Page 1

7

NEWS

Seafarer shore leave gets extra protection

The magazine of the International Maritime Organization SPRING 2018

11

NEWS

Safe and sustainable ship recycling in Bangladesh

19

MEETINGS

2020 sulphur limit – carriage ban agreed

25

FEATURE

Flame-defying maritime pilots recognized with IMO bravery accolade


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

Its time to make a difference

2020 0.5% Max

The IMO has adopted a global sulphur cap. This requires all ships to either use max 0.5% sulphur content Marine Fuel Oil, or fit a scrubbing device capable of removing the sulphur to an equivalent level of MFO emissions or better as from 1st January 2020. By using approved exhaust gas scrubbing devices operators can continue using HFO safe in the knowledge that pollutants are captured at source

With it’s patented technology Pacific Green Marine is able to offer state of the art exhaust gas scrubbing systems for fleets of all classes around the world. We offer a comprehensive one stop tailored solution from start to finish providing the economic benefit model, costing, design, engineering, manufacturing and installation.

Pacific Green offers the simplest solution for the 2020 regulations Visit www.pacificgreenmarine.com or email our team at enquiries@pacificgreenmarine.com for more information

2

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

CONTENTS

OPINION

IMO at 70: serving the 5  global community

FROM THE MEETINGS

FEATURE

12 IMO Assembly 30 Session on 16 Sub-Committee Ship Design and Construction th

lame-defying maritime pilots 25 Frecognized with IMO bravery accolade

on Pollution 19 Sub-Committee Prevention and Response Convention / 22 London London Protocol

NEWS

7

Seafarer shore leave gets extra protection

7

IMO in new partnership to support sustainable shipping

8

Global maritime technology network officially launched

9

Port State Control regimes move to boost collaboration

IMO AT WORK

9

Former IMO Secretary-General wins International Maritime Prize

27-33

and sustainable ship 11 Safe recycling in Bangladesh

MANAGING EDITOR Lee Adamson Email: ladamson@imo.org 4, Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

ASSISTANT EDITOR Natasha Brown Email: nbrown@imo.org

Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210

EDITORIAL PRODUCTION Mark Combe

Email: imonews@imo.org Website: www.imo.org

ADVERTISING Sally McElhayer Email: SMcElhay@imo.org Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611

Ref N316S

www.imo.org

News and stories from around the world on IMO’s work to promote safe, secure and sustainable shipping on clean oceans

IMO News is the magazine of the International Maritime Organization and is distributed free of charge to qualified readers. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IMO and the inclusion of an advertisement implies no endorsement of any kind by IMO of the product or service advertised. The contents may be reproduced free of charge on condition that acknowledgement is given to IMO News.

Please allow at least ten weeks from receipt at IMO for additions to, deletions from or changes in the mailing list. Design by FLIPSIDE www.flipsidegroup.com Copyright © IMO 2018 Printed by Micropress Printers, Suffolk, UK, using vegetable based inks and with FSC accreditation. www.micropress.co.uk

3


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

Carlson Merlin Vessel-based lidar system

Expand your marine surveying capabilities Map the full environment in one pass

Carlson Software Inc | 33 East Second Street Maysville, KY 41056 USA | 800-942-2540 info@carlsonsw.com | www.carlsonsw.com

Do you need training in the use of tank containers? Introducing the new Tank Container e-learning course The modules

Who should train?

Why train?

Benefits of e-learning

Introduction to tank containers

Suitable for anyone with a direct responsibility in the operation or management of tank containers including:

• Helps to enhance the safe, competent and efficient use of tank containers

• Cost-effective flexible, online training and course completion certificate

• Contents maintained within the scope of the IMDG Code concerning the operation of portable tanks

• Course management – administrator function to monitor and manage any number of students in local, regional or global training programs. Suitable for individual students or large corporations.

Regulations Operations Inspections, repairs and test

• Operations • Shippers and manufacturers • Carriers by road, rail and sea • Lessors • Surveyors and governmental agencies • Depot service providers

• May also be applied to the transport of non-dangerous goods

• Manufacturers and designers

The ITCO Tank Container e-learning course has been developed by ITCO (International Tank Container Organisation) and produced by Exis Technologies. ITCO members are eligible for a course discount. Up to ten courses can be purchased directly from: www.tankcontainer-elearning.com. For more than ten courses, or for more information, contact us at sales@existec.com

T: +44 (0)1325 466672 E: sales@existec.com W: www.existec.com

hazcheck exis-technologies-ltd---hazcheck/

Compliance, efficiency and safety in dangerous goods transport 184 x 132 EXIS ADVERT FINAL.indd 1

www.imo.org 16/02/2018 15:15


IMO NEWS • SPRING 2018Secretary-General Kitack Lim A message from IMO

OPINION IMO AT WORK

IMO at 70: serving the global community W

elcome to IMO News for the first issue in what I am sure will IMO’s greatest achievement has been to create a level playing be another busy and productive year for the Organization. field, through global regulations, so that ship operators cannot As ever, IMO is engaged in a wide range of important issues simply cut corners by compromising on safety, security and that affect not just the shipping world but the entire global environmental performance. This approach also encourages community; and I am confident that, with hard work and diligent innovation and efficiency. effort, we will be able to meet the challenges that will, inevitably, Since its beginning, IMO has worked to ensure that the people arise from them during the course of 2018. of the world can continue to benefit from shipping in a manner This year is a particularly important one for IMO, as we that meets the needs of the global economy, but also changing celebrate two major anniversaries: 70 years since the IMO expectations about safety, environmental protection, social Convention was adopted and 60 years since it entered into force. responsibility and so on. Our theme for the year – “IMO 70: Our With shipping transporting more than heritage: better shipping for a better 80 per cent of global trade to people future” – looks both at the past and into and communities all over the world, it is Our theme for the year the years that lie ahead. It provides an clear that IMO’s actions have an effect opportunity to reflect and showcase beyond the ships it regulates. IMO’s – “IMO 70: Our heritage: how IMO has developed and adapted Member governments represent billions better shipping for a while staying true to its overall of ordinary people, all over the world, who better future” mission – to promote safe, secure, rely on shipping every day of their lives, environmentally sound, efficient and whether they realise it or not – and this will sustainable shipping. be among IMO’s major priorities in this IMO can be justifiably proud of its record of steering the anniversary year and in the years to come. shipping industry, through regulation, to being ever safer, The world needs a viable shipping industry. Peoples’ greener, cleaner and sustainable. prosperity, their well-being and, in some cases, their very The 50-plus international instruments adopted by IMO cover survival, depend on it. all aspects of international shipping – including ship design, IMO’s heritage for 70 years has been to drive improvements construction, equipment, crewing, operation and disposal. in shipping to achieve a better world today. Our challenge for Complying with these standards can be difficult or challenging the years to come remains the same: to work in partnership with for the industry. But nothing truly worthwhile is ever easy. all stakeholders, enhancing the already well-established spirit of cooperation and communication, to create better shipping – for a better future. IMO’s 70th anniversary gives the entire shipping community an opportunity to promote shipping, loudly and proudly, to a global audience, and I hope that you will all seize that opportunity during the course of this momentous year.

www.imo.org

5


NEWS

BE THE MASTER OF YOUR SEAFARING CAREER

Our Master of Applied Science program can help advance your career in maritime operations; whether you are technical personnel wanting to enter the shipping industry or a seafarer contemplating a shore-based career. Study one of the following specialisations by distance: • Shipping Operations Management • Marine Engineering Enquire now: amc.edu.au

IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

Witherby Titles now available on iPad

Search ‘Witherbys’ in App Store For more information please visit: www.witherbydigital.com Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

info@witherbys.com +44 (0)1506 463 227 witherbys.com

4 Dunlop Square, Livingston EH54 8SB, Scotland, UK

CRICOS Provider Code: 00586B

Sustainable Maritime Operations MSc | BSc (hons) | BSc | PGDip | PGCert | Access course SUPPORT YOUR TRANSITION FROM SEA TO SHORE LEARN NEW SKILLS AND GREATLY IMPROVE YOUR CAREER PROSPECTS APPLY NOW, PLACES LIMITED

www.mla-uk.com IMarEST SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE Contact us for details 6

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

NEWS

Seafarer shore leave gets extra protection S

eafarers’ rights to shore leave have been strengthened through amendments which entered into force globally on 1 January 2018, under the revised treaty which aims to achieve the smooth transit in ports of ships, cargo and passengers. The amendments to the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic (FAL Convention) also bring in a new requirement for national governments to introduce electronic information exchange,

including electronic data interchange (EDI), to transmit information related to maritime transport. This should be in place by 8 April 2019, with provision for a transitional period of at least 12 months during which paper and electronic documents would also be allowed. The amendment to the international standard on shore leave adds a new provision, on top of the requirement to allow crew ashore while the ship on which

they arrive is in port. This new provision says there should be no discrimination on grounds of nationality, race, colour, sex, religion, political opinion, or social origin. Shore leave should be granted, irrespective of the flag State of the ship. If any request is turned down, the relevant public authorities must provide an explanation to the crew member and the master, which the seafarer or master can request to be provided in writing.

IMO’s global mandate and outreach and EBRD’s experience and expertise on investment and finance, is expected to contribute a great deal to sustainable maritime transport and the implementation of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals,” said IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim. The IMO/EBRD MoU represents the first such arrangement to be established between IMO and a multilateral development bank. In addition to providing investment financing, IMO and EBRD will work together

under the agreement to provide technical advisory services, project preparation and planning, capacity building and institutional development, focusing initially on joint projects with the national authorities of Azerbaijan, Egypt, Georgia, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Gap analysis will be carried out with specific projects likely to focus on a range of safety- and environment-related issues, centred on implementing and enforcing IMO regulations.

IMO in new partnership to support sustainable shipping I

MO has signed a new partnership agreement with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD to promote sustainable shipping through a range of safety- and environment-focused capacity-building activities in the maritime and port sectors in selected countries. It brings together IMO and the multilateral development bank EBRD, which has experience in supporting comprehensive transport-related development activities and practices in the maritime and port sectors. “This strategic partnership, combining

www.imo.org

7


IMO NEWS

NEWS

Global maritime technology network officially launched A

global network of centres of excellence in marine technology was officially launched on Monday 4 December at IMO headquarters. The Directors of five regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (MTCCs) signed a Memorandum of Understanding to establish the global maritime technology centre network. The network of MTCCS - in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Pacific - is the mainstay of the GMN maritime technology project, run by IMO and funded by the European Union. The MTCCs are expected to provide leadership in promoting ship energyefficiency technologies and operations, and the reduction of harmful emissions from ships. Through collaboration and outreach activities at regional level, the MTCCs will help countries develop national maritime energy-efficiency policies and measures, promote the uptake of low-carbon technologies and operations in maritime transport and establish voluntary pilot data collection and reporting systems. Speaking at the signing, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim offered his congratulations to all five MTCC representatives, MTCC host institutions, host countries and regions, the European Union, and the IMO team for the rapid

8

progress made in forming the GMN since the project was first mooted two years ago. “The GMN project brings together two of the most important themes that IMO and its member states are pursuing as we move into a new era. These are developing new and innovative technology and building the necessary capacity, the latter especially directed to the developing world, to be in a position to take up that technology and then use it to its best advantage,” Mr. Lim said. “Today, we live in a world in which new technology seems poised to have a transforming impact on all our lives. Shipping is no exception. Technology holds the key to a safer and more sustainable future for shipping,” he said. The five MTCCS are: • MTCC-Africa – hosted by Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Mombasa, Kenya • MTCC-Asia – hosted by Shanghai Maritime University, China • MTCC-Caribbean – hosted by University of Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago • MTCC-Latin America – hosted by International Maritime University of Panama, Panama • MTCC-Pacific – hosted by Pacific Community, Suva, Fiji

SPRING 2018

IMO Assembly elects new 40-Member Council

T

he IMO Assembly has elected the following States to be Members of its Council for the 2018-2019 biennium: Category (a) 10 States with the largest interest in providing international shipping services: China, Greece, Italy, Japan, Norway, Panama, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, United Kingdom, United States. Category (b) 10 States with the largest interest in international seaborne trade: Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, India, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, United Arab Emirates. Category (c) 20 States not elected under (a) or (b) above, which have special interests in maritime transport or navigation and whose election to the Council will ensure the representation of all major geographic areas of the world: Bahamas, Belgium, Chile, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kenya, Liberia, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, Turkey. The Council is the executive organ of IMO and is responsible, under the Assembly, for supervising the work of the Organization. Between sessions of the Assembly, the Council performs all the functions of the Assembly, except that of making recommendations to Governments on maritime safety and pollution prevention. The newly elected Council will meet, following the conclusion of the 30th Assembly, for its 119th session (on 7 December) and will elect its Chair and Vice-Chair for the next biennium. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

NEWS

Port State Control regimes move to boost collaboration

T

he Port State Control regimes which carry out inspections on ships to monitor and enforce compliance with international regulations have pledged to strengthen their collaboration with IMO and among themselves. A recent workshop for Port State Control (PSC) MoU/Agreement Secretaries and Database Managers and Member States, the seventh of its kind, was held at IMO headquarters in London. Participants shared experiences, highlighted new projects and approved a wide range of recommendations, which are aimed at further collaboration, harmonization and information sharing. The recommendations will be forwarded for review by IMO and the regional governing bodies of PSC regimes. Among the recommendations made by the meeting, the PSC regimes agreed to explore the development of statistical output and to look into the compatibility of their systems. They also agreed to consider moving away from “black/ grey/white lists” towards expanding an individual ship “risk profile” approach.

As a potential step towards mutual recognition of other regimes’ activities, the PSC regimes agreed to convey to their regional governing bodies the recommended use of the results of interregional information exchanges in their internal procedures, including their targeting systems. The workshop recommended that PSC regimes consider developing and maintaining, in their information systems, a coordinated list of under-performing ships. The possible development of a common platform for interregional exchange to facilitate informal exchange among PSC regimes, as well as the development of joint working policies, were also recommended. The workshop considered the possibility of establishing an outreach partnership between IMO and PSC regimes, the objectives of which would be to disseminate the outcome of the work of IMO; to collect first-hand feedback on implementation; and to develop technical cooperation and capacity building activities. Appropriate fora at IMO and in

PSC regimes will be invited to consider this matter. Existing technical cooperation activities, partially supported by IMO to encourage the sharing of expertise among PSC regimes, should be enhanced under IMO’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP). Recognizing the need for training of new entrants in port State and flag State personnel, the workshop recommended that IMO consider developing a harmonized training manual for use by flag State inspectors and PSC officers. To support the implementation of the Code of Good Practice included in the IMO procedures for PSC, the III Sub-Committee will be invited to consider developing a format for a “PSC letter to the Master”. This would set out how an inspection would be carried out and would be signed by both the PSC officer and a ship’s Master. The workshop also recommended that a dedicated GISIS facility for complaints could be developed.

Former IMO SecretaryGeneral wins International Maritime Prize T

he prestigious International Maritime Prize for 2016 has been presented to Mr. Koji Sekimizu, former IMO Secretary-General, for his contribution to the work of IMO over many years. IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim presented the prize in November 2017 at the IMO awards ceremony, “Mr. Sekimizu has dedicated his career and his lifetime to promoting safety of life at sea and protecting the marine and atmospheric environment. He is truly deserving of the International Maritime Prize,” Mr Lim said. The IMO Council unanimously decided to award the Prize to Mr. Sekimizu, IMO Secretary-General Emeritus, in recognition of his invaluable contribution to the work and objectives of the Organization and the www.imo.org

international maritime community as a whole. Mr. Sekimizu, a Japanese national, had a long and distinguished career with IMO, culminating in his four-year stewardship as Secretary-General from 2012 to 2016. Accepting the prize, Mr. Sekimizu expressed his gratitude for the honour and reflected on more than a quarter of a century spent working at IMO. “I spent the whole of my professional life in the development of international rules and regulations at IMO for the safety at sea and prevention of pollution from ships and ensuring maritime security. It was a great honour for me to serve IMO and the international maritime community as the Secretary-General and I am proud of my life totally devoted to IMO,” Mr. Sekimizu said.

9


IMO NEWS

NEWS

SPRING 2018

smm-hamburg.com /trailer

the leading international maritime trade fair

53

ha 33´ 47 ˝ mb N, 9 ur ° 58´ 3 g 3˝ E °

setting a course 4 – 7 sept 2018 hamburg 3 sept

Maritime Future Summit

4 sept

TradeWinds Shipowners Forum

5 sept

gmec, global maritime environmental congress

6 sept

Offshore Dialogue

6-7 sept

MS&D, international conference on maritime security and defence Maritime Career Market

7 sept

10

facebook.com/SMMfair

linkedin.com/company/smmfair

twitter.com/SMMfair #SMMfair

youtube.com/SMMfair

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

NEWS

Safe and sustainable ship recycling in Bangladesh

T

he second phase of an IMOimplemented project to enhance safe and environmentally sound ship recycling in Bangladesh has begun, following a US$1.1 million funding agreement with Norway. The two-year project will build on the first phase of the Safe and Environmentally Sound Ship Recycling in Bangladesh (SENSREC) project, which resulted in economic and environmental studies on ship recycling in Bangladesh, the development of training materials and capacity-building plans and a preliminary design for infrastructure including facilities for treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous wastes generated from recycling operations. Bangladesh is one the world’s top four ship recycling countries by capacity, alongside China, India and Pakistan, which together account for 94.9% of known ship recycling in the world. Ship recycling is key for the local economy and produces large quantities of steel and other materials which are recycled and sold on. www.imo.org

The second phase of the SENSREC project (SENSREC Phase II - capacity building) will continue to support Bangladesh to comply with international requirements and guide Bangladesh towards accession to the IMO ship recycling treaty, the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships (known as the Hong Kong Convention). The Hong Kong Convention sets the international standards for ship recycling and, when in force, will ensure that ships do not pose any unnecessary risks to human health, safety or the environment when being recycled at the end of their operational lives. The SENSREC Phase II - capacity building project will assist Bangladesh to build the capacity to develop and implement a legal, policy and institutional roadmap towards accession to the Hong Kong Convention. Also, under the project, a variety of stakeholders will be trained to lay the foundation for an effective and sustainable training programme within the ship recycling sector in Bangladesh.

“We are very pleased to be moving forwards with phase II of the SENSREC project. The key focus of this phase will be on training and governance, to ensure safe and sustainable ship recycling,” said Dr. Stefan Micallef, Director of IMO’s Marine Environment Division, adding that the comprehensive training programme would be aimed at workers in ship recycling yards, supervisors and government officials. The project is funded by Norway’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, channelling finance through the Embassy of Norway to Bangladesh. The budget is 9 Million Norwegian Krone (approximately US$1.1 million), for the 24-month project, commencing in January 2018. The agreement between IMO and Norway on funding support was signed on 24 November 2017. Other international partners including the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) will also be involved.

11


IMO ASSEMBLY

IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

IMO ASSEMBLY

30th session

SPRING 2018

27 NOVEMBER - 6 DECEMBER 2017

Strategic directions and vision adopted T

he Assembly adopted its strategic plan for 2018-2023, including a revised mission statement, a vision statement (included for the first time) and seven newly-identified strategic directions for IMO, placing the Organization firmly on route to supporting the implementation of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The strategic directions are:

• Improve implementation – ensuring regulations are effectively, efficiently and consistently implemented and enforced. • Integrate new and advancing technologies in the regulatory framework - balancing the benefits derived from new and advancing technologies against safety and security concerns, the impact on the environment and on international trade facilitation, the potential costs to the industry, and their impact on personnel, both on board and ashore. • Respond to climate change - developing appropriate, ambitious and realistic solutions to minimize shipping’s contribution to air pollution and its impact on climate change. • Engage in ocean governance – engaging in the processes and mechanisms by which the use of the oceans and their resources are regulated and controlled. • Enhance global facilitation and security of international trade - addressing things like arrival and departure formalities, documentation and certification, and generally reducing the administrative burdens that surround ship operation. • Ensure regulatory effectiveness - improving the actual process of developing regulations, to make them more effective; gathering more data, and being better and smarter at using it to make decisions; getting better feedback from Member States and the industry and improving the way IMO learns from experience and feeds those lessons back into the regulatory process. • Ensure organizational effectiveness - increasing the overall effectiveness of IMO, including the Member states, nongovernmental organizations, donors, the Secretariat –all the many stakeholders in the Organization as a whole.

12

IMO Vision Statement IMO will uphold its leadership role as the global regulator of shipping, promote greater recognition of the sector’s importance and enable the advancement of shipping, while addressing the challenges of continued developments in technology and world trade; and the need to meet the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. To achieve this, IMO will focus on review, development and implementation of and compliance with IMO instruments in its pursuit to proactively identify, analyse and address emerging issues and support Member States in their implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.” www.imo.org


SPRING 2018

FROM THE MEETINGS

IMO ASSEMBLY

30th session

Support for UN SDGs through technical cooperation

Focus on marine plastic pollution

T

T

he Assembly adopted three resolutions which focus on IMO’s capacity-building work to support the implementation of the SDGs. The first resolution covers the linkages between IMO’s technical assistance work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and requests the Technical Cooperation (TC) Committee to give high priority to those activities which not only promote the early ratification and effective implementation of IMO instruments but also contribute to the attainment of the SDGs, taking into account the special needs of the least developed countries (LDCs) and small island developing States (SIDS) and the particular maritime transport needs of Africa. The second outlines guiding principles of IMO’s integrated technical cooperation programme in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It urges Member States to ensure the integration of maritime issues within their United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAF) which will determine their national

priority areas of funding and support for maritime technical assistance activities. The third covers financing and partnership arrangements for an effective and sustainable integrated technical cooperation programme. It invites Member States, international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations and industry to engage actively in the support of technical cooperation activities through voluntary cash donations to the TC Fund; financial allocations to IMO multi-donor trust funds; multi-bilateral arrangements; voluntary donations of interest earnings under the Contributions Incentive Scheme; and in-kind support through the provision of no-fee consultants, hosting of technical assistance events and the donation of equipment.

Port State Control – revised procedures adopted

P

ort State Control plays a crucially important role as the second line of defence against sub-standard ships. The Assembly adopted revised Procedures for Port State Control. The resolution contains a comprehensive compilation of guidelines relevant to Port State Control. It updates the previous

Procedures for PSC adopted in 2011 (resolution A.1052(27)). The revisions include, in particular, guidelines on the ISM Code; the certification of seafarers, hours of rest and manning; and procedures regarding voluntary early implementation of amendments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention and related mandatory instruments.

Polar Code second phase welcomed

T

he IMO Assembly welcomed the planned work within the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) to build on the already-adopted Polar Code and move forwards with looking at how vessels not currently covered by its requirements might be regulated in future. The Polar Code, which entered into force on 1 January 2017 under both the www.imo.org

27 NOVEMBER - 6 DECEMBER 2017

SOLAS and MARPOL treaties, provides additional requirements for safe ship operation in polar waters and the protection of the polar environment. The work on the second phase, to address other vessels, including fishing vessels and smaller ships not covered by the SOLAS treaty, will be initiated at MSC 99 in May 2018.

he Assembly recognized that the ongoing problem of marine plastic pollution required further consideration as part of a global solution within the framework of ocean governance. This is in line with the UN SDG 14 (Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development) which has a target to prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from landbased activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution by 2025. IMO’s MARPOL treaty addresses garbage under its Annex V, which bans the discharge of plastics from ships into the oceans. The treaties which regulate the dumping of wastes at sea (London Convention and Protocol) also have roles to play in addressing plastic in the oceans from land-based sources. The Assembly recognized the role that the Organization has and continues to play in addressing this problem. The Assembly encouraged Member States, Parties to MARPOL Annex V and international organizations to submit concrete proposals to the next sessions of the Marine Environment Protection Committee and the meeting of the Parties to the London Convention and Protocol which take place during 2018.

Ratification of 2010 HNS Protocol urged

T

he Assembly adopted a resolution calling on States to consider ratifying a key treaty which will provide a global regime for liability and compensation in the event of an incident involving the international or domestic carriage by sea of Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS), such as chemicals, LPG and LNG. The resolution calls on States to consider ratifying, or acceding to, the 2010 HNS Protocol and to implement it in a timely manner. It also urges all States to work together towards the implementation and entry into force of the 2010 HNS Protocol by sharing best practices, and in resolving any practical difficulties in setting up the new regime.

13

IMO ASSEMBLY

IMO NEWS


IMO ASSEMBLY

IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

IMO ASSEMBLY

30th session

SPRING 2018

27 NOVEMBER - 6 DECEMBER 2017

IMO number scheme extended to fishing vessels and other vessels

T

he Assembly agreed to extend the IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme to more vessels, on a voluntary basis, to support ship safety and pollution prevention by being able to more easily identify vessels. The number scheme applies to ships over 100 gross tonnage and is mandatory for passenger ships of 100 gt and upwards and all cargo ships of 300 gt and upwards. In 2013, the Assembly agreed to voluntary extension to fishing vessels over 100 gt. Further voluntary application is now extended to fishing vessels of steel and non-steel hull construction; passenger ships of less than 100 gt, high-speed passenger

craft and mobile drilling units, engaged on international voyages; and to all motorized inboard fishing vessels of less than 100 gt down to a size limit of 12 metres in length overall authorized to operate outside waters under national jurisdiction of the flag State. Identifying and tracking fishing vessels operating at sea and being able to establish their ownership is an important part of ongoing work to tackle illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing. IMO is working closely with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) as well as other stakeholders, to

Full list of resolutions adopted: A.1110(30) Strategic plan for the Organization for the six-year period 2018-2023 A.1111(30) Application of the strategic plan of the Organization A.1112(30) Results-based budget for the 2018-2019 biennium A.1113(30) Revision of the Organization’s financial regulations (effective 1 January 2018) A.1114(30) Presentation of accounts and audit reports A.1115(30) Arrears of contributions A.1116(30) Escape route signs and equipment location markings

A.1122(30) Code for the transport and handling of hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk on offshore support vessels (OSV Chemical Code) A.1123(30) Implementation and entry into force of the 2010 Hazardous and Noxious Substances Protocol A.1124(30) Delegation of authority to issue certificates of insurance or other financial security required under the 1992 Civil Liability Convention and the 2010 Hazardous and Noxious Substances Convention A.1125(30) Relations with nongovernmental organizations

A.1117(30)) IMO Ship Identification Number Scheme

A.1126(30) Linkages between IMO’s technical assistance work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

A.1118(30) Revised Guidelines on the implementation of the International Safety Management (ISM) Code by Administrators

A.1127(30) Guiding principles of IMO’s integrated technical cooperation programme in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

A.1119(30) Procedures for Port State Control, 2017

A.1128(30) Financing and partnership arrangements for an effective and sustainable integrated technical cooperation programme

A.1120(30) Survey Guidelines under the Harmonized System of Survey and Certification (HSSC), 2017 A.1121(30) 2017 Non-exhaustive list of obligations under instruments relevant to the IMO Instruments Implementation Code (III Code)

14

A.1129(30) World Maritime University and International Maritime Law Institute students visiting IMO Headquarters A.1130(30) Charter of the World Maritime University

tackle IUU fishing. IMO is also encouraging States to ratify the Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety, to bring this important treaty into force.

Delegating the authority of issuing certificates of insurance

T

he Assembly adopted a resolution to allow for the delegation of authority to issue certificates of insurance under the International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage, 1992 (the 1992 Civil Liability Convention) and the 2010 HNS Convention. Unlike the Bunkers Convention 2001, the 2002 Athens Convention and the 2007 Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention, the 1992 Civil Liability Convention and the 2010 HNS Convention do not provide an explicit framework for the delegation of authority to issue certificates of insurance. The resolution confirms that a State Party to the 1992 Civil Liability Convention or the 2010 HNS Convention can authorize an institution or an organization recognized by it to issue the certificates of insurance or other financial security required by these Conventions. It also reminds States Parties that the delegation of authority to issue the certificates of insurance or other financial security required by the 1992 Civil Liability Convention and the 2010 HNS Convention would not affect the potential liability the delegating State may have in relation to those certificates.

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

•

SPRING 2018

FEATURE

MacGregor Voyage Data Recorders in line with your NavCom services MacGregor’s innovative communication and navigation products connect hundreds of vessels globally sending vital data to enable real time monitoring and improved performance. The voyage data recorder systems, VDR G4e, S-VDR G4e, the Frame Grabber FGR5 and the Maritime Data Engine are the main products offered by us. Our products are supported by NavCom maintenance and repair services for navigation and communication equipment of any manufacturer. Our team is ready and waiting for your inquiry - so let's talk!

www.macgregor.com www.imo.org

15


IMO NEWS

SDC

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON SHIP DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Safe mooring operations guidelines progressed

Draft Guidelines for wing in ground (WIG) craft finalized

D

raft Guidelines for wing-in-ground (WIG) craft were finalized by the Sub-Committee, for submission to MSC 99, for approval. The draft Guidelines apply to WIG craft carrying more than 12 passengers and/or having a full load displacement of more than 10 tonnes. The Guidelines cover the full range of structural and operational issues (buoyancy, stability and subdivision; anchoring, towing and berthing; life-saving appliances and arrangements; navigational equipment; radiocommunications; aerodynamic stabilization systems; inspection and maintenance provisions; etc). IMO and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have agreed that any WIG craft capable of flying outside the influence of ground effect at an altitude of more than 150 m, typically referred to as type C craft, should, in such a flight, be subject to the rules and regulations of ICAO. Other craft, including those with limited “fly-over” capability, should be covered only by the maritime regulatory regime. The Guidelines will replace the Interim Guidelines issued by IMO in 2002 (and amended in 2004).

16

5th session

SPRING 2018

22 - 26 JANUARY 2018

Draft Guidelines on stability computers and shore-based support for existing passenger ships agreed

T

he Sub-Committee continued to develop draft guidelines and SOLAS amendments aimed at preventing accidents and injury when ships are being secured at their berth in a port. The proposed draft SOLAS amendment would require ships to be provided with arrangements, equipment and fittings of sufficient safe working load to enable the safe conduct of all towing and mooring operations associated with the normal operation of the ship. Such arrangements would need to be approved by the Administration (flag State) or recognized organization acting on its behalf. New draft guidelines being developed will cover the design of mooring arrangements and the selection of

T

appropriate mooring equipment and fittings for safe mooring; and inspection and maintenance of mooring equipment including lines. The Sub-Committee is also updating and revising existing guidance on shipboard towing and mooring equipment. A correspondence group was established to further develop the draft guidelines and revised guidance and consider any consequential amendments to relevant IMO instruments.

Draft amendments to enhanced inspection of bulk carriers and tankers (ESP) Code agreed

T

he Sub-Committee prepared draft amendments to the International Code on the Enhanced Programme of Inspections during Surveys of Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers, 2011 (2011 ESP Code), based on editorial changes proposed by the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) and the Secretariat to identify mandatory requirements and improve the format of the tables and forms, and recent updates to IACS Unified Requirements, related in particular to the goal-based ship construction standards for bulk carriers and oil tankers. The finalized draft amendments will be forwarded to MSC 99 for approval and subsequent adoption.

he Sub-Committee agreed draft Guidelines on operational information for masters in case of flooding for passenger ships constructed before 1 January 2014, for submission to the ninety-ninth session of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 99) for approval, in conjunction with the adoption of draft amendments to SOLAS regulations II-1/1 and II 1/8-1 on computerized stability support for the master in case of flooding for existing passenger ships. The draft new SOLAS regulation II-1/81.3, requires that all passenger ships shall have an onboard stability computer or shore-based support to provide operational information to the master after a flooding casualty. The draft Guidelines were developed to ensure that: - an onboard stability computer is capable of receiving and processing data; or - if a shore-based support is provided, the system comprises two-way communication links to the shorebased support with a stability computer capable of receiving and processing data, The aim is to provide the Master with regularly updated operational information on the residual damage stability of the ship after a flooding casualty. Following the request of the Maritime Safety Committee to confirm when the draft new SOLAS regulation II-1/8-1.3 should apply to existing passenger ships constructed before 1 January 2014, the Sub-Committee recommended that such ships shall comply with SOLAS regulation II-1/8-1.3.1 not later than the first renewal survey after five years after the date of entry into force of the amendments.

Mandatory code on carriage of more than 12 industrial personnel progressed

F

urther progress was made in developing a draft new SOLAS chapter and draft new code on the carriage of more than 12 industrial personnel on board vessels engaged on international voyages. The requirements would apply to vessels transporting/accommodating

persons for the purpose of offshore industrial activities that are performed on board other vessels and/or offshore facilities (e.g. personnel transported to work on offshore wind farms). The correspondence group was re-established to continue the work. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

FROM THE MEETINGS

WHAT’S YOUR SPECIALISM?

Practical peer-reviewed books and guides for the marine professional Browse our bookstore at www.nautinst.org/shop

th

www.imo.org

17


IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

•

SPRING 2018

www.shipmanagementinternational.com

HOW DO YOU READ YOURS?

Download the ShipManagement International App today Contact: Karen Martin +44 (0)1296 682 108 +44 (0) 7812 077 502 kmartin@elabor8.co.uk

18

Use your smartphone camera to scan QR code and download App

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

FROM THE MEETINGS •

5th session

5-9 FEBRUARY 2018

2020 sulphur limit – carriage ban agreed I

MO has agreed to move forward with a prohibition of the carriage of fuel oil for use on board ships, when that fuel oil is not compliant with a new low sulphur limit which comes into force from 2020. The aim of the new limit is to reduce sulphur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships to improve air quality and protect the environment. The 0.50% limit on sulphur in fuel oil on board ships (outside designated emission control areas or ECAs, where the limit is 0.10%) will come into effect on 1 January 2020. To help ensure consistent implementation of this regulation, IMO’s Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR) agreed draft amendments to the MARPOL Convention on the prevention of pollution from ships (MARPOL Annex VI) to prohibit the carriage of noncompliant fuel oil, such that the sulphur content of any fuel oil used or carried for use on board ships shall not exceed 0.50%. The exception would be for ships fitted with an approved “equivalent arrangement” to meet the sulphur limit – such as an exhaust gas cleaning system (EGCS) or www.imo.org

so-called “scrubber” – which are already permitted under regulation 4.1 of MARPOL Annex VI. These arrangements can be used with “heavy” high sulphur fuel oil as EGCSs clean the emissions and therefore can be accepted as being at least as effective at meeting the required sulphur limit. For a ship without an approved equivalent arrangement the sulphur content of any fuel oil carried for use on board shall not exceed 0.50%. Under regulation 3.2 of MARPOL Annex VI a ship undertaking trials for ship emission reduction and control technology research can be exempted by the Administration of a Party to Annex VI. The Sub-Committee forwarded the proposed draft amendments to the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 72) meeting in April 2018, for urgent consideration. Once approved by MEPC 72, the draft amendments could be adopted at MEPC 73 (October 2018) and could enter into force on 1 March 2020 (just two months after the 0.50% limit comes into effect). To assist with consistent implementation, the Sub-Committee agreed to develop a

single set of guidelines covering all relevant aspects and also agreed the outline of draft guidelines for consistent implementation of regulation 14.1.3 of MARPOL Annex VI (the regulation on the 0.50% limit). The guidelines would cover: • Preparatory and transitional issues, relating to how ships can prepare for implementation, including relevant time schedules; • Impact on fuel and machinery systems resulting from new fuel blends or fuel types; • Verification issues and control mechanism and actions, including Port State Control and in-use fuel oil samples; • Fuel oil non-availability: guidance, information-sharing and standard reporting format; • Safety implications relating to the option of blending fuels; • Other useful guidance/information that assist Member States and stakeholders, including guidance addressing quality assurance and integrity of the supply chain.

19

PPR

SUB-COMMITTEE ON POLLUTION PREVENTION AND RESPONSE


IMO NEWS

PPR

FROM THE MEETINGS

NIVA’s Ballast WaterPREVENTION Testing SUB-COMMITTEE ON POLLUTION AND Facility RESPONSE 5 •

th

session

SPRING 2018

5-9 FEBRUARY 2018

NIVA (Norwegian Institute for Water Research) is IMO and USCG approved Test Facility with over 10 years of experience with testing of ballast water management systems for Type Approval. We offer multiple adapted consultancy services and extensive expertise within water treatment system testing. Pilot/Laboratory testing • IMO basic approval testing (whole effluent toxicity test and risk assessment), proof of concept according to IMO/USCG testing requirements • Pilot or laboratory bench scale study of components carried out according to specific testing needs and requirements Full scale testing • Type approval Land-based testing of ballast water treatment technologies in accordance with IMO and/or USCG requirements • Filter testing, design by mutual agreement for extra challenging testing Shipboard testing • Type approval shipboard testing of ballast water treatment technologies in accordance with IMO and/or USCG requirements • Compliance testing according to EPA’s Vessel General Permit requirements and IMO’s Port State Control requirements Contact: Stephanie Delacroix, Research Scientist Tel: +47 936 17 109 • stephanie.delacroix@niva.no

20

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

FROM THE MEETINGS •

5th session

ontinuing its valuable work in the field of spill preparedness and response, the Sub-Committee finalized, for approval by MEPC, part IV of the guidelines for the use of dispersants for combating oil pollution at sea, which focuses on the sub-sea application of dispersant. This is the final part of the revision and update of the IMO Dispersant Guidelines which was initiated following the Deepwater Horizon incident to reflect the latest developments in this field of response. The guidelines, once published in their entirety, will provide useful and practical advice to Governments in preparing for and responding to oil spills at sea.

5-9 FEBRUARY 2018

Ballast Water Management guidance agreed

Guidelines for the use of dispersants agreed C

T Revised guidelines for FPSOs and FSUs agreed

T

he Sub-Committee agreed the 2018 guidelines for the application of MARPOL Annex I requirements to floating production, storage and offloading facilities (FPSOs) and floating storage units (FSUs), for submission to MEPC 73, for consideration, with a view to adoption. The guidelines update previous versions to provide guidance and interpretation information which may be specifically applicable to FPSOs and FSUs used for the offshore production and storage or for the

offshore storage of produced oil. FPSOs and FSUs are a form of floating platform and subject to the provisions of MARPOL Annex I that relate to fixed and floating platforms. However, some of the environmental hazards associated with the quantities of produced oil stored on board operational FPSOs and FSUs are similar to some of the hazards related to oil tankers. The guidelines outline those relevant requirements of MARPOL Annex I related to oil tankers which could be adapted to address those hazards.

he Sub-Committee considered matters relating to the implementation of the Ballast Water Management Convention. Draft guidance on system design limitations of ballast water management systems and their monitoring, was agreed, for submission to MEPC 73 with a view to approval. Meanwhile, the SubCommittee invited submissions to the next session on specific examples of contingency measures acceptable to port States and implemented by the shipping industry, which could then be included in an annex to the guidance on contingency measures under the BWM Convention; and further submissions related to ports with challenging water quality.

Guidelines and amendments for use of electronic record books agreed

T

he Sub-Committee agreed to draft guidelines for the use of electronic record books under MARPOL, for submission to MEPC 73 for consideration, with a view to approval in principle and subsequent adoption at MEPC 74, in conjunction with associated draft amendments to MARPOL and the NOX Technical Code. The guidelines note that recording and reporting should be encouraged as they may have many benefits for the retention of records by companies, crew and officers. The guidance aims to provide standardized information on approving an electronic record book to ensure the obligations of MARPOL are met and that there is a

www.imo.org

consistent approach to approving such systems. The amendments provide for the use of an electronic record book (a device or system, approved by the Administration, used to electronically record the required entries for discharges, transfers and other operations) in lieu of a hard copy record book. The MEPC was invited to encourage ships using electronic record books during the interim period, prior to the entry into force of the amendments, to share their experience; and to encourage both flag and port States to provide information on the use of the guidelines.

The format for recording discharges under MARPOL is provided in the appendices to the relevant MARPOL annexes. Traditionally, the format of these record books has been in a hard copy provided by the Administration. However, as companies and shipowners increasingly focus on ways to operate in an environmentally responsible manner and aim to reduce the heavy burden associated with paperwork through electronic means, the concept of operational logs in an electronic format has become a popular consideration. Related draft amendments to the IMO Procedures for Port State Control, to note that record books may be presented in electronic format, were also agreed.

21

PPR

SUB-COMMITTEE ON POLLUTION PREVENTION AND RESPONSE


IMO NEWS

PPR

FROM THE MEETINGS

LONDON CONVENTION / LONDON PROTOCOL

SPRING 2018

39th / 12th sessions • 9-13 OCTOBER 2017

Discharge of high-viscosity products – draft MARPOL amendments agreed

T

he Sub-Committee agreed draft amendments to MARPOL Annex II to strengthen discharge requirements for tank washings containing high-viscosity, solidifying and persistent floating products (such as certain vegetable oils), in specified sea areas. The draft amendments follow concerns about the environmental impact of permissible discharges of such products. The new requirements would cover persistent floating substances with a high viscosity and/or a melting point greater than or equal to 0ºC. Under the new requirements, a chemical tanker that would

unload a cargo of such a substance would have to carry out a prewash of its tanks and the residue/water mixture generated during the prewash would have to be discharged to a reception facility at the port of unloading. It is proposed that the requirements would be applied in North West European waters; the Baltic Sea area; the Western European waters; and Norwegian waters north of 62° N. The draft amendments will be forwarded to MEPC 73 in October 2018 for approval and subsequent adoption

Revision of IBC Code completed

T

he Sub-Committee completed its revision of the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code), including revised product lists and index. The revised chapters 17 (Summary of minimum requirements), 18 (List of products to which the code does not apply), 19 (Index of Products Carried in Bulk) and 21 (Criteria for assigning carriage requirements for products

subject to the IBC Code) and other amendments will be forwarded to MEPC 73 and to the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 100) later in 2018 for approval and subsequent adoption. The comprehensive review of the IBC Code aims to harmonize the requirements for individual substances with the UN Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) and the

2014 edition of the Revised Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) hazard evaluation procedure for chemical substances carried by ships. The Sub-Committee also agreed a draft MEPC circular on Guidelines for the carriage of energy-rich fuels and their blends, for submission to MEPC 73 (October 2018) with a view to approval.

Black carbon reporting and measurement methods agreed

B

lack carbon is the product of incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. Black carbon emissions from ships contribute to climate change as a ‘Short-Lived Climate Pollutant’. IMO has been looking at how to measure and report on black carbon emissions as part of its work to consider the impact on the Arctic of black carbon emissions from international shipping. The Sub-Committee agreed the reporting

22

protocol for voluntary measurement studies to collect black carbon data as well as most appropriate Black Carbon measurement methods for data collection. The Sub-Committee encouraged Member States and international organizations to continue to collect black carbon data, using the agreed reporting protocol and the agreed measurement methods, and submit relevant data to the next session of the Sub-Committee.

Draft Guidelines for exhaust gas recirculation bleed-off water

T

he Sub-Committee agreed draft 2018 guidelines for the discharge of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) bleed-off water, for submission to MEPC 73, with a view to adoption. One method for reducing NOX emissions to meet Tier III NOX emission levels when operating in a NOX Tier III emission control area is to use Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), which is an internal engine process resulting in a NOX reduction which will meet the requirements of the regulation. By means of this process, condensate of exhaust gas will be generated and discharged as bleed-off water, which should be handled differently depending on the fuel oil sulphur content. EGR may also be used as a Tier II compliance option. The guidelines cover the discharge of EGR bleedoff water.

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

•

The Marine Professional weekly e-newsletter Now being sent, on a weekly basis, to key decision makers across the marine industry

SPRING 2018

FROM THE MEETINGS

1

Sign up to receive the newsletters and keep yourself up to date with the latest industry goings on. Log in to: www.imarest.org/ themarineprofessional to sign up now and contact marinesales@caspianmedia.com for advertising information For further information please contact: Valder Gates Advertising Sales Manager valder.gates@caspianmedia.com + 44 207 045 7578 www.imo.org

Scandinavia Roland Persson Orn Marketing roland@orn.nu +46 411 18400

23


38

IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

YEARS 1980-2018

LIVE

WEEKLY

MONTHLY

e b i r c Subs for y a d o t 1 £ t s ju

BRINGING NEWS AND ANALYSIS OF THE DANGEROUS GOODS SUPPLY CHAIN FOR 38 YEARS

www.hcblive.com www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

FEATURE

Flame-defying maritime pilots recognized with IMO bravery accolade

T

wo maritime pilots who defied fire to bring a burning ship to safety, averting a major maritime catastrophe, received the 2017 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea during the 2017 IMO awards ceremony, on Monday 27 November 2018. Pilots Captain Michael G. McGee and Captain Michael C. Phillips, from Houston, United States, were recognized for their role in averting a major tragedy in September 2016. The ship they were piloting, the 247m long tanker Aframax River, broke down in the Houston Ship Channel in the middle of the night and burst into flames after colliding with mooring dolphins. Captain McGee and Captain Phillips were surrounded by a towering wall of burning fuel as the raging fire quickly spread across the channel, threatening other tank ships and nearby waterfront facilities. Both pilots remained at their stations on the bridge of the ship during the fire. Captain McGee managed to manoeuvre the stricken and blazing vessel away from surrounding ships and facilities. Captain Phillips coordinated communications and firefighting efforts with the United States Coast Guard and numerous local fireboats. Captain Phillips rushed to

www.imo.org

to even think about what we needed to do. grab a fire extinguisher and put out a fire We just did it,” Captain Philips said. raging on the port bridge wing. “We’d like to think, however, that we did The inferno was finally extinguished after what we did in large measure because we’re 90 minutes, leaving both pilots exhausted state pilots. We’re used to taking control and suffering minor burns. Captain McGee, when we climb aboard a ship. Pilots don’t using tugs, was then able to bring the sit back and wait for others to tell them what damaged tanker safely to a mooring facility. to do. We also feel a deep responsibility for Captain McGee and Captain Phillips protecting our port. We are proud to be state were nominated by the International Maritime commissioned pilots and proud of what state Pilots’ Association (IMPA). The award was pilots do in safeguarding their respective decided by a panel of judges and endorsed ports. In that respect, we accept this award by the IMO Council at its 118th session in July. on behalf of our fellow Presenting the It’s also not something that we pilots in Houston and pilots with medals train for or practice. Frankly, we everywhere else in the and certificates, world,” he said. didn’t have a lot of time to even IMO SecretaryThis annual award think about what we needed to General Kitack was established do. We just did it. Lim said they had by IMO to provide been faced with a international recognition challenge which was out of the ordinary and for those who, at the risk of losing their own required great initiative and heroism. life, perform acts of exceptional bravery, Accepting the award, Captain Philips displaying outstanding courage in attempting agreed that the incident on the night of to save life at sea or in attempting to September 6, 2016 was not something that prevent or mitigate damage to the marine they encountered in routine piloting duties. environment. For 2017, 33 nominations were “It’s also not something that we train for or received from 16 Member States and five non-governmental organizations. practice. Frankly, we didn’t have a lot of time

25


IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

•

SPRING 2018

Welcome to / Bienvenue sur

Photo: David L Labrie, photodll.com

www.maritimemag.com

26

Maritime/Multimodal/Logistics Combining Analysis and News Maritime/Multimodal/Logistique Analyse et nouvelles

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

IMO AT WORK

Developing African solutions for maritime security

W

ork to address maritime security challenges in Africa’s major maritime zones continued at a regional workshop in Victoria, Seychelles (19-23 March). Over 60 maritime security professionals from more than 30 States attended the Africa Center for Strategic Studies event, which was designed to emphasize whole-of-Africa solutions to the maritime security challenges faced in the Gulf of Guinea, the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean, and the Horn of Africa. IMO’s Henrik Madsen provided an outline of two IMOsupported regional codes helping to address a range of interrelated maritime crimes and threats to security and development in Africa – the Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct, and the Code of Conduct concerning the repression of

piracy, armed robbery against ships, and illicit maritime activity in west and central Africa. Speaking at the Seychelles event, Mr. Madsen underlined that development of maritime security in Africa must be based on a solid foundation at national level, saying that “The initial focus must be on developing capability, legal frameworks and inter-agency cooperation nationally as the foundation for stronger regional cooperation. It is therefore vital that the signatory States establish their own national organizations, legal frameworks and develop their capacity in order to benefit from the maritime sector”. Participants at the workshop analysed key areas where their national approaches both align and differ, as well as identifying areas for collaboration.

Joining forces in the fisheries sector

A

ccording to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), fishing at sea is probably the most dangerous occupation in the world. To address this issue, a two-day regional seminar, “Joining forces in the fisheries sector: promoting safety, decent work and the fight against Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU)”, was held (21-22 March) in Manila, Philippines. IMO’s Head of Marine Technology, Sandra Allnutt, delivered a presentation on IMO’s work in promoting safety at sea. She also emphasized the long-standing cooperation between FAO and ILO through which safety recommendations have been developed and adopted on the design, construction, equipment,

training and protection of fishing vessels. But she stressed that more States must comply with IMO conventions on safety at sea and greater cooperation is needed among the relevant stakeholders. The event also discussed many related issues including, the protection of human rights in the fishing sector, the need for increased political commitment, the development of regional actions to fight labour abuses and ways of inter‐agency collaboration and future actions by concerned stakeholders. The seminar was organized by the Apostleship of the Sea (AoS) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), in collaboration with the International Labour Organization (ILO) and IMO.

Reducing emissions in ports

H

ow can ports cut emissions to ensure cleaner air and contribute to the battle against climate change? First, ports need to quantify emissions, then they need to identify measures to cost-effectively reduce portrelated emissions. A strategic partnership between the IMO-executed GloMEEP energy efficiency project and the International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH) is helping selected countries to develop port emission inventories and subsequently draw up a port emission reduction strategy. A new three-day workshop package on the “Prevention and control of shipping and port air emissions” is being developed as part of the GloMEEP-IAPH strategic partnership. Training will begin in May 2018 and will be rolled out to the ten lead pilot countries participating in the GloMEEP

www.imo.org

project. The workshops will train port personnel in how to develop an inventory of emissions in a port, and subsequently how to develop a strategy to address emissions from ports, based on two technical guides which are also being developed (for assessment of emissions in ports; and for the development of port emissions reductions strategies). The workshop package is designed for port personnel and aims to increase their awareness about maritime energy efficiency from a port perspective and show how port management, port infrastructure development and port logistical systems contribute to overall maritime energy efficiency and air quality. The GloMEEP team met (19 March) with experts representing IAPH, from the Port of Los Angeles, the Port of Long Beach and

Starcrest Consultancy Group, to further develop the draft workshop package and guides. GloMEEP technical adviser Astrid Dispert outlined the prospective new training course and the ongoing collaboration between GloMEEP and IAPH at the 5th Pacific Ports Clean Air Collaborative (PPCAC) Conference, hosted by the Port of Los Angeles, United States (20-22 March). GloMEEP is a GEF-UNDP-IMO project aimed at supporting the uptake and implementation of energy efficiency measures for shipping, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions from shipping. The Lead Pilot Countries of the GloMEEP project are: Argentina, China, Georgia, India, Jamaica, Malaysia, Morocco, Panama, Philippines and South Africa.

27


IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

Future of shipping in the spotlight S

ustainable use of the oceans, maritime trade, and the digital revolution were some of the issues addressed by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim at the International Shipping Summit in Istanbul, Turkey (17 March). In his opening address to maritime industry and government representatives from around the world, Secretary-General Lim spoke about how IMO, in its leadership role as the global regulator of shipping, is and will be addressing a number of challenges facing the shipping industry. On the marine environment, he said that to be sustainable, human activities have to be balanced with the oceans’ capacity to remain healthy and diverse in the long term – and that a major part of IMO’s role is to ensure that shipping continues to make its contribution to the global economy without upsetting that

delicate balance. He highlighted IMO’s work on GHG emissions and ship energy-efficiency, ballast water management, and polar shipping. He also emphasized that improving ports, developing and strengthening inter-modal links and hinterland connections can both drive and support a growing economy, through promoting trade by sea. And, on the digital revolution Mr. Lim said that the shipping industry is entering a new era, through new, emerging technology in areas such as fuel and energy use, automation and vessel management, materials and construction. The Summit was organized by the Turkish Ministry of Transport, Maritime and Communications, and opened by Prime Minister of Turkey, Binali Yıldırım, with Transport Minister, Mr. Ahmet Arslan, also speaking at the opening ceremony.

Role-playing to design security drills

A

four-day workshop on how to best design and conduct maritime security drills and exercises, has been held in Kingston, Jamaica (13-16 March). The aim of the event was to equip participants with the necessary skills and knowledge to plan, conduct and assess security drills and exercises in their port facilities, in accordance with the requirements of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. The workshop included live role-playing sessions with various communication equipment, with participants taking turns acting

28

as “players” and “controllers” respectively. It demonstrated to practitioners how to make use of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Manual of Maritime Security Drills and Exercises for Port Facilities in their work. The newly learned activities will continue to help port facility security officers and personnel, as well as designated authority officials, to improve and test existing procedures and practices in order to maintain vigilance and security awareness in ports.

SPRING 2018

Maritime women to benefit from new leadership course

M

aritime subjects are set to feature on a new Leadership in the Public Sector course being developed by the training arm of the UN system – the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). This was decided at a UNITAR meeting at IMO Headquarters, London (28 February) where a task force, including IMO, was set up to develop the course. The training will be launched in Marrakech, Morocco (23 June) with a view to delivering the training to women officials attending the next regional meeting of the network for women of maritime authorities in Latin America later this year. This initiative is part of IMO’s ongoing efforts to support the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls (SDG 5). Representatives from IMO’s Technical Cooperation Division also discussed the potential for future collaboration with UNITAR in its role in providing high-quality learning solutions to individuals, organizations and institutions, particularly in the developing world.

Training for port facility security staff in the Dominican Republic

I

MO has delivered maritime security training for port facility security officers, managers and designated authority officials in Santo Domingo City, Dominican Republic (12-16 March). Run by IMO in collaboration with the Dominican Republic Ministry of Defence, the workshop is training participants on how to perform their duties in line with IMO’s code on International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and SOLAS Chapter XI-2. Participants are also being taught

to train other officials with similar responsibilities. The workshop follows a 2016 national table-top exercise on maritime security, organized in cooperation with the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (UNLIREC). The 2016 exercise identified a number of recommendations for further training, parts of which were addressed by this workshop. www.imo.org


The Royal Institution of Naval Architects

IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

IMO AT WORK

Subscribe to any of our journals

Published 10 times a year • Providing up-to-date technical information on commercial ship design, construction and equipment • Regular reports on centres of shipbuilding activity worldwide • Comprehensive, technical descriptions of the latest newbuildings • News, views, rules & regulations, technology, offshore, CAD/CAM, innovations • Bi-monthly publication, WARSHIP TECHNOLOGY • Quarterly publication, OFFSHORE MARINE TECHNOLOGY

2018 Subscription 12 months Print only† UK £190 Rest of Europe £199 Rest of World £213

Digital Only* £190 £190 £190

S Sea

08

20: 7 12:

201

13/12/

m

r.co afna ww.r

w

dd

1

1.in

_p0

b18

-Fe

Resp

onse

Suprem e there an anti-fouling he re, d everyw here

We introdu with nan ce our Globic 950 o suprem acr ylate techno 0 series e anti-fo uling pro log y for everyw her tec to re-dock e from outfittin tion g ing.

Find out engine more about s and system outstanding s: diese marine lturbo .man. - SEM eu 6

Globic95

FC WarShip

Navy

WT_Oct1

7_p1.ind

- Fast

Respons

e - 182x182

d 1

.indd

00.hemp

4

el.com

Jac Resear ch & surv k-ups & liftb oats ey ves sels / Safe / Support ves sels / ty / 4th Quarter 2017 2017-09-

20

17:01:39

22/09/20

17

Print + Digital £242 £251 £266

15:19:06

NA FC

- Globi

OMT_Q417

_p1.indd

1

NA Jan

11/09/2017

c 9500

- 182x1

82.indd

1

18 - p01.in

dd 1

16:42:57

2018-01-02

15:01:58

02/01/2018

16:03:07

• Provides up-to-date technical information on commercial small craft/small ship design, construction and operation • Covers a comprehensive range of vessel types from 5m up to 100m in length, including fast ferries, workboats, fishing vessels, patrol boats, pilot boats, tugs and offshore vessels • Regular features on propulsion technology, new marine equipment, construction materials and CAD/CAM • Special regular regional reports and electronic features by well-known industry figures

8'' ' 16.56 .970'' ° 13 N 64 ° 51' 34 4 W 21 tate

Jan

Fast

Published 6 times a year

raft en c 8 Gre 201 n/ ctio ebruary ru st ry/F con n & / Janua esig ht d Europe Yac / ies / ology rr e F hn tec

S&BI

Ice clas s / CAD /CAM/C Green AE / Ba ships / So llast wat uth Asia er treat / Founda ment / tion / Ja nuary 20 18

Surfac e co mbata nts / Austra Patro lia / l boats / Unma Shipbuild ing / nned ves Octob sels / Naval er 201 7 by MA power solutio N Die sel & ns Turbo

2018 Subscription 12 months Print only† UK £140 Rest of Europe £148 Rest of World £169

Digital Only* £140 £140 £140

Prop China / Un ulsio derw ns ate Elec ystem r re re trica l up pairs / S pairs / Env gra inga des ir / Dry pore / onmen tal re Ship doc king c fi / 4th onvers ts / ions Qua / rter 201 7

Published quarterly • In depth coverage of all aspects of shiprepair and conversion work includes technical descriptions of major conversion projects worlwide • Regular regional surveys on the major shiprepair centres • Developments in shipboard and shipyard equipment technology • Contract news, appointments, industry views, new regulations

2018 Subscription 12 months Print only† UK £65 Rest of Europe £71 Rest of World £79

Print + Digital £171 £180 £200

INV wwwESTING .cam IN T mell HE F -lair UTU d.co RE m

RIN

Digital Only* £65 £65 £65

Print + Digital £85 £92 £101

A 4.in

dd

SRM

4Q

17 -

1

p1.ind

d 1

04/02/

2015

16:31:

14

27/10

/2017

14:41

:17

www.imo.org

The Publications Department RINA, 8-9 Northumberland Street, London WC2N 5DA Tel: +44 (0)207 235 4622 Fax: +44 (0)207 259 5912 Email: subscriptions@rina.org.uk www.rina.org.uk/publications

29


Digital Ship 2018 extra distribution and editorial line up NEW IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

•

SPRING 2018

categories

Communications & Cyber Security | Software, Big Data & IoT | Navigation, Autonomy & New Technologies

Issue

Extra Distribution

Editorial focus

February / March

DS Cyber Resilience Rotterdam, 15 February DS ishipping Copenhagen, 27-28 February APM, 14-16 March DS Cyber Resilience @ APM, 15 March CMA, 12-14 March Satellite 2018, 12 - 15 March

Remote Monitoring and Optimisation

Sea Japan, 11-13 April VPO @ Sea Japan, 11 April DS Big Data @ Sea Japan, 13 April Danish Maritime Fair, 2-4 May DS CIO Hamburg, 24 April DS Big Data Oslo, 29 May

Blockchain in Maritime

Posidonia, 4-8 June DS Cyber Resilience @ Posidonia, 6 June DS CIO Supply Chain London, 21 June DS CIO Tokyo, 29 Aug

Big Data and industry stakeholder integration ALSO: Posidonia Maritime IT exhibitor preview

copy deadline 23 Jan

April / May copy deadline 6 Mar

June / July copy deadline 15 May

August / September SMM, 4-7 September DS Cyber Resilience @ SMM, 5 September copy deadline DS ishipping Dubai, September 14 Aug DS CIO Rotterdam, 26 September

e-Navigation and the Port/Vessel interface ALSO: SMM Maritime IT exhibitor preview

October

Autonomous Ship development

copy deadline 18 Sep

November copy deadline 23 Oct

December 2018 / January 2019

VPO Singapore, 9th October DS CIO Singapore, 10 October VPO Copenhagen, 31 October DS Athens, 7-8 November

DS CIO Bergen, 22 November Evolution in Maritime Satcoms DS CIO Shanghai, 28 November International Workboat Show, 28-30 November

DS Cyber Resilience London, 4 December

copy deadline 20 Nov

30

* This calendar ia a guide and is subject to change without notice.

Cyber Security in Shipping For further details please contact:

Ria Kontogeorgou Advertising Manager Tel: +44 (0)207 017 3442 Mob: +44 (0)7815 481036 Skype: ria.kontogeorgou Email: ria@thedigitalship.com www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

IMO AT WORK

Latin America maritime cooperation centre launched

T

he Latin America Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre, part of a global network established under an ambitious IMO-EU project to further efforts to combat climate change, has been launched in Panama (13 March). The centre, hosted by the Universidad Marítima Internacional de Panamá (UMIP), is one of five such centres established under the GMN project, which is funded by the European Union (EU) and run by IMO. The centres, in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Pacific regions, act as regional focal points for a wide range of activities. These include, improving compliance with existing and future international energy-efficiency regulations;

Stopping the spread of invasive species N

on-native species can be spread from ocean to ocean via ship. They may be carried via ballast water or attach to the hulls and other parts of ships, hitching a ride across the oceans. IMO is addressing this problem through the Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention, which entered into force in September 2017 and requires ships to manage their ballast water to limit the spread of aquatic organisms. Also, IMO’s Biofouling Guidelines address bioinvasions via ships’ hulls. The joint International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission www.imo.org

promoting uptake of low-carbon technologies and operations in maritime transport, and establishing voluntary pilot data-collection and reporting systems to feed back into the global regulatory process. In doing so, they will play their part in supporting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Latin America Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre – or MTCC-Latin America – was launched at the host institute at a special event attended by representatives of the European Union, the Government of Panama, non-governmental organizations and academia as well as representatives from 17 countries in the region.

of UNESCO and IMO (ICES/ IOC/IMO) Working Group on Ballast and Other Ship Vectors, discussed various topics related to the management of both ballast water and biofouling, which are the two vectors for ship-mediated introductions of invasive aquatic species, at its annual meeting, held in Madeira, Portugal (5-7 March). IMO’s Theofanis Karayannis updated the meeting on the latest developments and outcomes on ballast water management from recent IMO meetings, including the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC

Philippine officials trained in forming maritime transport policy

O

fficials from various government entities in the Philippines have received training in how to develop a National Maritime Transport Policy (NMPT). The concept is being promoted by IMO as a good governance practice to guide planning, decision making and legislation in the maritime sector, and as a key driver for a country’s sustainable development. The event took place in Manila, Philippines (6-8 March), organised by IMO together with the Philippines Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA) and the World Maritime University (WMU). The training comes at an opportune moment – with the Philippines in the process of adopting its Maritime Industry Development Plan (MIDP) 20182028 – designed to enhance the country’s maritime industry. Forty-five officials took part in the Manila event.

71) and the Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR 5), as well as expected discussions at MEPC 72 to be held in April. Mr Karayannis also outlined the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloFouling Partnerships Project which will aim at building capacity in developing countries for improved implementation of biofouling management. The project is in its preparatory phase, selecting the recipient countries and designing the list of activities that will be carried out once the full-size project is launched later this year.

Spill preparedness and response – a collaborative effort

I

MO joined leading oil spill experts and stakeholders to discuss future issues concerning oil spill preparedness, response and restoration – at the Interspill 2018 conference and exhibition in London (13-15 March). Speaking at the opening session, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said that “many years of collaborative work between governments and industry, at IMO, have helped reduce dramatically the number of oil spills and the amount of oil spilt from ships”. Mr. Lim outlined how individual incidents had been catalysts for significant improvements, through IMO regulations, in areas such as ship design, operation, disposal of engine room wastes, as well as the framework for compensating the victims of pollution incidents. He also highlighted IMO’s continuing support, with assistance from a number of key partners, to countries to improve their capacity in preparing for, and dealing with, major incidents that might result in pollution damage.

31


IMO AT WORK

IMO NEWS

•

SPRING 2018

The essential tool for anyone involved in shipping

Visit: vp.imo.org/trial to access your free 2-day subscription trial

32

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

IMO AT WORK

Putting the Polar Code into practice

I

MO’s Polar Code, when properly applied, is a powerful tool for safeguarding the environment and protecting the lives of seafarers and passengers in the challenging polar regions. This was the message from IMO SecretaryGeneral Kitack Lim to an international conference on implementing the Polar Code, in Helsinki, Finland (22 February). The Code entered into force in January 2017 and sets out mandatory standards covering the full range of design, construction, equipment, operational, training and environmental protection matters that apply to ships operating in the inhospitable waters

surrounding the two poles. Speaking at the opening of the event, Mr. Lim addressed the wide variety of stakeholders involved in applying the treaty, including law makers, business leaders, diplomats and international organizations. He emphasized that one of the Code’s strengths, as a “living document”, was that it can and will be regularly reviewed, amended and adjusted to reflect changing considerations, new concerns and new experience gained in its practical application. Some of these developments may involve amending the treaty to cover issues like oil spill response, search and rescue

facilities, and applying the code to non-SOLAS ships such as fishing vessels, pleasure yachts, and cargo ships under 500 gt. During his trip to Finland Mr. Lim also visited the Finnish Meteorological Institute, the Vessel Traffic Services Centre, an ice-breaker, and H.E. Anne Berner, Minister of Transport and Communications of Finland – using the experience to exchange ideas with those directly involved in putting the Polar Code into practice.

Fine-tuning ballast water testing E xperts from ballast water testing facilities around the world gathered in London (1-2 February) to discuss the science behind ballast water management. They were meeting as part of the Global TestNet – a forum of organizations involved in standardization, transparency and openness of land-based and/or shipboard testing for the certification of ballast water management systems. Standardized testing helps to ensure the effectiveness of IMO measures to protect marine ecosystems from potentially harmful invasive aquatic

species transported in ships’ ballast water. IMO’s Ballast Water Management Convention requires ships to manage their ballast water and sediments to a certain standard. Another key issue on the agenda was biofouling – the build-up of aquatic organisms on ships’ underwater hull and structures – which the Global TestNet will also be addressing. IMO’s Antoine Blonce gave a presentation on the subject, introducing IMO’s new GloFouling project, which is building on the Organization’s work to help protect marine

ecosystems by dealing with potentially invasive species. Further technical issues discussed at the 9th Global TestNet meeting included so-called challenge water validations, representative sampling and ring testing between test facilities. The Global TestNet was created in 2013 under the Global Industry Alliance (GIA) of the GloBallast project.

New sponsor for marine science

I

MO’s marine science advisory group, GESAMP (The Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection) is welcoming a new sponsor. The International Seabed Authority (ISA), the agency responsible for regulating mining and related activities in the international seabed, beyond national jurisdiction, an area that includes most of the world’s oceans, is becoming the tenth sponsoring organization of GESAMP. The new sponsor is joining the other nine organizations whose task is to advise the United Nations on the scientific aspects of marine environmental protection. The ISA’s expertise is already being put to good use, with the Authority taking part in a working group dealing with the impacts of wastes and other matter in the marine environment from mining operations, including marine mineral mining. The newly added sponsor is good news for GESAMP, which will celebrate 50 years of service as an advisory mechanism to the UN next year.

Policy planning lessons for maritime law students

S

tudents from the International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) in Malta were introduced to key policy planning issues as part of IMO’s on-going work to support the future leaders of the maritime world (15-16 February). The event focused on National Maritime Transport Policy (NMTP) formulation, which is being promoted by IMO as a good governance

www.imo.org

practice to guide planning, decision making and legislation in the maritime sector, and a key driver for a country’s sustainable development. IMO has been providing training to its interested Member States on developing, adopting and updating NMTPs. The seminar saw students participate in a practical group exercise, in which they themselves practised formulating the key aspects

of a maritime transport policy. The students were introduced to the topic by IMO’s Jonathan Pace and World Maritime University (WMU) Associate Professor George Theocharidis. The seminar was held for a second consecutive year and is the result of continuing, fruitful collaboration between IMO and its two global maritime training institutions – WMU and IMLI

33


IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

SPRING 2018

Global Ocean Conference 2018

Building Transformative Partnerships for Ocean Sustainability 8-9 MAY 2018 WORLD MARITIME UNIVERSITY MALMÖ, SWEDEN 34

http://ocean2018.wmu.se

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2018

IMO AT WORK

A new generation of scrubbing technology Simple patented design • No moving parts or media • Straight through or bypass designs

Pacific Green offers the simplest solution for the 2020 regulations One decision, one supplier, one solution Fully customised process from bespoke design through to installation and commissioning Unrivalled manufacturing capacity and International Technical Service Centres

Our expert team is on hand to deliver a successful solution

Visit www.pacificgreenmarine.com or email our team at enquiries@pacificgreenmarine.com for more information

www.imo.org

35


SHAPE YOUR FUTURE Study an online industry leading professional qualification this year and unlock professional opportunities in the maritime sector Starting soon Certificate in Marine Pollution Prevention & Management Starts 14 March – investigating mitigation and regulation for marine pollution Certificate in Chartering Starts 10 April – understand the complexities of time and voyage charterparties Certificate in Marine Insurance Starts 8 May – covering cargo, hull & machinery, and protection & indemnity

Certificate in International Maritime Codes & Conventions Starts 9 May – learn more about the implementation of maritime regulations Certificate in Ship Operations Starts 16 May – enhance your understanding of the workings of global shipping Certificate in Ship Technology Starts 21 May – build your knowledge of propulsion, navigation and engineering Certificate in Marine Claims Starts 6 June – gain an insight into the handling of wet and dry claims

We’re here to help and would love to have you on board. Contact us on learning@knect365.com or call +44 20 7017 4483 to speak to our team and find out more. Remember to quote IMO News on your application.

IMO News - Spring Issue - 2018  

The Official Magazine of the International Maritime Organization

IMO News - Spring Issue - 2018  

The Official Magazine of the International Maritime Organization