part of a larger group or team

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

6%

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Leadership in a Borderless World Dr. Ken Rauch The goal of most every major corporation in 2012 is global leadership success. More and more this success is built upon maximizing capital, technology, and information — and no longer do these have nationalities. They are borderless. They flow freely in and out through national borders and are the keys to effective leadership in every corner of the globe. In effect this has created a “borderless world.” Here then is the key for high-performing global leadership. Each organization, based on its competitive competencies, must build an integrated framework that ties everything together. Focusing on increased cultural awareness this would allow us to understand society, the world, and our place in it, and help us to make the critical decisions that will bring better products and services to the global markets faster and in the long run will shape a more vibrant future. Synthesizing the wisdom gathered in different societies is a critical step as we move forward together. Rather than focusing on our individually held, small segments of reality, this provides us with a picture of the whole and

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Five Insights

how we can add value to it. Such a conceptual framework allows for expanded understanding of a new “global view.” It epitomizes Stephen Covey’s concept of “First seek to understand; and then to be understood.” This continual drive to understand new markets, different cultures, and their business practices is critical to global success in 2012 and into the decades to come.


Five Insights insight four: leading by personal example

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Insight FIVE: leading by personal example

Overview How do you lead by personal example? Most leadership research says “Modeling the Way” is critical to leadership success as is explained in the #1 selling leadership book titled The Leadership Challenge by James Kouzes

43%

Want help building trust and credibility.

and Barry Posner. Human Synergistics, an international leadership assessment firm, has found the most important “thinking styles” for successful leadership are self-actualization, achievement orientation, caring and encouraging, and enjoying and being enjoyed by others, known as affiliation.

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Five Insights


Here’s what our professionals tell us they want most to develop when it comes to leading by personal example:

Trusting and being trusted by others

17%

Caring and encouraging others

Leading by Personal Example

18%

8% Self-actualizing (developing self)

Credibility

26%

16%

Executive Image

15% Achievementorientation

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Getting Peak Results with Positive Leadership Dr. Jim Schaffer Positive leadership and positive coaching are all about getting the absolute best results. Beginning in the 1990s with the work of Martin Seligman — the modern father of positive psychology — and up to the present, positive psychology has become a dominant and well-researched approach to building high performing individuals, teams and organizations. Turning the old-style command-and-control on its head, perhaps the most important element of positive leadership is its consistency in being life-giving and bringing out the best in every person and virtual team. Positive leadership places an emphasis on what elevates and inspires individuals, what goes right in a team or organization, what drives out fear and provides the courage to take risks, and what creates positive emotions and energized networks. Positive leadership uses four strategies to achieve peak results.

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Five Insights

1. Positive Climate: creates an all pervasive supportive and encouraging tone which in turn generates an upward spiral of creativity and performance. 2. Positive Relationships: reinforces and builds upon each individual’s strengths, and creates “positive energizers,” people who inspire others to do their best work. 3. Positive Communication: expresses appreciation, support, helpfulness, approval, encouragement and transparency. In high performing organizations the ratio of positive to negative communication is 5 to 1. 4. Positive Meaning: connects with the core values of workers and creates an over-arching purpose beyond the personal benefit individuals receive from the organization. Together these four positive leadership strategies generate psychological capital which research indicates is characterized by hope, optimism, self-efficacy and resiliency – and in both the short and long run gets the best results time after time.


Five Insights insight five: the most important benefit from coaching

A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want

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Insight five: the Most important benefit from coaching Overview “What is the most important benefit you would expect to gain from working with a coach” is an openended question we asked in our survey? Here are the most frequent responses we received.

59% Want to better understand other people’s emotions and how to read them.

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Five Insights

Increases in these areas are most important to me. •• Personal awareness and self-understanding •• Emotional intelligence •• Leadership competencies •• Effective communication •• Engaging and motivating others •• Preparing for change •• Goal attainment and achieving business results


Improving Emotional Intelligence Extensive research indicates emotional intelligence is critical for leadership success. Of four basic dimensions of emotional intelligence our respondents tell us these are the most important for them to improve.

Enhanced understanding of other people’s emotions and how to read them

59%

Enhanced ability to connect with others and to build long term successful relationships

54%

Enhanced ability to manage and control my emotions

45%

Enhanced understanding of my emotions and what drives me

29%

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Contributors Arthur E. Snyder, Ed.D., was inaugurated as the eighth president of Indiana Tech in October, 2003. Snyder’s previous position was at Millikin University, where he was dean of the Tabor School of Business and the Dwayne O. Andreas Chair of Executive Management from July 2001 to June 2003. From 1992 to 2001 he was chairman of the Department of Marketing and dean of Professional/Graduate Studies at Lynn University. He also taught for the New York Institute of Technology in the MBA program. Prior to academia, Snyder served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Ensec, Inc., in Miami, Fla., and Sao Paul, Brazil, and served as vice president for the data systems division of AT&T. His career with the Bell system spanned more than 20 years. Snyder’s educational credentials include a Doctor of Education in Innovation and Leadership from Wilmington College and a Master of Business Administration in Strategic Management from Barry University. His undergraduate work was also at Barry University. In addition to his position at Indiana Tech, Snyder serves as chairman of the Sisters of Providence Mission Advisory Board and chairman of the Downtown Educational Partnership. He is also a member of the NAIA Council of Presidents, Fort Wayne Business Forum and Quest Club and is a decorated Vietnam veteran.

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Five Insights

Jeffrey A. Zimmerman, Ph.D., has served as dean of Indiana Tech’s College of Business and professor of business since 2011. As dean, Zimmerman is focused and passionate about creating a dynamic relationship- based environment which will maximize student learning, challenge faculty to push forward with cutting-edge educational technologies, and build mutually beneficial relationships with community and business leaders. He has served previously as a college dean and as an active community leader, organizer and frequently requested speaker on issues facing both the tactical and long-term strategic success of business organizations regardless of their size, maturity or industry. Zimmerman’s academic credentials include a Doctor of Philosophy in Economics from Purdue University and a master’s degree in economics from West Virginia University. He completed his undergraduate work at the State University of New York in Albany with studies in computer programming, economics, and business administration. Service and community activities have always been an important part of Zimmerman’s career. He has been involved in with United Way of Cumberland County, Cumberland County Business Council, Douglas Byrd Finance Academy, Fayetteville Area Chamber of Commerce, and Community Concerts of Fayetteville. He is also a member of Rotary International.


Ken Rauch, Ed.D., has served as director of the university’s Ph.D. in Global Leadership program since 2010. Rauch brings a multidimensional perspective to the Ph.D. program including a strong leadership background in business and industry along with interdisciplinary experience across the academic horizon. His strength and ongoing interest is in bridging academic disciplines with cutting-edge global and cross-cultural issues and in helping both graduate students and practitioners solve global leadership challenges. Dr. Rauch’s research interests include: • Eastern European leadership orientation within the transition economies of these countries, • Generational attitudinal persistence of gender leadership inequality, and • Followership and role orientation in shared leadership including the connections between relational self-concept and leadership. Rauch’s academic credentials include a doctorate in organizational leadership from Indiana Wesleyan University; a master’s degree in human resources from Indiana University; a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Indiana Wesleyan; and an associate degree in supervision from Purdue University. Service and community involvement are also an important part of Rauch’s professional efforts both past and present. These include serving on the New Haven Chamber of Commerce Board, Big Brothers/ Little Brothers of Northeast Indiana, the Fort Wayne Children’s Home and serving as past president of the New Haven Baseball Association.

Jim Schaffer, Ph.D., is a professor in the College of Business at Indiana Tech, where he has taught leadership and related organizational development courses at the doctoral, master’s and undergraduate levels for more than 20 years. Earlier in his career, Schaffer directed staff consultants in the Indiana region as vice president for professional services of a national HR management consulting firm. He has provided services to leading companies such as Eli Lilly & Company, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Ford, GM, Lincoln Life, Amax Coal, and IU Health Systems. Coaching and leadership development are his primary interests of research and professional service. He is a graduate of the College of Executive Coaching, the only graduate level coach-training institute affiliated with the American Psychology Association. He is a Certified Personal and Executive Coach and has provided more than 3,000 hours of coaching to key executives and managers. Schaffer’s educational credentials include a Doctor of Philosophy in Administrative Leadership and Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Indiana University; advanced graduate studies in administration, planning and social policy at Harvard University; and a master’s degree in higher education administration from Oklahoma State University. He completed his undergraduate work at Oral Roberts University in the areas of biblical literature and business administration.

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Five Insights A Study of Coaching: What Leaders Really Want Jim Schaffer, Ph.D.

www.indianatech.edu 800.937.2448


Five Insights