Page 1

Mac Donald College Fro m the land o f the le ap e rs we seek h igh t h in gs

1963 - 2013 Mac Donald College

C

M

Y

CM

CY

CMY

K

50th Anniversary Commemorative Magazine

MY

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TI A M S US

1963 - 2013

50

Years

Of Excellence in Education Amidst the Odds


*ERE COMES THE SUN. SAY HELLO TO A NEW BEGINNING.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Happy

home | motor | marine | travel | bonds | commercial insurance call 440-0217 QTXKUKVUWPIGPGTCNPGV

50th Anniversary

Petrocaribe Grenada Ltd is proud to be associated with the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the formation of Mac Donald College and take this opportunity to extend its congratulation to the institution on such a milestone COVERING THE CARIBBEAN ANGUILLAË#06+)7A & BARBUDAË$ARBA&15ËDOMINICA G R E N A D A  Ë  S 6  L U C I A  Ë  S 6  8 + 0 % ' 0 6   6 * '  G R E N A D I N E S


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

1


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

CALL 435-EASY for

from Republic Bank BUILD or BUY a home PURCHASE land RENOVATE your home REFINANCE loans at another lender Use EQUITY to finance special needs At Republic Bank, we’ve taken the hassle out of getting a mortgage and added rewards to our HOMEasy Loans!* Visit our website at republicgrenada.com, call 444-2265, or come into any of our branches.

We extend congratulations to Mac Donald College on its

50th Anniversary. “The Roots of Education are sometimes bitter, but the fruit is always sweet.”

2


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Looking to

relax, enjoy nature and escape the crowds? Small boutique hotel located off the beaten track with spectacular views of the Grenadines. Cottage style rooms - each over looking the Caribbean Sea to Carriacou and beyond. Ideally located for trips to beautiful Sandy Island, leatherback turtle watching and hiking. Get away from it all. We grow much of our own produce for our restaurant. Wifi available across the grounds. BOOK NOW for special offers.

“The best kept secret on Grenada, lovely people, fabulous place, great views...”

Petite Anse Hotel & Restaurant

Tel: +1 473 442 5252 Email: info@petiteanse.com www.facebook.com/petiteansehotelgrenada www.petiteanse.com 3


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TI A M S US

50th Anniversary Commemorative Magazine PUBLISHED BY:

36

Innovative Marketing Services for Mac Donald College

EDITORIAL TEAM: A. Kiwanie Toussaint Donnette R. Narine

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Angus Samuel

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Dianne Abel-Jeffrey James Alexander, Arkia Auld Clyde Belfon, Gordon Bolah Shievlyn Boney, Ginelle Charles Wilma Charles-Alexander Ashalee Cobourne, Kimron Corion Lorraine De Allie, Neville Glean Ikashacu Hamlet Rev. Dr. Osbert James Finley Jeffrey, Zaenia Jeffrey Davis John, Loxley John Alfred Logie, Donnette R. Narine Charles Paryag, Esther Swan Ryan Nelson-Paryag Peron Paul, Perry Paul Tesfa Peterson, Lyndon Pope Maria Ramjohn, Nordia Roberts A. Kiwanie Toussaint

PHOTOGRAPHY: Choice Photos, Digital Memories, Arkia Auld, Shievlyn Boney, A. Kiwanie Toussaint

SPECIAL THANKS: Ethlyn Fortune Margaret Glean Sharrie Jones Esther Swan

Every effort has been made when compiling and producing this magazine to ensure the accuracy of its content. The publisher accepts no responsibility for any typographical or other errors. Copyright @ 2013 by Mac Donald College. All rights reserved.

4

57

Table of Contents Editorial

6

Tribute to Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald

Principals of Mac Donald College

22

8

Poem: Mac Donald College

22

Rise Up O Men of God

8

Meet the Staff

24

Mac Donald College: The Beginnings

10

In his Footsteps

28

The Principal Speaks

14

Poem: Hail to the Chief

30

MDC - The Way I See It

32

Another Life is Taken

32

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Mr. Kenny Lalsingh

34

A Message from the Chairman of the 50th Anniversary Committee

16

Presbyterians Believe in the Value of Education

18

Beyond the Classroom

36

The Motto, Vision and Mission

20

The Crest

21

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: MDC Ex-Students Association (NY)

40


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

10

69

62 24 My Father, My Daddy

42

Our Cultural Legacy

54

Top CXC Performers (1991-2012)

43

Approaches to Conflict

56

Random Recollections of the 1970’s

44

My MDC Memory

57

Mac Donald College Farm

58 59

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Dr. Dolland Noel

46

Steps for Academic Success

48

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Dr. Kedra Cyrus

Acrostic Poem: Mac Donald College

48

The Importance of Reading

60

Music Comes to Mac Donald College

49

On the Sports Beat

62

Poem: The Final Race

68

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Mr. Rondell Bartholomew

69

One of Ivan’s Students Looks Back

70

I’ll Always Remember

71

School Song: We Belong

72

Entrepreneurship: An Avenue for Employment and Wealth Creation

50

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Mrs. Catherine King

52

MDC Cultural Group

53

5


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Editorial Fifty years later, and Mac Donald College is still proudly perched on its lush green throne of gently rolling hills, continuing its founding legacy of providing a quality secondary education experience to students who are still primarily from the rural parts of Grenada. Branded a ‘sports school’, due to its exceptional performances in various sporting disciplines it is often difficult and understandably so to divert our attention from the excitement of continuous, and often highly publicised victories to acknowledge our less endearing strengths. However, this lack of fanfare does not change the fact that we excel in the other areas of a well-rounded educational curriculum, including academics, and a host of cocurricular activities that foster strength of character, integrity and a strong sense of self, as well as, community participation and the enhancement of artistic abilities. Yet, many still do not know what it means to be an MDCite. This can probably be attributed to our ancestral method of recording our school’s history: it is etched solely in the minds of our elders, a delicacy reserved for special occasions. However, a connection with those who went before us is vital in order to foster pride and provide a

6

sense of purpose for those who follow. It is not until one of these tidbits peak our interest that a bond is formed; a connection is made and that sense of belonging takes root. MDC offers something that each of us is able to identify with; one of our own would have more than likely paved the way for those to come. Even in virgin fields, the fearless attitude and perseverance of our students, coupled with the unfailing dedication of highly involved and impressively qualified teachers, noticeably springs to the surface in a collaborative effort to inaugurate our humble institution. This is our celebration of ‘excellence in education amidst the odds’. As we look back, we hope to find a comrade to identify with; as we evaluate where we are, we hope to encourage pride in our achievements; and as we look expectantly towards a future of successive fifty year milestones, we trust that we will continue to be cheered on by the ever strengthening and resounding chant of our maroons-and-greys throughout the world. Donnette R. Narine


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Congratulations & Best Wishes to Mac Donald College as you Celebrate 50yrs of Academic Excellence. - Dominic Paul - Class of 1979 -

Spice Isle Imaging Center MEDICAL . DIAGNOSTIC . DENTAL . LABORATORY SERVICE

Carenage, St. George’s, Grenada , W.I. Tel: 473-444-7679 / 405-4557 / 415-2754 Email: images@spiceisle.com Web: www.spiceisleimage.com 7


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Tribute to Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald

Rise Up, O Men of God

(once sung as the school song)

Rise up O men of God, Have done with lesser things.  Give heart and soul and mind and strength,  To serve the King of Kings,  To serve the King of Kings.  Rise up O men of God,  His Kingdom tarries long,  Bring in the day of brotherhood,  And end the night of wrong,  And end the night of wrong.  Rise up O men of God,  The Church for you doth wait.  Send forth to serve the needs of men, In Christ our strength is great,  In Christ our strength is great.  Lift high the Cross of Christ,  Tread where his feet have trod,  As brothers of the Son of Man,  Rise up O men of God,  Rise up O men of God. 

This is dedicated to Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald “Father of Rural Secondary Education” in Grenada heralded the guiding light who kept focusing on the dark spots of disappointment, difficulty and despair and pointing the way to achievement and success in the days when Mac Donald College seemed but an elusive dream; it is no wonder the school is named after him.

8

Rise up O men of God, Have done with lesser things.  Give heart and soul and mind and strength,  To serve the King of Kings,  To serve the King of Kings.


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

“We care because you matter”

Come Home…

To the bank that has always been there and always will be, because of prudent financial practices and sound financial performance.

• Due diligence and compliance with financial regulators such as ECCB • Strict corporate values of integrity, confidentiality and loyalty to our customers • Long-standing history of consistent growth and performance, and financial stability in the market-place

Grenada Co-operative Bank Limited welcome home

St. George’s: 440-2111 Fax: 440-6600 • Grenville: 442-7748 Fax: 442-8400 Sauteurs: 442-9247 Fax: 442-9888 • Spiceland Mall: 439-0778 Fax: 439-0776 Carriacou: 443-6385 Fax: 443-8184 • info@grenadaco-opbank.com www.grenadaco-opbank.com

9


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Mac Donald College: The Beginnings 10


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

On January 21, 1963, Mac Donald College officially opened its doors to twenty-seven students, which included twelve boys and fifteen girls under the instructional leadership of Dr. Wellington Friday. The principal, together with Miss Claudia Nyack and Reverend Paul Sharma taught the students. Mr. Leon Courtney was the caretaker.

The beginnings of Mac Donald College go as far back as 1957. The idea of building a secondary school by the Presbyterian Church was first mooted. The main purpose was to set up a school with a high moral tone, a religious atmosphere, and good teaching that would provide quality secondary school education. At that time, there were

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

only six (6) secondary schools existing in Grenada so they also wanted to help cut the cost of transportation for rural students who were travelling all the way to St. George’s to attain a secondary education. A committee was put in place to investigate, plan and take action. A fundraising drive was hosted, monthly monetary donations were given, and 11


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

appeals for help were made, both at home and abroad to ensure the school was established. The following is a list of persons who served on the “Founding” Ad Hoc Committee and subsequently on the Administrative Committee of the College.

Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald Rev. Jim Sennarine (PSEB.) Mrs. Alice Mason Rev. Arlen Salthouse Miss Ethel Brathwaite Rev. C. Kanhai Miss Rosemarie Charles* Mr. W. Ramkerrisingh (PSEB.) Miss Beryl Charles Miss Fedora Grant* Mr. W.H.D. Scott Miss M. Scrimgeour Mr. W. O’Brien Donovan Mr. Shane Curry

*

Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald, who was

Mrs. N. Benjamin Mr. E. Fenty Mr. R. S. Edwards Mr. Lawrence Commissiong+ Mr. J. Mc.Cormick Mr. J. A. Japal Mr. Clifton Ali* Mr. Nathaniel DeAllie Mr. W.E. Copland Mr. B. St. Bernard Miss Minnie Kemp Mr. J.D. Walker Mr. Chris Byrant Mr. Eric Glean* Mr. Nobert Nyack

Members of the Administrative Committee 21/3/73

+ Past Treasurers

The following persons chaired the different committees: Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald

From inception of Ad Hoc Committee September 1957 to July 1961

Rev. Paul Sharma

Chairman of Ad Hoc Committee February 1962 to August 1963

Mr. Lorenzo A. Japal

Chairman of the Administrative Committee 12th October, 1963 to 13th January, 1970 (resigned)

Mr. Eric E. Glean

Chairman of Ad Hoc Committee 23rd January, 1970 to 1973 There was a general consensus by members of the committee that the school should be erected in the parish 12

of St. Patrick, and Marli was chosen as being ideal. The piece of land, on which the school now lies, was originally owned by the Ferguson’s; it overlooks the town of Sauteurs, its environs and the sea.

Mr. Stephen John* Mr. L.L. Ramdhanny Mr. Vernon Simon* Mr. Frederick Mirjah Miss Z. Logie Mr. Alistair Charles• Dr. R.R. Japal* Mr. Kennedy Teka Mr. Edgerton Mirjah W.E. Julien Mr. Lorenzo Japal Mr. Ivan Charles+ Rev. Paul Sharma Mr. W.R.L. Friday*

• Past Secretaries

then the Superintendant Minister of the Church of Scotland in Grenada, was very instrumental in the foundation of the school. His motive was to set up a Presbyterian High School in Grenada, and he believed that the church should infringe upon and inflence the development of the college. He was referred to as the guiding light that kept focusing on the dark spots of disappointments, difficulty and despair and pointed the way forward to achievement and success. By the time he left Grenada towards the end of 1961, considerable ground work for the school had already been laid, and efforts had been made to arouse the awareness of the public, the Presbyterian Synod of Trinidad and Grenada, and the Government of Grenada. After another two years of dedicated efforts by those who followed, Mac Donald College became a reality in

1963, and the institution was named in honour of its pioneer - Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald. At the time, there were only twelve subjects listed on the school’s curriculum: English Language, Latin and Geography taught by the principal; Current Affairs, General Science, English Grammar and Arithmetic taught by Miss Nyack, Junior Mistress; and Geometry, Art, English Literature, History and Scripture taught by Reverend Sharma, Visiting Master. These subjects were taught during the morning periods from 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The afternoon sessions from 2.00 - 3.30 p.m. were devoted to individual and co-curricular activities such as physical education, homework preparation and club work. There was also a sixth form. In order to accommodate the rapid increase in students coming to the college, Mac Donald College needed to grow and move forward. Thus, more classrooms, a library and a science building were completed. The science building is now dedicated to the De Gale family who had contributed the major share of the cost for erecting this building. From inception, the school not only pursued academics but also stood out distinctively in the field of sports, notably cricket, football, netball and athletics; to date, it still holds its rich heritage in these areas. Today, past students of Mac Donald College are ambassadors in practically all walks of life in Grenada, within the region and internationally. Mac Donald College continues to fulfil its high destiny by proudly living up to its motto:

Saltando Alta Petimus (From the land of the leapers we seek high things). Arkia Auld


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

13


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

The Principal Speaks sight of its maroon, grey and white uniform strikes terror in the hearts of its challengers to whom the M.D.C. logo is synonymous with victory. Our past students are known for excellence in whatever profession, vocation or sporting discipline chosen for a career as they continue to uphold the knowledge, skills, attitudes and character of their Alma Mater - Mac Donald College. Many continue to express their gratitude by providing financial support and other tangible contributions to the institution.

As we celebrate our fiftieth anniversary under the theme: “Celebrating Fifty Years of Excellence in Education Amidst the Odds”, it is inevitable that one reflects on the challenges faced by “The Gem on the Hill”, Mac Donald College and how this institution has become a leading icon with all its achievements during the last half century. From its inception, Mac Donald College was faced with the challenge of aiming to make its impression as a prestigious school in the northern, rural parts of the island when the already well established urban institutions had their grasp on the families of the targeted enrollment of the school. However, with the valor of the first Principal, Dr. Wellington Friday; Presbyterian Moderator at the time, Rev. Dr. John Mac Donald; and others, the institution opened its doors on 21st January, 1963 with

14

twenty-seven students whose parents understood the value of education and recognised the financial constraints that an urban education would impose. Mac Donald College has since grown and today boasts an enrollment of five hundred and twelve students accommodated on the most elegantly located campus in Grenada with its panoramic view of the Grenadines, historic Leapers Hill and majestic mountains. Mac Donald College’s achievements are vast. A profusion of trophies representing every area of secondary school activity: curricular, sports and other co-curricular activities in the nation decks our walls and testifies to the school’s progress in just fifty (50) years. Today, so renowned is the reputation of Mac Donald College that just the

I take this opportunity to congratulate Mac Donald College on all its accomplishments and I sincerely wish my alma mater all the best as it celebrates fifty years. I firmly believe that we have just begun glowing in our achievements and will continue to shine as we continue to provide a holistic education to empower young minds and future leaders. I am dedicated to working collaboratively with my staff, the Ministry of Education, the Presbyterian Church of Grenada and other stakeholders to take this institution from the clouds to beyond the sky. Lorraine De Allie Acting Principal


50

©2012 St. George’s University

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Like Carnival, St. George’s University has become an integral part of Caribbean tradition. For more than 35 years, St. George’s University has been honored to be part of the Grenadian community; together, we’ve created a university whose students hold global influence. Join the thousands who have come before you as we continue to raise global educational standards. • SGU has provided nearly 1,000 scholarships to CARICOM students in the past year • Programs in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, other Biological Sciences, Public Health, Research, Business & Information Technology

Office of Admission +1 (473) 444-4680 www.sgu.edu/caribbean

• Beautiful, technologically advanced campus • On 2010 USMLE Step 1, the 94% pass rate of SGU’s first-time test takers from US and Canada surpassed the 92% first-time pass rate of students at US and Canadian schools • The MPH program is one of only five non-US programs to receive accreditation by the US Council of Education for Public Health

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Program accredited by American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) www.avma.org

• MBA Programs offer scheduled online classes with two separate one week residencies on the academic paradise of Grenada • Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program earned full accreditation from the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA COE) The Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) announced its accreditation of the St. George’s University’s Master of Public Health program, making the University only the fifth non-US institution approved - and the only university in the Caribbean region holding this distinction.

15


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

A Message from the Chairman of the 50th Anniversary Committee I am very pleased to be afforded the opportunity to chair the committee responsible for organizing the 50th anniversary celebration of Mac Donald College under the theme - Celebrating 50 Years of Excellence in Education Amidst the Odds. When Mac Donald College opened its doors on January 21, 1963 as the seventh secondary school in Grenada, many people thought that it was a joke. It could not be true. It was a mistake. However, fifty years later, what appeared to have been an elusive dream has truly turned out to be a reality. The attainments and accomplishments of this noble institution speak volumes. The litany of graduates of this institution can be seen in various professions locally, regionally and internationally. As the College approaches middle age status, those who were instrumental in its establishment can be very proud of their investment in such a venture. Truly its accomplishments have exceeded their expectations as the college is undeniably living up to its mission statement “To provide students with a holistic education geared at producing well-rounded individuals who will be able to participate effectively and efficiently in a democratic society�. I therefore urge each and everyone who will be participating in the yearlong event to reflect on the past as we prepare for the future. Remember where we came 16

from, where we are and where we hope to be fifty years later. While we are glad to have our sisters and brothers from abroad participating in this once in a lifetime activity, it will be remiss of me if we did not recognise the contribution made by the following: The Presbyterian Church of Grenada under the dynamic leadership of Reverend Dr. John Mac Donald after whom the College is named; Dr. Wellington R.L. Friday, a former principal; the Ferguson family of St. Patrick; the founding staff- Miss Claudia Nyack and Reverend Paul Sharma; the first twenty-seven students; Mr. and Mrs. Leon Courtney; the business community of St. Patrick; Messrs. David Mc Queen; Reginald Bhola; Lawrence Charles; Errol Purcell; and all those who in their small way contributed to the establishment of the College. I say hats off to you. Finally, as the College grows from strength to strength, I implore all of us, both past and present students to always keep the maroon and grey flying very high and be proud to know that you are a product of Mac Donald College. Saltando Alta Petimus. Happy 50th Birthday MDC. I love you! James I. Alexander Former Principal


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Barry’s Engineering CONGRATULATIONS

Company Ltd.

to Mac Donald College on 50 years of sterling service to Grenada. We wish you continued success as you shape our nation’s future. - Leslie Barry, Class of 1987 -

“Total Engineering & Construction Solutions”

Consulting Civil & Structural Engineering Project & Construction Management T: 473 443 2327 . F: 473 443 5057 E: barrysengineering@gmail.com W: www.barrysengineering.com Unit #4 Knight’s Building, Archibald Avenue, St. George’s, Grenada.

Architectural Designs General Construction Property Appraisals/Valuations 17


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Presbyterians Believe in the Value of Education A hallmark of the Reformed Faith (the tradition from which Presbyterianism comes) is an emphasis on education. Reformed Christians believe education’s main goal is to be transformative. The person who is educated must be changed by the education he/she has received, and he/she is then to seek to transform society. Presbyterians have always considered education as a core value. In the United States, for example, the first Presbyterian college was started in 1746. It is now known as Princeton University. This emphasis on education comes from the Bible. Jesus insisted that man must love God “with all [his] heart, all [his] soul, and all [his] mind” (Matthew 22:37-38). Presbyterians believe that the mind must be developed fully; education is one sure way of doing this. Given this approach to developing the whole person, it is not surprising that from the beginning, the Presbyterian Church in Grenada became involved in the enterprise of education. George Brizan noted that the Presbyterian Church had, early in its existence, provided education for the East Indian indentured servants. Although the Anglican and Presbyterian Churches, according to Brizan, were considered the church of the plantocracy1 the Presbyterian Church’s interest in educating the newly arrived Indians is undeniable. In its work among the East Indians, it established schools for their education. By 1921, the Indian population had increased to 2,672, the majority of whom were in St. Andrew and St. Patrick. However, more and more Indians moved into St. John and St. Mark and from 1891 to 1921 their numbers increased by 588% and 297% respectively in these two parishes. The presence of 18

Presbyterian Mission Stations in these two parishes and the establishment of at least five Indian Mission Schools accounted partially for this2. The Presbyterian Church was founded in 1831 and its first place of worship, the Scots Kirk, was completed in 1833. The Maidstone sailed into Grenada with its first batch of East Indian Indentured servants on 1st May, 1957 and in less than 30 years after their arrival the Samaritan Presbyterian School (founded in 1886) was there to meet their education needs. By 1891, with only 466 members, the Presbyterian Church had established a second school, the Belair Church of Scotland School3. Minutes reporting efforts to start the Mac Donald College noted: “A meeting of persons interested in constructing and maintaining a secondary school for boys and girls in Grenada was held in the Manse, St. George’s on September 2, 1957. The aim was to set up a school with a high moral tone, a religious atmosphere, and good teaching.” Mac Donald College began with twenty-seven students on January 21, 1963 with an assembly at 10am. Its motto, “Saltando Alta Petimus” meaning “From the land of the leapers, we seek high things” indicated what was to be the focus of this new institution. Reverend Dr. Osbert James 1

2 3

George Brizan, Grenada: Island of Conflict (London: MacMillan Caribbean, 1998). Ibid. 245-246. After Hurricane Janet, the Church agreed that government would administer the school; it was renamed the Belair Government School.


50 St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

The Scots Kirk Rebuilding and Restoration Project

In September 2004, the beautiful, then 175-year old building which housed the St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church locally known as the “Scots Kirk”, in St. George’s was virtually destroyed. Everything, except for the north wall to which the tower is attached, and the south wall, were completely decimated. The pews, granite baptismal font, antique pipe organ, piano and hymn books were all crushed by the roof and 3-ft thick walls. The fundraising programme realised $450,000.00 which has had to be used to restore and reinforce the tower - the first phase of rebuilding. The Church members are having to raise approximately EC$1.7m (2007 estimate) to rebuild the sanctuary. Both the Church bell which was cast in Glasgow, Scotland in the early1830’s and the Clock manufactured in the 1820’s are housed in the tower. The more than 100-year old pipe organ which was sent to Barbados for restoration after the hurricane will be returned before the end of this year. The Scot’s Kirk is a historic building and belongs to the country and not just to Presbyterians. Please help the Presbyterians of Grenada to ensure that this built heritage is restored. Donations can be sent to: The Presbyterian Church in Grenada, P.O. Box 1886, Knox House, St. George’s, Grenada.

Tel: (473) 440-2436 . Website: www.presbyterianchurchgrenada.com

19


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Motto

“Saltando Alta Petimus� From the land of the leapers, we seek high things.

Vision

To establish an institution with a high moral tone and a positive religious atmosphere in which students will be provided with the necessary knowledge, skills, attitude and values to meet the needs of the rural community in particular and the nation and the society in general.

20

Mission

To provide students with a holistic education geared at producing well-rounded individuals who would be able to participate effectively and efficiently in a democratic society.


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

The Crest of Mac Donald College AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TI A M S US

O

nce a distinct part of the uniform, the crest of Mac Donald College is now predominantly used as a hallmark. According to former principal, Mr. James Alexander, it was designed by Dr. Wellington Friday.

At its pinnacle, a cross is nestled between the initials of the school, symbolising that Mac Donald College is a denominational school. In addition, the cross symbolises the vision of the founding fathers to have a school with “a positive religious atmosphere and a high moral tone”. The three blue stripes on the left represent the Caribbean Sea which the school is a stone’s throw from. On the right, the greenery represents the lush vegetation which characterises Grenada as well as the fact that the school is ideally located on a large expanse of land. At the base of the crest, is an open book illustrating the fundamental reason the school was created, to educate the masses. 21


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

PRINCIPALS

Mac Donald College is our Alma Mater,

Hereunder is a list of the principals who have

It’s one place in the world we would never barter,

served Mac Donald College through the years.

A place where knowledge goes wild,

We are aware that the hot seat is not an easy

Athletes sprint and scholars thrive.

one. Thank you for your guidance and leadership. We salute you for taking us thus far.

A place where athletes and students strive for the best, A place that Grenadians have ranked among the rest. A place where we love and in our minds it would be,

Dr.

W.R.L. Friday *

Rev.

Arlen Salthouse

Mrs.

Fedora Grant-Hercules *

Miss

Margaret Scrimgeour

Proud students of Mac Donald College

Miss

Minni Kemp

And our love is in thee.

Mr.

R.S Edwards

Mr.

C.A Martineau

Mr.

George Boldeau

Mr.

Francis Sookram

Mr.

Baxter Fanwar

Mr.

Rolstan Adams

Mr.

Franklyn Duncan

Mr.

Arnold Lochan

Mr.

James Alexander

Miss

Lorraine De Allie

* Served three terms

22

Mac Donald College

A school on the hill where the students are free and true Anywhere we go we will always be,

Ashalee Cobourne


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Helping Businesses Make the Right Moves!

Proud Publishers of this Anniversary Magazine We extend Congratulations to Mac Donald College on 50yrs of Excellence in Education. We wish you every success as you continue to help our Nation’s Youths Make the Right Moves! - Angus Samuel - Class of ‘84

Advertising & Marketing

Graphic & Web Design

Printing & Publishing

#1303 Bruce Street Mall, St. George’s, Grenada . T: 473.440.4467 . F: 473.435.4467 E: info@imscaribbean.com . www.imscaribbean.com

23


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Seated Left to Right: C. Lewis, A. Baptiste, F. Alexander, S. Palmer, G. Cudjoe, M. Glean, L. De Allie, C. Andall, Second Row: C. Chitterman, A. Auld, M Mc Queen, L. Julien, R. Benn, D. Ganness-Phillip, F. Noel, M. St. John, N. Joseph, Third Row: M. Ratoo, V. Thomas, R. Aberdeen, A. Edwards, S. Francis, L. Nicholas, J. Pascal, A. Cyrus, E. George, L. Neckles, Back Row: A. Whiteman. Absent: C. Alexander, G. Andall, J. Best, C. Felix, D. Paterson.

Meet the Staff “I was blessed with the greatest teachers within the Grenadian teaching system - teachers who counselled and guided me through the five years I spent at Mac Donald College.� Tarchelle English.

caretaker. Today, it has a staff of 56, 41 of which include the principal and teachers and 15 persons which make up the ancillary staff; there are 19 males and 37 females. Almost 50% of the staff are past students.

From four to fifty-six how the staff of Mac Donald College has grown! At its inception on January 21, 1963, Mac Donald College had a principal, and a staff of two teachers and a

The Senior Management Team comprising the Heads of Department: Florian Alexander (English), Ann Baptiste (Business), Dillon Paterson (Mathematics), Dianne AbelJeffrey (Modern Languages), Finley Jeffrey (Science), Gerard

24


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

D. Abel-Jeffrey, F. Jeffrey, M. Paul, A. Toussaint, D. Narine. D. Noel, A. Date, T. Smith, K. Daniel, E. Noel, K. Boney, S. Boney, T. Nelson. J. Jeremiah, L. Viechweg, R. Chitterman, K. Budd, P. Paul, I Hamlet.

Cudjoe (Social Science) and Michael Paul (Technical), Salie Palmer (School Counselor), Carl Andall (Vice Principal) and Lorraine De Allie (Acting Principal) manages the school. Acting Principal, Miss Lorraine De Allie, attended Mac Donald College from 1986 to 1991. She joined the faculty in 1993, as a teacher of Mathematics and Integrated Science. In 1999, she attended St. George’s University to pursue an undergraduate degree in Natural Science which she later graduated with honours. In 2002, she attended the T.A Marryshow Community College (Teacher Education Department) and became a qualified teacher in Mathematics. Shortly after her training in pedagogy, she attended the Georgia State University where she pursued graduate studies

in Science Education and again graduated with honours. From 2007-2010, she was the Vice Principal of Mac Donald College and became the Acting Principal in January 2011, when former principal Mr. James Alexander retired. Some of the longest serving members of staff include farm attendant Alister Peters, Secretary Margaret Glean, teacher Leslie Nicholas and caretaker Joan Jeremiah. Mr. Alister “Ras” Peters has worked on the Mac Donald College School farm for over thirty seven (37) years, as a Farm Attendant. For the first twenty-five years he was employed by the school, but about twelve years ago he became an employee of the government. 25


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

it. He began his tenure in November 1982 just months after completing his second year as a fifth form student at Mac Donald College. His presence here is owed to Mr. Martin Harvey who was the sports master at the time. Recalling how excellent a footballer Mr. Nicholas was, he suggested that he return to Mac Donald College to assist him with coaching. According to Mr. Nicholas, the then principal Ralston Adams actually wrote his letter of application and he was asked to report to work the next day.

Qualifications of Teachers at Mac Donald College 35

Percentage of Teachers

30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Trained Graduate Trained Graduate Level 1 Level 2

Graduate

Qualified

Certified Level 1

Certified Level 2

Qualification

Ras, as he is affectionately called, takes care of the plants and animals and also guards the farm. When students come on the farm to complete activities related to their SBA’s, he demonstrates some of the techniques utilised in farming. Additionally, he sometimes teaches students when their teachers are not available to do so. Ras is outgoing and is a faithful and dedicated worker who takes pride in his work. It is evident that he enjoys what he is doing. Ras declares, “I would have settled for no other job.” (by Peron Paul)

Mrs. Margaret Glean returned to her alma mater as its secretary in September 1980, when her predecessor Miss Majorie Perrotte migrated. When Miss Perrotte offered the position to her, Mrs. Glean recalls, “I was unsure, but told her I would give it a try.” Mrs. Glean had attended secretarial classes with Miss Perrotte and whenever the school was closed for vacation or Miss Perrotte had a lot of work to do, she assisted her with secretarial tasks. When Mrs. Glean became the secretary of Mac Donald College, Mr. George Boldeau was its principal. Mrs. Glean has worked with 9 principals and because of her versatility was able to cope. Of former principal, James Alexander, whom she has worked with the longest, Mrs. Glean says this: “I learnt a lot from Chief, he has increased my vocabulary immensely and he always had a story to share.”

Apart from coaching, when Mr. Nicholas began his tenure at Mac Donald College, he taught mathematics in form two. After Mr. Harvey left and Mr. Neville Glean joined the staff, he also assisted Mr. Glean with the coaching of the footballers and athletes. Six years after joining the staff of Mac Donald College, Mr. Nicholas received a scholarship from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) to study Agricultural Science in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago which earned him a diploma. Presently, he is the form teacher of form 2BN and teaches Agricultural Science throughout the school. He has taught Integrated Science and History. In the 1990’s, he also taught Pittman Mathematics in form 5 for several

A graduate of the St. John’s Christian Secondary School, Leslie Nicholas is the only teacher on staff that has had the privilege to see every other teacher “come in” as James Alexander puts Alister “Ras” Peters 26

Leslie Nicholas


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

years. Mr. Nicholas generously gives of his time, whether it is to coach the senior boys football team (which has done remarkably well over the years), to help repair the staffroom, to nail sheets of galvanise on the roof of the recently built security booth (even if he needs assistance to get off the roof after), to dig holes to fence the school or to tend the bar in fair, sports or graduation dances, bad back and all, Mr. Leslie Nicholas is always there when Mac Donald College needs him. Long before Miss Joan Jeremiah became the caretaker of Mac Donald College, she

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

was a member of staff. Miss Jeremiah worked on the school’s farm as a farm attendant for several years. As the school was en route to her home, after Miss Jeremiah completed her duties on the farm she usually came to the school. On one such day, Mr. Arnold Lochan asked Miss Jeremiah if she would like to be the caretaker of the school and she readily accepted. She commenced her new appointment on September 1, 1987. Miss Jeremiah expresses a love for her job, clearly evident by her reacceptance of the same job after her July 2010 retirement. Joan Jeremiah

MDC Staff 1986

MDC Staff 1992

MDC Staff 2010 27


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

In His Footsteps When one thinks of Mac Donald College, one inevitably thinks of James “Chief” Alexander. Some propose that it is because he has been at Mac Donald College the longest - 22 years - indeed that is a long time. Others posit that he is one of the few principals still around so it is him whom the current generation knows. However, everyone would certainly agree that Mr. Alexander has made an ineffaceable mark in education. It is said that Mr. Alexander was literally handpicked by the late Carlyle John to be principal of Mac Donald College. Mr. John was instrumental in Mr. Alexander’s accomplishment of a Bachelor’s Degree in Educational Administration and Supervision from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Though Mr. Alexander was relatively young when he was placed at the helm of a prestigious institution, he had had some experience in administration as principal of the St. Mary’s Roman Catholic School and Grenville Junior Secondary School, but his career in education commenced decades ago at the River Sallee Government School.

28

No doubt, Mr. Alexander would have felt the enormity of the task thrust upon him, a mere two months after he had joined the faculty of his Alma Mater as a Social Studies teacher. He had as his watchwords Swahili terms: Harambee, (all pulling together); and fuata nyayo (following in his footsteps). Mr. Alexander was determined to follow in the footsteps of founding Principal, Dr. Wellington Friday. Like Dr. Friday, who regularly visited the homes of his students, Mr. Alexander recognised the importance of effective home/ school relationship in a student’s success, so he went to great lengths to ensure that he knew every student who ever darkened the doorway of a classroom at Mac Donald College during his tenure as principal, which commenced on March 15, 1988. This knowledge that he had of his students enabled him to be accommodating of their differences thereby providing equality of educational opportunity at Mac Donald College and the conditions that enabled many students to taste the fruits of success, a feat that would have been impossible had they been students at other institutions. His attempt to accommodate the differences among students characterised his instructional leadership at Mac Donald College, but it was the very thing for which he was scathed. Many felt that Mr. Alexander was too lax with students and teachers alike. Regardless, no one would disagree that Mr. Alexander had Mac Donald College at heart. Probably due to his pedagogical


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

training, Mr. Alexander recognised the impact a staff in harambee would have on the success of the school. Thus he encouraged socialisation among teachers and in many a staff meeting after veering off course like he often did, to share an adage, a biblical quotation or what was supposed to be an anecdote, Mr. Alexander urged the staff to be each other’s keeper, since the success of one was the success of all and conversely. Certainly “Chief” is a household name and to suggest that it is by default of the number of years that he gave to Mac Donald College is to imprudently equate quantity with quality. Like Dr. Friday, in whose footsteps he vowed to follow, Mr. Alexander has left a legacy. He has held many positions including President of the local Principal’s Association and brought many innovations to Mac Donald College for which he was awarded The ARL Miller Award. Undeniably, Mr. Alexander has had many exploits; the most important he believes is the creation of an atmosphere where effective teaching and learning can take place. This is evident in the marked increase in the number of passes

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

attained by the most outstanding students of the school and the consistent performance of the school in the CXC CSEC examination with an average pass rate of at least 70%. What people may always remember though is that it was under the stewardship of “Chief” that Mac Donald College had its historic, inaugural 2003 INTERCOL victory. More than anything else, Mr. Alexander would like continuity; he would love to see generations of families attending Mac Donald College as was done in the past, and for Miss De Allie and those who follow to “fuata nyayo”_ not so much in his footsteps_ but their predecessors, those who laid the foundation, and those who continued the building process of “the pride of the north” Mac Donald College. A. Kiwanie Toussaint

GRENADA PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION Commercial and Residential Paving

We Congratulate

Mac Donald College on 50 years of Excellence in Education and remaining true to its motto: “From the land of the leapers we seek high things”

Parking Lots & Driveways Concrete Curbs & Sidewalks Road Construction Resurfacing

Dusty Highway, Grand Anse Tel: (473) 444-3425

We Have Built a Reputation On Quality 29


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Hail to the Chief (for James Alexander on the occasion of his retirement)

From his vantage point in the Pride of the North, the immaculately dressed Chief watches, as they trickle in. Neither their antics nor neighborhood happenings escape him. The shrill ring of the bell cuts the conversation of one of the early birds. He ambles to the big tree and shoos the reluctant scholars away. The days when they ran as he approached, come back to him. Before long they come scurrying like little mice; he retreats to the black throne. Silently demanding his attention is a mountain of papers “A group of students” is and not “are” he notes, but the exigency of the news takes precedence over concord. To their annoyance, the hand summons them again to the headquarters of grey. Autobiographical excerpts, adages and biblical quotations, metamorphose the supposedly brief meeting to a harangue. An automatic “Don’t worry,” is emitted, in response to expressed concerns. Yet, uncertainty plagues them, as they diverge across the haphazard spread of buildings. As he retraces his steps, one of them races after him. With understanding brown eyes, he tells her, “It’s not a problem.” The short journey is punctuated by an angry parent, and two bickering students waiting in the lobby, honey-dripping words quickly placate her; an interrogation quells the dispute. The reformists can wait. May be tomorrow, he would assert his authority. The black chariot glides over the country roads. “Chief! Chief!” they hail. A Kiwanie Toussaint

30


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

FLOW joins McDonald College Mac Donald College in celebrating 50 years of Excellence as an Academic Institution

Excellence in Education Amidst the Odds MacDonald Mac DonaldCollege College

“From “Fromthe theland landofofthe theleapers leaperswe weaim aimat athigh highthings” things”

“Locally distributed by Independence Agencies Limited”. Maurice Bishop Highway, St. George’s Telephone: 440-2615 / 440-2008 . Mon - Fri 8.00am - 4.30pm. 31


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

MDC The Way I See It

Mac Donald College opened its doors to its first 27 pupils on 21st January, 1963. It operated in a small two-room building with Dr. Wellington R. L. Friday as principal and two teachers. The members of the Presbyterian Church had seen the need for a secondary school to be established in the St. Patrick area, because parents had to bear the heavy expenses just to have their children attend school in St. George’s, thus, with the determination of the governing body of the College and the support of the Presbyterian Church, a suitable spot was located on the hills at Marli. Today, 50 years later, we can still boast of having the best spot on the island. In September 1963, Mac Donald College took in its second group of students. They were housed in an extension, put on to the existing building. Mac Donald College had to grow, it had to expand, and it had to carve out a name for itself. Thus, on 22nd July, 1965, the De Gale Memorial Science building was opened. One year later, another building was erected. This expansion was necessary to cater for the increasing number of students, and also to establish library facilities. A few years later, additional land was bought to facilitate an ‘Agricultural Project’. On part of the land is a farm and the rest of the land was and is still being utilised by students who are doing Agricultural Science for external exams. No doubt Mac Donald College has produced some outstanding students who can safely say that its motto: “In Sauteurs we aim at high achievements” was maintained and is still being maintained. Today it has a student body of over 500 and a staff of 41 teachers including the Principal. Mac Donald College can boast of achieving a lot in a short time.

32

Another Life is Taken (Dedicated to all those who have died violently)

Another life is taken One more mother’s crying The youths of our nation are killing And yet no one is praying Only Jah knows what’s happening People broadcasting the news like it’s a happy feeling But what about the ones that are really hurting? Who’s gonna give them the comforting? Start Praying More Often My People … Lyndon Pope


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

G G Grenadian General Insurance Co. Ltd. “Safe with us in your corner of the world�

We are known for personal customer service, financial strength and a tradition of excellence for the past 22 years. For our customers we are committed to providing quality service and general insurance products at affordable prices.

Ask us about

MOTOR MAX Grenada: Carriacou: Scott Street Tel/Fax: 443-6234 P.O. Box 47, St. George's Tel: (473) 440-2434/1280/1320 Fax: 440-6618 E-mail: ggicoltd@spiceisle.com www.grenadiangeneralinsurance.com

33


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Kenny Lalsingh

“In every sector of society, there is a student of Mac Donald College and he/she is doing well.”

James I. Alexander.

One of the pioneer students, Mr. Kenny Lalsingh attended Mac Donald College from January 21, 1963 to December 1967. As a student, he played football and to this day recalls the embarrassment of going to INTERCOL wearing short pants while students from other schools were wearing long pants. After leaving Mac Donald College, he focused on earning a living with the belief that the sky was the limit. By 1975, Mr. Lalsingh owned and managed a musical band called “Seven Degrees”, three wooden buses, and Kenny’s Disco in Sauteurs. He was an insurance agent, until his incarceration in 1979 by the People’s Revolutionary Government (PRG). According to Mr. Lalsingh, “I was imprisoned without charge or trial by the PRG.” During his incarceration, he played Scrabble and discussed world affairs. In spite of the many hardships of prison, he kept his goals in sight and it was there that he developed the name of his company: KALICO (Kenny A. Lalsingh Investment Company). On October 25, 1981, Mr. Lalsingh was released from prison but was made to sign a document never to be involved in politics again. On his release he discovered his businesses had collapsed, and he had to start again from “scratch”. April 1982 was a new beginning when he transformed the Disco into a wholesale and retail enterprise and registered his business as KALICO Shopping Centre. In December 1984, as part of the New National Party (NNP) led by the late Herbert Blaize, Mr. Lalsingh was elected to Parliament to represent the people of the St. Patrick’s West constituency. He won his seat for two other consecutive terms. After a break from politics, he returned in 2006 and served as president of the Senate from February 1, 2006 to July 2008. Despite his active involvement in politics, he decided that his business must grow and in May 2009, he executed his planned expansion of KALICO by opening and relocating the warehouse to the Frequente Industrial Park. In January 2010, he opened a store at the GCNA Complex on Kirani James Boulevard, which, due to its non-profitability, was later forced to close. In March 2011, at the request of the owner, he acquired Valu-City Supermarket in Gouyave making it the fourth location of KALICO. Presently, Mr. Lalsingh is the campaign manager for the NNP. Ginelle Charles 34


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Forget the traffic, drive your mouse to

Royal Online Experience the convenience of our FREE Internet Banking

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

• • • •

View current balances in local currency and U.S. dollars Get instant account balances Review withdrawals and payments for one full year Perform customised searches and choose the information you want • Make online payments directly to other RBTT account holders (from anywhere in the world) • Download your account information to any spreadsheet software • Pay your RBTT credit card, utilities and other bills

K

Sign up for Royal Online today!

For further information, please call: Grand Anse 444-4919 • St. George’s 440-3521 • Grenville 438-0880-1 • True Blue 440-3521, visit any RBTT Bank branch or log on to www.rbtt.com

35


50

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Years of Excellence in Education...

Beyond the Classroom

A

t Mac Donald College the growth of the whole student: moral, emotional, physical, psychological, artistic, spiritual, and intellectual dimensions is encouraged through participation in co-curricular activities. Students have countless groups or clubs to choose from which include the following: Cadet Corps, Choir, Debating and Literary Society, Drum Corps, Environmental Club, Folk Group, French Club, Girl Guides, Journalism Club, Junior Achievement, Rangers, Red Cross, Student Council and Young Leaders.

Mac Donald College Cadet Corps

In 2009, following a 26 year dormancy, the Grenada Cadet Corps was re-established by the Government of Grenada 36

under the Ministry of National Security. At the helm of the new Corps is Lt. Col. Charles A. R. George. Since this re-establishment, the Mac Donald College Cadet Unit has been commanded by two officers: 2nd Lieutenant Kuan Budd (2009-2010); and 2nd Lieutenant Jason Phillip (2010-present). The Unit currently has 28 registered Cadets and 38 recruits. To date, the Cadets have accomplished an astonishing record of service within the Grenada Cadet Corps, and have made significant contributions to the school, as well as the surrounding community.

Mac Donald College Drum Corps

The Mac Donald College Drum Corps was previously coordinated by Mr. Kuan Budd. However, following the passage of Hurricane Ivan, there was a halt in the group’s


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

performance until February of 2007, when Mr. Frankie Noel, the current Drum Corps Coordinator, saw a need for the school to have an active Drum Corps. Despite limited knowledge of drumming, Mr. Noel and sixteen selected students trained tirelessly. Today, the MDC Drum Corps is a small percussion unit that is widely recognized for its unique style of playing that incorporates both traditional military and modern day rhythms; it provides musical accompaniment for parades and other social activities throughout the island. The Corps aims at developing its students’ musical and moral skills so that they would be able to empower others to strive for success.

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

in the minds and hearts of our students. This group started in 2010, has entertained audiences in the respected Camerhogne Folk Festival as well as other small gatherings. The enthusiasm and spirit shown by the students never fails to disappoint. The group, under the direction of Mrs. Susan Jones-Benjamin, Mr. Gerard Cudjoe and Ms. Kirah Boney, hopes to continue to learn about their folk culture, foster a love for the performing arts as well as entertain.

Mac Donald College French Club

Mac Donald College Folk Group

Culture is the story of a people. Folk, as part of that culture, is the expressions of joys, sorrows, pain, suffering, expectations and disappointments lost to time and memory but relived through song, dance and drama. With cultural penetration threatening to dispute what is really ours as a people, the MDC folk group seeks to relive these treasures

The French Club of Mac Donald College was started by Mrs. Dianne Abel-Jeffrey on September 10, 1997 with 37 students. The goals of the club are: to enhance students’ enthusiasm for the language; to promote leadership, cooperation and friendship through cultural and social activities; to establish a rapport between students and the French teachers outside the classroom; and to create opportunities for students to interact with native speakers. Currently the club has 27 student members and 4 teachers.

37


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Girl Guides and Rangers

Mac Donald College Red Cross Youth

Rangers/Girl Guides is a female-centred organisation for girls whose ages range between fourteen and twenty- five. It was officially founded in the year 1910 in the United Kingdom (UK) by Baden-Powell and headed by Rose Kerr. The group became effective at Mac Donald College in the year 2005. It is headed by Ms. Lil Viechweg, Ms. Cindy-Ann Alexander and Ms. Katisha Daniel. Rangers/Girl Guides can be seen as an organisation that can help young girls get involved in community activities, develop good character traits and socialise in a positive way.

The Mac Donald College Red Cross Youth was started by Ms. A. Kiwanie Toussaint on March 20, 2007 with 30 students. In keeping with its motto “Serve One Another”, most of its efforts focus on assisting those who are in need as well as promoting disaster preparedness and healthy living among members and people in the community. Three other teachers are also involved in the group: Mrs. U. Cyinnica Chitterman, Mr. Akeem Cyrus and Mrs. Doniecia Ganness-Phillip. There are currently 10 students in this group.

We salute Mac Donald College on 50 years of sterling service in educating our nation’s youths. We specialize in: Graduations, Weddings, Funerals, Family Portraits..... Main Street, Sauteurs, St. Patrick’s (upstairs RJ’S Pharmacy) Phone: (473) 442-0555 / 414-6582 / 420-0555 Email: digitalmemories18@gmail.com

Christian Book Store

Extends Heartiest Congratulations To Mac Donald College on its 50th Anniversary

Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one. ~Malcolm S. Forbes~

Tel: 440 2289 Gore Street, St. George’s Grenada Email: bereanpost@spiceisle.com

38


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

WATER

IS ESSENTIAL... Do you have enough STORED? Know your household's minimum needs TODAY!

Tel: 473-440-2155 . Email: nawasa@nawasa.gd

NAWASA...Committed to meeting customers’ needs

In Memory of Our Dad

George Eric Charles Sr.

HAPPY 50TH ANNIVERSARY

MAC DONALD COLLEGE We acknowledge the contribution that this great learning institution has made to our society. We are also very proud to have been part of this school and would like to thank those members of staff who have played a part in our personal development and in the advancement of the school over the past 50yrs. We wish you continued success in the years ahead. Erica, George Jr , Georgia and Gloria Nadia.

Accommodation . Restaurant . Spa . Car Rental We extend congratulations to Mac Donald College on its 50th Anniversary T: 1 473 439 8585 F: 1 473 439 8586 E: sales@laheliconia.com www.laheliconia.com

Point Salines, Maurice Bishop Highway, Grenada

39


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: MDC Ex-Students Association (NY) “In every sector of society, there is a student of Mac Donald College and he/she is doing well.”

James I. Alexander.

MDC Ex-Students Association, New York Chapter, was founded in September of 2005, by a group of Mac Donald College alumni. It is a fundraising organisation with its primary objective, “To give back to Mac Donald College”, the alma mater of members. According to the President of the Association, Mr. Lazarus Antoine, “Mac Donald College is the high school that laid the foundation for us to become the successful men and women that we are today, and, to us, it is an honour to be able to assist the school in any way possible.” The Executive Committee comprises of 14 members: Lazarus Antoine (President), Robert Anthony (Vice President), Teresa Thomas-Phillip (Treasurer), Victoria St. John (Secretary), Norma Belfon (Assistant Secretary), Raymond Baptiste, Cicera Fleming, Joy Fletcher, Clarence Hosten, Mann Hutchinson, Rodney Mark, Tommy Wildman, Esther Wiliams, and Kelvin Xavier. When the association commenced its operation, there was no capital. However, this neither discouraged nor hindered these determined individuals. Using personal funds, the first activity, a bus ride to Atlantic City, was organised. Thanks to the support from the public, the trip was a huge success and it provided the funds needed to undertake other fundraising ventures, which in turn allowed the association to fulfill some of its goals. The group works closely with the school to determine its needs.

40

The following include some of the countless donations made to the school to date: • A commercial lawn mower and funds for its maintenance • Students Special Needs Fund • Gym Equipment • Fax/printer/scanner equipment for the school’s office • Books for Health and Nutrition Class • Communication equipment (laptop, digital camera, video camera, mike, etc.) • Library Project (ongoing) • Scholarship Program, including the Donald Taylor Science Award, which took effect in August 2011 • Stationery supplies In addition to its primary mission of providing assistance to Mac Donald College, the association would also like to put thousands of MDC ex-students worldwide in contact with each other through its website:

www.mdcexstudentsassociation.org


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Building or Renovating?

L.L. Ramdhanny & Co. Ltd

We are experts in providing industry standard products from foundation to roof. Visit or call us at: Grenville

Gladstone Rd & Victoria St (473) 442-7636 / 7653

Grand Anse

Maurice Bishop Highway (473) 444-4793 / 4794

41


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

My Father, My Daddy “My parents knew it was a great school (MDC) and sent all my siblings there.” Erica, George, Gloria Nadia and Georgia Charles

My father was a reader; still is as far as I know. And so by age ten I was well acquainted with the works of Robert Ludlum and Tom Clancy and a host of others. Though I had little understanding of what the KGB was or what the ANC did, I was convinced of their importance because if my father, my Daddy who made kites for me every Easter, and let me plait his hair, thought that they were a big deal, then naturally so did I. In the Caribbean region and beyond, there has been a push in recent years to engage fathers more concretely in the education of children. Given the authoritative and disciplinary nature of fathering in Grenada, I would like to suggest that were fathers to seriously attend to this issue, it would be a boon to the education of our children and society as a whole. I use the example above to illustrate the thrust of this article, that fathers have a role in both the formal and informal education of their children. It is important to explain what I mean by this. When speaking of the role of fathers in education, the picture that immediately comes to mind is that of a kitchen table, father and child seated, books open and both patiently working through a Math problem. In this scenario the father exerts his disciplinary authority by ensuring that Junior is doing as he should, but also demonstrates an empathetic interest in the well-being of his child in the arena of education. This is the ideal. The question then becomes how much of our Grenadian students experience this ideal? I would venture to say, very few. Does that mean therefore, that all is lost? 42

Is it that unless Daddy can sit down with me at the table, or attend PTA meetings, he is not playing a participatory role in my education? How many times have we heard the adage “children learn what they live”? I would suggest that in our society this is quite relevant. The lack of idealised models of fathering means that we must find other ways in which men are being both Fathers and Daddies and build on those. Study after study has demonstrated that in educating children, our actions speak much louder than words. A father who is a reader needs to do very little to impress upon his offspring the importance of books, a Daddy who is kind teaches his children the virtue of kindness. A father who does not raise his voice in anger imparts knowledge about how to resolve conflict. A Daddy who takes his son to the “bush” is reinforcing the connection with nature that we lament is lacking in our youth. There are in fact a myriad of ways that the informal mechanisms of education can be utilised to benefit our children. In closing, I must mention that we cannot overlook the impact that our history has had on the exclusion of fathers in parenting. Mothers are often regarded as the ultimate standard of parenting. However, by recognising the role that fathers can play and are already playing in the education of our nation’s children, we may begin to engage in a broader dialogue of social change. Tesfa Peterson


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Top CXC Performers In 1991, Mac Donald College discontinued the General Certificate Examination (GCE) Ordinary Levels Examinations and began entering fifth form students exclusively for the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate examinations. Here is a list of the top performers since then. No. of Passes

Year

Student

Paul Mc Ewen

6

2004

Donnette Narine

9

1992

Hainsley Edwards

6

2005

Ian James

10

1993

Edmund Edwards

7

2006

Lakisha Andrew

8

1994

Lyle Mark

9

2007

Christopher Gilbert

9

1995

Pemba Braveboy

9

2008

Arkia Auld

11

1996

Tonia Frame

7

2009

Esther Swan

11

1997

Shannon Browne

9

2010

Kistra Williams

11

1998

Kennard Lalsingh

9

2011

Candace Penny

11

1999

Portia Charles

9

2012

Jaydyne Alexander

10

2000

Cherrylyn Rush

9

2012

Tonya Boney

10

2001

Kimani Neckles

10

2012

Camille Charles

10

2002

Kevin Noel

10

2012

Dariell Fortune

10

2003

Bassanio Graneau

9

2012

Zaenia Jeffrey

10

Year

Student

1991

No. of Passes

43


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Random Recollections of the 1970’s Miss Mable’s hot yummy patties evoke the most pleasant memories for every student who passed through the doors of MDC during the first fifteen years. Miss Mable’s basket of goodies gave a boost to even the most daunting day. Along with the big tree, she was easily the most identifiable feature of MDC’s landscape in those early years. But MDC of the 60s and 70s was much more than hot patties, it was indeed a period during which Grenada was embroiled in major social and political upheavals and secondary school students were in the centre of it all.

The creation of MDC was the game changer in the north; it dramatically increased the options opened to children in St. Andrew, St. Patrick, St. Mark and St. John. The MDC that I knew of in the 1970s was a school of great camaraderie and fierce rivalry. Your best buddy was placed on hold in March each year if that buddy happened to be in another house. Wright’s House dominated the athletics house sports meet for the first two decades and those of us in the yellow uniform had to be prepared to withstand the verbal assault from other houses.

MDC students were present in the Nurses’ demonstration for better conditions at the General Hospital; our voices were heard during the turbulent 1973–1974 era. Prior to that, the MDC student body stood up and fiercely defended their own perimeter when there were distant rumblings of danger that the Government wanted to take over the College. For that act of defiance MDC paid dearly, the government cut the subvention to the College which resulted in the parents having to dig deep into their scarce resources to pay school fees of fifty dollars per term. This, I believe continued until March 13, 1979.

This gave rise to some epic battles. Who would forget Mann Hutchinson’s and Keith Friday’s 100 yards run in 1973! It had little to do with Mann or Keith; they were the leaders of two warring factions, Wright’s and Friday’s and it was time to settle old scores. It was the same old story when Panate and I faced off in the 1500 metres in 1976. If only the walls of the Fond Recreation Grounds could speak!

It is small wonder that the MDC family was so proud and protective of this little educational enclave in Marli. When, on the 21st day of January, 1963, the doors of MDC were thrown open, it was much more than a school that was being opened; it was indeed the opening of a new life for hundreds of families in rural Grenada. “Muff Man” buses roared in from the east while “Easy Going”, “Leader G”, “Victory B”, “Western Service” and “Welcome” proved to be invaluable links on the west coast. 44

By the time the house fete was held the following day, all was well again; the house fete was the melting pot that healed all wounds and the entire house would get together to honour its heroes, even Clarrie Joseph of Friday’s and Paul Noel of Taylor’s, rival sprinters, would be on speaking terms by the time the house fete was over. By the time I slipped through the doors in September 1972, dressed in my older brother’s oversized maroon blazer, the founding principal Dr. W.R.L Friday was no longer at the helm. Ms. Fedora Grant had just taken charge but not for long. She was followed by a period of joint stewardship of Messrs. George Boldeau and Vernon Simon, until Mr. Martineau took charge. By


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

the time Mr. Martineau got to the Marli campus, he obviously had chalked up some miles and it showed. Mr. Martineau was a pleasant, mild mannered fellow who was every student’s dream principal.

The College’s netball team was dominated by the five Barry sisters, who also formed the core of Wright’s House netball team so, as you can well imagine, the outcome of the inter-house netball competition was never in doubt.

The story is told of the irrepressible Keith “Primo” Charles and Mr. Grumbs being sent to the principal’s office for disciplinary action and while Mr. Martineau closed his eyes and slipped into his favourite tag line, “You see, it is not what you want or I want but what the situation calls for,” the two students seized the opportunity to slip away. When Mr. Martineau opened his eyes to an empty office, he reportedly shrugged his shoulders, smiled and that was the end of the matter.

In those days, the MDC team could not boast of being a powerhouse at the INTERCOL games; however, the College was always assured of a gold medal in the girls’ sprint races in which Gloria Munroe competed.

I fondly remember in 1975 Mr. Martineau bravely taking up the position of goalkeeper in the annual students versus teachers football competition. We all thought that it would have been a goal festival; this was not to be as Mr. Boldeau recruited some of the roughest, toughest defenders in Sauteurs to play for the teachers eleven. No one got within shooting distance of the goalie. By the mid 1970s, MDC had produced a cadre of graduates who now served as teachers; these included Rose Francois, Brenda John, Erica Charles, Paul Phillip, Liliana Logie, Gayle O’neale, as well as an injection of young energetic outside recruits such as Merle Collins, Annette Lalsee-Charles, Cecil Joseph, Calvin Fletcher, and Allister ‘Wild Cat’ Phillip. These, together with George Boldeau, Vernon Simon and Mr. Bartholomew formed a well-balanced team.

While this may sound as if we lived in medieval times, I must confess that we had no electronic devices except the calculator. There was no computer, no iPad, no iPod, no cell phone, and no Game Boy. However, there was never a dull moment. The afternoons were filled with sporting activities, drama, debates, students perched on top of the big tree engaged in anything but studies or the editorial team hurdled over the next edition of the newsletter “MDC Speaks” under the watchful eyes of Ms. Collins. It was the time when Bob Marley shot the Sheriff and the Mighty Sparrow wanted to marry Mr. Walker’s daughter. MDC rocked to the beat mindful that Jimmy Cliff warned that there would be many rivers to cross. That’s the MDC that I knew and that’s the MDC that I loved. Alfred Logie

The elderly Mr. Bat was a favourite. I recall him getting really annoyed with one of our classmates in form two, when he was trying his utmost to get us to see the plight of Tom Sawyer under Aunt Polly, and thought that that student was gazing into form six in the adjoining building. He pulled up his trousers in that familiar way, fixed his glasses and severely reprimanded her for not paying attention, while noting that she seemed to have “a lot of interest in form six”. Little did Mr. Bat know that he was getting the full and undivided attention of our classmate who was cock-eyed. Mr. Bat loved the always neatly attired Ann Marie Mitchell for her reading ability and he would have her stand and read in almost every literature class as he hovered around like a proud peacock. Ann Marie, I must admit, was a superb reader and put the rest of us to shame with her impeccable diction and flawless intonation. The football team was no dream team but probably the hardest working group of boys anywhere and under the watchful eyes of the coaches George Boldeau and later Wild Cat, our team made us proud. Even today Little Reds, Archie, Cubano and Southie still tell the tale of how on a wet Tanteen field these “giant killers” held a star studded GBSS football team to a hard fought three all draw in 1975. 45


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Dr. Dolland Noel “In every sector of society, there is a student of Mac Donald College and he/she is doing well.”

James I. Alexander.

Dr. Dolland Noel grew up in the small village of Marli in St. Patrick. He attended Mac Donald College from 1974-1979 where his passion for becoming a doctor was moulded and encouraged by then principal Mr. George Boldeau, as well as his Chemistry teacher George La Mothe, and his Biology teacher Annette Lalsee. However, due to family circumstances and financial constraints, Dr. Noel was unable to pursue his dream immediately after secondary school, but that did not deter him. He was determined to become a medical doctor, and fuelled by the continued encouragement of his former MDC teachers, that is exactly what he did. After finishing his secondary school education, he went to the Grenada Institute of Further Education for a subsequent two years of study. In 1981, he joined the faculty of St. Joseph’s Convent, St. Andrew where he taught a number of science subjects. Following several years of service, Dr. Noel went off to the University of the West Indies, Barbados where he double-majored in Chemistry and Biology, and in 1990 he graduated with honours. After completing his Bachelor’s Degree in Science, Dr. Noel once again joined the staff of St. Joseph’s Convent, St. Andrew as a teacher, and also acted as the Deputy Principal of the school. A mere year or so later, Dr. Noel went back to the University of the West Indies, Barbados where he did one year of postgraduate research in Chemistry, immediately followed by medical school at St. George’s University, Grenada. Dr. Noel was a physician at the St. George’s General Hospital, Grenada until 2000 when he went to pursue postgraduate studies in internal medicine (board certified) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (Jamaica) Program, Queens Hospital Centre. Upon his return to Grenada in 2004, Dr. Noel spent a year working as the Registrar of Internal Medicine at St. George’s General Hospital. Dr. Noel presently wears several hats: he is Consultant and Head of the Department of Medicine, as well as Director of Medical Education, at the St. George’s General Hospital, Grenada; and Associate Dean of Clinical Studies at St. George’s University, Grenada.

46


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

PHILBERT BROS. & CO. LTD. Supermarket Dealers

Ex�end Cong�at�lations to Mac Donald College On 50 years of Academic Excellence.

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

The Caribbean’s Finest Agri-tourism Experience

OVER 30 YEARS OF DEDICATED SERVICE Retail & Wholesale of General Merchandise Wide Range of Quality Items at Affordable Prices  Excellent Customer Service  Late Night Shopping for your Convenience.  

Main Street, Sauteurs, St. Patrick’s . Tel: (473) 442-9231

In our busy world we need to remember those who have made a difference in our lives, and when they come to mind, pray for them, and find a way to say

Thank You Hilary David - Class of 1974, Congratulates

Mac Donald College

on its 50th Anniversary

Set in 400 acres of lush rolling hills in the north of the island, our working plantation offers delicious food and a variety of activities for everyone: Creole Restaurant Plantation Tours Museum Gardens Animals Goat Dairy Gift Shop Craft Co-operative Conference Room Fine Organic Chocolate and Bon Bon Shop We are available for... Anniversaries, Birthdays, Weddings, Business Meetings, Retreats, Seminars, Awards Ceremonies, Cocktails or Just spending time with family & friends

Open Sunday to Friday (closed Saturdays) Belmont Estate St. Patrick, Grenada West Indies 473.442.9524/6 . 473.438.4152 info@belmontestate.net . www.belmontestate.net

47


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Steps to Academic Success

“Looking back, I did not make enough use of my time in MDC, but enough to look back and say thank you MDC.� David Simon

According to the Oxford dictionary, success is the accomplishment of an aim or a favourable outcome. If you want to achieve your aim, the following must be considered: 1. Have a positive attitude towards what you have to do including classes, assignments and teachers. 2. Be respectful of your teachers since they are more experienced and tend to know best. 3. Be determined to learn new things. Even if they are difficult to understand at first, try again and never give up. 4. Always be a leader (do not follow the crowd). For instance, if your friends decide to skip class or fail to complete an assignment one day, that does not mean you should do the same. 5. Always have faith in yourself. Some people may never have faith in you and there are those who would discourage you from doing what you ought to do while others may try to lead you in the wrong direction; do not allow them! In life, nothing comes easily. You must be prepared to go the extra mile in order to reap the benefits of tomorrow. There is no better feeling in the world than to successfully complete your secondary education and to have your parents and teachers feel proud of you. Zaenia Jeffrey

48

An Acrostic Poem Mac Donald College M - Most northerly of all Secondary Schools A - Aspiring earnestly to achieve higher heights with C - Caribs Leap in sight D - Dignified maroon skirts, white shirts, ties and O - Outstanding grey pants, N - Neatly Uniformed A - Achieving the goals L - Laid down by pioneers D - Devoted to nation building C - Courageous and committed O - Obligated to future generations L - Liberating young minds L - Lifting the morals of a people E - Enriching and preserving their Cultural Heritage G - Generating positive values E - Enhancing educational standards for a better life Charles Paryag, Davis John, Wilma Charles-Alexander


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Music Comes to Mac Donald College When Mr. Bolah ended his tenure at Mac Donald College in 1992, Mr. Finley “Scholar” Jeffrey assumed full responsibility of the band and with the astute guidance of Mr. David “Peck” Edwards the band soared to almost professional heights. However, Mr. Jeffrey soon became National Calypso Monarch and his engagements and activities in this role denied him the time to continue with the band.

The moment Mr. Gordon Bolah joined the staff of Mac Donald College he began exploring ways to help students discover and develop their talent by getting involved in more co-curricular activities, one of which is music. With the aid of Mr. James Clarkson, ex -Commissioner of Police, who donated seven instruments from The Royal Grenada Police Force Band, he began his music programme with Mr. Clarkson himself as the tutor. Deciding that all students so identified must be given the opportunity, Mr. Bolah went scouting for more instruments. Through Charlene Wade and Andy Frank, members of his Brass Band, he met Mr. Hess Charles, skipper of Sissons Syncopators Steel Orchestra of Victoria, who fervently embraced the idea of a steel band at the school and one week later his band donated enough instruments to start a band of thirty (30) players with Messrs. Hess Charles, Joslyn “J B” Felix and David “Peck” Edwards as its principal tutors.

This was September 1990, and Mac Donald College made history by being the first school in the nation to have a steel band on its campus. Mr. Finley “Scholar” Jeffrey, a former steel band man himself, was the only teacher on the staff who joined the band. The players were so dedicated to and focused on mastering the art that in December of the same year they were able to perform in the School Christmas Programme and the following year play for the St. Patrick’s Day Celebration and M.D.C’s graduation ceremony.

These duties were immediately taken on by two enterprising students Sasha Narayan and Sarana Mc Leish and it was under their leadership that the band truly attained greatness. “Peck” continued with them as they continued to make a name in music for the school. In the mid-1990’s, Mac Donald College Steel Orchestra placed 3rd in the National Junior Panorama its highest achievement for shortly thereafter both Sasha Narayan and Sarana Mc Leish graduated and left school, and with no one willing to take the leadership, the band died. Gordon Bolah

49


50

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Years of Excellence in Education...

Entrepreneurship: An Avenue for Employment and Wealth Creation It is pellucidly clear to all, that in Grenada, there has been a decline in the economic landscape over the past couple of years, as a result of the global economic recession which began in 2008. As a consequence, one fundamental problem affecting Grenada today is the issue of escalating levels of unemployment. As a society, we have to take the initiative to tackle this situation by becoming entrepreneurs, as, gone are the days when the government was seen as the ultimate creator of employment. In this new era, the government’s main role is to act as a facilitator of employment and to ensure that the correct conditions are in place to stimulate what renowned economist Joseph Schumpeter referred to long ago as, “Entrepreneurship - the engine of capitalism”. Entrepreneurship is the engine of capitalism because it creates employment and wealth. When someone identifies a need and seeks to satisfy this need through entrepreneurship, he/she combines factors of production to create a product or service to satisfy this need. Labour, being one of the factors of production, is always required, and that’s how jobs are created. Anytime an investment takes place, people are needed, and the entrepreneur not only creates employment for himself, but also for others.

E

ntrepreneurship is increasingly being viewed worldwide as the engine of economic and social development for many countries, and is certainly an avenue that should be encouraged to propel the Grenadian and other economies forward.

Entrepreneurship can simply be defined as the art of developing a commercial idea into a reality, or combining the factors of production (land, labour, capital) to create value. The person who, through a given knowledge base and experience, is able to observe his environment, identify an opportunity or need in the market, and employ the necessary resources to create value, is an entrepreneur.

50

When the product or service is sold at a price, if the price covers the cost and there is a surplus, this surplus becomes the profit and from an accumulation of profits over time, wealth is created. It is important, however, to mention that with entrepreneurship the market is the single most important factor, as a business will not be very successful if it is not satisfying the needs of a given market. Hence, in this economic climate it is critical that we begin to take the bull by its horns, think outside the box, become creative and undertake the rewarding challenge of entrepreneurship, to create wealth, and reduce the high levels of unemployment in our beloved country and beyond. Kimron Corion & Shievlyn Boney


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

& Supplies

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

ry

sa er

iv

Your Complete Building Partner for over 25yrs

th

n eo

0 s5

n An

it

g

ld na

e oll

C

o

o st

D ac

M

ion

t ula

at

r ng

We specialize in Lumber . Cement . PVC Pipes Paint . Nails . Petrol & Petrol Products . And Much

Co

Open: Mon - Sat: 8am to 4pm

Tel: (473) 442-9245 . Fax: (473) 442 2919 . EandFSuppliesltd@gmail.com

Fred L. Belfon & Associates Land Surveyors & Appraisors

Congratulations to Mac Donald College for 50 Years of Academic Excellence

Cadastral Surveys

Engineering Surveys

Building Layout

Property Valuation

Welcomes you to our Supermarket, where you can shop in leisure and comfort for all your groceries, drinks, pet supplies and utensils

Email: smartbuy@spiceisle.com

Tel: (473) 417-4968

420-2154

S. A. B

elfon Smart Buy

Services Offered:  Commercial and Residential Surveys

442-9219

Patrick Main Street, Sauteurs, St. 3) (47 442-2912 Tel: (473) 442-9219 Fax: mail.com @g Email: SABelfon

51


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Mrs. Catherine King “In every sector of society, there is a student of Mac Donald College and he/she is doing well.”

James I. Alexander.

addition to teaching History (forms 2 & 3), Bible Knowledge (form 3) and English Language (form 1), she was also the Physical Education teacher throughout the school and was responsible for coaching the junior and senior netball teams. That very same year, when Mrs. King joined the faculty, Mac Donald College came second in the Inter-secondary School Netball Tournament in the junior division and this marked the beginning of Mac Donald College’s dominance of inter- secondary school netball in the junior division for more than a decade. To this day, those “sweet victories of netball” as she puts it are some of Mrs. King’s best memories of her days at Mac Donald College as a teacher. With Mrs. King as coach, many netballers of Mac Donald College were selected to be part of the National Netball Team for secondary schools. Undoubtedly, Mrs. King can be credited for playing a significant role in producing some of the most respected netballers, coaches and referees that Grenada has ever seen including Ms. Curlian Gludd, Mrs. Kathy-Ann Williams-Gabriel and current Mac Donald College netball coach Miss Vanessa Thomas.

A devout Christian, Mrs. Catherine King has spent the greater part of her life - 36 years at her alma mater Mac Donald College. She attended Mac Donald College from September 1975 to July 1981. As a student, Mrs. King represented Mac Donald College for five consecutive years in INTERCOL. However, her participation in sports was not limited to athletics; she also played netball and represented the school on several occasions in the inter-secondary school netball tournaments. A few months after graduating, on October 2, 1981, Mrs. King joined the faculty of Mac Donald College after one of the teachers migrated. In 52

During the early years of her teaching career, Mrs. King did many short term courses in Physical Education with an emphasis on netball. In addition, she was trained in Health and Family Life Education and was among the first graduates of a University of the West Indies programme created to facilitate the introduction of Health and Family Life Education as part of the curriculum across the Caribbean. She also received training in Guidance and Counselling. Long before counselors were placed in schools, Mac Donald College could have boasted of having its own school counselor in the person of Mrs. Catherine King. Not only was Mrs. King a coach of sports, but she was also involved in coaching students for quizzes, particularly of a religious nature, which Mac Donald College won several times until these quizzes were discontinued. Several years after beginning her teaching career, Mrs. King sought to improve her academic qualifications by pursuing Advanced Level courses through T.A. Marryshow Community College (Extension School). She recalls rushing home after school only to rush off to Grenville Secondary School to attend classes; some days she was forced to attend classes directly after school. In 2000, she became a qualified teacher and in 2010, she graduated from the University of the West Indies with First Class Honours with a B.Ed. in Educational Administration. In November 2011, Mrs. King accepted the position of Acting Principal at the Grenada Christian Academy ending her 30 year tenure at Mac Donald College. Committed to lifelong learning, plans are afoot to commence graduate studies soon.


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

MDC Cultural Group Nothing helped shape my life as the MDC Cultural group under the direction of Mrs. King. I joined the group while I was in form 2, after my friend and classmate Leon asked me to check it out. He was having a great time as the guitarist of the group. One day, I showed up for one of the practices after school, just to observe the group, with no intention of joining. One of the lead actors was out, leaving Mrs. King to direct and play his part. She was about to call off practice when Leon suggested that I fill in. I had never acted on stage before and my experience was limited to my class singing to an accompaniment track of Bob Marley’s “One Drop” at the Roman Catholic School two years earlier. So with Mrs. King feeding me the lines, I became totally engaged. My love for the stage and my collaboration with Mr. Edmond Mark aka “Longest” began. From then on, the tallest and shortest guys in the school were on the stage together. We were one talented group. We had singers, dancers and drummers including Bubbler and Robert Whyte. The annual MDC Cultural Group Christmas show on December 23rd was what we were best known for. It was a showcase of our biggest and best moments. Some acts that cannot be forgotten are Mr. Budsey, Goose and Gander and Caribbean folk songs. I had the pleasure of being a part of that legacy for the rest of my time at MDC. Even now, 25 years later, through the miracle of Facebook, conversations among past students always seem to include the Dec. 23rd Christmas show. The fond memories are still fresh; the bond of friendship is deep and the lessons I learned will be with me always. To Mrs. King and the members of the MDC cultural group, I say thank you. Ryan Nelson-Paryag 53


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Finley “Scholar” Jeffrey

Neil Ferguson

Our Cultural Legacy Many are often of the view that Mac Donald College is a single focus school. Some even go as far as touting that MDC is a sports school, with the intention of convincing others of this erroneous view. What could be further from the truth? Mac Donald College is an institution which focuses on creating well-rounded individuals. We do not only recite our mission statement, we believe in it and we are guided by it.

54

Robert Whyte

of the major cultural art forms. Our past students have won major calypso/ soca titles and national queen show titles, they are well-known in theatre productions, musical arrangement and production and mass production.

For years we have been making indelible marks in the building of our nation. We have been doing so in all facets of nation building but we are usually disinclined to blow our own trumpet. Sometimes however, it becomes necessary to highlight one’s positives one’s self and now is such a time.

Mr. Finley “Scholar” Jeffrey, one of Grenada’s Cultural Ambassadors, is one of the most renowned artistes in Grenada. Having won seven National Calypso Monarch titles, a Groovy Monarch title, a Soca Monarch title, an Independence Calypso King title and having placed 4th in a CARIFESTA Calypso competition, he has earned his entitlement to being a cultural ambassador. Mr. Jeffrey is also a very prolific writer and in fact, has written songs for many calypsonians who have gone on to win major titles themselves. He is well known for his witty, thought-provoking lyrics and in recent times for his upbeat rhythms while dealing with current social/ political issues. He is controversial but he is exceptional and he is a product of Mac Donald College.

Among the many nation-building contributions made by MDCites is the making of numerous national cultural icons. If we were to reflect on the achievements of MDC past students in culture we would realize that they are numerous. Former Mac Donald College students have achieved the highest awards (the most coveted titles) in all

Biko Lewis has won the National Calypso Monarch on two occasions while Elimus “Inspector” Gilbert had reigned for years as one of Grenada’s best soca artistes and entertainers. His trajectory of awards in the 80s is evidence of his prowess in calypso and soca. National Calypso Monarch twice, three times Soca Monarch, three times Road March


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Lazarus Antoine

King and twice National Junior Monarch are some of his achievements. Lincoln “Bubbler” John, a stalwart calypsonian, arranger and guitarist was not fortunate to win any of the major titles but has been able for a number of years to write and sing top class calypsos. Monique Cummings had attained the National Junior Monarch title once. They are all MDCites. As if that isn’t enough, in recent years MDCites have been storming and controlling the soca arena. Kellon Ogiste who together with his brother has won Soca Monarch on two occasions is a former MDC student. So too are Shem “Terror Kid” Bernard, Soca Monarch winner 2011 and Jalon “Boyzie” Olive, Soca Monarch runner-up and Road March winner 2012. Many other former MDC students are making their marks in calypso/soca. There are Sharrie Jones, Damion “Pappy Boi” La Pompe, Asim “Sylum” Bernard, Devon Flaunders and Chard De Couteau. Alejandra John and Asheida Charles have represented us well. So too has Isabella Sylvan. Alejandra captured the National Carnival Queen title in 2003 and Asheida did the same in 2008. Isabella Sylvan had the honour of winning a Miss Las Especias title. Judy-Ann Auld, a 1st runner-up National Carnival Queen, is also a notable cultural figure. She has chaperoned several queen contestants and has designed carnival costumes and evening gowns for carnival queens.

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Kellon “Luni Sparks” Ogiste

Jalon “Boyzie” Olive

One of Grenada’s well known mass band leaders, costume designers and kings of the band is Lazarus Antoine. He is one of the proudest past Mac Donald College students, being at the helm of the Mac Donald College Past Pupils Association. Another one of our well known cultural icons is Neil Ferguson. He, like Scholar, is a prolific song writer. He is also a playwright and theatre director, heading the Privilege Theatre Company. Our students are also making indelible marks in the arrangement and production of music. The likes of Trevor Friday, Lyndon Pope, Jude Robertson, Kaydon Paul, Rickenson Andrew and Damion La Pompe are producing music of the highest quality. In fact, many of them have been able to arrange and produce award winning songs. We are also holding our own as MCs and DJs with persons such as Daniel “Heavy D” Robertson, Negus “Jus Gus” Swan and Shawn Alexis. Another one of our products is one of Grenada’s best and most recognized actors and MCs, Robert Whyte. Dwight “Greenzking” Downes is making his contributions in the promotion of Grenada’s music. Lista Noel, a young aspiring stand-up comedian, actor and Master of Ceremony is another son of whom Mac Donald College can boast. What is heartening about this situation is that most of these national cultural

Asheida Charles

icons have started building their careers or harnessing their talents at Mac Donald College. At MDC they either took part in their first Queen Show Competition, composed and performed their first calypso, wrote and performed their first skit or hosted their first show as MC. We are proud of them and we are sure that they are proud to be MDCites. MDC will continue to produce cultural icons because ‘we love we culture bad’ Dianne Abel-Jeffrey

55


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Approaches to Conflicts

The need for people (particularly our young people) to manage conflicts continues to be a topical issue for some time now. The recent incident in one of our secondary schools in which a young student lost his life has reinforced the call for more conflict management skills to be taught to our students. Conflict is the actual or perceived opposition of needs, values, wishes or perceptions resulting in stress or tension (Crisis Intervention and Conflict Resolution Manual).

to ensure that the needs of the parties involved are met. As long as people interact, there will be conflicts. A conflict in itself is not bad, what is bad is the inability of parties in a conflict to resolve it. The win-win method of resolving conflict is recommended because it shifts the focus from an adversarial approach to a collaborative one in which a mutual search for information ensures that the interests of all parties are represented in the resolution; thus no one loses.

Given the above definition, one can see why there will always be conflicts. There will always be opposition of needs, values and wishes. Individuals are always going to have varying perceptions on issues. However, conflict in itself is not bad. What is bad is the inability of persons to manage the conflict. Characteristics of a Win-lose Approach Attitudes, beliefs and assumptions about conflict will influence the degree to which conflicts are successfully resolved. Negative attitudes toward conflict will negatively affect its resolution. However, a positive attitude will result in a successful resolution to conflicts. Generally, there are two methods of conflict resolution. The win-lose style which is associated with an adversarial style of resolution, and the win-win style which seeks 56

хх

The attitude is “you” versus “me” rather than “us” versus “the problem”

хх

An atmosphere of either victory or defeat

хх

The issue is seen from the individual’s point of view

хх

The conflict is personalized

хх

Parties are conflict focused

Loxley John

Characteristics of a Win-win Approach 33 Recognises that there may be differences between us, however if we work together, we may be more successful in resolving the issue. 33 It clarifies the “real” problem. 33 It helps build understanding and strengthen relationships. 33 It is based on the concept that there may be several possible solutions. 33 By working together in a collaborative problem solving atmosphere, the solutions are often more creative.


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

My MDC Memory My most treasured memory is that of our location. I believe everyone will join in the chorus of much praises to the person or persons who had the final say in planting our school where it is. Mac Donald College, perched on the overthrow of the town of the leapers, affords one a panoramic view of the town and grenadines from virtually any spot on the compound. You can gaze on the islands sticking out in the beautiful blue waters (most of us didn’t care about which was which), but if you look without much force Carriacou is there, and yes way out in the shadows, guess who else_St. Vincent and the Grenadines I am told. Being a stone’s throw from the ocean means that the cool breeze from the Caribbean Sea regularly invaded the classrooms and the good Lord knows how welcomed it was on a hot games day, in the peak of the dry season, but what was better was sitting under that wonderful, magical ‘Big Tree’. The Big Tree was one of our most treasured, yet taken for granted landmarks. For if only that Big Tree could have talked, it would have said so much. It’s true that almost, if not all of us, up to today know nothing or cared about the origin or botany of the Big Tree. Rumour has it that Hurricane Janet dropped it there. But indeed every one of us shares a treasured moment in our journey through MDC ‘Under the Big Tree’. Whether it was just hanging out, courting, hiding from Chief or waiting to get a seat on one of the buses to go to a game or INTERCOL. How can we forget the assemblies that Chief had there using the roots of the gigantic tree as his platform or

the times we spent just sitting there, scoping out the happenings, especially the teachers making their way to their various classes. Who could forget a certain Physics teacher we had for a very short time, sometime around 1992-1993 and the lesson he taught on the superscript which remained a hit lesson even today, especially with “Epee” and the boys because of the skill and time he took to pronounce the word. Neither can we forget our English B teacher hurrying to our Form, 3T, to announce that the big word of the day was P A R A P H R A S E only to discover much to her disgust that Rachael Palmer had already discovered that huge word in primary school. Hurricane Ivan destroyed the Big Tree and indeed it was a real sense of loss. Not long after, however, another sprung up in its place and it is flourishing having won the war waged against it by the village children and soon its roots and sinews would once again become the confidant of many students, teachers and passersby. It is my hope, that like the old Big Tree, this one maintains its legacy. Even more so, that in the true spirit of the leapers we continue to produce many more great leapers for our country and the world, where surrender or retreat are not options. Saltando Alta Petimus! Happy Anniversary MDC! Nordia Roberts 57


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Mac Donald College Farm: The Centre for Sustainable Agriculture A few years after the inception of Mac Donald College, several acres of land were bought and the Mac Donald College Farm came into existence. It occupies approximately eight acres of land and is situated in Lower Marli, St. Patrick, Grenada. About half of the land is cultivated with cocoa, citrus, banana, a few fruit trees, avocados and about ten spice trees. In addition, there are three sheep and between one hundred and three hundred broilers are reared quarterly. The other half of the farm land is either in woods or uncultivated, with exceptions to the small area that is utilised for the practical aspect of Agricultural Science by fourth and fifth form students pursuing it for CXC and the areas that are utilised by the farm watchmen to plant for personal gains. The farm’s watchmen are Alister Peters and Wycleff Phillip who carry out their duties on a rotational basis. In addition to securing the farm, they perform farm duties which include cleaning and harvesting the cocoa as well as caring for the animals. In its genesis, the Mac Donald College Farm was very productive and operated with hired labourers. In the 1970’s and 1980’s when it was managed by Agricultural Science teacher, Mr. Vernon Simon, the farm experimented with onions and other crops. Carrots and other vegetables were produced abundantly and were marketed to the school’s employees and community folks. Although no animals (in the 1990’s the agouti among other animals were included) were initially reared on the farm, the extent of crop production back then, by far outweigh the mixed farming practice today. The Mac Donald College School Farm though full of potential is very much under developed. If the farm is given the serious attention and investment it demands, its full potential will be realised and invaluable profits will be obtained that can significantly impact the school and the quality of education that it offers.

In light of this, it is the intention of the school to not just restore the farm to, but to surpass its early production years. The first objective is to make the farm a model farm, one that students in the country can visit and learn from. It is also intended that the farm become a sustainable food production enterprise that would contribute significantly to food security at the community level and by extension the country at large. To achieve this, initially, the existing enterprises will be revamped and strengthened, followed by the addition of new farm enterprises. The farm house will be refurbished to include an office and storage facilities and the nursery rebuilt to support the increased food crop and vegetable production. In addition, the areas utilised for the food and vegetable crop production will be equipped with irrigational pipes so as to support year-round production. A shed will also be built on the periphery of the pasture to house the livestock at night and the classroom will be renovated to facilitate learning in a comfortable environment. Broiler production will continue with greater emphasis on securing stable and optimal markets. Other plans include the establishment of coconut and sour sop plots, extension of the orchard and the planting of root crops. Slowly, the Mac Donald College farm is moving towards its goal of sustainable Agriculture. The woodland areas are being cleared to make way for the establishment of a fenced pasture for livestock as well as open grounds for food crop and vegetable production. The cocoa field, located at the back of the farm is being rehabilitated and extended. What has been done, however, pales in comparison to what still needs to be done. In order for the Mac Donald College farm to be transformed into a model farm and realise its goal of sustainable agriculture, it requires an urgent injection of capital. Perry Paul

58


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Dr. Kedra Cyrus “In every sector of society, there is a student of Mac Donald College and he/she is doing well.”

James I. Alexander.

It began in a little lab on the campus of Mac Donald College. Even then, she was convinced that she could find a cure for cancer, a passion she pursues to this day. Those years at Mac Donald College provided the foundation and the catalyst for what was to come. Inspiring teachers, among them Mr. Singh and the inimitable Mr. Jeffrey made Science simultaneously challenging and approachable. After leaving MDC, Dr. Cyrus migrated to the United States where she attended Medgar Evers College, City University of New York (CUNY) and graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. While at Medgar Evers College, Dr. Cyrus was a Dean’s list honoree each semester and received a number of awards, including the School of Health and Sciences Award for Academic Excellence. She was also awarded two undergraduate research fellowships, one from the New York State Louis-Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (NYS-LSAMP) in Science, Engineering and Mathematics programme. The second fellowship was awarded to Dr. Cyrus from the National Institute of Health (NIH) Minority International Research Training program, where she was given the opportunity to conduct research at the National University of Singapore into the biosynthesis of chemotherapeutic agents from a novel bacterial strain discovered in Singapore. Upon completion of her Bachelor of Science degree, Dr. Cyrus was accepted into the Pharmaceutical Sciences Ph.D. program at the University of Kentucky. While at the University of Kentucky, Dr. Cyrus’ dissertation focused on researching the synthesis and evaluation of novel therapeutics for breast cancer, and has published a number of scientific journal articles and scientific meeting abstracts. In 2008, Dr. Cyrus was honored by her alma mater Medgar Evers College CUNY, as a recipient of the National Student Role Model Award from Minority Access, for her academic achievements and distinctions. She is also a member of the American Chemical Society and the Rho Chi Honor Society. Since earning her PhD, Dr. Cyrus has received a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and is currently continuing her research into breast cancer, at Georgetown University’s Lombardi Cancer Centre. Tesfa Peterson 59


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

The Importance of Reading Reading is the activity that translates symbols and letters into words and sentences that have meaning to the individual. The ultimate goal of reading is to be able to understand written material, to evaluate it, and to use it for one’s needs (Encarta, 2009). For instance, the warning on a bottle of bleach which says “harmful if swallowed” must be understood as such by an individual for his/her own well-being. Furthermore, a sign at a parking lot which states, “The owner is not responsible for any loss or damage resulting from parking in this parking lot” should cause a driver to evaluate that message and he/she either accepts the risk by parking or refuses to accept the risk by not parking there. Thus, this suggests that reading applies not just to the reading of books for knowledge and information, but it applies to the development of reading ability for the ease of everyday living in a society that is becoming even more complex. Jeanne S. Chall (1983) proposed six distinct stages of reading development that one must go through in order to attain efficiency, fluency and independence in reading. In stages zero to two, a child from ages 0-8 engages in pretend reading through to decoding, fluency and speed. Disturbingly, Chall found that many people, especially in developing countries, do not progress to stage three and beyond.

60

This means that they do not get to the stages of reading development that allows for reading to learn new information whereby one begins to deepen understanding of the pragmatics (context of language used), syntactics (grammatical structures), and semantics (meanings of words and phrases). It also means that individuals will not learn to appreciate multiple viewpoints as they read nor be able to read and construct or reconstruct knowledge for themselves using analysis, synthesis and judgement as their main tools based on what others have said. With this in mind, no one should, nor can afford to, overlook the importance of reading and the development of reading ability, since the proper development of reading ability affords one the privilege of achieving a higher education as one uses reading for more complex cognitive purposes; it allows one to survive in a print rich environment where everything from food to entertainment, health information and services to travel information are all written down; and it allows for the simple enjoyment and appreciation of reading, such as the reading of this article of which some have already been denied. Ikashacu Hamlet


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

CONGRATULATIONS MAC DONALD COLLEGE ON YOUR

50th ANNIVERSARY

As one of the pioneers in Education & Excellence, moulding young minds into Country Leaders, Astute Businessmen, Outstanding Athletes, and All-Round Achievers, we applaud you. May your Institution continue to grow from strength to strength as you abide by your motto: “Saltando Alta Petimus” From the Management and Staff of

“Where good food costs less” 61


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

INTERCOL Champs 2006

On the Sports Beat Showcasing our Sporting Legacy Fifty years of winning and losing, excellence and inadequacy, brilliance and sometimes outright mediocrity, moments in sports we will always remember. We can only imagine the future; but we can relive the past. Fifty years – the better part of 18,262 days of sports at Mac Donald College. We are looking back at events and the personalities that brought them to fruition; events that left us shaking our heads in disbelief, wonder and sometimes utter frustration.

MDC Football Team 1996 62

Football

Before children hid in the caves around the school to escape the monotony of formal classes, even before the big tree was a big tree, there was Trevor and Keith Friday, Harrison Fleming and of course there was Dave “Cressy” Bartholomew, reputed to be the hardest kicker that ever played the game in Grenada. Old timers will tell you that when Mac Donald College was playing at Fond, once you heard “ah- blue-doom” from a mile away it was either Cressy had scored one of his bullet shots or some hapless goalie’s hand will be in Plaster of Paris for some time to come. During that era, Mac Donald College ran things and most schools came to play against us with shaky and dejected expectations. With the exit of players like Cressy, Mac Donald College enjoyed moderate and sometimes limited success in football as we were often made to suffer against the likes of St.


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

John’s Christian; then came the era of Miguel Wharwood. Mac Donald College has not taken a backward step since. In the 1980’s and early 1990’s, teams comprising of players like Chester “Bandie” David, Jester Noel, Franklin Baptiste, Ryan Sodah and Ronnie Henry promised much but were unable to deliver consistently. In the mid-1990’s, however, Mac Donald College assembled a team of young players led by Miguel Wharwood, a young man with two cannons in his boots. That team included players, the likes of Andre Cyrus, Neil Charles, Troy George, Sherwin Merryman, Adrian Scott, Bunny George and Kenroy John. The trophy cabinet started to fill up once more as team after team was put to the sword. They broke the hearts of supporters of every school team in Grenada and in one of the biggest let downs in MDC’s football history, they broke the hearts of their own supporters as well. The year was 1995, the venue was Cuthbert Peters Park in Gouyave and the event was the League Final, the most coveted title in school’s football. It was supposed to be a walk over, an easy day at the office because we had already beaten St. Mark’s Secondary in the preliminary round. To this day, no one knows what went wrong. Miguel’s cannons never fired that afternoon while the pistol of St. Mark’s Secondary went off twice. Tears flowed by the gallons that day as over-zealous supporters like Martha Philbert and Kedra Cyrus were left to rue what should have been; and one week later in the Knock Out finals at the same venue, when our boys slammed six unanswered daggers past the same St. Mark’s Secondary School, it served as little consolation.

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

The curse of losing in the league final but winning all the other competitions has dogged Mac Donald College to this day; and even quality players the calibre of Devon Smith, Queacy Peters and Melvin Toussaint have been unable to escape it. In fact, over the last twelve years, we have lost no fewer than six League finals, three of those at the hands of guess who? - St. Mark’s Secondary School. But we have also reversed the tables on them too, beating them 1-0 at Fond in 2006. In 2009, Mac Donald College created football history when it won every competition – the Knock Out, Junior Division and League Final – and has remained the only team to ever accomplish such a feat. Our junior teams have enjoyed as much success as our seniors. Coming on the scene about three years ago, our girls have competed manfully in their competition which is still in its infancy stage. On the first two occasions, they placed second, and they won for the first time this year. Following in the footsteps of recent stalwarts like Marcus Julien, Josh Charles, Josh George and Daniel Toussaint, our current crop of players led by Shavon John Brown seems to have the acumen that winners of silverware should possess. Time alone will tell.

Cricket

He spoke with exaggerated precision. The words rolled out of his tongue as though they were oiled and supple. The day that Gordon Bolah joined the staff of Mac Donald College, cricket did a 360 degree turn for the best. It was not that MDC did not produce excellent cricketers before;

Junior Football Champs 2009 63


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Trophies won after Hurricane Ivan the exploits of James Alexander was almost folklore back in the 1960s while the glove work of Gordon “Bushes” Richardson was rated higher than that of Junior Murray. It was just that we were not consistent and throughout the 1970’s and most of the 80’s, no one seriously considered us a cricketing force. Gordon Bolah almost single-handedly changed that. In less than no time he rolled up his sleeves and went to work, transforming the youngsters in his charge into a potent cricketing unit. His methods were sometimes quite unorthodox but it obtained the desired results. One remembers a training ground story in which Cheguy Logie could not perfect the forward defensive shot. Mr. Bolah took the bat from him and said, “Let me show you a perfect forward defensive shot, boy”. Then turning to one of his fast bowlers he ordered, “Henson Calliste, bowl the ball!” Elated at the prospect of putting his coach to

shame, Henson roared in and delivered the fastest ball that he had ever bowled. Before Mr. Bolah could bring his bat down, his stumps were scattered in all directions. Broad smiles were at the point of being transformed into raucous laughter when Mr. Bolah looked Cheguy Logie squarely in the eyes and said, “Now I was just showing you what you should not do”. Then he turned to one of his non bowlers and said, “Small Head, bowl the ball let me demonstrate the correct way”. Gordon Bolah also created history when he included a girl on the boys’ cricket team in the late 1980’s. Some of the players from the other schools looked at that development and sniggered openly while others proclaimed it as madness. Debbie-Ann “Metric” Alexander not only rubbed shoulders with the boys; in many instances she out performed them all. She later became the first Grenadian to play cricket for the West Indies. By the time Gordon Bolah had left MDC, we were at the pinnacle of secondary school cricket in Grenada and had produced several national players; Renee Belfon being the most celebrated and Chester “Bandie” David being the most memorable. Into the fray stepped Carl Andall and under his guidance, the cricket gods continued to smile on us. Trophy after trophy was secured as young players emerged, developed to their full potential, graduated and left only to be instantly replaced by new ones. It was like they

MDC Cricket Team 1980 64


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

came from an assembly line; Troy George, who went on to represent the Windward Islands, Adrian Scott, Miguel Wharwood, Steve Garrett, Marlon Henry, Lethon Bayne, a leg spinner who turned it as well as Shane Warne, Devon Smith, West Indies open batsman and by far the most famous of them all, Daniel Smith, Melvin Toussaint, arguably the fastest bowler Devon Smith that ever played for MDC and indeed the most wayward, Gennard Paul, a Windward Islands U-20 player and Jalon Olive just to name a few. The assembly line continues to produce them now, even more than ever before. In 2009, we won the United Insurance Secondary School Competition, defeating Grenville Secondary in the finals. In 2010, we lost in the semi-final to Grenville Secondary, and in 2012, we again played in the finals, a game which ended in controversy. With new stars like Patrick Omar Charles, arguably the best U-17 batsman in Grenada, Craig Phillip, the fastest bowler of his age group in the Windward Islands and Daniel Rush, an authentic mystery spinner, the 2013 competition is filled with mouth-watering possibilities for us.

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Catherine Rennie King became coach in the 1980’s, Deslyn Hosten and the rest of her young charges, drew every breath for one purpose only - to play netball. Thus, by the time the torch was handed to Cathy-Ann Williams and company, the foundation had already been laid. Players like Vanessa Thomas the current netball coach, Keisha Mitchell, Margo Swan, Curliann Gludd, a player with telescopic reach, Lottie Cato, the first in a procession of netball playing sisters, Ralda Jeffrey who did not know how to miss and Merliker Logie, a diminutive centre who breezed around the court at a rate of knots, fitted comfortably into the system, played to their full potential and never failed to deliver the goods. Over the last two decades, Mac Donald College has become the recurring decimal in secondary school’s netball always consistent and always at the forefront. By the middle of the first decade of the twenty first century, a team led by a six-foot six-inch giant of a goal shooter by the name of Lottysha Cato dominated netball for four consecutive years, swatting all who stood in their way. Lottysha was like the Al Qaeda of school’s netball - feared by all. I remember a final against Happy Hill Secondary at Tanteen; when the Happy Hill supporters saw Lottysha doing her warm ups, one

Netball

“We can’t afford to lose the temperature rising”. The chants filled the afternoon air, cacophonic and deafening, with decibels that not even the most powerful sound level metre could measure. Alsha Merryman and CathyAnn Williams were on fire, the Mac Donald College fan base was in a state of euphoric frenzy and Tanteen began to brace itself for the impossible. That the girls in maroon could arrest the trophy from the invincible Anglican High School in their own back yard was tantamount to Daniel taming the lions without God in his corner. But even before that momentous victory over twenty years ago, our girls had always upheld their end of the bargain in secondary school’s netball. Since the days of the Barry sisters and Little Joan Whyte back in the 1970’s, netball was an institution in Mac Donald College. By the time

Junior Netball Champs

MDC Netball Team 65


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

Lottysha “Timmie” Cato

student turned to another and said, “Gal leh we go nor, you doh see we lose aredy. Once dat giant dey we could never win.” Lottysha now plays professional netball in the UK and one would hope that present players like Cleopatra Cato, her sister, and Nashel Charles will position themselves to follow in those massive footsteps.

Athletics

Trevor Friday and Cressy Batholomew were quick; Gloria Munro moved like greased lightning; Theresa “Patricka” John and Alfred Logie had donkeys’ lungs; but as a team we enjoyed only moderate success when we went to St. George’s to compete against the other secondary schools at the INTERCOL games. Something had to be wrong; but what? It would take more than twenty five years for the Mac Donald College’s think tank to put its finger on the root of the problem. Meanwhile, we continued to produce athletes who demonstrated great individual brilliance and record breaking ability. Anthony “Dog” Charles was the hero of long distance running in Grenada for much of the 1980s; Kenny De Coteau could have won Grenada’s first Olympic gold medal in the 400m had his career not been so abbreviated; Franklin Baptiste was notorious for his come from behind INTERCOL victories, the Swan brothers were legendary in the 1990s and to this day it is puzzling that none of them went on to achieve greatness; Rudian Sylvan, Devon Charles, Gilleon Richardson, Sherwin Merryman and many others made their mark in the male division of INTERCOL. There were some prominent females as well. Thama Gilbert, arguably the fastest female that Grenada has ever seen; Stephanie Ferguson, Saranna Patterson and Sandra Scott dominated the long distance races at INTERCOL for more than a decade; Genise Canning and Natasha Phillip were formidable in the middle distance events; Merliker Logie, Subrina Wildman and Rickisha Thomas set the Queens Park ablaze albeit briefly; while Patricia Cornwall and Neisha Bernard never failed to impress and today are world class athletes in their respective disciplines. Yet as a unit, Mac Donald College never threatened the INTERCOL giants or looked like winning a title. Indeed we placed second in both the boys and girls division on several 66

Rondell Bartholomew occasions, but even then, winning was as important to us as an air conditioning unit is to an Eskimo. This would all change in 2003. Armed with an arsenal of well-trained young athletes like Marcus Julien, Leslie Frederick, Neilon Joseph, Andon Mitchell, Kwame Andrew and Damion La Pompe and a belief that was drilled into them by Neville Glean and his coaching staff, who finally realised that this was the missing ingredient, Mac Donald College pulled off their first INTERCOL victory, clinching the title in the final race of the day. The drums beat forever that night as school children and residents of St. Patrick alike, transformed Sauteurs into a carnival like city. We would go on to win again in 2004, in the only tied INTERCOL in the history of the games, 2006, 2007 and 2009. We were especially unstoppable in the 4x400m relay, an event that we won for umpteen years, breaking and setting the record on many occasions in the process. Meanwhile, we dominated the Western Games winning for an unprecedented fifteen consecutive years. The list of athletes who contributed to these successes includes Kenroy Peters, Eyssen Joseph, Kenton Olive, Koran Charles, Kendel Frame, Kishton Frame, Lawson Frazer, Brian Bishop, Josh Charles, Kemon Herry, Rondel Bartholomew, Gennard Paul, Shawn Hutchinson, Shagor Peters and Brent Alexander. The last three years have been disappointing for us. We have not been able to relive those glory years due primarily to the fact that most of the great athletes are now gone while the quality of the athletes that we now receive from our feeder primary schools leaves a lot to be desired. In a move that is difficult to comprehend, most of the athletes with good potential from the primary schools in St. Patrick are being whisked away to SAASS and St. Mark’s Secondary School. But we will continue to forge on at Mac Donald College for we have no doubt that sometime soon the drums will sound again on INTERCOL night heralding another momentous Mac Donald College victory.


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

Volleyball and Basketball

Friday House - Sports Day 2012

Volleyball Team 2012

Taylor House - Sports Day 2012

Nyack House - Sports Day 2012

These are virtually new disciplines. In basketball, we are yet to lay down a substantial legacy. Though the baby of all the sports at Mac Donald College, we have made our presence felt in volleyball. When the Inter-secondary School Volleyball Competition was restarted in 2008/2009, we won that competition. We placed third in the next two competitions and last year we should have won, but placed second. Ironically, for each of those three years, only one game was lost by our volleyball team. For the two years that we placed third, we lost the semi-final matches so we had to play for third place and of course last year, we lost the most important match of the season: the finals. Despite this, the team has many young enthusiastic players including a few girls who will be competing in this year’s tournament for the first time. With players like Enrique John, Kevon Noel and Hansel Williams our performance in volleyball is only expected to get better. There is no doubt in my mind that Mac Donald College will continue to hold its own in sports in Grenada for the next 50 years. Finley Jeffrey

Wright House - Sports Day 1983 67


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

The Final Race A hush descended… Tension as tight as Miss Mary’s girdle… Only the staccato thumping of unsteady hearts Disturbed the uneasy silence n the stadium… The final race was about to begin… “You see me. Ah kya Tek it nomore. Ah ha To stand,” complained a nervous commentator As they discussed In Duck worth- Lewis fashion The final outcome… Ashby’s GBSS ahead… Four needed… Alexander’s MDC third Needing twelve… PBC? Boca Sec? SAASS? Westerhall? Would they? Can they? 68

Mayday! Mayday! The gun of destiny sounded And they were off! Spirited pandemonium reigned… Our father, who art in heaven… MDC! Hail Mary, full of grace… MDC! I believe in God the Father Almighty… MDC! Creator of heaven and earth… MDC! When my mother and father forsake me… MDC! The good Lord will take me up… MDC! And give me a place… MDC! In the land of the living… MDC!

Hearts prayed… MDC! Soles caressed the ground… MDC! Souls were uplifted… MDC! And the good Lord Looked down on the athletes of Mac Donald College As they did their victory lap And was greatly pleased… Congratulations, Champions! Amen. Eh heh! Clyde Belfon


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

MDCites We can Truly be Proud of: Mr. Rondell Bartholomew

“In every sector of society, there is a student of Mac Donald College and he/she is doing well.”

James I. Alexander.

Sometimes a change is good. Sometimes a change can be a marvellous thing. You just have to have known Rondell when he arrived at Mac Donald College to understand what I mean. That upright, well-mannered, dedicated young man that we see competing against the best in the world at 400 metres is nothing like the scrawny youngster that entered Mac Donald College. Rondell was mischievous, but likeable. During the early years, he would leave the school grounds with the other boys on a run. About two hours later after everyone else had returned Rondell would show up walking casually down the hill sucking an orange, mango or sugar cane. During his sub-junior and junior years he had a permanent spot on the third leg of the 4x100m relay team. Then a change happened. During his second year as a junior, Rondell’s effort gave him a glimpse of success that would change him. He placed second in the 400m and the 800m. From then he ate up the hard work and he became the leader of the team just by the effort that he produced. In his second year as a senior, Rondell won the 100m, 200m, 400m and the 800m at his school games. At the Inter-Secondary School games he won both the 200m and 400m. He broke the record in the 400m and then went on to win the under-twenty 400m at the CARIFTA Games. Later Rondell travelled to Berlin for the World Games and to India for the Commonwealth Games. In his third year as a senior, he came second in the under twenty 400m at the CARIFTA games, but he also broke Usain Bolt’s record. Soon he was on his way to South Plains College in Texas to start on his quest to conquer the world in the 400m and also to enhance his education with a college degree. In 2011 he had the fastest time in the world (44.65) and made it to the finals at the world games. That also earned him a lucrative deal with Adidas. Rondell had a very hard season (over 35 races) in 2011 and by the end he was tired so he did not perform as expected. Unfortunately, also, a severe hamstring injury kept him out of the 2012 Olympic Games. However, his coach at South Plains has high hopes for his future, and so do I. Neville Glean 69


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

One of Ivan’s Students Looks Back “MDC has made me what I am today.”

Cosmos George

O

n September 6, 2004, an excited, well-deserved group of students entered the “hallowed walls of wisdom” – Mac Donald College, but about midday, we were sent home because of the approaching hurricane Ivan. The next day, hurricane Ivan devastated the entire island and to some extent Mac Donald College. The roof of the form one block was totally destroyed; as a result we had to stay away from school for about a month. We returned in October and attended school every other day for about three hours.

It wasn’t long before we entered form two and became the first group of students to occupy the wooden buildings at the end of the pasture. Our form mistress, Miss Ramjohn was very wonderful to us, but it was the days when rain fell that we relished. When rain fell and the teachers were unable to attend classes because of the muddy path, the boys beat the tables and the girls danced to the rhythmic music created. We had dance competitions to determine the best dancer and there were times when we were caught and punished, but we did not care for when rain fell again, we continued with our fun. Apart from drumming and dancing, we had fun by locking teachers outside of the classroom. There were some teachers that we considered boring and whenever the boys saw them approaching, they locked the doors. Again we got punished, yet we continued our devious acts. Who would have thought that we would begin parting ways with some of our classmates as early as form three? But we did, because not all students embraced the philosophy of 70

hard work so some were retained. It was in Form four that we really became involved in the co-curricular activities of the school. Many of us became members of Rangers, Junior Achievement and Club Latinos among other groups. “All good things must come to an end” and soon we were in form five, getting ready to say goodbye to some of the nation’s best teachers who loved and looked out for us, and of course our dear principal James “Chief” Alexander. Chief was funny and strict, but he groomed us for life in a way that could never be forgotten. In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson, to have attended Mac Donald College is: To laugh often and love much; to win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children; to earn the approbation of honest citizens and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to give of one’s self; to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exultation; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. Esther Shannel Swan


50

Years of Excellence in Education...

AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

I’ll Always Remember

“Whenever I feel down, all I have to do is go back into my memory bank, choose a topic from the days at MDC and smile.” Ann Simon Clyne

1960’s

1970’s

1980’s

1990’s

Millennium

I’ll always remember…. How disciplined the students were and how hard we worked. Mr. Friday always wanted the best for us and so he brought PTA to the village. He did notwait for our parents to come to the school, instead he made it his duty to visit the home of every student.

When we lay our books and pens down and took up paint brushes, paint, rakes and spades to do voluntary services by painting and beautifying around MDC, with the entire town of Sauteurs (Mable and Big T in particular) supplying us with things to cook and drink.

When exams came around how we’d go down to the school house on the farm to study. One day while we were there, we saw the Agricultural Science teacher Mr. Vernon Simon coming so we ran upstairs and he ran downstairs thinking it was a thief. Standing at a distance he pushed the door, ready to open cutlass on whomever was there; boy was he surprised to see us.

When I was in form 4A and we cooked oil down for our independence treat under the big tree. Our form teacher Miss Florian Alexander did a great job motivating us to bring the ingredients for our cook so we hardly had to buy anything. It was great hanging out with our teacher and eating the best oil down ever!

Being part of the MDC Literary Society and visiting the Hilarian Home during the Christmas season. We combed the ladies’ hair, chatted with the residents and donated some essentials. However, the best part was seeing the smiles on their faces as we socialized with them and entertained them in song; that was just priceless.

George Ferguson Grenada Class of 1968

David Simon N. Y., USA Class of 1974

Catherine King Grenada Class of 1981

Anonymous Grenada Class of 1995

Shievlyn Boney Grenada Class of 2004

71


AL M C TA D O D N A LT PE TIM A S US

50

Years of Excellence in Education...

The School Song Like a star up in the heaven Like a ripple in the sea Your greatness can’t be shaken Now unto eternity The dear old hills of learning Your school room high of fame So many sing your praises And so many torches burn your flame Chorus We belong to this life; we belong to Mac Donald We belong to the sound of the bell, your voice calling onwards Whatever we do wrong through the years, for worse or for better We belong, we belong, we belong together These halls have rung with laughter And echoed youthful strife They’ve changed the great hereafter Of many noble lives These hallowed walls of wisdom Have withstood every test 72

That’s why our Alma Mater Stands right among the very best Your light will always flicker Like a beacon in the storm With the help of God the father Your faith will stand its ground And from the land of leapers Unflinching in the flight Like those whose steps we follow We will always seek the highest height Though in the distant future Our parts may parted lie Fond memories will linger Of happy days gone by Whatever path we follow No matter far or near Mac Donald if you need us Just call our names and we’ll be there Finley Jeffrey


*ERE COMES THE SUN. SAY HELLO TO A NEW BEGINNING.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Happy

home | motor | marine | travel | bonds | commercial insurance call 440-0217 QTXKUKVUWPIGPGTCNPGV

50th Anniversary

Petrocaribe Grenada Ltd is proud to be associated with the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the formation of Mac Donald College and take this opportunity to extend its congratulation to the institution on such a milestone COVERING THE CARIBBEAN ANGUILLAË#06+)7A & BARBUDAË$ARBA&15ËDOMINICA G R E N A D A  Ë  S 6  L U C I A  Ë  S 6  8 + 0 % ' 0 6   6 * '  G R E N A D I N E S


Mac Donald College 50th Annivery Commemorative Magazine  

Special Magazine to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Mac Donald College

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you