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2016-2017

ANNUAL REPORT

INSTITUTE

OF

MENTAL

HYGIENE


contents 02

03 Mission 04

Core Values

05

Letter from Executive Director and Board President

06

New Orleans Campaign for Grade-Level Reading

08

Summary of Grants by Type

09

Advocacy Grants

10

School-Based Grants

11

Community-Based Grants

12

Nancy J. Aronson Core Support Grants

13

Early Childhood Grants

15

End of Year Financial Statement

17

Board of Directors


mission IMH’s mission is to promote optimal mental health for children and their families in New Orleans.


corevalues 04

IMH BELIEVES

that mental health must be defined broadly and

recognizes that the development of optimal mental health (sometimes referred to as social-emotional development) is affected by many factors. We believe that it is important to build on successes by promoting best practices and innovative approaches that offer promise. We believe that issues of race and culture affect mental health and the provision of services and should be addressed. We believe that our grants should support programs that intentionally and specifically address the social-emotional development of low-income and/or underserved children and their families in Orleans Parish. We believe that early intervention and prevention are the most effective approaches to promoting optimal mental health in children and their families in our community. We believe that families are fundamental to their children’s social and emotional development and should be supported in their parenting.


L E TTE R F R O M E X E CUTI VE DI RE CTO R A ND BO A RD PRE SI DE NT December 8 marks 80 years since Samuel Zemurray made a visionary gift that launched the Institute of Mental Hygiene. We were created during a time when the field of child psychiatry was still emerging. IMH continues this legacy of innovation today, as we evolve in our approach to our mission of promoting optimal mental health for children and their families in New Orleans. Eighty years ago, we saw child mental health as an issue of individual pathology. Now, we recognize the critical importance of children’s environment on their mental health. In 2017, IMH made 26 grants totaling $941,080, including key investments in advocacy, diverse delivery, and collaboration as important strategies to expand access to high-quality environments and programs for children to learn and develop in New Orleans. This year, we returned to two grant cycles after having to reduce new grant making to one cycle in 2016 due to existing multi-year commitments and reduced investment returns. IMH continues to partner with the United Way of Southeast Louisiana to help lead the New Orleans Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, which uses a collective impact approach to address the fact that just over half of New Orleans third graders are reading on grade-level. IMH helped spark renewed interest and energy in a local campaign that has helped engage city leaders in pledging new dedicated city resources to meet the needs of young children. Our efforts have leveraged more than a decade of work by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. This organization developed a model, now active in over 300 communities nationwide, in which stakeholders work across sectors to ensure that low-income children succeed in school and graduate prepared for college, careers, and active citizenship. In 2017, we welcomed new board members Marialis King and Katie Gibert, whose expertise and passion for our work help to further and elevate our mission. We are excited to usher in this new decade of our work with strong leadership, clear focus, and the collective strength of our partners who are committed to moving the needle for New Orleans children.

R O N M C C L A I N M A H L O N D . S A N F O R D Executive Director Board President

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THE NEW ORLEANS CAMPAIGN FOR GRADE-LEVEL READING: A UNIFYING VISION FOR NEW ORLEANS CHILDREN Over the past few months, the New Orleans Campaign for Grade-Level Reading has engaged a diverse group of partners in making the city’s investment in young children a key issue in the 2017 municipal elections in New Orleans. And it’s working. IMH’s leadership of the Campaign, in partnership with United Way of Southeast Louisiana, has not only been financial. We have provided thought leadership, informed campaign strategy, and leveraged and convened our networks. IMH’s Executive Director Ronald McClain penned an op-ed on the importance of early investment as a core strategy to address public safety. Decorated military leader and local hero Lt. Russel Honore wrote about how critical it is to the city’s resilience. United Way of Southeast Louisiana CEO Michael Williamson co-authored a November letter to the editor with the IMH Executive Director calling for sustained public investment in quality early care and education seats. Entergy CEO Charles Rice wrote that municipal support for early care and education is a critical strategy to ensure businesses have the workforce of today and tomorrow. Sixty-one organizations – from small businesses to schools – signed a joint statement calling for city investment to increase access to quality early care and education and quality summer programming for low-income children. City council members worked together to secure $750,000 in the 2018 city budget to pilot and evaluate the city’s first-ever direct investment in quality early care and education seats.

“We have to do a better job of improving access to all summer programming. Part of that is providing additional resources to NORDC by beginning to leverage those private dollars that were promised when the NORD program was transformed years ago…. The new Office of Youth and Families I will create will better connect the New Orleans Recreation Department, New Orleans Public Library, sports leagues, health clinics, and arts and cultural programs with our schools and communities.” New Orleans Mayor-Elect LaToya Cantrell

A Local Strategy to Improve Third-Grade Reading IMH has helped develop a ten-year community solutions action plan, which focuses on three primary drivers of third-grade reading proficiency:

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IMPROVING SCHOOL READINESS 2013 data from the Orleans Public Education Network show that only eight percent of New Orleans kindergarteners were considered “very ready” on all five of the Early Development Instrument’s domains of development. Agenda for Children shows that 12,000 at-risk New Orleans children under age four still do not have access to an affordable quality early care and education. The Campaign will focus on increasing supports for families as children’s first teachers and increasing the number of quality early care and education seats for birth through threeyear-olds in New Orleans.

REDUCING CHRONIC ABSENCE in the elementary grades in New Orleans public schools by half through: supporting early warning and intervention systems across schools, promoting policy change to incentivize schools to address chronic absence, and helping reduce barriers that affect attendance through health services, alternative transportation, and access to clean school uniforms.

ADDRESSING SUMMER SLIDE that causes low-income students to lose as much as two school years of learning before the fourth grade by partnering with the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission, schools and youth development programs to increase access to quality summer programming for children and providing families with supports for summer learning.


City Council President Jason Williams said of the investment, “We have a real opportunity here to place our city at the national forefront of early childhood education…. [The allocation] moves money in the general fund to where we need it most: investing in our young people from the very start. We can create generations of educated, prosperous New Orleanians by putting children on a track for success with highquality early care and education.” And New Orleans’ next mayor committed publicly to creating a city office of children and families and dedicating additional city resources toward early care and education and summer learning, particularly for low-income children. The New Orleans Campaign for Grade-Level Reading’s 2017 municipal elections advocacy campaign is only one component of the ambitious ten-year plan that has been developed with input from more than 70 people representing 50 organizations. The plan outlines annual benchmarks toward a long-term vision of every New Orleans child reading on grade level by the end of the third grade.

ETHAN ASHLEY Orleans Parish School Board member and Director of Policy and Advocacy for the Center for Development and Learning “I am most excited about working with IMH as a partner whose vision and commitment to systemic improvement for our city helps sustain and, in many ways, lead the way for better life outcomes for all New Orleanians, especially our youth.”

CATHY MCRAE Chair of Women United: retired Shell executive

DANA HENRY New Orleans Director, Stand for Children

MELANIE BRONFIN Executive Director of the Louisiana Policy Institute for Children

“Collectively through the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, we are identifying, working on, and developing solutions for tough issues that will have a positive impact on the children in our communities. I can see a path that will lead to systemic change and can convey this message to our Women United donors that our investment of time, advocacy, and money can be transformational.”

“The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading has helped mobilize more than 60 partners behind our efforts to secure dedicated city funding for early childhood education. This has moved this from a ‘someday’ issue to a ‘right now’ issue in the minds of city leaders.”

“IMH has co-led an exciting campaign in New Orleans around grade level reading. As only funders can do, IMH and the United Way have brought together the experts and stakeholders in the field to define a path forward for our city and work to move the needle on this critical issue of third-grade reading. Their leadership has been instrumental, and the Policy Institute is grateful to see them bringing attention to the urgent needs of young children in our community.”

Why Third-Grade Reading Matters A growing body of research shows the importance of reading proficiency in the third grade, as it is a key predictor of high school graduation and future earnings. Third-grade reading scores have also been used to predict the need for future prison beds. This is because third grade marks the transition from learning to read to reading to learn. If a student isn’t a proficient reader by the end of the third grade, national research shows that he or she is four times more likely to drop out of school than his or her peer who is a proficient reader. Children who drop out of school are 3.5 times more likely to be incarcerated than their peers who complete high school. Last year, in New Orleans, only half of public school third graders scored basic or above on the iLEAP English Language Arts exam. Half of Black students, and 47 percent of economically disadvantaged students achieved this critical third-grade milestone, compared to almost 90 percent of White students, demonstrating an alarming achievement gap by race and economic status. As a result, fewer than three out of four public school students in New Orleans complete high school in four years, which has a significant impact for future life success.

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grants

SUMMARY OF GRANTS BY TYPE

APRIL 20, 2017 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2017

Grant making at IMH is guided by our mission, our core values and by the areas of focus selected by the Foundation. IMH funding is limited, by charter, to Orleans Parish. We do not fund capital projects or individuals. For grant application guidelines, deadlines, and, details, please visit www.imhno.org or call (504) 566-1852. GRANT TYPE

GRANT COUNT

Advocacy

GRANT TYPE AMOUNT

2 $60,000

Community-Based 10

$258,000

Core Support

2

$300,000

Early Childhood

9

$268,080

School-Based 3 $55,000 GRANT FUNDING TOTALS

08

26 $941,080


ADVOCACY GRANTS IMH supports advocacy as a strategy to work toward increased public support for the full range of mental health services for children and their families and toward the development of policies and regulations that promote quality in the supports and services available to all children. IMH also supports organizational efforts to increase and strengthen the voices of children, parents and caretakers in their communities; and we will support convenings to better inform the public on issues relating to children’s optimal development and mental health.

GRANTEE

DESCRIPTION

GRANT PERIOD

GRANT AMOUNT

Families and Friends of Louisiana’s Let Kids Be Kids 2017 $10,000 Incarcerated Children (FFLIC) ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Rethink Youth Organizing and 2017–2018 $50,000 Leadership –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

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CHILD & ADOLESCENT GRANTS IMH accepts applications for programs providing comprehensive mental health services in public schools and community based programming. SCHOOL-BASED GRANTS IMH defines comprehensive mental health services as the range of services necessary to address the barriers to learning that many children experience. We are especially interested in efforts that address the barriers that stem from emotional and behavioral issues and problems, which must be integrated with efforts to address barriers that stem from learning and physical health problems. We believe that comprehensive mental health services need to be rooted in a school climate that welcomes and nurtures students and their families. IMH supports the use of prevention programs to build the social and emotional competence of the entire school population.

GRANTEE

10

DESCRIPTION

GRANT PERIOD

GRANT AMOUNT

Bricolage Academy Reading Recovery Intervention 2017 $25,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Collegiate Academies G. W. Carver High School, Collegiate 2017 $20,000 Academies Restorative Education (CARE) ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– St. Michael Special School Special Education Program Support 2017 $10,000 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––


COMMUNITY-BASED GRANTS IMH supports efforts to increase the availability of prevention, early intervention and treatment services in community settings. Such efforts might include the co-location of mental health services with other well-utilized services for children and their families. IMH supports the provision of services in locations that are easily accessible to vulnerable populations. We also support the development of partnerships and collaborations between multiple organizations that serve the same population.

GRANTEE

DESCRIPTION

GRANT PERIOD GRANT AMOUNT

The Beautiful Foundation, Inc. Program Expansion 2017 $20,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Catholic Charities Isaiah 43 Program 2017 $30,000 Archdiocese of New Orleans ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Crossroads NOLA Greater New Orleans Collaborative for Children 2017–2018 $50,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Families Helping Families of Enhanced Education Advocacy 2017 $15,000 Southeast Louisiana ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Foundation for Louisiana YouthShift Youth Development Intermediary 2017–2018 $15,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Grow Dat Youth Farm Staff Capacity Building 2017 $25,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Louisiana State University Development of an ASD (Autism Spectrum 2017–2018 $50,000 Health Sciences Center Disorder) Clinic without Walls: A NOLA Department of Psychiatry Family and Community Pilot Project ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NAMI New Orleans Youth Mental Health First Aid Program 2017 $5,000 for Orleans Parish Public Schools ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– unCommon Construction Apprenticeship Program 2017 $18,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Volunteers of America Greater Program Scaling and Staff Capacity Building 2017–2018 $30,000 New Orleans, Inc. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

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NANCY J. ARONSON CORE SUPPORT GRANTS IMH provides Core Support Grants to organizations with a proven record of accomplishment. These grants are intended to provide stable yet flexible dollars to organizations addressing the mental health needs of children and their families. These grants are named the Nancy J. Aronson Core Support Grants Program in recognition of the sixteen-year tenure of the first director of IMH and her commitment to supporting the work of nonprofits in the community. Applications are by invitation only.

GRANTEE

DESCRIPTION

GRANT PERIOD

GRANT AMOUNT

Louisiana Policy Institute Core Support 2017–2019 $150,000 for Children ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– VIET Core Support 2017–2019 $150,000 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

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EARLY CHILDHOOD GRANTS IMH seeks to strengthen and sustain policies, programs, and providers focusing on early childhood and families with children from birth to age six. EARLY CHILDHOOD GRANTS IMH funds programs that 1) increase the number of children ready for kindergarten by building their social and behavioral skills; 2) improve the social and emotional well-being of children in early childhood programs; 3) assist parents and caretakers in parenting their children; and 4) improve the effectiveness of parents and organizations in advocating for programs and policies that address the social and emotional needs of young children. In reviewing applicants, we look for the use of evidence-based approaches. IMH also funds early intervention and treatment programs for young children with mental health issues. CHILD CARE IMPROVEMENT GRANTS TO PROMOTE DIVERSE DELIVERY IMH supports diverse delivery, the provision of LA 4 preschool and/or Head Start/Early Head Start services in child care centers. In each case, these diverse delivery classrooms meet all the standards for each funding stream and setting involved, providing the highest quality option for the children served. Such partnerships offer many benefits. Children are better prepared for “big school� but remain located in a familiar and developmentally appropriate setting for pre-K, families are helped to prepare for the transition; schools are assured a class of children prepared to learn; and child care centers are recognized as partners in the larger effort to provide the best-quality education for our children.

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Additionally, diverse delivery offers the opportunity to braid the scarce funding streams available for early childhood education, maximizing the available state and federal dollars. Over time, we anticipate such partnerships will have the potential to help New Orleans move toward more neighborhood-based schools and provide greater access to high quality early childhood education for all children.

GRANTEE

DESCRIPTION

GRANT PERIOD GRANT AMOUNT

Early Learning Focus Inc. Center-based Early Literacy Program 2017 $3,080 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Foundation for Louisiana New Orleans Campaign for 2017 $50,000 Grade-Level Reading ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– KID smART Artful Families 2017–2018 $20,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Kingsley House Community Counseling Center 2017–2018 $20,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LSU Health Sciences Center- Department of Psychiatry 2017–2018 $50,000 New Orleans ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Noble Minds Institute for Staff Capacity Building 2017 $35,000 Whole Child Learning ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Son of a Saint Son of a Saint 2017 $20,000 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Tulane University School Tulane University, School of Medicine; Early 2017–2018 $50,000 of Medicine Childhood Consultation in Primary Care ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Urban League of Louisiana Urban League Clarence L. Barney 2017 $20,000 Head Start –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

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STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION ASSETS –––––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents Accrued investment income Prepaid excise taxes Prepaid expenses Loan receivable, current

2016

2015

$ 2,976,971

$ 1,115,945

8,145 11,966

18,794 0

348 3,750

21,052 0

Total Current Assets

3,025,310 1,131,661

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Furniture and equipment Less: Accumulated depreciation

21,995

21,995

19,480 17,888

Total Property and Equipment

2,515 4,107

OTHER ASSETS

Investments Loan receivable, long-term

17,034,041 18,605,056

21,052 0

17,055,093 18,605,056 TOTAL ASSETS

$20,082,918 $19,740,824

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS ––––– CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable Current portion of grants payable Total Current Liabilities

LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

Grants payable, Net Total Liabilities

NET ASSETS

Unrestricted

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

2016

$

2015

15,419

$

27,232

740,600 1,264,684 756,019 1,291,916

December 31, 2016 and 2015

SUPPORT, REVENUES AND GAINS ––––––

Investment Income Net realized and unrealized gains (losses) on investments Total Support, Revenue and Gains (losses)

2015

$ 290,383

$ 271,436

1,505,559

(1,088,589)

1,795,942 (817,153)

EXPENSES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Program Services: Grants made to charitable organizations

2016

$ 65,727

Total Program Services Supporting Services: Investment expenses Management and general

2016

2015 $ 1,730,687

$65,727 $1,730,687 99,076 127,553

303,824

281,278

Total Supporting Services

402,900 408,831

TOTAL EXPENSES

468,627 2,139,518

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN NET ASSETS

$1,327,315 ($2,956,671)

NET ASSETS –––––––––––––––––––––––––– BEGINNING OF YEAR END OF YEAR

2016

2015

17,999,584 20,956,255

financials

INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HYGIENE OF THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS

$19,326,899 $17,999,584

0 449,324 756,019 1,741,240 19,326,899 17,999,584 $20,082,918 $19,740,824

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INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HYGIENE OF THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION 2016 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Increase (Decrease) in net assets Adjustments to reconcile increase in net assets to net cash (used for) operating activities:

2015

$ 1,327,315

$(2,956,671)

1,592 1,645

Depreciation Net realized and unrealized (gains) losses on investments

(1,505,559)

1,088,589

(Increase) decrease in accrued income and prepaid expenses

(11,571)

11,991

Increase (decrease) in payables Net cash (used for) operating activities CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Purchase of investments Proceeds from sale of investments Increase in loans receivable

Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

(985,221) 233,167 (1,173,444)

(1,621,279)

(3,512,685)

(7,659,588)

3,034,470

(972,818)

6,589,259 6,686,770 (42,104) 0

1,861,026 (2,594,097)

cash and cash equivalents Beginning of year End of year

1,115,945

3,710,042

$ 2,976,971

$ 1,115,945

SUPPLEMENTAL SCHEDULE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION

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Interest paid Excise taxes paid

$

0

$ 20,000

$

0

$ 18,769

December 31, 2016 and 2015


Mahlon D. Sanford, CPA

Allison Boothe, PhD

PRESIDENT

Tap Bui, MPH Ayanna Butler, JD

Jilla K. Tombar, MPD

Martin Drell, MD

VICE PRESIDENT

Katie Gibert, JD Marialis King, Esq.

Qi Wiggins, MLA

Beverly R. Nichols, CPA

SECRETARY

Mia D. Merrell, BBA

board

CURRENT BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Adewale O. Oyemade, MD David Francis, MBA

Maggie Runyan-Shefa, MPA

TREASURER

Carol Wise, BA

Ronald P. McClain, JD, LCSW-BACS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

PREPARED B Y

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I N S T I T U T E O F M E N TA L H Y G I E N E 1055 St. Charles Avenue, Suite 350, New Orleans, LA 70130 phone (504) 566-1852 fax (504) 566-1853

Institute of Mental Hygiene 2017 Annual Report  
Institute of Mental Hygiene 2017 Annual Report  
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