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institute of mental hygiene

2012-2014

Triennial Report Report


contents

Table of Contents

Mission and Core Values

5

Letter from the President

6

Executive Director Transition

8

Campaign for Grade Level Reading

10

Summary of Grants by Type

12

Advocacy Grants

13

Core Support Grants

15

Children’s Mental Health Grants

16

Early Childhood Program Grants

18

Other Grants

19

Financial Statements

20

Board of Directors

23


4

IMH’s mission is to

promote optimal

mental health for children and their

families in New Orleans.


5

values

Core Values

IMH believes that mental health must be defined broadly and recognizes that the development

of optimal mental health (sometimes referred to as social-emotional development) is affected by many factors.

We believe that it is important to build on successes by promoting best practices and innovative approaches that offer promise.

We believe that issues of race and culture affect mental health and the provision of services and should be addressed.

We believe that our grants should support programs that intentionally and specifically address the social-emotional development of low-income and/or underserved children and their families in Orleans Parish.

We believe that early intervention and prevention are the most effective approaches to promoting optimal mental health in children and their families in our community.

We believe that families are fundamental to their children’s social and emotional development and should be supported in their parenting.


6

Letter from the President The past three years at the Institute of Mental Hygiene have been marked by transition. In September 2014, Nancy Freeman, our second Executive Director, retired after 11 years of service. Under her leadership, the foundation helped make dramatic improvements in the quality of child care in New Orleans, built the mental health capacity of schools and out-of-school programs, and came through Hurricane Katrina and the Great Recession stronger and more responsive to community needs than ever. We are deeply thankful for her graceful and steadfast leadership. We are honored to welcome Ronald P. McClain as our newest Executive Director, following a national search. Ron has more than three decades of experience in social service administration and university teaching in the field of social work. He is the former President & CEO of Family Service of Greater New Orleans and the Children’s Bureau of New Orleans, both longtime grantees of IMH. In his first year, Ron has brought a wealth of experience and insight to IMH as he leads us forward. We also said goodbye to our Grants Manager, Kris Pottharst, as she took on the role of Executive Director of Project Homecoming in April 2015. Kanitra Charles has taken over as our Data and Grants Manager, where she has brought her experience from the United Way and Royal Castle Child Development Center to ensure smooth operations at IMH. We have also seen significant board transition. I recently took over as the President of IMH’s Board of Directors from Storey Charbonnet after he aptly guided us through the Executive Director search and selection process. Since 2012, we have also welcomed several new board members and seen several former board members move on. We are thankful to Erin Bolles, Alan Franco, Ashleigh Gardere, Judith Kieff, Geoffrey Nagle, Lee Reid, Sarah Newell Usdin and Kyshun Webster for their service on our Board. And we appreciate our new board members – Allison Boothe, David Francis, Adrian L. Morgan, Mahlon D. Sanford, Jilla K. Tombar and Qi Wiggins – for answering the call to serve.


7

We continue our work on the Strategic Priorities the Board of Directors first approved in 2011, reviewing and updating them annually to respond to the realities children are facing in New Orleans. As a result, we are making more multi-year grants than ever before to build the capacity of our grantees. In the last three years, IMH has made 80 grants to 56 organizations totaling $4,656,209. Amidst New Orleans’ dynamic education system, we have invested in innovative Charter Management Organizations to provide behavioral health interventions for their students. And we have increased our investments in advocacy to help our grantees better leverage public policy and resources to address the mental health needs of our children. Now, more than a decade after Hurricane Katrina, we have discontinued our small technical assistance grants for child care centers, as the gap between needed and available child care slots shrinks. IMH continues to use data to drive our work. We are alarmed by the fact that 89% of African-American fourth-graders in Louisiana are behind in reading. When children are proficient readers by the end of third grade, they can shift from learning to read to reading to learn, allowing mastery of more complex subject matters as they progress. Reading at grade level by the third grade is integrally linked to the optimal mental health of children. Most students who fail to reach this critical milestone falter in the later grades and often drop out before earning a high school diploma. IMH increasingly will align its investments with strategies to ensure children are reading at grade level by the end of third grade, including investing in school readiness, attendance, and quality out-of-school time learning along with the advocacy and backbone organizational capacity that is needed to achieve collective impact on complex and persistent challenges like grade level reading. We have deep admiration for our grantees who choose to work every day to promote optimal mental health for children and their families in New Orleans. We are honored to support such incredible work and look forward to the work ahead!

Julius E. Kimbrough, Jr. President


8

Executive Director Transition On October 23, 2014, IMH hosted a special reception to honor retiring Executive Director Nancy Freeman and welcome incoming Executive Director Ronald McClain. Many of our friends, grantees and current board and staff were able to join us.

Celebrating Nancy Freeman

The IMH Board of Directors celebrates with its outgoing and incoming Executive Directors

After 11 years, Nancy Freeman retired as Executive Director of the Institute of Mental Hygiene. During her time with the foundation, IMH made more than $10 million in grants. She helped steer the organization through some of the most challenging times in its 78-year history. Within weeks of the devastation of Katrina, IMH was making grants to programs in Baton Rouge that served evacuated residents of New Orleans. The foundation was fully operational by late October 2005. She led the re-organization of IMH’s grantmaking to be responsive to community needs in a dramatically altered local landscape, quickly moving from three annual grant cycles to seven in order to ensure timely and responsive grantmaking. She led IMH to join with the United Way, Agenda for Children, several national foundations and others in the Child Care Rebuild Collaborative to raise and distribute funds to rebuild child care centers following Hurricane Katrina. She also developed an IMH grant program to help flooddamaged child care centers furnish and equip their centers with developmentally appropriate materials, which helped 47 child care centers replace and update furnishings and learning materials to support child development and well-being in the critical first five years. With Nancy’s leadership, IMH sought to facilitate change at the systems-level to multiply the impact of its grants. Nancy played a seminal role in the Bridge to Quality program. Funded by the Conrad N. Hilton and W. K. Kellogg Foundations, the program encouraged early childhood education programs to participate in Louisiana’s new Quality Rating Program. As a result, Orleans Parish led the State in the number of highly rated childcare centers per capita. Nancy also worked with the IMH Board to commit 10% of its annual giving toward advocacy efforts to ensure the voices of those affected by mental health issues in New Orleans influence local and state policy. Nancy also guided IMH to make significant multi-year investments in schools to help equip them effectively to address the trauma many children have experienced. As IMH’s second Executive Director since it became a community grantmaking institution, Nancy leaves a legacy of thoughtful, strategic, compassionate and responsive philanthropy.


9

Welcoming Ron McClain

A long-term resident of New Orleans, Ron has more than 30 years of experience in social service administration and university teaching in the field of social work. His strategic re-building of Family Service of Greater New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina was featured in a social policy textbook by Dr. Bruce Jansson of the University of Southern California: Becoming an Effective Policy Advocate, From Policy Practice to Social Justice. He holds a Master of Social Work from Southern University at New Orleans and a Juris Doctor in Civil Law from Loyola University School of Law. As President & CEO of Family Service of Greater New Orleans for a decade and Children’s Bureau of New Orleans for eight years before that, Ron led both agencies in achieving accreditation from the Council on Accreditation, an international accrediting organization for human service agencies. He has a long history of civic engagement, having served most recently as a member of the Loving Cup Selection Committee. Ron also has served on the board of Agenda for Children, the Lindy Boggs National Center for Community Literacy, and Young Artists-Young Aspirations (YA-YA). He is a member of the NOLA.com-Times Picayune Roundtable of Community Leaders and the New Orleans Civil Service Commission. For Ron, the opportunity to serve as IMH’s Executive Director is a dream come true. Upon his selection, he said: “It is my dream to lead an organization with which I have worked for many years. IMH has steadfastly served an important, unique role in support of the social and emotional needs that require attention as our young people aspire to productive lives. The opportunities that lie ahead for collaboration with other funders and service providers in creating healthy futures for children in our community are exciting.”

Past IMH Board President Anthony Recasner (left) and current Board President Julius Kimbrough, Jr. (right) welcome Ron McClain (center)


10

Grade Level Reading

89% of AfricanAmerican fourth graders in Louisiana are not reading at grade level, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT.

Reading on grade-level by the end of third grade has been identified by educational researchers as one of the most important predictors of school success and high school graduation. Recent research has revealed strong connections between school success and the mental health of students. Students who are proficient readers by the end of third grade can shift from learning to read to reading to learn, which allows them to master more complex content across all subjects. On the other hand, students who are not reading at grade level by the end of third grade are significantly more likely to experience school failure, mental health challenges and drop out before completing high school. Nationally, two-thirds of the nation’s fourth graders are not reading at grade level, according to National Assessment for Education Progress scores. 80% of the nation’s low-income students miss this critical milestone. The data is worse in Louisiana. Three quarters of Louisiana’s fourth-graders are not reading at grade level. And 85% of Louisiana’s low-income fourth graders are not proficient in reading. The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Campaign for Grade-Level Reading has identified three primary focus areas – in addition to quality teaching and a seamless system of care, services and support – to engage communities in enhancing schools’ efforts to improve grade-level reading by third grade. These align with IMH’s strategic priorities:


11

1. Closing the Readiness Gap: Research has shown that a disproportionate number of low-income families begin school far behind their wealthier peers. By three years of age, low-income children who are not in highquality early care hear 30 million fewer words than their wealthier peers. This gap in exposure to language causes a significant gap in vocabulary, language development and early reading skills. 2. Closing the Attendance Gap: Research has found that one in ten kindergarten and first grade students nationwide misses nearly a month of school each year due to excused and unexcused absences. This chronic absenteeism means children miss critical reading instruction during important formative years of school. 3. Preventing Learning Loss: Enrichment activities during the out-of-school hours throughout the school year and summer reinforce and enhance reading comprehension. Research has shown that children from low-income families who do not have access to high-quality enrichment activities lose as much as three months of reading comprehension skills each summer. By the end of fifth grade, these young people are nearly three grade levels behind their wealthier peers. IMH recognizes the importance of children reading on grade level by the end of third grade. For more than a decade, our work has focused on supporting the optimal mental health of children by improving school readiness, investing in out-ofschool time programs, and helping schools and community organizations effectively address the barriers to attendance and learning in school. In the coming years, we will continue to invest in organizations working to address the three challenges to grade-level reading outlined above.


Summary

12

Summary of Grants by Type

GRANT TYPE

Advocacy

October 19, 2012 – October 22, 2015

Grant Count

Grant Amount

11

$657,500

6

$725,000

Child and Adolescent Mental Health

50

$2,701,434

Early Education

12

$570,275

1

$2,000

Nancy J. Aronson Core Support

Other

For grant application forms, deadlines and details, please visit www.imhno.org or call (504) 566-1852.


13

Advocacy Grants Since 2011, IMH has explicitly invested in advocacy as a strategy to work toward increased public support for the full range of mental health services for children and their families and toward the development of policies and regulations that promote quality in the supports and services available to all children. IMH also supports organizational efforts to increase and strengthen the voices of children, parents and caretakers in their communities and we will support convenings to better inform the public on issues relating to children’s optimal development and mental health. Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families 2013 $25,000

Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights

2015 $50,000.00

New Orleans Children and Youth Planning Board Louisiana Partnership for Children and Families 2012-2013 $25,000 2014 $12,500

Early Childhood Advocacy

NonProfit Knowledge Works 2013-2016 $45,000

Data, Planning and Advocacy Efforts for Children & Families Orleans Public Education Network 2013-2015 $90,000

Parent Leadership Training Institute (PLTI) 2015-2016 $100,000

Family Leadership Training Institute (FLTI) Policy Institute for Children 2014-2016 $50,000

Louisiana Schools Tax Credit Initiative

Silence is Violence 2014-2015 $100,000 2015-2017 $150,000

Victim Allies Project

Stand for Children 2014 $10,000

Early Childhood Program


14

Nancy J. Aronson Core Support Grants (By Invitation Only) IMH also provides Core Support Grants to mental health organizations with a proven record of accomplishment. These grants are intended to provide stable yet flexible dollars to organizations addressing the mental health needs of children and their families. These grants are named the Nancy J. Aronson Core Support Grants Program, in recognition of IMH’s first director’s sixteen-year tenure and her commitment to supporting the work of non profits in the community. Applications are by invitation only. Children’s Bureau of New Orleans 2012-2013 $100,000 2014-2016 $100,000 Family Service of Greater New Orleans 2015-2017 $150,000 Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights 2014-2017 $150,000 Louisiana Partnership for Children and Families 2014-2015 $75,000 Orleans Public Education Network 2015-2017 $150,000


15

Child and Adolescent Grants IMH supports programs providing comprehensive mental health services in public schools and community based programming.

Comprehensive Mental Health Services in Public School Settings

IMH defines comprehensive mental health services as the range of services necessary to address the barriers to learning that many children experience. We are especially interested in efforts that address the barriers that stem from emotional and behavioral issues/problems, which must be integrated with efforts to address barriers that stem from learning and physical health problems. We believe that comprehensive mental health services need to be rooted in a school climate that welcomes and nurtures students and their families. IMH supports the use of prevention programs to build the social and emotional competence of the entire school population.

Community Based Services

IMH supports efforts to increase the availability of prevention, early intervention and treatment services in community settings. Such efforts might include the co-location of mental health services with other well-utilized services for children and their families. IMH supports the provision of services in locations that are easily accessible to vulnerable populations. We also support the development of partnerships and collaborations between multiple organizations that serve the same population. Boy Scouts 2015-2016 $50,000

ScoutReach

Center for Restorative Approaches 2013-2015 $88,200

Akili Academy and Andrew H. Wilson Charter School Children’s Bureau of New Orleans 2012-2014 $152,380

McDonogh City Park School Mental Health Support Services 2013-2015 $166,281 McDonogh City Park School Mental & Behavioral Supports for Students Children’s Health Fund 2014-2015 $25,000

Pediatric Healthcare

City Year 2014-2015 $15,000 Student Support


16

College Track 2014-2016 $62,500

Mental Health in an Institutional Framework Covenant House New Orleans 2015-2017 $96,000

Youth Behavioral Counselor

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice 2014-2017 $50,200

Navigate Her Leadership Institute

Jewish Family Service of Greater New Orleans 2013-2016 $45,000

Teen Life Counts

KIDsmART 2013-2014 $32,476

Emotional Literacy Curriculum 2014-2015 $40,000

Middle School

2015

$12,000

Early Childhood and Family Learning Foundation 2013-2014 $50,000 2014-2016 $50,000

Reducing Barriers to Learning

Ellis Marsalis Center 2015-2017 $100,000

KIPP Discovery Program Expansion 2014 $10,000

Family Service of Greater New Orleans 2013-2014 $37,500

Liberty City Community Development Corporation 2015-2016 $130,000

Mental Health Coordinated Care for the Whole Child

Counseling Services

NOLA Dads

Family Service of Greater New Orleans 2015-2016 $25,000

Parenting Education

Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools 2014-2015 $25,000

Nothing About Us Without Us

Mental Health Services Partnership Liberty’s Kitchen 2013-2015 $30,000

Youth Development Program

Family Service of Greater New Orleans 2015-2016 $50,000

LINKS (Ponchartrain Chapter) 2015-2017 $45,000

Healthy Relationships

Rising Stars Mentoring Program

Foundation for Science and Mathematics Education 2012 $10,000

Louisiana Outdoors Outreach Program (LOOP) 2012 $5,000

The Good Shepherd School 2015 $10,000

Area Health Education Center of Southeast Louisiana 2014 $10,000

Psychoeducational Evaluation Assessment Harriet Tubman Charter School 2014 $20,000

Louisiana Parenting Education Network (LAPEN) – Triple P Training


17

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center 2015-2016 $50,555

Autism Spectrum Disorder Support

New Orleans College Prep Charter School 2014-2016 $100,000

Dropout Prevention Project

New Orleans Family Justice Alliance 2015-2016 $130,000

Treatment of Children Survivors of Violence New Orleans Kids Partnership 2014-2015 $40,000

Building Capacity of Behavioral Youth Providers New Orleans Police and Justice Foundation 2015 $25,000 Project Homecoming 2014-2015 $50,000

Generations of Hope Initiative Reconcile New Orleans 2014 $25,000 2015-2016 $60,000

Mental Wellness Initiative

Silverback Society 2015-2017 $175,000

Mentoring Program

St. Benedict the Moor School 2013-2016 $42,600

School Social Work Program 2014

Parent Play

$5,600

Tulane University 2015-2017 $81,200

Community Talk, Touch & Listen 2015-2016 $56,780

Cornerstone Support

2015-2017 $92,925

New Orleans Day Treatment 2015-2017 $100,000

TCARD

Urban League College Track 2013-2015 $75,000

Mental Health in an Instructional Framework VIA Link 2015-2016 $60,000

Y Texting

YAYA 2015-2016 $50,000

Family Arts

YMCA of Greater New Orleans 2015 $6,737

Babysitting Certification

Youth Empowerment Project 2013 $20,000


18

Early Childhood Grants IMH seeks to strengthen and sustain policies, programs, and providers focusing on early childhood and families with children ages birth to six years.

Early Childhood Program Grants

Through this grantmaking program, IMH will fund programs to increase the number of children ready for kindergarten by building their social and behavioral skills; to increase the social and emotional well-being of children in early childhood programs; to assist parents and caretakers in parenting their children; and to improve the effectiveness of parents and organizations in advocating for programs and policies that address the social and emotional needs of young children. In reviewing applicants, we look for the use of evidencebased approaches. IMH will also fund early intervention and treatment programs for young children with mental health issues. Center for Development and Learning (CDL) 2015 $75,000

New Orleans Early Learning Association 2013 $10,000

Central City Renaissance Alliance 2013-2014 $36,000.00

Early Education Centers in Unison 2013-2014 $40,000

Touchpoints Central City

Children’s World 2013-2014 $20,000

Diverse Delivery

Crescent City Schools 2014-2015 $42,000

PreK at Paul Habans School ECSS 2013-2014 $100,000 Tulane University 2014-2017 $195,000

Fussy Baby Network

Louisiana Children’s Museum 2014 $15,000

Word Play

Shared Services

Tulane University 2014 $10,000

Barbara Lemann 2012

Bright Start

$12,275

Vietnamese Initiatives in Economic Training (VIET) 2014 $15,000

Early Childhood Education Capacity Building Initiative


19

Other Grants IMH participates in several national grantmaking networks to support its mission and improve its effectiveness. Additionally, IMH will make a contribution to a charity of an outgoing Board Chair’s choosing upon the completion of his or her service.

Visiting Pet Program 2013 $2,000


20

I nstitute of M ental Hygiene of t h e C ity of N ew O rleans

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents Accrued investment income Prepaid excise taxes Pledges receivable Loans receivable Total Current Assets

$ 1,238,619 16,220 10,699 313,000 3,500 $ 1,582,038

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Furniture and equipment Less: Accumulated depreciation Total Property and Equipment

OTHER ASSETS

$ 23,356 (17,951) $ 5,405

Investments

$18,945,241

TOTAL ASSETS

$20,532,684

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS ––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable Payroll liabilities Excise taxes payable Grants payable - Current portion Total Current Liabilities

LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

Grants payable - Net of current portion Total Liabilities

NET ASSETS

Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted

$

$

$

44,892 2,329 0 427,443 474,664

282,970 $757.634

$19,316,009 459,041

TOTAL NET ASSETS

$19,775,050

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

$20,532,684

December 31, 2012

SUPPORT, REVENUES AND GAINS ––––––––––––––––––

Contributions Dividends and interest Net realized and unrealized gains on investments Net assets released from restrictions

$ 237,254 399,355

Total Support, Revenue and Gains

$ 3,137,711

1,892,297 608,805

EXPENSES ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Program Services: Grants made to charitable organizations Bridges to Quality expenses Shared Services Alliance expenses Total Program Services Supporting Services: Investment expenses Management and general Total Supporting Services

$ 770,802 608,805 237,254 $1,616,861 $ 92,098 222,307 $314,405

12

TOTAL EXPENSES

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN NET ASSETS

$1,931,266 $1,206,445

NET ASSETS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BEGINNING OF YEAR

$18,109,564

END OF YEAR

$19,316,009


21

I nstitute of M ental Hygiene of t h e C ity of N ew O rleans

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents Accrued investment income Prepaid excise taxes Pledges receivable Loans receivable Total Current Assets

$2,022,850 5,156 0 0 2,040 $2,030,046

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Furniture and equipment Less: Accumulated depreciation Total Property and Equipment

OTHER ASSETS

$ $

23,165 18,013 5,152

Investments

$21,862,397

TOTAL ASSETS

$23,897,595

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS ––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable Payroll liabilities Excise taxes payable Grants payable - Current portion Total Current Liabilities

LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

Grants payable - Net of current portion Total Liabilities

NET ASSETS

Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted

$

$

22,417 7,912 30,597 662,392 723,318

$ $

256,208 979,526

$22,591,400 326,669

TOTAL NET ASSETS

$22,918,069

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

$23,897,595

December 31, 2013

SUPPORT, REVENUES AND GAINS ––––––––––––––––––

Contributions Dividends and interest Net realized and unrealized gains on investments Net assets released from restrictions

$

Total Support, Revenue and Gains

$ 4,757,304

0 374,904 4,250,028 132,372

EXPENSES ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Program Services: Grants made to charitable organizations Bridges to Quality expenses Shared Services Alliance expenses Total Program Services Supporting Services: Investment expenses Management and general Total Supporting Services

$ 931,574 0 137,356 $1,068,930

13

TOTAL EXPENSES

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN NET ASSETS

$ 140,746 272,237 $ 412,983

$1,481,913 $3,275,391

NET ASSETS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BEGINNING OF YEAR

$19,316,009

END OF YEAR

$22,591,400


22

I nstitute of M ental Hygiene of t h e C ity of N ew O rleans

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents Accrued investment income Prepaid excise taxes Loans receivable Total Current Assets

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Furniture and equipment Less: Accumulated depreciation Total Property and Equipment

OTHER ASSETS

$ 3,710,042 8,938 18,769 0 $ 3,737,749

$ $

21,995 16,243 5,762

Investments

$18,720,827

TOTAL ASSETS

$22,464,328

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS ––––––––––––––––––––– CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable Payroll liabilities Excise taxes payable Grants payable - Current portion Total Current Liabilities

LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

Grants payable - Net of current portion Total Liabilities

NET ASSETS

Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted

$

25,240 0 0 1,031,949 $ 1,057,189

$ 450,884 $ 1,508,073

$20,956,255 0

TOTAL NET ASSETS

$20,956,255

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

$22,464,328

December 31, 2014

SUPPORT, REVENUES AND GAINS ––––––––––––––––––

Investment Income Net realized and unrealized gains (losses) on investments Net assets released from restrictions

$ 365,540

Total Support, Revenue and Gains

$ 471,595

(220,614) 326,669

EXPENSES ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Program Services: Grants made to charitable organizations Bridges to Quality expenses Shared Services Alliance expenses Total Program Services

$1,340,180 316,500 390 $1,657,070

Supporting Services: Investment expenses Management and general Total Supporting Services

$ 131,965 317,705 $ 449,670

14

TOTAL EXPENSES

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN NET ASSETS

$2,106,740

($1,635,145)

NET ASSETS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– BEGINNING OF YEAR

$22,591,400

END OF YEAR

$20,956,255


2015 Board of Directors Julius E. Kimbrough, Jr., President Allison Boothe Ayanna Butler J. Storey Charbonnet Martin Drell Bernadette D’Souza David Francis Mia D. Merrell Adrian L. Morgan Beverly R. Nichols Maggie Runyan-Shefa Mahlon D. Sanford Jilla K. Tombar Qi Wiggins Carol Wise Ron McClain, Executive Director

editing The Verbena Group design Dandelion Design


institute of mental hygiene

1055 Saint Charles Avenue Suite 350 New Orleans, LA 70130 tel 504.566.1582 fax 504.566.1853 www.imhno.org

IMH 2012 - 2014 Triennial Report  
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