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MARCH 2016 • UK £4.25

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Healthy midweek

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Make our perfect Portuguese custard tarts

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US $10.99 • AUS $11.95 • CAN $11.50

Omagazine.com

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Easter feasting • Mastering miso • A weekend in Malmö • Cook like a local in Florence • Trend alert: overnight coconut oats

Family-friendly restaurants to try today

Fresh new look!

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O MARCH 2016

The world’s best cooking holidays


Here now &

HERE & NOW

Tuna tacos, Jamaican goat curry, a meal for one and the best Easter eggs for 2016…

PHOTOGRAPH: KRIS KIRKHAM, STYLING: JENNY IGGLEDEN. FOOD STYLING: ANNA GLOVER. WORDS: LAURA ROWE, ANNA GLOVER, ALEX CROSSLEY, CHARLY MORGAN, JANINE RATCLIFFE

Compiled by LAURA ROWE

TRENDSPOTTER Each month, the O team tracks down a hot new chef and shares one of their top trends for the year. This month, Paradise by way of Kensal Green’s Cat Ashton explores 2016’s love affair with Mexican food in her recipe for tuna tacos with spring fattoush and tahini yogurt, complete with homemade tortillas.

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HERE & NOW FOOD EDITOR’S SHOPPING BASKET

Janine Ratcliffe’s favourite new products

Male goats have, until recently, been seen as a byproduct of goat’s milk farming and wasted.Cabrito aims to get this untapped resource of low-fat, high-iron and high-protein meat onto our dinner table. Because of its young age, kid meat has a subtle flavour, similar to lamb, and as it’s naturally free-range it’s a good ethical choice for shoppers. As Cabrito founder James Whetlor says, ‘this way the consumer gets more choice and the humble Billy goat gets six months of good life before it becomes someone’s dinner, rather than being considered worthless and chucked in the bin’. Temper this rich and nutritious meat with chilli and spices to make a lighter-style Caribbean curry.

Jamaican goat curry 3 HOURS + MARINATING OVERNIGHT | SERVES 4 | EASY

This is actually called ‘curry goat’ in Jamaica. If you can’t get Jamaican curry powder use a mild Madras powder and add a pinch of ground allspice. diced kid goat meat 400g Jamaican curry powder (try Dunn’s River) 4 tbsp garlic 4 cloves, 2 whole and bashed, and 2 crushed oil for frying onion 1 large, chopped scotch bonnet chilli 1, seeded and finely chopped thyme 3 sprigs, leaves picked tomatoes 4, roughly chopped light chicken stock 600ml waxy potatoes 300g, peeled and cut into chunks rice to serve • The day before, mix the goat meat with 2 tbsp of the curry powder, the whole bashed garlic cloves, a good grinding of black pepper and 1 tsp salt. Cover and leave to marinate overnight. • The next day, heat the oven to 160C/fan 140C/gas 3. Add 2 tbsp oil to a large ovenproof pan with a lid. Add the marinated meat in batches, discarding the whole garlic, and brown all over. Scoop out onto a plate once browned. • Add the crushed garlic, onion and scotch bonnet to the pan and cook for 7-8 minutes until softened. • Return the meat to the pan with the thyme leaves, tomatoes and stock. Put on a lid and transfer to the oven for 2½ hours. • Stir in the potatoes and cook for another 30 minutes. Serve with rice. PER SERVING 302 KCALS | FAT 9.2G SATURATES 1.7G CARBS 22.6G | FIBRE 7.2G PROTEIN 28.7G | SALT 1.9G

»

Cabrito diced kid, £9.99/400g, ocado.com

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In season Make the most of purple sprouting broccoli, spring onions, kiwi, dab, hake, and bananas this month Recipes: LULU GRIMES Photographs: MOWIE KAY

Chinese-style purple sprouting broccoli with tofu p24

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eat-free

Midweek m

WINNER


STYLING: OLIVIA WARDLE. FOOD STYLING: KATY GREENWOOD

COOK

Easy kiwi sorbet p24

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Taste the mixture and add more sugar if it is not sweet enough or more lime (or lemon) if it is too sweet. Pour the mixture into an ice-cream machine and churn it until it is almost frozen then scrape it into a box and freeze until solid. PER SERVING 70 KCALS | FAT 0.3G SATURATES 0G CARBS 15.1G | FIBRE 1.6G | PROTEIN 0.8G | SALT 0G

Dab with vinegar butter 20 MINUTES | SERVES 2 | EASY

If you can’t get hold of dab, any flat fish such as lemon sole will work well in this recipe. dab 2, cleaned with tail and fins removed olive oil butter red chilli 1 small, very finely chopped sherry vinegar 2 tbsp flat-leaf parsley, very finely chopped to make ½ tbsp, plus some leaves to serve wilted spring greens and boiled potatoes to serve

Chinese-style purple sprouting broccoli with tofu 45 MINUTES | SERVES 2 | EASY | VEGAN

firm tofu 200g, cut into slices and dried on kitchen paper oil for frying purple sprouting broccoli 300g, cut into bite-sized pieces ginger grated to make 1 tbsp garlic 1 clove, crushed spring onions 2, finely sliced rice wine 3 tbsp soy sauce 1 tbsp chilli garlic sauce (We used Lee Kum Kee) 2 tbsp veg stock 3 tbsp sesame oil to finish steamed rice to serve • Make sure the tofu is very dry, and season it well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Heat a good glug of oil in a wok and fry the tofu until it's browned all over, tip it onto kitchen paper to drain. Tip most of the oil out of the pan and add the broccoli, stir and fry until the stalks are just tender. Add the ginger, garlic and spring onions and cook for a minute then add the rice wine, soy

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sauce, chilli garlic sauce and stock and bubble everything together, add more stock if you need to. The sauce should be glossy and quite thick when it is ready. Add the tofu and toss together, sprinkle with sesame oil. Serve with steamed rice. PER SERVING 421 KCALS | FAT 26.5G | SATURATES 3.9G CARBS 15.4G | FIBRE 11.4G | PROTEIN 24.4G | SALT 2.3G

Easy kiwi sorbet 11/2 HOURS + FREEZING | SERVES 8 | EASY

Serve this in small glasses with a little champagne or cava poured over. kiwi 500g, as ripe as possible golden caster sugar 50g lime 1, juiced pineapple juice 200ml • Heat the grill. • Peel and chop the kiwi into small pieces and mix it with the sugar and lime juice. Leave for 1 hour to melt the sugar. • Tip the mixture into a blender with the pineapple juice and 200ml water and blend to a purée in bursts, don’t overdo it or you’ll break the seeds and muddy the flavour.

• Rub the lighter side of each fish with oil. Heat an ovenproof non-stick frying pan and put the fish in, cook for 1 minute and then brush the top of the fish with oil, and put the pan under the grill (mind the handle) until the fish skin blisters and bubbles, and the flesh is cooked, about 5-10 minutes depending how big they are. Remove the pan, slide each fish onto a hot plate and lift off the top skin carefully. Add a large knob of butter to the pan, add the chilli, cook for 1 minute then add the vinegar and bubble for a few seconds. Add the parsley, swirl the pan and then spoon the butter over the dab. Serve with more parsley if you like, and the greens and potatoes. PER SERVING 340 KCALS | FAT 18.4G | SATURATES 4.2G CARBS 0.2G | FIBRE 0.1G | PROTEIN 43.3G | SALT 0.6G


COOK

from 20 minutes pan to table

BUY IT NOW

Dab are flat fish native to Europe. Sandy coloured with a delicate, sweet flesh – use them like the more familiar lemon sole. They're often quite small so buy 1 or 2 per person. Despite their abundance you may need to visit a supermarket fish counter or fishmonger to find them.

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Ultimate devilled Easter eggs p32

Big sharing dishes are our kind of cooking – friends and family get as much as they like, and there’s less washing-up when it’s all over! Recipes JANINE RATCLIFFE Photographs MOWIE KAY

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STYLING: OLIVIA WARDLE. FOOD STYLING: NATALIE THOMSON

s a t ! e F


COOK

Slow-roast mechoui leg of lamb with mint labneh p32

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Hot cakes! Peanut butter layer cake p44

This month we’re bringing you the coolest new trends in baking – time to raise your cake game Recipes: SARAH COOK Photographs: PETE CASSIDY

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COOK

STYLING: ROB MERRETT. FOOD STYLING: SARAH COOK

Double lemon, gin & tonic cake p44

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Portuguese

custard tarts Create these classic tarts, with step-by-step help from O’s test kitchen

Recipe ANNA GLOVER Photographs TONY BRISCOE

Psst....

Share your photo on Twitter, our Facebook page or Instagram #Ochallenge – we’d love to see your results

48 Omagazine.com March 2016

Portuguese custard tarts 50 MINUTES
 + COOLING | MAKES 24 | EASY

Dusting the pastry with icing sugar gives the tarts a golden, caramelised crust when cooked. plain flour 2 tbsp icing sugar 2 tbsp, plus more to serve all butter puff pastry 375g golden caster sugar 250g lemon zest 2 strips cinnamon 1 stick eggs 2 egg yolks 4 cornflour 50g whole milk 500ml vanilla 1 pod, split lengthways, seeds scraped out and kept ground cinnamon to serve 1 Mix the flour and icing sugar, and use this to dust the worksurface. Roll the pastry out to make a 45 x 30cm rectangle. Roll up lengthways to create a long sausage shape. 2 Cut the pastry into 24 wheels, about 1-2cm thick. 3 Roll each wheel lightly with the rolling pin to fit 2 x 12-hole non-stick fairy cake tins. 4 Press the pastry circles into the tins and mould into the tins to make thin cases. Chill until needed. 5 Heat the oven to 220C/fan 200C/gas 7. Make a sugar syrup by bringing the sugar, 200ml water, lemon zest and cinnamon stick to the boil. Reduce until syrupy, allow to cool, then remove the cinnamon and lemon. Whisk the eggs, egg yolks and cornflour until smooth in another large pan. 6 Heat the milk and vanilla pod seeds in a separate pan until just below the boil. Gradually pour the hot milk over the eggs and cornflour, then cook on a low heat, continually whisking. 7 Add the cooled sugar syrup to the custard and whisk until thickened slightly. 8 Pour the custard through a sieve. Pour into the pastry cases and bake for 15 minutes until the pastry is golden and the custard has darkened. 9 Cool completely in the tins then sift over icing sugar and ground cinnamon to serve. PER SERVING 151 KCALS | FAT 6.2G | SATURATES 2.8G CARBS 20.7G | FIBRE 0.5G | PROTEIN 20.7G | SALT 0.2G

STYLING: JENNY IGGLEDEN. FOOD STYLING: ANNA GLOVER

Make your own


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Cook everyday Let Janine Ratcliffe, O’s food editor, rescue you from your rut with these great, quick and easy midweek ideas Recipes JANINE RATCLIFFE Photographs TONY BRISCOE

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COOK Bang bang chicken salad 40 MINUTES | SERVES 4 | EASY

skinless chicken thigh fillets 6 coconut milk 400g tin fish sauce 1 tbsp green beans 300g, trimmed spring onions 4, finely shredded cucumber 1/2, seeds scraped out and shredded red chilli 1, finely shredded toasted sesame seeds to serve PEANUT SAUCE crunchy peanut butter 125g red chilli 1, finely chopped soy sauce 3 tbsp sesame oil 2 tbsp • Put the chicken in a wide, shallow pan with the coconut milk and fish sauce, bring to the boil, then simmer with the lid on for 10 minutes. Take off the heat and leave to cool completely in the liquid. • Meanwhile, cook the green beans in boiling water for 3 minutes then cool under cold water. Drain and halve lengthways. • To make the peanut sauce, put the peanut butter in a small pan with 150ml boiling water and warm gently for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the chilli and the soy sauce then take off the heat and whisk in the sesame oil. You might need to add a little more boiling water to thin it to a sauce. • Shred the chicken, (you can freeze the poaching liquid and use it for a curry base later), then pile onto plates with the rest of the veg, spooning over the peanut sauce as you go. Finish with shredded chilli and some sesame seeds if you like.

STYLING: JENNY IGGLEDEN. FOOD STYLING: KATY GREENWOOD

PER SERVING 620 KCALS | FAT 46.4G | SATURATES 20.3G CARBS 16G | FIBRE 6.1G | PROTEIN 31.5G | SALT 2.7G

Hot-smoked salmon cakes 30 MINUTES | SERVES 2 | EASY

Use leftover mashed potatoes if you have any. potatoes 3 medium (about 550g) lemon ½, zested and juiced spring onions 2, finely chopped dill chopped to make 1 tbsp skinless hot-smoked salmon fillets 2, flaked plain flour 2 tbsp olive oil

rocket leaves 50g capers 2 tsp, rinsed shallot 1, finely chopped • Microwave the potatoes for 8-10 minutes, until tender, then halve and scoop the flesh out into a bowl. Discard the skins. Mash with some seasoning. Add the lemon zest, spring onions, dill and the hot-smoked salmon. • Season well and shape into 4 fishcakes. Dust them in the flour, and fry in a non-stick pan in a drizzle of olive oil for 5 minutes on each side until golden and hot throughout.

• Put the rocket, capers and shallot in a bowl. Add the lemon juice, a good drizzle of oil and season. Toss and serve with the hot salmon cakes. PER SERVING 593 KCALS | FAT 15.5G | SATURATES 3.3G CARBS 63.9G | FIBRE 6.3G | PROTEIN 46.3G | SALT 3.4G

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COOK

HEALTHY choices

Great lowcalorie, low-fat and 5:2 dietfriendly ideas from O’s cookery writer, Anna Glover, including a quinoa and black bean chilli, and Cajun prawn tacos Recipes ANNA GLOVER Photographs TONY BRISCOE

FOOD STYLING: ANNA GLOVER. STYLING: JENNY IGGLEDEN

Coconut overnight oats p66

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COOK Cajun prawns with pineapple salsa 20 MINUTES | SERVES 2 | EASY

Gluten free

These prawns tick so many healthy boxes – they’re really low fat and a good choice if you’re going the 5:2 diet. raw peeled prawns 200g smoked paprika 1/2 tsp garlic salt or powder 1/2 tsp dried thyme 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper 1/4 tsp

olive oil pineapple 100g, chopped shallot 1, finely diced coriander chopped to make 2 tbsp red chilli 1, seeded and diced lime 1, juiced, plus wedges to serve Little Gem lettuce leaves to serve fat-free yogurt to serve • Toss the prawns with all the spices and 1 tsp oil. Season with lots of black pepper

and a pinch of salt if using garlic powder. • Mix the pineapple, shallot, coriander, chilli, lime juice and season. • Heat 1 tsp oil in a non-stick pan and fry the prawns for 2 minutes, until pink. Divide between lettuce leaves, top with the pineapple salsa and a dollop of yogurt. PER SERVING 138 KCALS | FAT 4G | SATURATES 0.6G CARBS 6.1G | FIBRE 1.7G | PROTEIN 18.5G | SALT 0.6G

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pro vs punter

Ox Club

at Headrow House, Leeds

Does an average diner reach the same conclusions about a new restaurant as a food pro, who may get special treatment if recognised?* Tony Naylor and O reader Jodie Dobb compare notes on the Ox Club at Headrow House, Leeds

PHOTOGRAPHS: DANIEL BAMFORD, TOM JOY

The pro

Tony Naylor is a Manchester-based journalist who regularly writes for O as well as Restaurant magazine and The Guardian.

Ox Club

The punter

Jodie Dobb is a student services manager from Flixton, Manchester. She eats out as often as possible and her favourite new haunt is Hawksmoor.

86 Omagazine.com March 2016

, is in Heathrow House, a former textile mill built in the early 1900s, opened in October 2015 following a multi-million pound investment. It’s also home to a cocktail bar and beer hall. The focal point at Ox Club is a Grillworks grill imported from Michigan – it’s used to cook everything from hanger steak to guinea fowl, hake and razor clams. Expect delicate accompaniments such as buttermilk polenta with tea and molasses brine; creamed flageolet beans with bacon jam; or Jerusalem artichoke with mushrooms and ymerdrys (a Danish sugared rye bread crumb). Although vegetarian options are limited, the side dishes are all innovative and vegetable-based: try brussels sprouts with bacon and cured egg yolk, coal-roasted beetroot with muscovado walnuts, or kale with chard, cider and golden raisins. oxclub.co.uk

For Ox Club’s sustainability score, visit Omagazine.com


pro vs punter

Ox Club

at Headrow House, Leeds

Does an average diner reach the same conclusions about a new restaurant as a food pro, who may get special treatment if recognised?* Tony Naylor and O reader Jodie Dobb compare notes on the Ox Club at Headrow House, Leeds

PHOTOGRAPHS: DANIEL BAMFORD, TOM JOY

The pro

Tony Naylor is a Manchester-based journalist who regularly writes for O as well as Restaurant magazine and The Guardian.

Ox Club

The punter

Jodie Dobb is a student services manager from Flixton, Manchester. She eats out as often as possible and her favourite new haunt is Hawksmoor.

86 Omagazine.com March 2016

, is in Heathrow House, a former textile mill built in the early 1900s, opened in October 2015 following a multi-million pound investment. It’s also home to a cocktail bar and beer hall. The focal point at Ox Club is a Grillworks grill imported from Michigan – it’s used to cook everything from hanger steak to guinea fowl, hake and razor clams. Expect delicate accompaniments such as buttermilk polenta with tea and molasses brine; creamed flageolet beans with bacon jam; or Jerusalem artichoke with mushrooms and ymerdrys (a Danish sugared rye bread crumb). Although vegetarian options are limited, the side dishes are all innovative and vegetable-based: try brussels sprouts with bacon and cured egg yolk, coal-roasted beetroot with muscovado walnuts, or kale with chard, cider and golden raisins. oxclub.co.uk

For Ox Club’s sustainability score, visit Omagazine.com


ON THE ROAD: Y E S E L G N A ONE WAY

This St David’s Day, steer a course to the island of Anglesey and feast on fresh-fromthe-creel seafood, Welsh whisky ice cream and deconstructed bara brith

94 Omagazine.com March 2016

joke it’s travelled from farmhouse to White House,’ Alison Lea-Wilson says with a smile. Alison and her husband David started a business growing oysters and mussels on Anglesey and then opened a sea zoo before turning their attention to salt. It was the zoo’s fussy seahorses happily breeding in these waters that made them realize how pure the seawater was. They’ve now gone full circle and have started farming mussels once more, on the shore. But it’s salt that has put them, and Anglesey, on the culinary map. Alongside products like smoked water (famously used by Heston Blumenthal and good in a risotto, apparently), Halen Môn salt is now exported to 22 countries and sold by Waitrose, M&S and Harvey Nichols among other stockists, including sixth-generation butcher John Swain-Williams in Menai Bridge. This pretty, pastel-painted village, linked to the mainland by Thomas Telford’s suspension bridge and the sturdy Britannia Bridge, was for years bypassed by holidaymakers heading for the pier at

Beaumaris or the Irish ferries at Holyhead. Today, Beaumaris, a sailing haunt, has a faded elegance – an ice-cream parlour, Red Boat Gelato (redboatgelato.com), with over 200 flavours (Penderyn whisky knocks spots off rum and raisin), but on the foodie front otherwise feels flat. The high street in Menai Bridge, however, bustles with independent retailers including high-class chocolatier and patissier Benjamin Lee (benjaminleecakes.co.uk) and artisan bakery Pumpkin Seed (pumpkinseedbakery.co.uk), where I bagged a loaf of bara brith and a giant Welsh egg (think Scotch egg but wrapped in pork and leek sausage and the bakery’s own breadcrumbs). Then there’s the Menai Seafood Festival (menaiseafoodfestival.com), which takes place here each August, and down on the waterfront, contemporary restaurant Dylan’s (dylansrestaurant.co.uk) dishes up local seafood straight from the creel beside picture windows onto the strait. Another exciting new addition to the village is

PHOTOGRAPHS: ALAMY, GETTY, KIERAN RIDLEY

I

n front of me are six mounds of salt and a bottle of water. First, basic table salt: an eye-wateringly unpleasant taste. Next, rock salt: a subtler flavour. The European sea salt looks and tastes as though it could do with a good wash. And then, sparkling like freshly fallen snow in the sun, the brilliant white crystals of Halen Môn, or Anglesey sea salt. Granted PDO (protected designation of origin) status, putting it in the same league as champagne and parma ham, Halen Môn is intensely salty. A smooth, long-lasting salty. I’m trying it as part of a guided tour and tasting at the new Saltcote and Visitor Centre (halenmon.com), a £1.25m stunner of a building on the banks of the Menai Strait, Anglesey. The last two mounds are of vanilla salt (good for baking and with white fish, I learn) and smoked salt – some of which was sprinkled on chocolates presented to President Obama. ‘Our story started with a pan of seawater on an Aga, so we like to

Words LUCY GILLMORE


ON THE ROAD: Y E S E L G N A ONE WAY

This St David’s Day, steer a course to the island of Anglesey and feast on fresh-fromthe-creel seafood, Welsh whisky ice cream and deconstructed bara brith

94 Omagazine.com March 2016

joke it’s travelled from farmhouse to White House,’ Alison Lea-Wilson says with a smile. Alison and her husband David started a business growing oysters and mussels on Anglesey and then opened a sea zoo before turning their attention to salt. It was the zoo’s fussy seahorses happily breeding in these waters that made them realize how pure the seawater was. They’ve now gone full circle and have started farming mussels once more, on the shore. But it’s salt that has put them, and Anglesey, on the culinary map. Alongside products like smoked water (famously used by Heston Blumenthal and good in a risotto, apparently), Halen Môn salt is now exported to 22 countries and sold by Waitrose, M&S and Harvey Nichols among other stockists, including sixth-generation butcher John Swain-Williams in Menai Bridge. This pretty, pastel-painted village, linked to the mainland by Thomas Telford’s suspension bridge and the sturdy Britannia Bridge, was for years bypassed by holidaymakers heading for the pier at

Beaumaris or the Irish ferries at Holyhead. Today, Beaumaris, a sailing haunt, has a faded elegance – an ice-cream parlour, Red Boat Gelato (redboatgelato.com), with over 200 flavours (Penderyn whisky knocks spots off rum and raisin), but on the foodie front otherwise feels flat. The high street in Menai Bridge, however, bustles with independent retailers including high-class chocolatier and patissier Benjamin Lee (benjaminleecakes.co.uk) and artisan bakery Pumpkin Seed (pumpkinseedbakery.co.uk), where I bagged a loaf of bara brith and a giant Welsh egg (think Scotch egg but wrapped in pork and leek sausage and the bakery’s own breadcrumbs). Then there’s the Menai Seafood Festival (menaiseafoodfestival.com), which takes place here each August, and down on the waterfront, contemporary restaurant Dylan’s (dylansrestaurant.co.uk) dishes up local seafood straight from the creel beside picture windows onto the strait. Another exciting new addition to the village is

PHOTOGRAPHS: ALAMY, GETTY, KIERAN RIDLEY

I

n front of me are six mounds of salt and a bottle of water. First, basic table salt: an eye-wateringly unpleasant taste. Next, rock salt: a subtler flavour. The European sea salt looks and tastes as though it could do with a good wash. And then, sparkling like freshly fallen snow in the sun, the brilliant white crystals of Halen Môn, or Anglesey sea salt. Granted PDO (protected designation of origin) status, putting it in the same league as champagne and parma ham, Halen Môn is intensely salty. A smooth, long-lasting salty. I’m trying it as part of a guided tour and tasting at the new Saltcote and Visitor Centre (halenmon.com), a £1.25m stunner of a building on the banks of the Menai Strait, Anglesey. The last two mounds are of vanilla salt (good for baking and with white fish, I learn) and smoked salt – some of which was sprinkled on chocolates presented to President Obama. ‘Our story started with a pan of seawater on an Aga, so we like to

Words LUCY GILLMORE


FOOD MILEAGE

EXPLORE

O’s travel editor, Rhiannon Batten, on the latest openings, eats and trends around the world

3 great march food festivals Inverness’ Nip Whisky Festival (29 March to 2 April) celebrates craft whiskies and gins from Scotland’s Highlands and Islands with tastings, food pairings and masterclasses. thenip.scot

MICRO b&Bs Supersizing is over, for hotels at least. Where once it was all about being the biggest, this year small is good. Try the trend yourself at micro-b&b Caro in Somerset, also home to a concept store and an ever-changing array of Bakemonger’s eye-popping bakes. carosomerset.com

CHANNEL-HOPPING Abstinence is all very well at the start of the year, but by March we’re taking our epicurious pleasures where we can find them, including Périgord, where new operator Duck & Truffle is running a Gastronomy & Wine Pairing weekend between 12 and 15 March. It’s based at Le Vieux Logis, a small Relais & Chateaux hotel in Tremolat, and offers a range of experiences, from cookery demos and wine tastings to dinners at local bistros. duckandtruffle.com

ALL INFORMATION CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS

Derry’s Legenderry Food Festival (19 to 20 March) celebrates ‘plot to plate’ produce from across Northern Ireland from slow-cooked breads to goat burgers. derrycity.gov.uk/food

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farmhouse chic A two-day celebration of Lake District food and drink, Kendal Festival of Food (12 to 13 March) includes tastings, demos and a local ale trail plus a well-stocked market. kendalfestivaloffood.co.uk

Opening at the end of March, Masseria Trapana is a new nine-suite hotel set in a honey-stone former farmhouse outside Lecce, in Puglia. On-site cookery courses are in the pipeline, and guests can enjoy stylish, pared-back décor (many suites have private outdoor bathrooms), the run of six walled gardens (home to lemons, blood oranges, pomegranates, walnuts and olives) and traditional Puglian cooking courtesy of chef Maria Carla. Double rooms cost from €250, b&b. trapana.com

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EXPLORE

Directions of travel

A BOOK AT BEDTIME

The trends to watch

It’s a safe bet that many an O reader takes a cookbook or two to bed with them. If you’re visiting Tokyo you can go one step further by booking in to Book and Bed. Essentially a library with hostel-like beds tucked behind some of its shelves, current stock includes 50 food titles, only 10 of them in English so don’t all book in at once. Rates start at £20 per night. bookandbedtokyo.com

GAINING GROUND

CLASSIC GLITZ

Springtime in Paris has always been a classy option, and will become more so this month when the city’s Ritz Hotel re-opens following a €200 million renovation. Can’t afford an overnight stay or dinner? Head to the hotel’s legendary Bar Hemingway for a cocktail. ritzparis.com

EXPERT TURKEY

the hebrides

Visitors from the UK to Turkey will be scarcer this year, given the country’s political troubles, a great pity given its scenic landscapes, pine-lined beaches and fabulous food. If you mean to buck the trend, take a look at Somewhere Wonderful before you go. The new website, launched by Turkey expert Jeremy Seal, might lack a little in sleek design, but more than makes up for it with a deep knowledge of the country’s most captivating places to stay beyond the big resorts. somewherewonderful.com

For cool food from a cool climate you need look no further than the Hebrides. Building on the islands’ increasingly impressive roster of food and drink producers (who’s for an Isle of Harris gin, made with sugar kelp?) a new self-guided Eat Drink Hebrides trail is launching this month. visitouterhebrides.co.uk

GONE TO GROUND

traditional travel guides

A fusion between a conventional reference book, a coffee table tome and a journal, the beautifully illustrated Rice Noodle Fish, out this month and written by Matt Goulding of roadsandkingdoms.com, is a literary journey into Japan’s culinary culture like no other. £16.99, Hardie Grant

CAN I EAT THAT?

One to pack if you’re travelling with kids, Can I Eat That? is a fun and informative new book by Joshua David Stein that’s just out. Not only has illustrator Julia Rothman done a brilliant job making food and food production appealing to young readers, but the book’s global perspective means new foods might just be embraced a bit more willingly while you’re away. £10.95, Phaidon

For more information about many of these stories visit O magazine. com

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PHOTOGRAPH: RICHARD HAMMOND

tv dinners

Striding out for your next meal – or from wine producer to beekeeper – is where it’s at. Why? We’ve been inspired by Inntravel’s Flavours of Piedmont holidays and Grass Routes’ trips to Spain’s Vall de Gallinera: both new food-themed hiking tours. inntravel.co.uk; villageways.com

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