IMO News - Autumn Issue - 2019

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NEWS

IMLI – 30 years of training in maritime law

The magazine of the International Maritime Organization AUTUMN 2019

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MEETINGS

Interim guidelines for Maritime Autonomous Surface Ship trials approved

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FEATURE

Turning the Tide – promoting gender diversity in the maritime sector

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MEETINGS

Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development


IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

Its time to make a difference

2020 0.5% Max

The IMO has adopted a global sulphur cap. This requires all ships to either use max 0.5% sulphur content Marine Fuel Oil, or fit a scrubbing device capable of removing the sulphur to an equivalent level of MFO emissions or better as from 1st January 2020. By using approved exhaust gas scrubbing devices operators can continue using HFO safe in the knowledge that pollutants are captured at source

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Pacific Green offers the simplest solution for the 2020 regulations Visit www.pacificgreenmarine.com or email our team at enquiries@pacificgreenmarine.com for more information

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

CONTENTS

OPINION

A digital and diverse future 5 FROM THE MEETINGS

FEATURE

on Human 12 Sub-Committee Element, Training and

the Tide – promoting 26 Turning gender diversity in the maritime

Watchkeeping (HTW)

sector

Environment Protection 16 Marine Committee (MEPC)

23 Maritime Safety Committee (MSC)

NEWS

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I MLI – 30 years of training in maritime law

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2018 International Maritime Prize to long-serving American

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IMO showcasing tangible progress at global Climate Action summit

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IMO bravery accolade goes to American rescuer

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UN Secretary-General highlights shipping progress at Climate Summit

Cooperation 29 Technical Committee (TCC) on 32 Sub-Committee Implementation of IMO Instruments

MANAGING EDITOR Lee Adamson Email: ladamson@imo.org 4, Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

ASSISTANT EDITOR Natasha Brown Email: nbrown@imo.org

Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210

EDITORIAL PRODUCTION Johanna Kleine

Email: imonews@imo.org Website: www.imo.org

ADVERTISING Sally McElhayer Email: SMcElhay@imo.org Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611

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IMO News is the magazine of the International Maritime Organization and is distributed free of charge to qualified readers. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IMO and the inclusion of an advertisement implies no endorsement of any kind by IMO of the product or service advertised. The contents may be reproduced free of charge on condition that acknowledgement is given to IMO News.

Please allow at least ten weeks from receipt at IMO for additions to, deletions from or changes in the mailing list. Design by FLIPSIDE www.flipsidegroup.com Copyright © IMO 2019 Printed by CPI Colour

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2019 A message from IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim

OPINION IMO AT WORK

A digital and diverse future T

he fundamental nature of work is changing. So, this is the perfect time to re-examine and re-assess traditional roles and expectations in the workforce – and that means embracing diversity, and equality. IMO’s World Maritime theme for this year is “Empowering Women in the Maritime Community”. Several factors underlie this; not only the objective to promote gender equality for its own sake, but also the practical reality that shipping must draw talent from every corner of the globe and every sector of the population to secure its own sustainability. IMO has been running a highly successful campaign to promote women in the maritime community for more than 30 years. With IMO’s help, seven regional Women in Maritime Associations have been established, covering more than 150 countries and dependent territories. IMO provides gender-specific fellowships and scholarships, both at our own maritime education establishments – the International Maritime Law Institute and the World Maritime University – and at others, too. And, last year, as you know, WISTA International was awarded consultative status with IMO. This year, to help celebrate the World Maritime theme, we have undertaken a range of initiatives and events, such as panel discussions and a social media campaign; and we have launched a new film on our YouTube channel. Gender equality is one of the Sustainable Development Goals – SDG 5 – and, although we are highlighting it this year, I want to stress that this is part of a continuing, long-term effort in support of this objective.

Of the other goals, SDG 14, dealing with the oceans, is central to IMO and its work. But aspects of our work can be linked to all the individual SDGs. Most of the elements of the 2030 Agenda will only be realized with a sustainable transport sector – including shipping and ports – supporting world trade and facilitating the global economy. Many are predicting the widespread and imminent “digital disruption” of the shipping world. Artificial intelligence, “big data”, automation and the “internet of things” are set to have a profound impact on shipping – not just in terms of navigation but across the full spectrum of ship operation and the logistics chain. As you would expect, at IMO, we are actively preparing for this. This is without doubt an exciting time to be in shipping, and transport in general. The only real certainties are that the next 10 or 20 years will see as much change in shipping as we have experienced in the past 100 years; and that whatever form the ships of the future eventually take, they will have to be ever safer and more environment-friendly. The need for new technologies to be applied and embedded within a strong safety culture remains as important as ever. A key role for IMO is to balance the benefits of new and advancing technologies against safety and security concerns, and their impact on the environment and on personnel, both on board and ashore. Thanks to new technologies, driven by digitalization, people are working differently today. And a modern workplace demands modern employment practices. For sustainability and success in the modern world, shipping needs diversity in the workforce and women helping to drive the decision-making processes. Women in the maritime world today are strong, powerful and constantly challenging old-fashioned perceptions. Experience tells us that diversity is better; it’s better for teamwork, better for leadership – and better for commercial performance. The maritime world is changing. And for the better. With help from IMO and many other organizations, exciting and rewarding career opportunities are opening up for women. And a new generation of strong and talented women are responding. They are proving that in today’s world the maritime industries are for everyone. It’s not about your gender, it’s about what you can do.

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FOR WATERBORNE TRANSPORT

NAVIGATION MORE ACCURATE AND SAFER Satellite-based systems have fundamentally changed maritime navigation. Vessels ranging from small sailing boats to super tankers have systems on board that rely on satellites for positioning.

How does EGNOS work?

Navigation in harbour approaches and entrances:

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, uses geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to increase the accuracy of existing satellite positioning signals while providing integrity information. The satellites relay these signals back to users on the ground, providing greater positioning accuracy than would be achieved through GPS alone.

EGNOS contributes to a safer navigation in the European Coastal Waters by providing differential corrections to increase the accuracy (<3m - 95%) as provided by the EGNOS Open Service. EGNOS also provides integrity information about the status of the system, the status of the satellites and the ionospheric errors, which are used by the receiver to manage alarms.

For more information please visit the EGNOS User Support Website: egnos-user-support.essp-sas.eu. You can also ask any questions to the EGNOS Helpdesk, which is available 24/7 by email (egnos-helpdesk@essp-sas.eu) or phone (+34 911 236 555).

Improved accuracy in maritime environments can facilitate the development of tools that promote sustainable fishery and can also serve as the basis for systems designed to protect vulnerable maritime areas such as marine parks.

Environmental Protections

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

NEWS

IMLI – 30 years of training in maritime law I

MO has marked 30 years of the IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) with a special event, attended by Malta’s Prime Minister, Joseph Muscat, who spoke of his country’s continuing commitment to hosting such an important global institution. IMLI’s overall mission is to help build the legal capacity among IMO Member States, particularly developing States, to fulfil their obligations under IMO treaties. It provides training in all aspects of international maritime law, as well as in legislative drafting techniques. Its academic programmes include a Master of Laws in International Maritime Law, a Master of Humanities in International Maritime Legislation, a Master of Philosophy in International Maritime Law and Ocean Policy, and a cooperative Master of Laws in International Maritime Law and Immigration Law with Queen Mary University of London. Since the academic year 2018-2019 was www.imo.org

completed, more than 1000 students from 146 States and territories have pursued studies at IMLI. IMLI is firmly committed to gender equality and to empowering females to become part of the maritime industries. One notable claim to fame is that IMLI has an official policy of reserving 50 per cent of its student places for female candidates. In recent years, the female student population has actually outnumbered the male students. Speaking at the celebratory ceremony, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim expressed his sincere gratitude to the Government of Malta, the many donors and other institutions, both public and private, without whose support IMLI’s success would not have been possible. At the end of the ceremony, IMLI Director Professor David Attard, received a letter of appreciation and commemorative award, to mark his many years of outstanding service.

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IMO NEWS

NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

2018 International Maritime Prize to long-serving American T

he prestigious International Maritime Prize for 2018 is to be awarded to Mr. Joseph J. Angelo, a former United States Coast Guard (USCG) and International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO) senior executive who participated in International Maritime Organization (IMO) meetings for many years, providing leadership on a number of key regulatory developments.

Mr. Joseph J. Angelo

Mr. Angelo was active in a number of IMO bodies, most notably the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) and the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC). He first attended the MEPC’s 13th session in 1980 and attended every session since, up to and including MEPC 73 in 2018.

The IMO Council, meeting for its 122nd session in London (15-19 July) decided to award the Prize to Mr. Angelo, in recognition of his invaluable contribution to the work and objectives of IMO and to the international maritime community as a whole.

The International Maritime Prize is awarded annually by IMO to the individual or organization judged to have made the most significant contribution to the work and objectives of the Organization. It consists of a sculpture in the form of a dolphin and includes a financial award, upon submission of an academic paper written on a subject relevant to IMO.

In their nominations, the Government of the United States and INTERTANKO highlighted Mr. Angelo’s constructive and collaborative work with all stakeholders to achieve outcomes.

The Prize will be presented to Mr. Angelo during the annual IMO Awards ceremony, which this year will be held on 25 November 2019, on the evening of the first day of the IMO Assembly’s 31st session.

IMO showcasing tangible progress at global Climate Action summit T

he UN Climate Action Summit in New York (23 September) gave global leaders the chance to show the world concrete proposals and tangible actions being taken in the fight against climate change. IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim reported on the solid progress being made by the Organization to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping, in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular SDG 13 on Climate change. Mr Lim delivered a keynote address at the opening of the World Economic Forum event on decarbonizing shipping. He then delivered a presentation at the launch of the Sustainable Ocean Principles, under the banner of the UN Global Compact. The Global Compact provides a tangible and practical way for the corporate world to embrace values that go beyond simply generating profits for their shareholders. Finally, he delivered a keynote address at the side-event organized by the Government of Belgium entitled “Actions speak louder than words”. He also took the opportunity for bilateral meetings with several key figures in the fight against climate change, including Ms Inger Andersen, who was appointed Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme in February this year. Mr Lim also met senior officials of the World Bank to discuss areas of

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common interest and to explore possible future collaboration to support the decarbonization of international shipping and its associated infrastructure, as well as marine plastic litter and waste management. Throughout the event, Mr Lim highlighted IMO’s initial greenhouse gas strategy, adopted in 2018. This envisages a total annual GHG emissions reduction of at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, and eventually phasing them out as soon as possible in this century. This means that individual ships currently at sea would have to reduce their emissions by more than 80%. The IMO initial GHG strategy has sent a clear signal to the shipping industry of the way forward and there are already strong signs that it is being embraced by both industry and financial institutions. Battery powered and hybrid ferries, ships trialling biofuels or hydrogen fuel cells, wind-assisted propulsion and several other ideas are now being actively explored. Alongside this, Mr Lim spoke of several major, global projects being led by IMO. These bring Member States and the industry together to promote implementation of all the various IMO measures related to GHG reduction. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

NEWS

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IMO NEWS

NEWS

IMO bravery accolade goes to American rescuer P

etty Officer Michael Kelly, a rescue swimmer with the United States Coast Guard, will receive the 2019 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea, for his courage, perseverance and skill in rescuing four survivors from a life raft, in extremely high winds and heavy seas. A panel of judges decided that the rescue merited the highest award. The decision was endorsed by the IMO Council at its 122nd session in London (15-19 July). Petty Officer Michael W. Kelly, Aviation Survival Technician Second Class, Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod, United States Coast Guard, was nominated by the United States of America for his part in the rescue operation which took place on 14 November 2018. The 2019 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea will be presented during the IMO Awards ceremony, to be held on 25 November 2019 at the IMO Headquarters in London. Of a total of 34 qualifying nominations, received from 16 Member States and four NGOs in consultative status with IMO, a further four will receive Certificates of Commendation and eight will receive Letters of Commendation. The IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea was established by IMO to provide international recognition for those who, at the risk of losing their own life, perform acts of exceptional bravery in attempting to save life at sea or in attempting to prevent or mitigate damage to the marine environment. Such acts of bravery may also involve extraordinary seamanship skills in very difficult conditions or any other display of outstanding courage. Nominations are scrutinized by an assessment panel made up of members of NGOs in consultative status with IMO, under the chair of the Secretary-General. Subsequently, a panel of judges (made up of the Chairs of several IMO bodies) considers the recommendations of the assessment panel and selects the recipient.

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AUTUMN 2019

UN SecretaryGeneral highlights shipping progress at Climate Summit I

n a cautious yet upbeat message at the close of the Climate Action Summit in New York (23 September), UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres praised the progress made by shipping in the race against the climate crisis, describing it as a “huge step up”. He referred to efforts being made by key players in the maritime industry to chart a course for carbon neutrality by 2050 in order to implement IMO’s initial greenhouse gas reduction strategy. The strategy, adopted in 2018, is driving activities to reduce emissions throughout the sector. The initial IMO strategy envisages a reduction of CO2 emissions per unit of transport work, the so-called carbon intensity, as an average across international shipping, of at least 40% by 2030 – at the same time, pursuing efforts towards a 70% reduction by 2050, compared to 2008. It also envisages a reduction of total annual GHG emissions of at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, aiming to phase them out as soon as possible. These levels of ambition, meaning actually more than 80% reduction of GHG missions per ship for ships currently at sea, are consistent with the Paris Agreement temperature goals. The IMO initial strategy is expected to drive a new propulsion revolution for ships and has sent a clear signal to innovators and financiers that this is the way forward. There are already strong signs emerging that sectors of the industry are really embracing this. Battery powered and hybrid ferries, ships trialing biofuels or hydrogen fuel cells, wind-assisted propulsion and several other ideas are now being actively explored. www.imo.org


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IMO NEWS

HTW

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON HUMAN ELEMENT, TRAINING AND WATCHKEEPING

6th session

AUTUMN 2019

29 APRIL – 3 MAY

Draft amendments to STCW Code agreed

T

he Sub-Committee finalized draft amendments to table B-I/2 (List of certificates or documentary evidence required under the STCW Convention) of the STCW Code, for submission to the MSC for approval and adoption.

Education and training are vital in the modern shipping industry

The amendments are intended to provide better guidance to Parties, Administrations, port State control authorities, recognized organizations and other relevant parties by updating the list of all certificates or documentary evidence described in the Convention which authorize the holder to serve in certain capacities, perform certain duties, functions or be assigned certain responsibilities on board ships.

Implementation of the 1978 STCW Convention

T

he Sub-Committee considered matters relating to the list of STCW Parties (“White List”) and its review, based on the continuous compliance by Parties, as required by the Convention. The MSC reviews information submitted by Parties and, since 2005, has issued on a regular basis: • MSC.1/Circ.1163, as amended, on Parties to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended, confirmed by the Maritime Safety Committee to have communicated information which demonstrates that full and complete effect is given to the relevant provisions of the Convention; and • MSC.1/Circ.1164, as amended, on Promulgation of information related to reports of independent evaluation submitted by Parties to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, as amended, confirmed by the Maritime Safety Committee to have communicated information which demonstrates that Parties are giving full and complete effect to the relevant provisions of the Convention. STCW regulation I/7.3.2 requires the Maritime Safety Committee to “review the list of Parties which communicated information that demonstrated that they give full and complete effect to the relevant provisions of the Convention, to retain in this list only the Parties so concerned”. The Sub-Committee was provided with a list containing only those Parties which had communicated the relevant information, representing a significantly smaller number of Parties than those on the current “White List” set out in MSC.1/Circ.1163. Following discussion, the Sub-Committee noted that the responsibility for the communication of information lies with STCW Parties and that time frames for the compliance with the “communication of information” provisions were provided in part A of the STCW Code, as amended. It also noted the availability of procedures and guidance relating to the “communication of information” set out in various circulars (MSC.1/Circ.1448 and MSC.1/ Circ.1449 ). The Sub-Committee encouraged Parties to the 1978 STCW Convention, as amended, to properly discharge the obligations emanating from STCW regulation I/8 and sections A-I/7 and A-I/8 of the STCW Code.

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Developing a new joint ILO/IMO medical guide for ships

T

he Sub-Committee agreed to develop a new joint ILO/IMO medical guide for ships. The main objective would be to produce a practical up-to-date ships medical guide to assist those required to give medical assistance who are primarily not medics. Subject to approval by the corresponding bodies of ILO and IMO, it was agreed that the new medical guide should be referenced as one of the carriage requirement options in the 1978 STCW Convention, as amended, the STCW F Convention and MLC, 2006. The Sub-Committee also agreed to establish a joint ILO/IMO Working Group to develop guidelines on the medical examination of fishing vessels’ personnel. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

•

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

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IMO NEWS

HTW

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON HUMAN ELEMENT, TRAINING AND WATCHKEEPING

6th session

AUTUMN 2019

29 APRIL – 3 MAY

Comprehensive review of fishing vessel personnel training treaty

T

he Sub-Committee continued its ongoing comprehensive review of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F), 1995, which entered into force in 2012. The Convention is a key pillar among the international instruments on fishing vessel safety. Progress was made with the review of all chapters and the preparation of an associated new STCW-F Code. A work plan agreed by the Sub-Committee envisages finalising the revised Convention and new STCW-F Code in the second half of 2021; consideration and approval by the MSC in mid-2022 and adoption of the revised STCW-F Convention and Code in late 2022.

New IMO model courses on IGF Code training validated Two new model courses were validated by the Sub-Committee: • Advanced training for masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on ships subject to the International Code of Safety for Ship Using Gases or Other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code); and • Basic training for masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on ships subject to the IGF Code. Following discussions on the process to develop, revise and validate model courses, the Sub-Committee agreed on the systematic use of the Model Course Trust Fund to hire experts for the development and revision of model courses under its purview, subject to the Secretariat’s contracting process. The Sub-Committee also discussed the possible conversion of IMO model courses to e-learning versions and agreed to advise the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), as the parent body, that this would need further careful consideration. Converting to e-learning would change the current approach and goals of IMO model courses. However, the Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III) could be invited to consider how e-learning material could assist with the implementation of instruments other than the STCW Convention. IMO model courses are valuable tools that assist Member States and other stakeholders to develop detailed training programmes, to effectively implement the provisions of IMO instruments.

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Use of seafarers’ electronic certificates and documents

T

he Sub-Committee established a correspondence group to consider how to address the use of electronic certificates and documents for seafarers. The group will consider a number of issues which need to be addressed, including verification of authenticity; security assurance; data form; physical location (storage); privacy; and any other matters which may arise during the course of the work. The correspondence group has also been asked to identify provisions of the STCW Convention and parts A and B of the STCW Code that might need to be amended in order to allow and facilitate the use of electronic seafarers’ certificates and documents; and prepare draft amendments, as necessary. The group will report to HTW 7.

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IMO NEWS

•

www.imo.org

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

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MEPC

IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE

74th session

AUTUMN 2019

13-17 MAY 2019

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from ships T

he MEPC pushed forward with a number of measures aimed at supporting the achievement of the objectives set out in the initial IMO strategy on reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from ships, in line with the Paris Agreement under UNFCCC and the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The MEPC approved amendments to strengthen existing mandatory requirements for new ships to be more energy efficient; initiated the fourth IMO GHG Study; adopted a resolution encouraging cooperation with ports to reduce emission from shipping; approved a procedure for the impact assessment of new measures proposed; agreed to establish a multi-donor trust fund for GHG; and agreed terms of reference for the sixth and seventh intersessional working groups to be held in November 2019 and in March 2020 respectively in order to expedite the work. Also discussed were possible candidate short-, mid- and longterm measures aiming at reducing GHG emissions from ships, to be further considered at next sessions. The MEPC approved, for adoption at the next session in April 2020, amendments to MARPOL Annex VI to significantly strengthen the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) “phase 3” requirements.

IMO’s work to reduce GHG emissions is moving ahead on several fronts

Implementation of the sulphur 2020 limit

T

he MEPC approved and adopted a comprehensive set of guidance and guidelines to support the consistent implementation of the lower 0.50% limit on sulphur in ships’ fuel oil, which will enter into effect from 1 January 2020. Related draft MARPOL amendments were also approved. These comprehensive guidelines include a template for a “Fuel Oil NonAvailability Report (FONAR)” and a “Technical review of identified possible potential safety implications associated with the use of 2020 compliant fuels”.

The reduced sulphur content of ships’ fuel from 2020 will have significant health benefits, especially in port areas

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

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IMO NEWS

MEPC

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE

74th session

AUTUMN 2019

13-17 MAY 2019

Marine plastic litter action plan F

ollowing up on the IMO action plan to address marine plastic litter from ships adopted at the last session, a working group met during the session to discuss how to move forward. Among other outcomes, the MEPC: • Approved the terms of reference for an IMO Study on marine plastic litter from ships, to focus on information on the contribution of all ships to marine plastic litter; and information of storage, delivery and reception of plastic waste from and collected by ships.

• Noted that the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) had established a Working Group on sea-based sources of marine litter (GESAMP WG 43), which would, inter alia, review and provide an analysis of the existing body of knowledge on marine plastic litter from all sea based sources, and an assessment of data gaps. • Invited GESAMP to provide a report to MEPC 75 on the work of GESAMP WG 43, together with a presentation. • Developed a regulatory framework matrix to identify all international regulatory instruments and best practices associated with the issue of marine plastic litter from ships. • Approved the scope of work for the Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR) in relation to actions of the action plan to address marine plastic litter from ships (resolution MEPC.310(74)) that had been categorized as short-term, including facilitating and enhancing reporting of the accidental loss or discharge of fishing gear. • Invited the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to

o make information on fishing gear marking and logging schemes available to MEPC and/or to the GESAMP Working Group 43, as appropriate;

o collaborate with IMO and provide advice on the voluntary or mandatory application of marking of fishing gear, including costs associated with the implementation of a mandatory requirement and the most appropriate FAO or IMO instrument for potentially introducing such a requirement; and

o submit to future sessions of MEPC or the PPR Sub-Committee relevant information on existing reporting mechanisms of accidentally lost or discharged fishing gear, including the challenges and benefits of such systems, as well as information that could help clarify details on losses that should be reported.

• Invited proposals to the PPR Sub-Committee from interested Member States and international organizations on reporting mechanisms for accidentally lost or discharged fishing gear, including the challenges and benefits of such systems and existing and potential ways to encourage fishing vessels to report. • Concurred that the preferred way for progressing mandatory reporting of containers lost at sea and ways of communicating their location, would be for interested Member States and international organizations to submit proposals for a new output to the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). The MEPC requested the SubCommittees on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers (CCC) and on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR) to note the importance of the issue of lost containers at sea for addressing marine plastic litter from ships, as their expertise could be sought in future. A correspondence group was established, to finalize a draft strategy to address marine plastic litter from ships, based on discussions during MEPC 74, and report to MEPC 75.

Amendments to Technical cooperation and mandatory codes capacity building activities IBC Code amendments

I

n order to implement IMO’s environment-related instruments, technical cooperation and capacity building activities have played a very important role at IMO.

The MEPC agreed to establish a voluntary multidonor trust fund (“GHG TC-Trust Fund”), to provide a dedicated source of financial support for technical cooperation and capacity-building activities to support the implementation of the initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships.

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The MEPC adopted a comprehensive set of amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code), including the revised chapters 17 (Summary of minimum requirements), 18 (List of products to which the code does not apply), 19 (Index of Products Carried in Bulk) and 21 (Criteria for assigning carriage requirements for products subject to the IBC Code). Consequential amendments to the Code for the construction and equipment of ships carrying dangerous chemicals in bulk (BCH Code) were also adopted. The expected entry into force date is 1 January 2021. NOX Technical Code 2008 amendments

The amendments relate to the use of electronic record books, and certification requirements for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. The MEPC also adopted a related MEPC resolution on amendments to the 2017 Guidelines addressing additional aspects of the NOX Technical Code 2008 with regard to particular requirements related to marine diesel engines fitted with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. The expected entry into force date is 1 October 2020.

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

•

www.imo.org

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

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IMO NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

•

AUTUMN 2019

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AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE

Ballast water management treaty implementation T

he International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWM Convention), entered into force in September 2017. Amendments to the treaty, relating to implementation timelines, enter into force on 13 October 2019. The main focus for the convention now is on its effective and uniform implementation, and on an experience-building phase, with a focus on gathering data on application of the BWM treaty. The MEPC approved BWM.2/Circ.67/Rev.1 on the revised data gathering and analysis plan for the experience-building phase associated with the BWM Convention, to incorporate a link to standard operating procedures. The MEPC approved amendments to the BWM Convention concerning commissioning testing of ballast water management systems and the form of the International Ballast Water Management Certificate. The amendments will be circulated with a view to adoption at MEPC 75. The Committee endorsed the view that commissioning testing should begin as soon as possible, in accordance with the already approved guidance for the commissioning testing of ballast water management systems (BWM.2/Circ.70) MEPC 74 approved five ballast water management systems that make use of active substances.

74th session

13-17 MAY 2019

Adoption of amendments T

he following MARPOL amendments were adopted.

MARPOL amendments – use of electronic record books

MARPOL amendments to allow for electronic record books to be used were adopted, for Annex I - Oil Record Book Part I – Machinery space operations and Oil Record Book Part II – Cargo/ballast operations; Annex II - Cargo Record Book; and Annex V - Garbage Record Book; and Annex VI for records relating to Regulation 12 – Ozone-depleting substances, Regulation 13 – Nitrogen oxides (NOX) and Regulation 14 – Sulphur oxides (SOX) and particulate matter. The expected entry into force date is 1 October 2020. The MEPC also adopted related guidelines for the use of electronic record books under MARPOL. MARPOL amendments – Cargo residues and tank washings of persistent floating noxious liquid substances MEPC adopted amendments to MARPOL Annex II to strengthen, in specified sea areas, discharge requirements for cargo residues and tank washings containing persistent floating products with a high-viscosity and/or a high melting point that can solidify under certain conditions (e.g. certain vegetable oils and paraffin-like cargoes), following concerns about the environmental impact of permissible discharges.

The amendments add new paragraphs to MARPOL Annex II Regulation 13 – control of discharges of residues of noxious liquid substances, to require prewash and discharge of residue/water mixture generated during the prewash to a reception facility, for specific products, in specified areas (North West European waters, Baltic Sea area, Western European waters and Norwegian Sea). The expected entry into force date is 1 January 2021. MARPOL amendments – EEDI regulations for ice-strengthened ships

Other amendments to MARPOL Annex VI were adopted, relating to the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) regulations for ice-strengthened ships, replacing the words “cargo ships having ice-breaking capability” with “category A ships as defined in the Polar Code”. The expected entry into force date is 1 October 2020. www.imo.org

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MEPC

IMO NEWS


IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS •

101st session

5-14 JUNE 2019

Interim guidelines for Maritime Autonomous Surface Ship trials approved T

he Committee approved Interim guidelines for Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS) trials.

Among other things, the guidelines say that trials should be conducted in a manner that provides at least the same degree of safety, security and protection of the environment as provided by the relevant instruments. Risks associated with the trials should be appropriately identified and measures to reduce the risks, to as low as reasonably practicable and acceptable, should be put in place. Onboard or remote operators of MASS should be appropriately qualified for operating MASS subject to the trial. Any personnel involved in MASS trials, whether remote or onboard, should be appropriately qualified and experienced to safely conduct MASS trials. Appropriate steps should be taken to ensure sufficient cyber risk management of the systems and infrastructure used when conducting MASS trials. The MSC made progress with the scoping exercise to look at how the safe, secure and environmentally sound operation of MASS may be introduced in IMO instruments. A working group met during the session and terms of reference were agreed for an intersessional working group to be held in

September 2019 to continue the work. The first step is underway – identifying, in the relevant treaties, provisions which: apply to MASS and prevent MASS operations; or apply to MASS and do not prevent MASS operations and require no actions; or apply to MASS and do not prevent MASS operations but may need to be amended or clarified, and/or may contain gaps; or have no application to MASS operations. Once the first step is completed, a second step will be conducted to analyse and determine the most appropriate way of addressing MASS operations, taking into account, among other things, human element, technology and operational factors. The analysis will identify the need for: equivalences as provided for by the instruments or developing interpretations; and/or amending existing instruments; and/or developing new instruments; or none of the above as a result of the analysis. The intersessional working group has been tasked with considering the results of the first step; considering how the outcome of the second step should be reported to MSC 102; based on a high-level discussion on the gaps, themes and/or relevant findings identified during the first step, providing guidance to Member States for use in the second step; and providing a report to MSC 102 (May 2020).

Goal-based standards – revised generic guidelines approved T

he MSC approved revised generic guidelines for developing IMO goal-based standards (MSC.1/ Circ.1394/Rev.2), taking into account experience gained by the Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE) in applying the generic guidelines to develop draft goals and functional requirements in relation to onboard lifting appliances and anchor handling winches. IMO has increasingly been applying a goal-based approach to the development of new requirements.

www.imo.org

In 2010, IMO adopted the goal-based ship construction standards for bulkers and oil tankers (GBS). These so-called “rules for rules” require that rules for the design and construction of bulk carriers and oil tankers of a recognized organization or administration need to meet the IMO GBS. As of mid-2019, a total 13 recognized organizations have undergone successful initial verification of compliance with the IMO GBS, by IMO GBS audit teams.

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MSC

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE


IMO NEWS

MSC

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE

101st session

AUTUMN 2019

5-14 JUNE 2019

Domestic ferry safety put on the agenda T

aking into consideration the ongoing occurrence of passenger ferry incidents with often high numbers of casualties, the MSC agreed to include a new item on measures to improve domestic ferry safety on its agenda for the next session (with an estimated four sessions needed to complete the work). This work will focus on developing model regulations on domestic ferry safety; providing guidance on the incorporation of model regulations on domestic ferry safety in domestic law; developing online training material on domestic ferry safety; and continuing to provide technical assistance to countries in need through the IMO’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP).

Safety of ships in polar waters T

he MSC approved guidance for navigation and communication equipment intended for use on ships operating in polar waters. The guidance includes recommendations on temperature and mechanical shock testing, and on how to address ice accretion and battery performance in cold temperatures. This is expected to be an important tool in support of the implementation of the mandatory Polar Code. IMO’s Polar Code helps ensure that ships operating in the harsh Arctic and Antarctic areas take into account extremes of temperature and that critical equipment remains operational under those conditions. The MSC also approved Interim guidelines on life-saving appliances and arrangements for ships operating in polar waters. The Committee approved a draft Assembly resolution urging Member States to implement, on a voluntary basis, safety measures of the Polar Code on ships not certified under the SOLAS Convention. The draft resolution will be submitted to the IMO Assembly in late 2019 for adoption. The Polar Code is mandatory for certain ships under the SOLAS and MARPOL Conventions. While SOLAS Chapter V (Safety of navigation) applies to all ships on all voyages (with some specific exceptions), the other chapters of the convention do not apply to some categories of ships, including cargo ships of less than 500 gross tonnage; pleasure yachts not engaged in trade; and fishing vessels (sometimes termed “non-SOLAS ships”). The Sub-Committee on Navigation, Communication and Search and Rescue (NCSR) was instructed to consider the consequences and feasibility of applying chapters 9 (Safety of Navigation) and 11 (Voyage planning) of the Polar Code to non-SOLAS ships; and to consider how best to enhance the safety of non-SOLAS ships operating in polar waters, including possible development of amendments to SOLAS and/or the Polar Code.

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Piracy and armed robbery against ships I

n 2018, 223 incidents occurred worldwide as compared to 204 incidents reported in 2017, an increase of about 9% at the global level. So far in 2019, incidents in West and Central African waters have accounted for about half of all reported incidents. The MSC reminded companies, masters and seafarers to continue the diligent application of existing IMO guidance and the revised Best Management Practices (BMP) guidance as well as the new Global Counter Piracy guidance and the updated guidance for protection against piracy and armed robbery in the Gulf of Guinea region contained in MSC.1/Circ.1601 on revised industry counter piracy guidance. The MSC also invited Member States to continue to provide naval assets; and flag States to continue to monitor the threat to ships flying their flag and set appropriate security levels in accordance with the ISPS Code. Activities to support capacity building in the Gulf of Guinea were noted. It was also noted that the IMO Secretariat is an active participant in the international Friends of the Gulf of Guinea (FoGG) group under the G7++ framework. This group is open to all interested Member States, NGOs and IGOs.

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

E-navigation – voyage to the future continues T

he MSC approved a number of circulars related to the development of e-navigation. E-navigation is defined as “the harmonized collection, integration, exchange, presentation and analysis of marine information on board and ashore by electronic means to enhance berth to berth navigation and related services for safety and security at sea and protection of the marine environment”. An updated IMO e-navigation Strategy Implementation Plan (SIP) was approved by MSC 99 in May 2018 (MSC.1/Circ.1595). The MSC approved/adopted: • MSC circular on guidelines for the standardization of user interface design for navigation equipment. The aim is to promote improved standardization of the user interface and information used by seafarers to monitor, manage and perform navigational tasks which will enhance situational awareness and improve safety of navigation. The guidelines, including icons, apply to Integrated Navigation Systems (INS), Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS) and radar equipment, and they may be applied to other electronic navigation equipment where applicable, improving standardization and usability. • Amendments to the performance standards for the presentation of navigation-related information on shipborne navigational displays (resolution MSC.191(79)). The implementation date of the revised standard for shipborne navigational displays on the bridge of a ship for radar equipment, ECDIS and INS should be 1 January 2024; and for all other navigational displays on the bridge of a ship 1 July 2025. • SN.1/Circ.243/Rev.2 to update the guidelines for the presentation of navigational-related symbols, terms and abbreviations, which provide guidance on the appropriate use of navigation-related symbols to achieve a harmonized and consistent presentation. • MSC resolution on guidance on the definition and harmonization of the format and structure of maritime services in the context of e navigation. The purpose of the guidance is to ensure that maritime-related information and data exchanged as part of different maritime services are implemented internationally in a harmonized, standardized and unified format. All maritime services should be conformant with the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) S-100 framework standard, which specifies the method for data modelling and developing product specifications. • MSC circular on initial descriptions of maritime services in the context of e-navigation. The circular includes what is intended to be the first draft of maritime service descriptions and is an initial contribution for the harmonization of their format and structure. The initial descriptions of maritime services include vessel traffic service information, navigational assistance, traffic organization, maritime safety information, pilotage, tugs, vessel shore reporting, telemedical assistance, local port information, nautical charts and publications, ice navigation, meteorological, hydrographic and environmental information and search and rescue. These are expected to be periodically updated, taking into account developments and related work on harmonization being conducted in collaboration with other international organizations, such as the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA), the International Maritime Pilots Association (IMPA) and the International Harbour Masters Association (IHMA).

www.imo.org

101st session

5-14 JUNE 2019

Oil fuel and ship safety F

ollowing discussion on ship safety issues relating to the implementation of the 0.50% limit of the sulphur content of fuel oil (outside emission control areas) and on enhancing the safety of ships relating to the use of fuel oil, the MSC adopted a resolution providing recommended interim measures to enhance the safety of ships relating to the use of oil fuel. The resolution highlights existing SOLAS regulations and recognizes the need to further consider oil fuel safety issues. It recommends that SOLAS contracting governments: • inform the Organization, for transmission to Parties and Member States of the Organization, of all confirmed cases where oil fuel suppliers delivered oil fuel failing to meet the requirements specified in SOLAS regulation II-2/4.2.1, taking into account regulation 18.9.6 of MARPOL Annex VI; • take action as appropriate against oil fuel suppliers in confirmed cases of deliveries of oil fuel that does not comply with the requirements specified in SOLAS regulation II-2/4.2.1, taking into account regulation 18.9.4 of MARPOL Annex VI; • encourage the widest possible application of the latest edition of relevant industry standards and guidance to enhance the safety of ships related to supply and use of oil fuel; inform the Organization, for transmission to Parties and Member States of the Organization, of confirmed cases where oil fuel suppliers had delivered fuel that jeopardized the safety of ships or personnel; or adversely affected the performance of the machinery. The MSC also endorsed an action plan to further consider measures relating to the flashpoint of oil fuel, with a view to finalizing such measures by MSC 104 (2021). The MSC established a correspondence group on Oil Fuel Safety. The 0.50% limit (reduced from 3.50% currently) on the sulphur content of ships’ fuel oil, in force from 1 January 2020 under IMO’s MARPOL treaty, will greatly benefit the environment and human health. The MSC concurrently approved an MSC-MEPC circular (already approved by MEPC 74) on delivery of compliant fuel oil by suppliers.

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MSC

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE


FEATURE

IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

Turning the Tide – promoting gender diversity in the maritime sector A

new film from the International Maritime Organization (IMO) shows how IMO’s women in Maritime programme is helping to support gender diversity in the maritime sector

participation of women in both shore-based and sea-going posts, under the slogan: Training-Visibility-Recognition, through a wide range of gender-specific activities.

The maritime world is changing – and for the better. With help from the International Maritime Organization (IMO), exciting and rewarding career opportunities are opening up for women and a new generation of strong and talented women are responding.

IMO Member States are encouraged to open the doors of their maritime institutes to enable women to train alongside men and acquire the high-level of competence that the maritime industry demands. Today, female graduates from IMO’s training institutes, the World Maritime University (WMU) and the IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) hold positions of responsibility across the maritime world.

They are proving that, in today’s world, the maritime industries are for everyone. It’s not about your gender, it’s about what you can do. “We see more women involved in different departments within the maritime industry, we don’t see them in the conventional roles anymore, where cooks and clerks, we see them in engineering, we see them going to sea, you see them in the radio rooms and communications, and intelligence, so it’s definitely improved,” says Lieutenant Alma Pinelo, an officer in the Belize Coast Guard. Lieutenant Pinelo is one of hundreds of women who have benefitted from IMO’s Women in Maritime programme. The programme, initiated in 1988, supports the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 5 – achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. The programme supports the

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WMU counts more than 1,000 female graduates to date, while IMLI was the first UN body to include a requirement that 50% of its places be reserved for women. “I applied to the World Maritime University, I got the fellowship and since graduating from the World Maritime University my career has really skyrocketed,” says Deniece Aiken, Lawyer, General Counsel, Jamaica. As well as training opportunities, IMO has facilitated the establishment of seven regional associations for women in the maritime sector across Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America,

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

FEATURE

Women in a wide variety of practical maritime roles feature in IMO’s new film “Turning the Tide”

the Middle East and the Pacific Islands, some 152 countries and dependent territories and nearly 500 participants. These associations support women by providing mentoring and networking opportunities, and many are working to promote maritime careers to younger people. “Now, there are students in high school that are finding out about the maritime industry now and that’s all because of the Women in Maritime Association, Caribbean (WiMAC) and the IMO,” says Rikki Lambey, Port State Control Officer, Belize. Studies show that diversity matters. It’s better for teamwork, better for leadership – and better for profits. Apart from the social imperative to promote diversity in the 21st century, supply and demand in the labour force dictate that the industry simply cannot afford to ignore women – a huge potential workforce. “We need to be more sustainable; we cannot continue leaving aside 50% percent of the population,” acknowledges Juan Carlos

www.imo.org

Croston, President, Caribbean Shipping Association. There are still barriers to overcome and IMO’s Women in Maritime programme is helping to address those challenges and work towards diversity and sustainability. “In my opinion, there’s never been a better time to close the gender gap, and I would encourage all to get on board with gender equality,” says Helen Buni, focal point for IMO’s Women in Maritime Programme. Today, young women and girls have strong role models in the maritime sector. “It’s a good job. It’s a creative job,” says Elizabeth Marami, Maritime Pilot, Kenya. “And everything is possible. That’s all I can say. So, go out to sea!” Watch the film on IMO’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube. com/user/IMOHQ.

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IMO NEWS

IMO AT WORK

AUTUMN 2019

NEWS

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme for 2020-2021 approved T

he Committee approved the proposed Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP) for the biennium 2020-2021. The allocation of some US$14.6 million from the IMO Technical Cooperation Fund was approved, to support the programme’s core activities. The planned 2020-2021 programme has a strong emphasis on achieving the targets set in the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The global programmes cover: 1. Technical advisory services – to ensure a flexible funding mechanism for immediate response not only to emergency requests, typically in the case of marine pollution and safety incidents, but also to demands to assist governments with the establishment/ upgrading of maritime administrations and legislation, and effective implementation of global maritime standards; 2. Support to SIDS and LDCs – for their special shipping needs to address the emerging and developmental needs of these Member States with emphasis on the implementation of relevant IMO instruments with a view to fostering the implementation of the Samoa Pathway as the blueprint of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; 3. Women in Maritime programme – to support the empowerment of women as a key resource for the maritime infrastructure of developing countries in line with SDG 5. Gender mainstreaming is enhanced through the IMO network of seven regional associations for women, which, together with their national chapters, offer a springboard for regional training, provide access to specialized training, promoting economic self-reliance and increased employment opportunities for women at the decision-making levels of the port and maritime sectors. This programme also supports gender equality and the empowerment of women through gender-specific fellowships by facilitating access to highlevel technical training for women in the maritime sector in developing countries; 4. Capacity Building and Training – to reinforce national and regional maritime capacities through human resource development, such as provision of fellowships to IMO’s global maritime training institutions and other maritime training institutions worldwide and support for WMU and IMLI; 5. Enhancement of maritime security – to assist and support the efforts of governments and industry towards the enhancement of security in the international maritime transport sector; 6. IMSAS (IMO Member State Audit Scheme) – to continue providing technical assistance to Member States in their endeavour to prepare for the audit through the delivery of regional training courses for auditors, regional and national workshops, as well as for the participation of observer auditors in audits of Member States; and 7. Maritime Development and the Blue Economy – a new global programme aimed at supporting the alignment of IMO’s technical assistance work with the SDGs and providing assistance to Member States to enhance their abilities to reflect and embed the SDGs in their maritime activities with a view to facilitating the implementation of the SDGs at country level. In this regard, the programme provides assistance in the formulation of national maritime transport policies. This programme also aims to assist Member States to comply with all international regulations and standards addressing greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping and improving the energy efficiency of ships. Furthermore, it will provide funding for developing and/or strengthening TC partnership arrangements and finally to ensure the global harmonization and coordination of all port State control inspection regimes. Besides the global programmes, there are a series of regional programmes aimed at the specific needs within Africa; Arab States and the Mediterranean; Asia; Pacific Islands; Western Asia and Eastern Europe; Latin America; and the Caribbean. www.imo.org

69th session

25-27 JUNE 2019

ITCP funding - multi-donor trust funds T

he Committee welcomed and thanked donations to fund technical cooperation activities, including nearly US$10 million to IMO’s multi-donor trust funds in calendar year 2018. During the session, the Committee welcomed with appreciation pledges from Malaysia (US$10,000 for the GHG-TC Trust Fund); Egypt (£50,000 for ITCP, to support environmental protection in African ports); Republic of Korea (US$500,000 for ITCP, in the series of annual contributions since the signing of the Republic of Korea/ IMO MoU in June 2003); United Arab Emirates (US$50,000 for ITCP); and Nigeria (US$50,000 for ITCP activities). The Committee encouraged Member States, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations and industry to continue supporting ITCP activities, through any of the modalities of financial support, thus ensuring the long-term sustainability of the IMO technical cooperation programme.

Maritime transport policy development T

he Committee noted the successful roll-out of training in the development of National Maritime Transport Policies (NMTPs), including a training package developed in collaboration with the World Maritime University and two videos promoting the importance and usefulness of NMTPs for a country’s maritime, social and economic development. The training package, which aims at providing beneficiaries with the required knowledge and skills necessary to prepare, review and adopt maritime transport policies, is available in English, French and Spanish and a number of Member States have already benefited from or have requested delivery of NMTP workshops in those languages. The videos are also available with French and Spanish subtitles.

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TCC

TECHNICAL COOPERATION COMMITTEE


IMO NEWS

TCC

FROM THE MEETINGS

TECHNICAL COOPERATION COMMITTEE

69th session

AUTUMN 2019

25-27 JUNE 2019

Empowering women – three decades of IMO’s Women in Maritime programme

T

he Committee marked three decades of IMO’s Women in Maritime programme, with the launch of an IMO film, which shows how the gender programme is supporting women and girls to progress within the maritime sector. (See P.26 for full story). The programme supports the Sustainable Development Goals, specifically SDG 5. It was recognized that one of the enduring successes of the programme has been the establishment of seven grass-roots associations across the regions, which draw on the UN principle of implementing from the field-level upwards. The Committee urged all maritime stakeholders to support, both financially and in-kind, the objectives and activities undertaken by the regional Women in Maritime Associations (WIMAs) and their national chapters. The programme has particular resonance this year, since the theme for World Maritime Day 2019 is “Empowering Women in the Maritime Community”, while the Day of Seafarer, celebrated on the first day of the committee session, took the theme of getting on board with gender equality, using the hashtag “#IAmOnBoard”. The Committee expressed its appreciation to all donors who provided fellowships to WMU, IMLI, IMSSEA, Institut Portuaire d’Enseignement et de Recherche (IPER) and the Galilee International Management Institute (GIMI). All Member States were requested to support the capacity-building activities of these maritime training institutions, with a view to increasing the number of female graduates. It was noted that, although a great deal of progress had been made, much still needed to be done to plug the gender gap when it came to empowering women through education. The Committee noted the IMO Secretariat’s intention to undertake a study to collect and analyse data on the number of women employed in the maritime sector, a key practical outcome resulting from the 2019 WMD theme. The finalized study, including recommendations, would be submitted to TC 70 (June 2020), for discussion and consideration.

Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development I

MO’s work relates to many of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The new Maritime Development and the Blue Economy global programme is aimed at supporting the alignment of IMO’s technical assistance work with the SDGs. The Committee noted ongoing work to establish the linkages between the SDGs and IMO’s Strategic Plan.

The Committee was informed of IMO’s support to Member States for the achievement of the SDGs through a wide range of regional and global programmes and major projects, including the GEF-UNDPIMO GloFouling Partnerships, the IMO-European Union GMN Project on Capacity-Building for Climate Mitigation in the Maritime Shipping Industry and GEF-UNDP-IMO GloMEEP Project, as well as through other initiatives such as the Country Maritime Profiles. The Committee noted the role played by the IMO Regional Presence Offices with regard to the development of some countries’ United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF), which is the main platform for the collaboration of the UN system at country level. The Committee noted with

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appreciation the conclusions, recommendations and lessons learned drawn from the pilot IMO regional workshop on UNDAF, which was organized by IMO in collaboration with the Chilean Maritime Authority (DIRECTEMAR), and with the support of the United Nations Development Group (UNDG), the United Nations Development Group for Latin America and the Caribbean (UNDG LAC) and the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). This pilot project could be considered as a model for developing regional workshops on UNDAF processes, to be replicated in other regions, aiming at enhancing the effective implementation of the 2030 Agenda. Two regional workshops on UNDAF processes are scheduled to be held in Africa and Asia during 2019. The Committee urged Member States to fully participate in their national UNDAF processes, ensuring that maritime issues were included in the country-wide implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It also encouraged Member States to request the necessary technical assistance in the regional programmes and global programmes to support the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

•

AUTUMN 2019

FROM THE MEETINGS

Welcome to / Bienvenue sur

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IMO NEWS

III

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON IMPLEMENTATION OF IMO INSTRUMENTS

6th session

AUTUMN 2019

1-5 JULY 2019

Draft resolutions to support implementation finalized

T

he Sub-Committee finalized updates to three key instruments which assist in the implementation of IMO instruments. The Survey Guidelines under the Harmonized System of Survey and Certification, 2019; the 2019 Non-exhaustive list of obligations under instruments relevant to the IMO instruments implementation Code (III Code); and the Procedures for port State control, 2019 will be forwarded for adoption by the IMO Assembly at its thirty-first session in November-December 2019.

Revised Model Agreement for authorization of recognized organizations

T

he Sub-Committee, following further review carried out at the request of the Committees, agreed the revised Model Agreement for the authorization of recognized organizations acting on behalf of the Administration, to be issued as a draft MSC-MEPC circular. The draft will be submitted to MEPC 75 and MSC 102 for approval.

Harmonizing port State control (PSC)

T

he Sub-Committee identified potential subject matters that could be addressed by the eighth IMO Workshop for PSC MoU/Agreement Secretaries and Database Managers workshop (PSCWS 8), envisaged to take place in the second half of 2020.

IMO Member State Audit Scheme – guidance on communicating information

R

eporting information has been identified as a key area for improvement in the analysis of the first consolidated audit summary report, which analysed audit findings from mandatory audits conducted during 2016. To help improve reporting, the Sub-Committee finalized a draft Assembly resolution on guidance on communication of information by Member States, for submission to the IMO Assembly for adoption.

The workshop is likely to discuss: in-depth analysis of annual PSC reports; duplication of inspection information in a port of a State that is a member of more than one PSC regime; issues related to GISIS, including the data exchange between PSC regimes and GISIS and facilities to upload deficiencies that have been corrected, and their possible follow-up; possible harmonization of review procedures in case of detention; possible harmonization of ship risk profile, targeting factors for PSC and RO responsibility; possible impact on PSC in follow-up to analyses of the consolidated audit summary reports from the IMO Member State Audit Scheme (IMSAS); and information update on ILO- and MLC, 2006-related matters.

The guidance aims to facilitate compliance by Member States with the communication of information requirements under various IMO instruments and to assist them in fulfilling their reporting obligations more effectively. In particular, the guidance recommends that Member States establish a reporting system by identifying the obligations for communication of information under IMO instruments and assigning related responsibilities among relevant entities participating in the implementation and enforcement of the applicable IMO instruments.

The Sub-Committee reviewed annual reports received from all nine regional PSC regimes and noted that 90,308 inspections were carried out in 2017, with 2,583 detentions reported to have taken place. The overall detention rate was 2.86% in 2017.

The Sub-Committee requested the Committee to include in its agenda a new output on “Development of guidance in relation to IMSAS to assist in the implementation of the III Code.”

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IMO NEWS

III

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON IMPLEMENTATION OF IMO INSTRUMENTS

6th session

AUTUMN 2019

1-5 JULY 2019

Alleged inadequacies of port reception facilities The Sub-Committee considered summary information on 96 reported cases of alleged inadequacies of port reception facilities, as posted in GISIS for the year 2018 (21 more cases than in 2017), received from six flag States, one Associate Member, and one territory of the United Kingdom. The Sub-Committee recalled that the compliance of ships with the discharge requirements of MARPOL depends largely on the availability of adequate port reception facilities, especially within MARPOL Special Areas, and that each Party to MARPOL is required to notify the Organization, for transmission to the port State concerned, of all cases where the facilities are alleged to be inadequate. The first consolidated audit summary report (CASR) under IMSAS showed that the lack of provision of port reception facilities, in particular under MARPOL Annexes I, IV and V, is among the most recurrent of MARPOL related audit findings. In response to this, the Sub-Committee noted that the Secretariat, through the Organization’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme (ITCP), supports the presence of adequate reception facilities in developing countries to prevent the pollution of the marine environment. The Sub-Committee agreed on the importance of reporting alleged inadequacies of reception facilities to the Organization, notably to progress IMO efforts to reduce pollution caused by marine plastic litter from ships, under the IMO action plan to address marine plastic litter from ships, adopted by MEPC. Investigations into reports of alleged inadequacies of port reception facilities will facilitate the identification of themes relating to the delivery and handling of plastic waste.

Review and analysis of maritime casualties

T

he Sub-Committee considered the analysis of 27 reports of investigation into casualties. Three potential safety issues were identified as needing further work, related to: fatal accidents involving elevators; collisions involving fishing vessels; and falls from height. There was also agreement on the need for further consideration of issues related to safe pilotage practice. The Sub-Committee identified a need for more information, not limited to ultra large container ships, on the shortcomings of master-pilot exchange; technical issues related to the performance of rudders, propellers, etc.; and commercial pressure and performance indicators. The Sub-Committee reminded Member States to submit reports of investigation, particularly on very serious casualties, in order to assist a more global analysing process. The taxonomy of the GISIS module on marine casualties and incidents is currently being re-developed. Once this is complete, the Sub-Committee will continue discussions on possible ways to achieve comprehensive reporting and a strategy for increasing the reporting rate of very serious marine casualties and the collection of casualty data to support trend analysis. The Sub-Committee will also consider the need for a robust strategy on the wider collection and use of casualty data.

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Exempting UNSP barges from HSSC

T

he Sub-Committee agreed draft amendments to MARPOL Annexes I, IV and VI concerning the exemption of unmanned non-self-propelled (UNSP) barges from survey and certification requirements, for submission to MEPC 75 for approval. Also agreed was a related draft MEPC.1 circular on guidelines for exemption of unmanned non-self-propelled barges from the survey and certification requirements under the MARPOL Convention, for submission to MEPC 75 for consideration and approval. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS AUTUMN 2019 Maritime Service Publications •

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The List of Ship Stations and Maritime Mobile Service Identity Assignments (List V) is a service publication prepared and issued, once a year, by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), in accordance with provision No. 20.8 of the Radio Regulations (RR). As stipulated in Appendix 16 to the RR, this List shall be provided to all ship stations for which a Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) installation is required by international agreement. This List is published in CD-ROM format and contains the Preface and Reference tables in a booklet form. The CD-ROM contains, in pdf format, information concerning Ship stations, Coast stations and Search and Rescue (SAR) aircraft for which an MMSI has been notified to the Radiocommunication Bureau (BR) as well as other ship stations, predetermined groups of ship stations, Accounting Authority Identification Codes (AAICs) and contact information of notifying administrations. The CD-ROM also contains a database, which enables users to search for and display, particulars and details of ship stations, Accounting Authorities and countries responsible for the notifications.

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Edition of 2017

LIST IV

LIST IV - List of Coast Stations and Special Service Stations The List of Coast Stations and Special Service Stations (List IV) is a service publication prepared and issued, every two years, by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), in accordance with provision No. 20.7 of the Radio Regulations (RR). This List is composed of a booklet (paper) containing the Preface and Reference tables and a CD-ROM (in pdf format) containing information (i.e. call sign, MMSI, geographical coordinates, transmitting and receiving frequencies, etc.) of coast stations that; provide watch-keeping using digital selective calling techniques and public correspondence service; transmit medical advice, navigational and meteorological warnings and urgent information (MSI) by means of narrow-band direct-printing techniques, meteorological bulletins, notices to navigators, radio time signals. It also contains information of port stations, pilot stations, coast Earth stations, VTS stations, AIS base stations, MMSI assigned to AIS Aids to Navigation (AtoN), contact information of rescue coordination centers, SAR agencies and Navarea coordinators.

3. The use of the Publication is limited to one ship station. Access to the Publication via a network or a website is not allowed. 4. This product is provided without warranty of any kind. In particular, ITU does not warrant or make any representations regarding the use, or the results of use, of this product in terms of correctness, reliability or otherwise. Under no circumstances shall ITU be held liable for any direct or indirect damages arising out of the use of, or inability to use, this product.

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