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radical hope prophetic action IGNATIAN FAMILY TEACH-IN FOR JUSTICE NOVEMBER 16-18, 2019


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ARLINGTON IFTJ REGISTRATION

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IFTJ ART Rooted in the Roses: Honoring the Martyrs Through Art As we honor the Salvadoran martyrs, visit Rooted in the Roses to explore the martyrs’ stories, screenprint a bandana or sign, and be inspired in your own activism. Presented in the hall behind the registration desk by Kate Marshall, artist and facilitator of the House of Hagar Catholic Worker in Wheeling, WV.

REGISTRATION

ALEXANDRIA

FAIRFAX BOARDROOM

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CAPITOL TOWER

MADISON JACKSON

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RESTAURANTS/SHOPS GUEST ELEVATORS/ESCALATORS

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HOTEL SERVICES

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LIBRARY

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ELEVATORS TO GARAGE ELEVATORS TO CAPITOL TOWER

JEFFERSON LEE

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SKYVIEW LOUNGE

ELEVATORS TO CAPITOL PENTAGON A/B TOWER CAPITOL BOARDROOM

GRAND REGISTRATION

BUSINESS CENTER

SOCIAL JUSTICE PHOTO BOOTH Share your passion for justice with the world! Stop by the #IFTJ Social Justice Photo Booth near the grand ballroom escalators for an opportunity to share your justice message on social media and with fellow #IFTJ attendees.


IFTJ

WELCOME

A NOT E F ROM T HE DIR EC TOR For more than twenty years, the Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice has brought people together to honor the legacy of the Jesuit martyrs of El Salvador and their companions by approaching the world with radical hope and prophetic action. This year, we mark the 30th anniversary of the deaths of the Salvadoran martyrs. With their witness as our guide, we endeavor to stand together at the margins of today’s world as they did in El Salvador—to take prophetic steps to work toward a world that better upholds the dignity of all. As we gather together as new and returning members of the Ignatian family, may we all find radical hope in our common work. May our hearts be set on fire as we put our faith into action, both this weekend and as we return to our communities.

Christopher Kerr Executive Director Ignatian Solidarity Network

@igsolidaritynet

@ignatiansolidarity STAFF José Arnulfo Cabrera Director of Education and Advocacy for Migration Erin Brown Program Director Lena Chapin Networking and Development Director Kim Coleman Integrated Marketing Director Brenna Davis Director of Education for Justice and Environmental Initiatives Chris Kerr Executive Director Kelly Swan Communications Director Elizabeth Cross Administrative Assistant Caitlin Drake Intern Ally Fritsch Intern Matt Loughran Intern Keira Reilly Intern Josie Schuman Intern

Why the roses? This year’s theme honors the 30th anniversary of the martyrdom of the Jesuits and their companions at the University of Central America in El Salvador. Today, a rose garden marks the place where their lives were taken for speaking justice to power. We offer this Teach-In in their spirit of radical hope and prophetic action. Learn more about the martyrs’ legacy on page 7.


CONTENTS

SATURDAY

NOV EMB ER 16

3 Schedule 5 Social Justice Expo Map 6 Food Map 7 The Legacy of the Jesuit Martyrs 11 Keynotes 14 Emcees/ Musicians 15 Ignatian Network Speakers 17 Breakout Session #1 19 Breakout Session #2 21 Breakout Session #3

Registration Desk/Store Hours: Noon-10 p.m.

PRE-SESSIONS

Social Justice Expo Hours: 3-10 p.m.

Pre-registration required unless otherwise noted

3:00 Pre-Sessions

4:30 Pre-Sessions

Jesuit Martyrs: Reflecting on their Legacy and What It Means to Us Today | CRISPAZ and the University of Central America | Salon K

Young Alumni Happy Hour Q&A (21+ only) | Sr. Peggy O’Neill, S.C., and James Martin, S.J. | Salon CDE | $10 Friends of ISN Reception | Skyview

Making the Connections: The UCA Martyrs and the Realities of Migration Today | Bob Lassalle-Klein, Holy Names University | Salon FG

Death Penalty Documentary Screening | Catholic Mobilizing Network | Salon H

Advocacy 101: How to Have an Effective Lobby Visit on the Hill (and Back Home) | Alex Burnett and Charlotte Hakikson, NETWORK | Salon A

Living Theology, Transforming Our World: An Invitation to Prophetic Action | Jesuit School of Theology Madison

Active Bystander Intervention Workshop | DC Peace Team and Conference of Major Superiors of Men | Salon J

Journalism at the Intersection of Faith and Justice | America Media | Jefferson

Ignatian Yoga: An Embodied Practice of Prayer & Reflection | Pat Cassidy, Ignatian Yoga | Salon B

Garbage and Justice: Working to Break Free From Poverty | International Samaritan | Salon J

Fostering Rehabilitation: The Many Facets of Catholic Prison Ministry | Catholic Prison Ministry Coalition | Rosslyn | This session runs from 3:00-5:30.

Reviving Civil Rights Movement Religion | Sojourners Salon A High School Networking Sessions | Multiple Locations

23 Liturgy 25 Public Witness/ Advocacy Day

GENER AL SESSION Arlington Foyer

3:00 General Registration

Charles Currie, S.J., Memorial Keynote:

7:05 Keynote: Peggy O’Neill, S.C.

7:45 Break: Say Hello to Our 6:00 Welcome & Introductions Exhibitors Chris Kerr, Ignatian Solidarity Network 8:20 Breakout Session #1 Opening Prayer Breaking Open the Arlington Ballroom Theme 9:30 Prayer for the Francisco Mena Ugarte, Chris- Jesuit Martyrs General Session - Arlington Ballroom

tians for Peace in El Salvador

6:45 Ignatian Network Speakers

Vrushangi Shah There Is No Finish Line for Social Justice Chloe Becker Love Requires Justice

Skyview Lounge

10:00 T-Shirt Swap Please note: all meeting rooms are reserved

10:00 Group Reflection


SUNDAY

NOV EMB ER 17

Registration Desk/Store Hours: 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Social Justice Expo Hours: 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

1:10 Breakout Session #3 General Session - Arlington Ballroom

2:25 Ignatian Network Speakers

Ben Campion Climate Justice: An Interconnected Solution Arlin TĂŠllez Martinez Radical Hope in Immigration

General Session - Arlington Ballroom

8:15 Regather & Announcements Opening Prayer 9:00 Ignatian Network Speakers

Emma Menchaca-Chavez and Regi Worles At the Crossroads: Staying the Cross for a Love That is Whole Danny Gustafson, S.J. The Incarnation: Why and How to Be Civically Engaged

3:00 Keynote: Reyna Montoya 3:35 Policy Briefing: Environment

Jose Aguto, Catholic Climate Covenant

3:50 Break: Say Hello to Our Exhibitors Arlington Ballroom

4:30 Liturgy

9:15 Policy Briefing: Immigration Joanna Williams, Kino Border Initiative 5:45 Dinner See page 6 for nearby food options 9:30 Keynote: Marcia Chatelain, Ph.D. 10:10 Break 10:40 Breakout Session #2 11:30 Lunch See page 6 for nearby food options Networking Lunches No RSVP required; Lunch provided:

Your training room location available at reg. desk

7:15 Advocacy Training

Please note: all meeting rooms are reserved

8:45 Group Reflection

MONDAY

NOV EMB ER 18

How Radical Community Changes Us and the World | Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest | Manassas Religious Life: A Faith That Does Justice | Jesuit Vocations | McLean Approaching Hope: How Our Faith in Action Can Leave a Lasting Impact | Jesuit Volunteer Corps | Alexandria IgnatianQ | IgnatianQ | Salon G

Columbus Circle, Union Station, Washington, D.C.

9:00 Public Witness

9:45 Ignatian Family Advocacy Day

RSVP required:

Education for Justice | Education for Justice | Suite 1729 Small Earth Stories: A Workshop on Climate Change | National Catholic Reporter| Alexandria Contemplatives in Action: Fostering Radical Hope in Graduate School | Boston College School of Theology and Ministry | Mt. Vernon

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cLEAN

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4/5 6/7

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28/27/26

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14 15

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ARLINGTON REGISTRATION

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BUSINESS CENTER

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SOCIAL JUSTICE EXPO ENTRANCE TO CRYSTAL CITY UNDERGROUND AND METRO

ARLINGTON TOWER

HOURS: 11/16 , 3 -10 P. M . | 11/17, 8 A . M .- 6:0 0 P. M .

JACKSON

FRONT DESK

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MADISON

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1-3 | Ignatian Solidarity Network

MAIN LOBBY 26-27 GIFT | America Media

4-5 | Jesuit School of Theology at

28 | The Jesuit Post

SHOP

49 | Rostro de Cristo

29 | Catholic Labor Network

BARof Theology 50 | Saint John’s School

Santa Clara University 6-7 | Boston College School of

30 | Catholic Legal Immigration

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Theology and Ministry

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8 | Jesuit Conference/Jesuit Vocations ELEVATORS TO GARAGE

9 |University of San Francisco McGrath Institute 10 | Sojourners ARLINGTON TOWER 11 | International

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Samaritan

12 | Villanova Campus Ministry 13 | USCCB/CCHD

48 |

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CONCIERGE

Network, Inc. 31 | St. Joseph Worker Program 32 | Ignatian Service Corps

and Seminary LIBRARY

51 | Jubilee USA Network CAPITOL TOWER

52 | Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos USA

33 | Magis Americas

53 | St. Vincent Mission, Inc.

34 | Spes Nova

54 | Jesuit Universities Humanitarian

35 | Loyola University Maryland 36 | Theology of Healing Earth in Action Institute

Action Network HOTEL SERVICES

56 | GUEST L’arche Greater Washington, D.C.ARLINGTON TO ELEVATORS/ESCALATORS

37 | Maggie’s Place

57 | Dominican Sisters of Sinsinawa

15 | Catholic Volunteer Network

38 | Kino Border Initiative

58 | Loretto Volunteer Program

16 | Equal Exchange

39 | Courts for Kids

59 | The Center for Global Education

17 | Ethix Merch

40 | Orbis Books

18 | National Catholic Reporter

41 | Maryknoll Lay Missioners

60 | Center for FaithJustice

19 | Jesuit Volunteer Corps

42 | New Ways Ministries

61 | Ignatian Yoga

20 | Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest

43 | Alliance for Catholic Education

62 | Sisters of the Precious Blood

Teaching Fellows

and Experience

63 | CRISPAZ

22 | Bread for the World

44 | Catholic Mobilizing Network

64 | Cristo Rey Jesuit High School

23 | Be the Light Youth Theology

45 | NETWORK Lobby for Catholic

65 | Voter Registration

Institute at Canisius College

Social Justice

24 | Network of Sacred Heart Schools

46 | Francisco Herrera

25 | Commonweal Magazine

47 | Hug it Forward

RESTROOMS

55 | Farm of the Child / Finca del NiñoCAPITOL TOWE RESTAURANTS/SHOPS

14 | Georgetown University

21 | Jesuit Refugee Service/USA

LOBBY LE


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A. Gateway Marriott

Coffee Shops B. Dunkin Donuts ($)

E. Extreme Pizza ($)

I. Chipotle ($)

M. Highline RxR ($$)

1419 S Fern St., Arlington, VA

Call ahead/online ordering

2010 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

T: 703-271-1020

2231 Crystal Dr Lobby 100

T: 703-413-2337

11 a.m.–11 p.m.

Arlington, VA

Sat/Sun 12 p.m.–1 a.m.

Mobile ordering available

T: 703-920-8779

1687 Crystal Square Arcade

F. Cosi ($)

Arlington, VA

2011 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

Sat 7 a.m.–6 p.m.

T: 703-521-1904

J. Mezeh ($)

T: 571-312-1902

Sun 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

7:30 a.m.–8 p.m.

2450 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

Sat 10 a.m.–7 p.m.

T: 703-685-9907

Sun 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Mon 6 a.m.–6 p.m. G. Good Stuff Eatery ($)

10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

N. A Deli ($$) 1301 S Joyce St., Arlington, VA

11 a.m.–10 p.m.

C. Starbucks ($)

2110 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

Mobile app ordering available

T: 703-415-4663

K. SweetGreen ($)

2800 S Randolph St.

2231 Crystal Dr Suite 16

Sat 11 a.m.–11 p.m. 

2200 Crystal Dr Suite E

Arlington, VA

Arlington, VA

Sun 11:30 a.m.–9 p.m.

Arlington, VA

T: 703-894-2250

T: 703-271-1020

Sat 10 a.m.–11 p.m.

10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

Sun 12 p.m.–9 p.m.

T: 703-415-7992

Restaurants

Other

Sat 11 a.m.–11 p.m.

L. San Antonio Grill ($$)

P. Rite Aid Pharmacy

Sun 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

T: 703-418-0226 Sat/Sun 6 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

H. We, The Pizza ($)

Mon 5 a.m.–8 p.m.

2100 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

Quick Bites D. Subway ($)

O. Cafe Pizzaiolo ($$)

1664 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

1671 Crystal Square Arcade,

2154 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA

T: 703-415-0126

Arlington, VA

T: 703-413-2233

Sat 11 a.m.–10 p.m.

T: 703-413-5430

Sat 8 a.m.–8 p.m. 

Sat 8 a.m.–7 p.m.

Sun 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Sun 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Restaurant Directory: www.thecrystalcityshops.com

Short on time? Call ahead food orders.

6


A LASTING LEGACY

THE JESUIT MARTYRS AND THEIR COMPANIONS On November 16, 1989, Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J., Ignacio Martín-Baró, S.J., Segundo Montes Mozo, S.J., Juan Ramón Moreno, S.J., Joaquín López y López, S.J., Amando López, S.J., their housekeeper Elba Ramos, and her 15-year-old daughter Celina Ramos, were murdered at the University of Central America (UCA) in San Salvador, El Salvador during the civil war that ravaged El Salvador from 1979 to 1992. Nineteen of the 26 soldiers who committed the murders were trained at the U.S. Army School of the Americas (SOA) as part of American aid to the Salvadoran government and military. Through their work with the poor and marginalized in El Salvador during the Salvadoran civil war, the Catholic Church and its leaders, including the Jesuits and now-Saint Óscar Romero, sought to address the long history of inequality and injustice in the country. The Salvadoran government worried that the actions of Church leaders would threaten their power and stability, and the military actively targeted the Catholic Church throughout the 1980s. As president of the Jesuit-run University of Central America, Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J., and his colleagues were outspoken about the rights of the poor and about the military’s violence against Salvadorans. This sort of public criticism only intensified the government’s response. When the government launched an offensive attack in the center of San Salvador in 1989, Colonel Rene Emilio Ponce handed down orders to search the university campus and, as a result, to execute the six Jesuits. The lives and loss of these martyrs have significantly influenced the Ignatian family in the United States and throughout the world. Over the past 30 years, Jesuit institutions have redefined what it is to be universities, high schools, parishes, etc. in light of the martyrs, discerning new ways of addressing issues of social justice.


IF T J 2019 T HEME

RADICAL HOPE PROPHETIC ACTION At the 2019 Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice, we affirm Radical Hope and we prepare to take Prophetic Action. Despite injustice in the world, we gather in hope-filled expectation, seeking encounter. We place the witness of the Salvadoran martyrs at the forefront of our learning, prayer, and action. They stood with those at the margins of society at the cost of their lives, taking Prophetic Action that expressed God’s love for all people and all creation. And we join in community to find support in our common charge and strength in our diverse voices and perspectives. Pope Francis reminds us that hope is alive in our daily lives because it is found in encounter; whether in prayer, community life, or in meeting each other. Jesus calls us to live in hope—to live in expectation that justice will come and to encounter God’s people and creation each day. As a people of Radical Hope, we trust in God’s promise—the promise of peace and justice, the vision of equality and dignity. We find our hope in Christ’s living message and model. And we honor the witness of the Salvadoran Martyrs.

(O U T S I D E , C L O C K W I S E F R O M T O P ) 1. Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J. 2 . Juan Ramón Moreno Pardo, S.J. 3 . Segundo Montes Mozo, S.J. 4 . Amando López Quintana, S.J. 5 . Julia Elba Ramos 6 . Obdulio, husband of Elba and father of Celina, planted a circle of six red rose bushes for the Jesuits and two yellow rose bushes in the center of the circle for his wife and daughter. The roses still grow today. 7. Celina Maricet Ramos 8 . Joaquín López y López, S.J. 9 . Ignacio Martín-Baró, S.J. (C E N T E R , C L O C K W I S E F R O M T O P ) 1. The Monument to Memory and Truth in Parque Cuscatlan in San Salvador, erected in 2003 and listing civilians who were killed or “disappeared” during the civil war. 2 . Celina and her brother, José 3 . A mural from the chapel at the UCA, depicting the crucified people of El Salvador. 4 . Ellacuría listens to a fútbol match. 5 . Liturgy in El Francis, at the Casa Santa Marta, 10/23/2108 Salvador. (C E N T*Pope ER IM A G E ) Homily Plaque in rose garden bearing the names of the Jesuit martyrs.

As a people of Prophetic Action, we discern and accept the invitation to reveal God’s Kingdom. Guided by the Spirit, we read the signs of the times and join together to care for one another and our common home.

8


THE LEGACY ENDURES

1989

Immediate Reactions of the Jesuit Network The network immediately began to mobilize to call attention to the U.S. role in the deaths of the Jesuits and their companions in El Salvador.

ROMERO AND THE CHURCHWOMEN At the beginning of the Salvadoran civil war in 1980, now-Saint Óscar Romero was killed by the Salvadoran military while celebrating Mass. Also in 1980, four American churchwomen were raped and murdered, also by military forces. Romero, the churchwomen, and the Jesuit martyrs were killed for their commitment to the marginalized people of El Salvador and speaking out against the injustices perpetrated by the government and military.

SOA, IFTJ, and the “Moveable Tent” Nineteen of the 26 soliders involved in the murder of the Jesuit martyrs and their companions were trained at the U.S. Army School of the Americas (SOA) at Fort Benning in Georgia. A gathering to call attention to this grew through the 1990s, and in 1997 the first IFTJ was held under a “moveable tent,” envisioned by founders as a space to address current and future justice issues.

BOB AND CHARLIE Robert Holstein and Charlie Currie, S.J., were integral to creating the vision for IFTJ. Fr. Currie was involved in the investigation into the murder of the Jesuit martyrs. Holstein, a former Jesuit, later partnered with Fr. Currie, then president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, to mobilize the network to attend the yearly SOA gathering and a vigil, which eventually became IFTJ.

2004

Building on the energy of IFTJ, the Ignatian Solidarity Network is formed. The Ignatian Solidarity Network was founded in 2004 as a lay-led nonprofit working in partnership with the Jesuits.


2006

BEYOND THE TENT IFTJ moved in 2006 from the tent to the Columbus Convention & Trade Center in Georgia to accommodate growing attendance.

2010

From the gates of Fort Benning to the Halls of Congress IFTJ moved from Georgia to Washington, D.C., allowing the Ignatian family to gather in proximity to the U.S. Capital to incorporate legislative advocacy as a method of working for justice. IFTJ remains grounded in the traditions from our time at the gates of Fort Benning through music, art, public witness, and the prayer for the Jesuit martyrs.

SINCE 2010, ISN HAS ENGAGED MORE THAN

10,000 PEOPLE

in legislative advocacy through Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice Advocacy Days.

2021

ISN’S GROWING PROGRAMS Beyond IFTJ, ISN has grown to include a host of dynamic programs across the U.S. each year for high school and college students, parishioners, school staff, and more—including the Arrupe Leaders Summit, the Ignatian Justice Summit on Immigration, the Jesuit Parish Justice Summit, and the Immersion Coordinators Summit.

A GROWING IFTJ Since the move to Washington, D.C., IFTJ has doubled from 1,000 attendees to more than 2,000 each year, consistently selling out within weeks of registration opening. To accommodate this growing hunger for justice, IFTJ is moving to the Washington Hilton in 2021, to allow us to welcome 3,000+ people to the gathering.

10


KEYNOTE S AT UR DAY, NOV EMBER 16 | 7:05 P.M .

SR. PEGGY O’NEILL, S.C. Sr. Peggy O’Neill, S.C., has been living in El Salvador for the past 33 years, during which time she has been an active member of the Pastoral Team at Santa Lucia Parish Suchitoto. She is the director of Centro Arte para la Paz (Center of Arts for Peace), a regional educational cultural center promoting peace through dance, art, and theological reflection in Suchitoto, El Salvador. She founded this healing space in 2006 and works toward building a culture of peace using the arts as a vehicle. A highly respected longtime peace activist, Sr. Peggy has received many honors and awards including the 2008 Peacemaker Award of the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace, recognizing her many

“You never see a U-haul behind a hearse. What we carry with us are those moments of oneness and our connections with all that is alive, all we have birthed and nourished and loved.” years of peace efforts in El Salvador and honoring her “contribution to peace making and work for justice.” Also, in 2008 she received the Ciudadana Ilustre Award, for her work on behalf of social and cultural development in Suchitoto. Sister Peggy holds degrees from Marquette University and

New York University. Sr. Peggy has served as a professor at Augsburg College, Center for Global Education; Santa Clara University, Casa de Solidaridad; and Iona College in New Rochelle, NY.


SUNDAY, NOV EMBER 17 9:3 0 A .M .

MARCIA CHATELAIN, PH.D. Marcia Chatelain, Ph.D., is a Provost’s Distinguished Associate Professor of History and African American Studies at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Previously, she was a Reach for Excellence Assistant Professor of Honors and African American Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She is a graduate of St. Ignatius College Prep, the University of Missouri-Columbia (B.A. Journalism/Religious Studies), and Brown University (A.M. and Ph.D., American Civilization). Her first book, South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration, reimagined the mass exodus of black Southerners to the urban North from the perspective of girls and teenage women.

recognition of her social media campaign #FergusonSyllabus, which implored educators to facilitate discussions about the crisis in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014.

Her latest book, Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America, examines the intersection of the post-1968 civil rights struggle and the rise of the fast food industry. Her next book will examine the history of college access programs and the specific ways that first-generation college students are transforming higher education. Chatelain has contributed to The Atlantic, Time, The Washington Post, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the podcast “Undisclosed,” serving as the resident historian on a narrative arc about the 2015 death of Freddie Gray while in the custody of the Baltimore Police Department. Chatelain has received awards and honors from the Ford Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the German Marshall Fund of the United States. At Georgetown, she has won several teaching awards. In 2016, The Chronicle of Higher Education named her a Top Influencer in academia in

“If we imagine all of our American institutions as being predicated on a sacrifice of human life, and of human dignity, then perhaps we might have a different relationship not only to our institutions, but to each other. ” 12


KEYNOTE SUNDAY, NOV EMBER 17 | 3 P. M .

REYNA MONTOYA Reyna Montoya is the founder and CEO of Aliento, a community organization that is DACA, undocumented, and youthled, invested in the well being, emotional healing, and leadership development of those impacted by the inequalities of lacking an immigration status. Montoya was born in Tijuana, Mexico and migrated to Arizona in 2003, fleeing violence. She is an undocumented/DACAmented social entrepreneur, community organizer, educator, and dancer. She is a 2016 Soros Justice Fellow, which enabled her to start Aliento. She is also a founding member of the first Teach for America DACA Advisory Board. She currently serves as a member of the Leadership Council of the ASU Lodestar Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Innovation. Montoya holds degrees from Arizona State University and Grand Canyon University. She recently completed

“We as a community, we as a nation have a responsibility [to protect] one another, to [protect] human dignity.”

an executive education program from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She has engaged in local, statewide, and national platforms to advance justice for immigrant communities. In 2013, she was the lead organizer preventing an immigration bus of undocumented immigrants from deportation in Phoenix for the first time in the nation’s history. In the same year, with the help of the community, she stopped her father’s deportation. She was recognized as a 2017

#NBCLatino20, a 2017 Echoing Green Fellow, a 2018 Forbes: 30 Under 30 Social Entrepreneur, and was the 2018 Humanitarian Recipient for Spirituality by the Muhammad Ali Center. In 2018, she was recognized by Univision as one of the 15 Latinas currently transforming the world. She hopes to share her talents and skills with the community to co-create healing spaces, political change, and leadership development of immigrant youth and migrant families.


MUSICIANS

KEN HOMAN, S.J.

FR ANCISCO HERRER A

Ken Homan, S.J., is a Jesuit brother from the Midwest Province studying at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry. Ken attended SLU High and Creighton before entering the Jesuits. Ken began coming to IFTJ in 2005, first hearing the call to enter the Jesuits at the IFTJ mass in 2006.

Francisco Herrera has been artist in residence with the Ignatian Family Teach-In for over a decade, during which time he has accompanied the IFTJ learning process by complementing the conference with songs that animate, engage, and inspire participants to go a little deeper in social discernment and organizing efforts. Francisco is currently campus minister at St. Joseph Notre Dame High School in Alameda, California. He and his wife, Maria Christina, direct Trabajo Cultural Caminante, a ministerial project through which they train communities in leadership, theology, organizing, and the arts. They are available to work with universities, colleges, and high schools throughout the country as they do with Ignatian Family Teach-In every year. The Ignatian family is happy to have Francisco with us again this year. Be sure to check out his breakout sessions and consider inviting him to your school or parish.

SCARLY RODRIGUEZ Scarly Rodriguez is a 2016 graduate of Fordham University. She spent two years in El Salvador with the University of Central America Volunteer Program and Casa de la Solidaridad. Scarly is currently working in NYC with the Sadie Nash Leadership Project: strengthening, empowering, and equipping young women and gender expansive youth.

EMCEES + MUSICIANS

EMCEES

THE PEACE POETS The Peace Poets are Frank Antonio López (Frankie 4), Abraham Velázquez, Jr. (A-B-E), Enmanuel Candelario (The Last Emcee), Frantz Jerome (Ram3), and Lu Aya. Grounded in the power of personal narratives and community, The Peace Poets create and have shared spoken word poetry, rap, and movement music that responds to social and political crises in over 40 countries. The Peace Poets wrote the song, “I Can’t Breathe,” about the death of Eric Garner. The actor Samuel Jackson heard the song, and via Youtube invited celebrities and others to record their own versions of it. It went viral, becoming an anthem of the Movement for Black Lives, widely sung in demonstrations. The Peace Poets have similarly worked with immigration rights, indigenous, and environmental justice groups to develop music as part of their political practice.

14


IGNATIAN NETWORK SPEAKERS

Chloe Becker

Ben Campion

Danny Gustafson, S.J.

M AG N I F I C AT HIGH SCHOOL

G O N Z AG A CO L L E G E HIGH SCHOOL

THE JESUIT POST

Chloe Becker is a senior at Magnificat High School in Cleveland, Ohio. This past year, she painted a mural in her school inspired by the call defined in Catholic Social Teaching to dismantle racism. The mural displays three African saints and two African American Catholic leaders who have causes for canonization. Above the saints, she painted constellations to represent a specific area of systemic racism (housing, education, wealth, criminal justice, and healthcare). Her aim was to educate her school on the lives of these saints and to raise school-wide awareness of the systemic racism prevalent today in the U.S.

Ben Campion is a senior at Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C. He is an active member of the Peace Club and helped lead Gonzaga’s participation in the Climate Strike on September 20, 2019.

Danny Gustafson, S.J., is a Jesuit scholastic studying theology at Boston College. He entered the Jesuits after graduating from Georgetown University in 2011. In college, he worked in the U.S. House of Representatives and at a political consulting firm. Jesuit life has taken him to Loyola University Chicago for philosophy studies, Fordham Preparatory School to teach religion, and now to B.C. He is editor emeritus of The Jesuit Post and is delighted to be attending his eighth Teach-In.

Emma MenchacaChavez and Regi Worles REGIS UNIVERSIT Y Emma Menchaca-Chavez is from Denver, Colorado. She is a sophomore at Regis University, majoring in politics with minors in Spanish and peace and justice. She serves as the director of the Regis University Student Government Association (RUSGA) Social Justice and Diversity Committee and is co-chair of the IgnatianQ 2020 conference. Regi Worles is originally from Memphis, Tennessee. He is currently a senior at Regis University double majoring in philosophy and peace and justice, with a minor in community food systems and women and gender studies. He serves as the Vice President of Social Justice and Diversity for the RUSGA.


Vrushangi Shah

Arlin Téllez Martinez

S A I N T LO U I S UNIVERSIT Y

Vrushangi Shah is a senior studying health management and public health at Saint Louis University. She attended IFTJ as a delegate and student leader for the last two years, gaining so much insight on social justice from a Catholic Social Teaching perspective. As a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar, a South Asian immigrant, and a woman, she is passionate about continuing her journey in advocating and amplifying the voices of those who do not share the same privileges as her. She hopes to bring to light her Hindu beliefs and join hands with those who identify in a different religious/spiritual medium. She believes, no matter how different, if we come together, we can achieve liberation of those oppressed.

POLIC Y BRIEFING

POLIC Y BRIEFING

Jose Aguto

Joanna Williams

TRINIT Y WA S H I N G T O N UNIVERSIT Y

C AT H O L I C C L I M AT E COV E N A N T

KINO BORDER I N I T I AT I V E

Arlin Téllez Martinez is a sophomore at Trinity Washington University, where she is a recipient of TheDream.US scholarship, created to give undocumented students access to higher education. She is double majoring in international relations and political science. As an undocumented immigrant from Hidalgo, Mexico, Arlin is passionate about her community and has held various leadership positions advocating and organzing for criminal justice and immigrant rights. She hopes to become an attorney and further her work around immigrant rights and prison abolition.

Jose is blessed to participate in the Catholic Climate Covenant’s mission to advance the Catholic Church’s call for us to love and care for God’s creation, especially for our most vulnerable neighbors. He tries to affirm the moral, spiritual, and nonpartisan foundations of this appeal, so that we can build bridges through divisions and generate lasting, compassionate, and cooperative solutions for the climate crisis. Before the Covenant, he served with the Friends Committee on National Legislation, the National Congress of American Indians, EPA’s American Indian Environmental Office, and the 10th Mountain Division of the U.S. Army. José is a graduate of Brown University and Villanova Law School.

Joanna Williams has been the Director of Education and Advocacy at the Kino Border Initiative (KBI) in Nogales, Arizona and Sonora since 2015. She graduated with a bachelor of science from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and received a master’s in public policy from Arizona State University. Prior to her current position, she has journeyed with immigrants in a variety of contexts. She volunteered at a shelter in Tierra Blanca, Veracruz, conducted Fulbright research on the reintegration of deported and return migrants, and worked as a coordinator for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Border Litigation Project.

16


BREAKOUT SESSION #1 S ATU RDAY 8 :2 0 - 9 :1 0 P.M.

SALON 1/2

SALON 3/4

SALON 5/6

Journeying Together: Addressing Racial Justice

Welcoming and Respecting LGBT Catholics in Our Parishes

Seeking Refuge at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Stories of Asylum Seekers

Beginning with a clear look at our present reality, this panel will examine ways in which our schools, communities, society, and the Church are failing to uphold racial equity, and also places where they find hope in this work. Discussion will then turn to prophetic action, asking: what are we called to do to build racial equity in our world?

How can the Catholic Church more compassionately welcome its LGBT members? How can we build a bridge between the institutional church and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people? Fr. Martin, author of Building a Bridge, invites you into a discussion of respect, sensitivity, and compassion. All are welcome.

Why would someone seek asylum at the U.S. border with Mexico? Hear firsthand testimonies of two individuals who have personal experiences with the asylum process as well as policy analysis from the Kino Border Initiative.

C A R LO S J I M É N E Z

JAMES MARTIN, S.J.

J UA N C A R LO S C A S T R O F LO R E S

Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Bellarmine College Preparatory

M AU R E E N O ’ CO N N E L L , P H . D. Associate Professor of Christian Ethics, LaSalle University

M A R Y WA R D E L LG H I R A R D U Z Z I , P H . D.

James Martin, S.J., is a Jesuit priest, author, and editor-at-large at America Media. His most recent book is Building a Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community Can Enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion, and Sensitivity (HarperOne). He is known for his appearances on The Colbert Report and his robust social media presence.

Vice Provost for Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach, University of San Francisco

S P O N S O R E D B Y: Jesuit School of Theology at Santa Clara University

Asylum recipient originally from Honduras

M A R T I N A PA B LO PA B LO

Indigenous teenage asylum seeker originally from Guatemala

J OA N N A W I L L I A M S

Director of Education and Advocacy, Kino Border Initiative

M O D E R ATO R : C E C I L I A G O N Z Á L E Z- A N D R I E U

Associate Professor of Theological Studies, Loyola Marymount University

S P O N S O R E D B Y: Boston College School of Theology and Ministry

S P O N S O R E D B Y: America Media


SALON A /B

SALON C-H

SALON J/K

The Iceberg in the Room: Why Catholics Can’t Freeze on Climate Change

POVERTY: It is a System NOT an Accident

Innocence, Racial Injustice, and the Death Penalty

From fossil fuel extraction to climate-related disasters, communities and the environment around the world experience both the drivers and impacts of climate change. Panelists will share stories of sorrow and hope, and will share how schools and the Catholic Church can act in solidarity with marginalized communities to stem climate change, especially through the divestment movement.

This workshop will explore the income disparity in our nation and how federal laws make it worse. In response to legislation that favors the wealthy, we need to develop our skills to be lobbyists for the COMMON good.

Alfred “Dewayne” Brown, the subject of an upcoming Netflix documentary, was released from Texas’ death row in 2015 after spending more than 12 years in prison for a crime he did not commit. Dewayne’s case was riddled with injustice: prosecutorial misconduct, ineffective defense counsel, racial bias, corrupt police. Hear from Dewayne and his attorney about ways we can work to build a more just justice system.

C H LO E N O E L

SIMONE C AMPBELL , S.S.S.

Faith-Economy-Ecology Program Director, Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns

S A M A N T H A PA N C H É V R E

Research Specialist, Gartner; Georgetown University ’19

CHRISTINA LE AÑO

Associate Director, Global Catholic Climate Movement

Sr. Simone Campbell has served as executive director of NETWORK since 2004. She is a religious leader and attorney with extensive experience in public policy and advocacy for systemic change. She lobbies, speaks, and educates on issues of economic justice, immigration reform, and healthcare. She has been instrumental in organizing the national “Nuns on the Bus” tours.

A L F R E D “ D E WAY N E ” B R O W N Exoneree

B R I A N S TO L A R Z , E S Q. Attorney

M O D E R ATO R : K R I S A N N E VA I L L A N CO U R T M U R P H Y

Executive Director, Catholic Mobilizing Network

M O D E R ATO R : C E C I L I A C A LV O

Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Justice and Ecology, Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States

18


BREAKOUT SESSION #2 SUNDAY 10:4 0 -11:3 0 A .M .

Radical Hope in Radical Darkness | Catholic Prison Ministries Coalition -

Taking Account: El Salvador’s 30 Year Struggle for Justice | Jesuit Conference

George Williams, S.J., Dr. Ronald Garrett, Marvin Jackson >> Perhaps the most

Office of Justice and Ecology - Caitlin-Marie Ward, Michael Reed-Hurtado, Almudena

radical place to seek hope is in one of the U.S.’s 5,000+ prisons. Hear how an

Bernabeu >> Examine the case of a former Salvadoran colonel facing trial for

inmate, a returning citizen, and a death row chaplain have experienced the

masterminding the assassination of six Jesuits, their housekeeper, and her

transformational love and light of Christ. |All Groups| Alexandria

daughter during the Salvadoran civil war. His case exemplifies the risks and rewards of retroactive justice in a society still grappling with wounds inflicted

Spes Nova: Connecting Students and Local Artisans | Spes Nova - Ngan

by violence in both the past and present. @jesuitjustice |US-US*-P| McLean

Tran, Victor Sapkota, Alison Stauffer, Dr. Erick Rengifo >> We will share our vision of building a global network to help local micro enterprises uplift their families

Cultural Work and Public Witness | Trabajo Cultural Caminante Inc. - Francisco

and communities. Interact virtually with artisans from Kenya and learn how

Herrera >> Explore the ability to move hearts, minds, and issues in harmony

you can join the Spes Nova family to alleviate poverty. |HS-US-US*| Fairfax

with Gospel values. Use your artistic self whether it be through music, written

Boardroom

language, body movement, etc. to prepare the liturgical/cultural component of Monday’s public witness.|All Groups| Mount Vernon

Navigating Conversation at the Thanksgiving Table | Loyola Academy Grayson Pitt, Alex Lupo >> Having open conversations with people can be tough.

Digital Storytelling at the Margins | Regis Jesuit High School - Adam Dawkins

In this session we will discuss and share healthy ways to communicate with

>> Learn how students and teachers who are engaged in journalism and

people whose views differ from your own. Come learn how to share your

documentary work are deepening the experience of service learning and

passions and activism with a wider audience, especially parents and loved

service immersion and generating awareness and empathy through digital

ones. |HS| Jackson

storytelling. @regisjesuiths |All Groups| Rosslyn 1

Calling Corporations to Serve the Common Good | Jesuit Committee on

“Were not Our Hearts Burning?” Using Ignatian Discernment for

Investment Responsibility - Mary Baudouin, Nick Napolitano, John Sealey >> The

Prophetic Action | Boston College Christian Life Community - Andy Lee, Michel-

Jesuit Committee on Investment Responsibility challenges companies to look

Jules Adjobadou, Perry Bowers >> Using the tools of Christian Life Community

beyond their bottom line by protecting human rights and creation. Learn how

small groups, we will read the Emmaus story, meditate with the Ignatian

the Jesuits are bringing community concerns to corporate boardrooms and

examen, reflect on what the speakers have shared, and discern holy invitations

consider how your institution can leverage financial investments.

to Radical Hope and Prophetic Action. |US| Rosslyn 2

|All Groups | Jefferson Jesuit Anti-Racism Sodality | Jesuit Anti-Racism Sodality - Patrick Hyland, S.J., One Campus, Two Worlds: Why a Washington, D.C. High School also Has

Thomas Bambrick, S.J., Ken Homan, S.J. >> We often talk about ending racial

a Day Shelter for Men on Its Campus | Gonzaga College High School - Luke

injustice, but when pressed to take practical action many don’t know what to

Elliott >> Come to learn about and be inspired by the Father McKenna Center

actually do. Learn how Jesuits in formation are organizing to combat racism

on the Gonzaga College High School campus—a Catholic agency serving men

and how you can organize your own school or university. |All Groups| Salon 1

struggling with homelessness and families in financial stress. @gonzagagoodnews |HS-US-HS*-AFVF| Lee

The Case for Abolishing Life Sentences | The Sentencing Project - Kara Gotsch, Nazgol Ghandnoosh, Tona Boyd >> Over 200,000 people in the United States

Nonviolence Works! Three Examples of Nonviolence in Action | Pax Christi

are serving life sentences—more than were incarcerated nationwide in 1970.

International - Marie Dennis, Judy Coode, Lea Krivchenia, Kim Redigan >> Pax

Hear from presenters, including Tona Boyd, Chief Counsel to US. Senator

Christi International’s Catholic Nonviolence Initiative is calling on the Church

Cory A. Booker on the Senate Judiciary Committee, on why long sentences

and public policy decision-makers to prioritize nonviolent approaches for

offer diminishing returns on public safety and divert resources from crime

building just peace in a violent world. Come to learn about three examples of

prevention, and how reform in this area is possible. @SentencingProj |HS-US|

nonviolence in action. @PaxChristi |All Groups| Madison

Salon 2

The Power of Kinship to Stop Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining | Jesuit

Finding God in Your Day: Learning to Pray the Examen | America Media -

School of Theology - Madeleine LaForge >> Mountaintop removal coal mining

James Martin, S.J. >> Learn how to discover God in your daily life in just a few

devastates the Appalachian mountains, the environment, and the people who

minutes. Fr. Martin has called the examination of conscience the “easiest

live there. To end MTR, we need a prophetic imagination and a theology of

prayer ever.” So even if you think prayer is beyond you, come and see!

kinship. Grow closer to Appalachia and be inspired to encounter God’s creation

|All Groups| Salon 3 & 4

and people in new ways. |HS-US| Manassas


Guide

US*: University Staff/Faculty HS: High School Students P: Parish Members US: University Students AFVF: Alumni, Former Volunteers & Friends HS*: High School Staff

Aliento: Transforming Trauma into Hope + Action | Aliento - Reyna Montoya

Stories of Hope: Refugees and the Forcibly Displaced | Jesuit Refugee Service/

>> More than 2,000 undocumented students graduate from Arizona high

USA - Josh Utter >> With 70.8 million people forcibly displaced worldwide, how

schools every year without access to in-state tuition and scholarships for

do we respond without exhausting our compassion? Through stories from the

public community colleges and universities. Many have shared that they

field, gain tools to speak out with maximum impact here at home on behalf of

feel abandoned and forgotten. Join us in this session to learn how Aliento is

refugees and the forcibly displaced. @jrsusa |All Groups| Salon F

transforming Arizona from an epicenter of hopelessness into an epicenter of hope! |All Groups| Salon 5

Reimagining the Grad at Grad: “Committed to Justice” as an Authentic Counter-Narrative to Race and Privilege | Loyola High School of Los Angeles

Keep Calm and Act Boldly: Contemplative Activism for the Planet|

- Jesus Rodriguez, Jamal Adams, Kaitlin Collins-Pardo >> Students and educators

Global Catholic Climate Movement - Christina Leaño >> How do we bring both

are invited to explore ways to best engage in conversations on racism through

contemplation and action to the fight for climate justice? Come hear stories and

the Grad-at-Grad “committed to justice,” using a Critical Race lens. |HS-HS*|

practical ways to cultivate a spirituality of activism and resilience in the face of

Salon G

climate emergency. Through interactive exercises, moments of reflection, and connecting with nature (yes inside!) we will deepen our relationship with all of

Telling Your Story, Owning Your Power: Community Organizing for

creation and how we can protect it. @CathClimateMvmt |HS-US-P| Salon 6

Relational Voter Engagement | POWER University - Student organizers from Cabrini, La Salle, Saint Joseph’s, and Villanova >> Join this student-led workshop

Innocence, Racial Injustice, and the Death Penalty | Catholic Mobilizing

to explore what makes faith-based community organizing an effective

Network with Alfred Dewayne Brown and Brian Stolarz >> Dewayne “Alfred” Brown

approach to social change. Small group activities will practice fundamental

was released from Texas’ death row in 2015. He spent 12 years and sixty-two

community organizing skills: reflection and storytelling, relationship building,

days in prison for a crime he did not commit. Now the subject of an upcoming

and mapping power assets. |HS-US-US*| Salon H

Netflix documentary, Dewayne and his attorney will share updates on his case and the state of the death penalty in the U.S. @CMNendtheDP |All Groups|

The Art of Immigration | Teatro la Fragua & St. Peter’s Catholic Church - Mike

Salon A

Warner >> Plug in Harry Potter, Snow White, Noah, or Danny Boy. Let the art kick-start challenging conversations about the immigrant experience, and

Creating a Welcoming School for the LGBTQ Community: A Conversation

then sit back and celebrate the voices of strangers, feel the human truth of

| Xavier High School, NY - Jack Raslowsky >> Engage in conversation about the

immigration, and have fun doing justice. |All Groups| Salon J

work to create welcoming schools for the LGBTQ community. Reflect upon and speak from experience in your school, share ideas, strategize, and ask questions,

Microaggressions in American Classrooms: Little Things that Matter |

whatever the current state of LGBTQ welcome in your school. |HS-HS*| Salon B

Saint Louis University - Vrushangi Shah, Shalini Raichur >> Microaggressions are often underestimated but the impacts long linger. Bring to light the potentially

The Intersections of Immigration and Mental Health | Political Advocates

lasting impact of words on young, developing minds in American classrooms.

of the Sacred Heart - Alexia Gutierrez Franco, Isabella Hienzen >> Examine the

Work to find solutions to make classrooms more positive all around. @SLU_

various ways in which immigrants suffer from mental health issues, perpetuated

official |All Groups| Salon K

by immigration policy and oppressive cultural norms. Receive resources and techniques to challenge this largely unaddressed issue to advocate in your own

The Racial Wealth and Income Gap | NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social

school, city, and state. |HS-US-HS*| Salon C

Justice - Alex Burnett, Charlotte Hakikson >> In this highly interactive workshop, learn about how our nation’s federal policies have led to the divestment from

Storytelling for Collaborative Urban Organizing: Youth Hope and Action |

Black communities and created the racial wealth and income gap that exists

City Bloc - Olivia Koulish, A’Niya Taylor >> Two Baltimore city youth organizers will

in our nation today. Educators will receive copies of the Facilitators Guide and

discuss best practices for working with marginalized and urban communities in

one set of simulation materials. @NETWORKLobby |All Groups| Skyview

activism work. We will demonstrate this through storytelling and the impact that it has on activism. @bccbloc |All Groups| Salon D

Examen-ing Climate Inaction | Ignatian Solidarity Network/Ignatian Carbon Challenge, Bishop O’Dowd High School - Brenna Davis, Michael Downs >> 7 in 10

Presente desde Afuera: The Struggle of the Nicaraguan Exile Community

people in the U.S. believe in climate change, but action to address the issue at

for Justice | Center for Global Education and Experience - Joseph Connelly >>

the scale we need has not occurred. In this session, reflect on why you have or

The Student Uprising of April 2018 changed the face of Nicaragua, and tens of

haven’t taken action, and learn ways to address the spiritual and psychological

thousands of activists have been forced into exile. Take a look at the realities

elements of climate change on a personal and structural level. |All Groups|

facing the Nicaraguan exile community in Costa Rica through testimony, images,

Suite 1729

art, and video. |US-US*-AFVF| Salon E

20


BREAKOUT SESSION #3

SUNDAY 1:10 -2:0 0 P.M .

Social Justice in the Suburbs | Gilmour Academy - Bri Lazarchik >> This

Bolivarian Nightmare: The Political and Humanitarian Crisis in Venezuela

session will explore existing dimensions of effective social justice education

| Jesuit Conference Office of Justice and Ecology - Caitlin-Marie Ward, Angelo Rivero-

in suburban environments, and seek to create an action-oriented framework,

Santos, Michael Penfold, Josh Utter >> Through a simulated negotiation activity,

toolkit, and network. Though focused on high schools, anyone with an interest

examine the challenges of balancing the interests of disparate parties, and

in or experience with this work is encouraged to attend. |HS-US-HS*-P|

maintaining a firm focus on the needs of the people who are most adversely

Alexandria

affected by the ongoing political and humanitarian disaster in Venezuela. @jesuitjustice |US-US*| McLean

The Call to Discernment in Troubled Times | Jesuits - Michael Rossmann, S.J. >> The world needs a critical mass of people who will respond to suffering,

A Guatemalan Perspective on Why People Are Leaving Their Communities

with long-term commitment and wise choices. Come find out how to make

| International Samaritan - Andrew Pawuk, Angelica Cancinos >> Gain a better

good decisions in our troubled times with the wisdom of Fr. Dean Brackley, S.J.,

understanding of violence, extortion, drug use, unemployment, and dangerous

and St. Ignatius of Loyola. @beajesuit |HS-US| Fairfax Boardroom

environmental conditions in the Guatemala City garbage dump community and why youth, teenagers, young adults, and families are being pressured to

Teaching and Living Laudato Si’: On Caring for our Common Home |

leave—and how you can demonstrate solidarity by raising awareness about

Jesuit Social Research Institute at Loyola University New Orleans and Catholic

poverty and hunger. @IntSamaritan |All Groups| Mt. Vernon

Climate Covenant - Dennis Kalob, Dan Misleh >> This interactive session is an opportunity to hear about and discuss materials and actions that have been

How Do We Bring It Back Home? | Loyola Marymount University Center for

successfully used to educate others on Laudato Si’ and the values embedded in

Service and Action - Patrick Furlong, Alyssa Perez >> During this session, LMU

this Encyclical of Pope Francis. @JSRI_JustSouth |All Groups| Jackson

staff will show you how we built a model of prophetic action to help students engage in their communities through advocacy—through a model where

Advancing Human Rights Through Food Procurement Standards at Jesuit

students return from IFTJ to lead their own advocacy teach-in on campus.

Universities | Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor - Patrick

@csa_lmu |HS-US-HS*-US*| Rosslyn 1

Dixon, Sara Hoverter, Beth Ford McNamee, Richard Clark >> This discussion will explore the potential to re-envision ecologically sustainable dining programs at

Five Things Catholics Are Doing About Climate Change...And What You

universities in a way that promotes human sustainability and workers’ rights.

Can Do, Too | National Catholic Reporter - Brian Roewe >> Hear a review of the

@GeorgetownKILWP |US-US*| Jefferson

news on how the Catholic Church is responding to climate change today, and brainstorm steps you can take—from individual choices to collective action—

Dirt to Shirt and Field to Cup: Ethical Purchasing (With)in the Circular

toward caring for creation within your schools, parishes, and communities.

Economy | Capeltic and Ethix Merch - Christina Rossini, Daniel Cardozo >> Learn

@NCRonline |All Groups| Rosslyn 2

more about the supply chain from producers to consumers through the lenses of the textile and coffee industries, and what you can do to be part of the

In a World of Darkness We Need to Be-Friend Hope | Centro Arte para

social justice solution with—and in—the circular economy. @capeltic

la Paz - Sr. Peggy O’Neil, S.C. >> Come to hear about Sr. Peggy’s 33 years in

@ethixmerch |All Groups| Lee

El Salvador—her own experiences and the ongoing consequences of the Salvadoran civil war. Learn about gang activity, reintegration of migrants

Civil Disobecience and the Catholic Tradition | St. Peter’s University -

forced to return, and restorative justice as an alternative to punishment. |All

Anna Brown, Ph.D. >> In this time of brutal cruelty inflicted on our migrant

Groups| Salon 1

neighbors, the threat of ecocide, the ravages of warfare, the degradation of impoverishment, and the plague of white supremacy, Catholics may ask what

Contracts, Proms, Uniforms, Restrooms: Negotiating LGBTQ-Inclusive

they can do to create a loving and just world. Explore why we are called to

Policies in Catholic Education | New Ways Ministry - Robert Shine, Sr. Jeannine

nonviolence and nonviolent civil disobedience, the Catholic roots of this way

Gramick, S.L. >> Catholic institutions are increasingly asked to develop and

of responding, and historical and contemporary examples. |All Groups|

implement LGBTQ-related policies on issues such as employment contracts,

Madison

gender-neutral restrooms, and same-gender prom dates. Using case studies derived from real life experiences, form a prophetic, practical, and dialogical

Radical Hope: Theological Foundations and Challenges | Boston College

individualized approach to emerging LGBTQ questions. @NewWaysMinistry

School of Theology and Ministry - Richard Lennan >> Hope is central to the

|All Groups| Salon 2

Christian tradition, but it often appears as a “soft” virtue. This session explores the challenging nature of Christian hope by focusing on hope’s foundations and some of the ways in which it might shape the contemporary church. |US-US*-AFVF-P| Manassas


Guide

US*: University Staff/Faculty HS: High School Students P: Parish Members US: University Students AFVF: Alumni, Former Volunteers & Friends HS*: High School Staff

Homeboy Advocacy: Community Organizing to Create a Community of

Mujer Aliada de Dios y la Tierra, “Woman: Ally of God and of the Earth” |

Kinship | Homeboy Industries >> Homeboy Industries provides hope, training,

Maria Cristina Herrera >> Join us as we work to eliminate the causes of gender

and support to formerly gang-involved and previously incarcerated men and

oppression and break down patriarchal models and violence to establish

women. Many systems of injustice impact the lives of the women and men

spaces of safety, equality, and equity, affirming of the power of women while

at Homeboy and throughout our nation. Share in a panel discussion around

opening access to economic resources and political and social decision-making

utilizing tools of community organizing to create a greater community of kinship.

space. |All Groups| Salon E

|All Groups| Salon 3 & 4 Migration Stories from the Oakland Catholic Worker | Oakland Catholic Our Legacy of Slaveholding: Seeking Healing for the Past, Justice for the

Worker - Bob Lasalle Klein, Ph.D., M.S.W., Martina Pablo Pablo >> Come meet

Present | Slavery, History, Memory, and Reconciliation Project - Ayan Ali, Kelly

teenager Martina Pablo Pablo who left her indigenous family in Guatemala

Schmidt >> Presenters from this Jesuit initiative will convey what life was like

at age 16, fleeing persecution and harassment. She will share her amazing

for the enslaved who belonged to the Jesuits and illustrate how this legacy of

story of crossing the U.S. border, claiming political asylum, imprisonment in a

enslavement endures in racial inequities today. Draw on what you have learned

children’s detention center, then enrolling in high school while working, and

and generate ideas about what the Jesuit network can do to respond to the

finally connecting with the Oakland Catholic Worker. |All Groups| Salon F

historical harms of slavery. @SHMRJesuits |All Groups| Salon 5 Catholic Women Preach on Hopeful, Prophetic Action | Catholic Women Ending the Practice of Extreme Sentences for Children | Campaign for the Fair

Preach - Jocelyn Collen, Betty Anne Donnelly >> In the three years since its launch,

Sentencing of Youth - Eddie Ellis, Greer Hamilton, Abd’Allah Lateef >> The Campaign

Catholic Women Preach has raised a rich range of diverse voices. Our session

for the Fair Sentencing of Youth works to end extreme sentencing for children.

will highlight some ways our preachers have called us to hope and act with

Come to hear personal experiences and to learn about the lasting impact of

justice and inspire those seeking to exercise their gift of preaching.

slavery and mass incarceration and the national landscape of these efforts.

@CWP112716 |All Groups| Salon G

@theCFSY |HS-US-AFVF| Salon 6 The “Marvel” of The Black Panther Film and the Importance of Racial Wealth Gap Simulation | Bread for the World - Genevieve Mougey >>

Representation | Loyola University Maryland - Stephanie Flores-Koulish,

Explore how federal policies impact the lives of people of color and create a

RaShawna Sydnor >> Learn about critical media literacy education by asking key

racial wealth gap in our country. @bread4theworld |All Groups| Salon A

questions of media texts to look beneath the surface to consider authorship, bias, power, and perspective. Realize the empowerment that can be gained

Youth Homelessness in America | Covenant House - Tom Manning, Kevin Ryan

from specific media texts, especially for marginalized young people of color.

>> We need a national movement to end youth homelessness, starting with

@loyolaUM_CISJ |HS*-US*| Salon H

every school, every youth group, every community across the country. Learn about the root causes of homelessness, where homeless youth come from, and

Organizing 101 | Brophy Prep, Jesuits West - Will Rutt, Annie Fox >> Learn about

what can be done to help. |All Groups| Salon B

the basics of organizing and the theology of resistance. Be challenged to consider how you can organize within your own community. |HS-US| Salon J

Radical Hope on the Line: Stories from the Border | Kino Border Initiative - Pete Neeley, S.J., Juan Pablo Torrecillas, David Quezada >> Hear how students living

Harm, Healing, and Human Dignity: A Catholic Encounter with

binational lives are making an impact in Ambos Nogales, and learn through

Restorative Justice | Catholic Mobilizing Network - Caitlin Morneau, George

stories what it means to humanize, accompany, and complicate within the

Williams, S.J. >> The U.S. criminal legal system is rooted in punishment,

modern border reality. @KinoBorder |HS| Salon C

retribution, and the legacy of slavery. Restorative justice proposes a different way—one that is rooted in healing, accountability, and racial equity. This

Water is Life: Hope and Action with Indigenous Peoples | Jesuit Conference

workshop will explore how restorative justice aligns with Catholic Social

of Canada and the United States - Cecilia Calvo, Chloe Noel, Red Cloud High School

Teaching and ways to utilize restorative practices in ministry and combatting

Students >> Indigenous peoples are acting with hope and courage to protect their

mass incarceration. @CMNendtheDP |All Groups| Salon K

land, water, and culture from mining and fossil fuel extraction. This interactive workshop will help us to see, judge, and act so we can move away from a

Advocacy 101: How to Have an Effective Lobby Visit on the Hill and Back

throwaway culture and toward an integral ecology that respects indigenous

Home | NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice - Alex Burnett, Charlotte

peoples and all God’s creation. @jesuitjustice |All Groups| Salon D

Hakikson >> Learn the essential elements of an effective lobby visit, with tips for Monday’s Advocacy Day and how to continue your advocacy and build relationships with your members of Congress when you return home. @NETWORKLobby |HS-US-HS*-US*| Skyview

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LITURGY

SUNDAY, 4: 3 0 P. M .

Opening Hymn

Caminaré//Espinoza

Refrain: Caminaré en presencia del Señor. Caminaré en presencia del Señor. V 1: Amo al Señor, porque escucha mi voz suplicante, porque inclina su oído hacia mí. El día que lo invoco V 2: Me envolvían redes de muerte, caí en tristeza y en angustia. Invoqué el nombre del Señor; “Señor, salva mi vida.” V 3: El Señor es benigno y justo, nuestros Dios en compasivo. El Señor guarda a los sencillos estando yo sin fuerzas me salvó.

Psalm Response

Psalm 34//The Lord Hears the Cry of the Poor

The Lord hears the cry of the poor, blessed be the Lord.

Gospel Acclamation Resucitó, resucitó, resucitó, aleluya. Aleluya, aleluya, aleluya, resucitó.

Prayer of the Faithful Response Te rogamos, Óyenos. Lord, hear our prayer.

Preparation Hymn

These Alone are Enough//Schutte

Refrain: Give me nothing more than your love and grace, these alone O God are enough for me V 1: Take my heart, O Lord, take my hopes and dreams. Take my mind with all its plans and schemes. V 2: Take my thoughts, O Lord, and my memory. Take my tears, my joys, my liberty. V 3: I surrender Lord, all I have and hold. I return to you your gifts untold. V 4: When the darkness falls on my final days, take the very breath that sang your praise.

Communion Hymn The Summons//Bell V 1: Will you come and follow me if I but call your name? Will you go where you don’t know and never be the same? Will you let your love be shown? Will you let my name be known, will you let my life be grown in you and you in me? V 2: Will you leave yourself behind if I but call your name? Will you care for cruel and kind and never be the same? Will you risk the hostile stare should your life attract or scare? Will you let me answer prayer in you and you in me? V 3: Will you let the blinded see if I but call your name? Will you set the prisoners free and never be the same? Will you kiss the leper clean and do such as this unseen, and admit to what I mean in you and you in me? V 4: Will you love the “you” you hide if I but call your name? Will you quell the fear inside and never be the same? Will you use the faith you’ve found to reshape the world around, through my sight and touch and sound in you and you in me? V 5: Lord the summons echos true when you but call my name. Let me turn and follow you and never be the same. In your company I’ll go where your love and footsteps show. Thus I’ll move and live and grow in you and you in me.


2nd Communion Hymn

We Are One Body//Scallon

Refrain: We are one body, one body in Christ. And we do not stand alone. We are one body, one body in Christ. And He came that we might have life. V 1 When you eat my body and you drink my blood, I will live in you and you will live in my love. When you eat my body and you drink my blood, I will live in you and you will live in my love. V 2 Can you hear them crying, can you feel their pain? Will you feed my hungry, will help my lame? See the unborn baby, the forgotten one, they are not forsaken, they are not unloved. V 3 I am the way, the truth, the life, I am the final sacrifice. I am the way, the truth, the life. He who believes in me will have eternal life. I am the way, the truth, the life. I am the final sacrifice. I am the way, the truth, the life. He who believes in me will have eternal life. V 4 I have come your Savior, that you might have life, through the tears and sorrow, through the toils and strife. Listen when I call you, for I know your need, come to me, your shepherd, for my flock I feed. V 5 At the name of Jesus every knee shall bend. Jesus is the Lord and he will come again. At the name of Jesus every knee shall bend. Jesus is the Lord and he will come again. V 6 On the rock of Peter, see my Church I build. Come receive my spirit, with my gifts be filled. For you are my body, you’re my hands and feet. Speak my word of life to everyone you meet.

Recessional

Lead me Lord//Becker

V 1: Blessed are the poor in spirit, longing for their Lord, for God’s coming kingdom shall be theirs. Blessed are the sorrowing, for they shall be consoled, and the meek shall come to rule the world. Refrain: Lead me Lord, lead me Lord by the light of truth, to seek and to find the narrow way. Be my way; be my truth; be my life, my Lord, and lead me Lord today. V 2: Blessed are the merciful for mercy shall be theirs, and the pure in heart shall see their God. Blest are they whose hunger only holiness can fill, for I say they shall be satisfied. V 3: Blest are they who through their lifetime sow the seeds of peace; all will call them children of the Lord. Blest are you though persecuted in your holy life, for in heaven great is your reward. All OCP Publications Inc. songs reprinted with permission U3721 All GIA Publications Inc. songs reprinted under OneLicense.net A-702226

“If God accepts the sacrifice of my life, may my death be for the freedom of my people. A bishop will die, but the Church of God, which is the people, will never perish. I do not believe in death without resurrection. If they kill me, I will rise again in the people of El Salvador.” S T . Ó S C A R R O M ER O , M A R C H 1 9 8 0

IF T J 2019 PR E SIDER : REV. BRIAN PAULSON, S.J.

Very Rev. Brian G. Paulson, S.J., is a member of the USA Midwest Province of the Society of Jesus. He is in his sixth year as provincial. Previously, he served as rector of the Loyola University Jesuit Community in Chicago, after having served eleven years as president of St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago and five years as director of vocations for the Chicago Jesuits. Fr. Paulson holds degrees from Georgetown University, Weston Jesuit School of Theology (now Boston College School of Theology and Ministry), Centre Sevres in Paris, Harvard, and Loyola University Chicago. 24


PUBLIC WITNESS + IGNATIAN FAMILY A MONDAY, 11/18

Luggage Drop

A complimentary Advocacy Day Legend luggage drop will be offered in all IFTJ block hotels. Check in with the bell Accessible Entrance stand or front desk.

Public Witness Monday, 9:00 a.m.

Accessible Route

Bus Pick-Up

Visitor Services Shuttle

Bus Drop-Off

Advocacy Meetings Circulator Bus Stop All Day

Ma

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IFTJ 2019 PUBLIC WITNESS

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Getting to the Public Witness

Location: Columbus Circle in front of Union Station (see map right) Fourth Street, NW

1. Yellow line (toward Ft. Totten) to Gallery Place/Chinatown 2. Red line (toward Silver Spring) to Union Station Madison “upper-level Drive NW 3. Exit toward concourse access to buses and shops” 4. Exit the front doors of Union Station; Columbus Circle is in the middle of the pick-up/drop-off roundabout Jefferson Drive SW

Fourth Street, SW

If you are taking the Metro: Please allow 60 minutes to travel to the Public Witness site. We recommend buying your Metro SmarTrip card ahead of time. Stop by the Metro station during one of the IFTJ breaks to order your cards during non-peak hours. SmarTrip cards are $10 and come with $8 in fares. The one-way trip from Crystal City to Union Station is a $2.75 fare. All riders must have their own SmarTrip card, but they can be saved for future IFTJs.

If you are driving: Car and/or bus parking is available in the Union Station parking garage.

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ADVOCACY DAY

WHAT IS THE PUBLIC WITNESS? Join the Ignatian family in showing our commitment to advocating for more just immigration and environmental policies. The Public Witness at IFTJ weaves together music, prayer, and elements of rallies, highlighting the Ignatian Solidarity Network’s vision of a just, peaceful, and loving world. The Public Witness seeks to empower students, faculty, and other participants to demonstrate how collective voices can join together and make positive steps toward change. Help us make a statement: Bring your institutional banners, and after Sunday’s Mass, grab our Public Witness signs to hold during the event. A Note on Location: While we gather at Columbus Circle to exercise some of the most powerful rights we enjoy in the United States of America—the right to gather non-violently, to speak freely, and to advocate—we acknowledge the grave injustices inflicted on so many throughout our country’s history. From the earliest of days of what would become the U.S., colonization nearly annihilated an entire continent of indigenous people—including at the hands of Christopher Columbus. We acknowledge today the imperfection of this space where we gather, and we encourage you to frame this gathering as a reclaiming of an unjust space as we prepare to tangibly fight for justice as advocates for those whose voices often go unheard.

OUR ADVOCACY DOESN’T STOP WHEN WE LEAVE CAPITOL HILL. Join the Ignatian family as we continue to stand together as advocates for more humane migration policy. ISN will update you on prayer, education, and advocacy opportunities to engage your community and district throughout March 2020.

In the Event of Rain: Please find rain location details at igsol.net/pwrainplan

Save the Date:

Speakers:

IGNATIAN FAMILY ADVOCACY MONTH

Trinity Cooper & Abigail Gonzales

Quincy Howard, O.P.

Saúl Rascón Salazar

Trinity Cooper and Abigail Gonzales are environmental justice activists at Bishop O’Dowd High School. Through partnerships on and off campus, they are working toward more sustainable communities in the Bay Area.

Quincy Howard, O.P., is a Dominican Sister of Sinsinawa, Wisconsin. After a career in urban planning and disaster recovery, she now ministers on Capitol Hill as a federal policy advocate for social justice.

Saúl Rascón Salazar, an 18-year-old from Sonora, Mexico, has worked with Aliento AZ & the DreamON Campaign advocating for education access for all students, including undocumented and DACA recipients.

MARCH 2020

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STAY CONNECTED

Your connection to the Ignatian family doesn’t end when you go home on Monday. The Ignatian Solidarity Network offers many ways to stay involved!

campaigns and online engagement With a host of dynamic campaigns and resources, ISN keeps you connected to the Ignatian family after IFTJ.

EDUCATION FOR JUSTICE Education for Justice is a global digital subscription membership service that provides resources for those who wish to study, teach, and practice Catholic social tradition. We offer members access to a growing library of thousands of text-based and multimedia resources, a monthly e-newsletter, and other benefits to help approach the world’s headlines from the perspective of Catholic social tradition. SIGN UP: igsol.net/efj IGNATIAN CARBON CHALLENGE The Ignatian Carbon Challenge is

the Ignatian Solidarity Network’s environmental initiatives hub. Join the Ignatian family in caring for creation by joining in minicampaigns throughout the year as an individual or with your school, university, or parish community. SIGN UP: igsol.net/iggy-carbon RISE UP Start your week by asking: how can we rise up to address injustice? Join voices from the Ignatian network as we reflect, explore, and respond to injustice through the lens of Ignatian spirituality and the previous Sunday’s daily readings. This free series delivers justice inspiration right to your inbox every Monday morning! SIGN UP: igsol.net/rise-up LENTEN SERIES Each year, ISN’s daily Lenten series invites contributors from

@igsolidaritynet

throughout the Ignatian network to to explore each day’s liturgical readings through a faith and justice lens. SIGN UP: igsol.net/lent-2020 ONLINE RESOURCES AND ACTIONS ISN’s website works around the clock to keep you connected to dynamic resources, current action alerts, and the latest news from the Ignatian network. VISIT US AT: igsol.net TELL YOUR STORY ISN is constantly working on web stories sharing the justice work of individuals and institutions in the Ignatian family. How are you bringing the Teach-In home to your campus, parish, or greater community? Tell us about your campaign, program, event, club, or other work to put “a faith that does justice” into action: igsol.net/stay-connected

@ignatiansolidarity


WHAT WE DO

IGNATIAN FAMILY

OUR MISSION

ISN offers dynamic programs, advocacy opportunities, campaigns, and resources to network, learn, educate, pray, and take action to build a more just world. While our focus is broad, our work can be found at the intersections of immigration, climate change, racial justice, criminal justice reform, and the realities of economic injustice.

Throughout this weekend, and at all ISN programs, you will hear the term “Ignatian family.� This describes the unique connection between those connected to ISN member and Jesuit institutions, participants in ISN programs, and anyone who is drawn to the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola and how it manifests in works of justice. Welcome to the family!

Network, educate, and form advocates for social justice animated by the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola and the witness of the Jesuit martyrs of El Salvador and their companions.

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programs

ISN’s programs focus on leadership formation and social justice education in the context of Ignatian spirituality—offering opportunities for attendees to explore the link between faith and justice.

MASS FOR L I FE ID EA L F O R :

High School & College Students & Staff D ES C R IP T IO N:

Join the Ignatian Mass for Life before the January 2020 March for Life with fellow members of the Ignatian family. D A T ES / L O C A T IO N:

January 24, 2020 Washington, D.C. L EA R N M O R E:

igsol.net/mass4life

A RRUPE L EA DER S SUM MI T ID EA L F O R :

High School Students & Staff D ES C R IP T IO N:

Build social justice leadership skills and deepen your understanding of “a faith that does justice” through the legacy of Pedro Arrupe, S.J.

ST O RE Want to take your commitment to justice a step further? Check out the ISN store for resources to deepen your understanding of the issues, bring your commitment to justice into the public sphere, and to harness the power of ethical purchasing.

SHOP AT: igsol.net/store

D A T ES / L O C A T IO N:

January-March 2020 California, Maryland, Ohio L EA R N M O R E:

igsol.net/arrupe

J ESUI T PARI SH A DVOCACY DA Y ID EA L F O R :

Parishioners & Ministers D ES C R IP T IO N:

Faith meets justice meets


Above: Cristo Rey New York High School (CRNYHS) alumni Kay Angrum (CRNYHS ‘12), Kasha Amara (CRNYHS ‘16), and Tyler Gaston (CRNYHS ‘19) shared the impact of a Cristo Rey education on their sense of self and their lives at the New York City Solidarity on Tap in May 2019. The conversation was moderated by CRNYHS President David Dougherty.

Congress as Jesuit parishes advocate for humane migration policies. DAT ES/LO CA TIO N:

D ATE S / L O C A T IO N:

July 28-31 2020 Milwaukee, WI

May 2020 Washington, D.C.

LE AR N M O R E:

LE ARN MO RE:

S O LI DARI T Y ON T A P

igsol.net/jpad

IGNA T I A N JUS T I CE S U MMIT: IM M I G R A T I ON IDE AL F O R:

College Students DESCRI PTI O N:

Network and organize for more just migration policies, more hospitable campuses, and more humane conversations about migration and people who have immigrated.

igsol.net/ijs I D E AL F O R :

21+ Year Olds Who Justice D E S CR IP T IO N:

Join others connected to the Jesuits and the spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola (FJVs, Jesuit school alumni, Jesuit parish members, etc.) for socializing and social justice in cities throughout the year.

N OM I N A T E A YOUNG L EADER FOR T HE O’DONN EL L EM ERGI N G L EADERS A WA R D Do you know a young alum of a Jesuit institution (ages 2333) who is a leader for justice in their community? Submit a nomination for this annual award: igsol.net/odonnell

D ATE S / L O C A T IO N:

Ongoing; Nationwide LE AR N M O R E:

igsol.net/sot

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join the movement!

SU P P O R T W ORKERS A ND THE E NVIR O NME NT SPON SO R : Ethix Merch

A M OVE ME N T IS I N F ULL SWI NG within the Catholic community to bring values in line with purchasing decisions. Schools like Bellarmine Prep (San Jose), Padua Academy, Boston College High School, St. Louis University High School, Creighton University, and Georgetown University are starting to say “no” to the status quo of treating garment workers like expendable cogs in a machine. Ethix Merch, a supplier of custom sweatshop-free merchandise, is working with these schools and others to bring the Collection—a line of ethical and sustainable merchandise—into student stores.

BUYING ETHICALLY MEANS SUPPORTING COMPANIES THAT PROVIDE QUALITY JOBS FOR WORKERS. Buying ethically means supporting companies that provide quality jobs for workers, use sustainable manufacturing processes, and are 100% transparent about how their products are made. Collection does just that and more as it’s even setting the standards for other textile producers. Co-Director Molly Hemstreet describes Collection’s unique mission: “What we are trying to

do with Collection is create something different where we’re highlighting workers’ voices, we are highlighting a true supply chain.” Providing quality jobs can transform communities. Workers are paid a living wage, given opportunities for growth, and even have a voice in the process. Walter Vicente, a worker/ owner at one of Collection’s factories in North Carolina, takes pride in his workplace: “I don’t have to have two jobs now, I can support my family with just one job. Dream came true!” Here’s how to join the movement: 1. Engage: encourage your school or parish to buy ethically-sourced merchandise 2. Spread the word: talk about the issues with peer groups, friends, and family 3. Buy high quality products that are made to last from manufacturers like Collection Contact us at: justmarkets@ethixventures.com Parishes, schools and bulk inquiries: www.ethixmerch.com/collection Buy direct: www.createthecollection.com @createthecollection


from agnostic to jesuit priest MY SP I R I TUA L JOURN E Y W R ITT EN B Y : Ted Penton, S.J. S PON SO R : Jesuit Vocations

I had a brief, sudden sense of overwhelming peace, love, and joy.

MY M OME N T of spiritual awakening occurred in 1997 at Wat Suan Mokkh, a Buddhist monastery in Thailand. I was 22 years old and agnostic, but had an interest in world religions.

Born in that moment was, among other things, a desire to follow a spiritual path, a desire to work for justice with those on the margins, and the knowledge that my own spiritual home is in the Catholic Church, in which I had been BORN IN THAT MOMENT WAS, raised, but which I AMONG OTHER THINGS, A DESIRE had left several years earlier. TO FOLLOW A SPIRITUAL PATH,

A DESIRE TO WORK FOR JUSTICE WITH THOSE ON THE MARGINS, AND THE KNOWLEDGE THAT MY OWN SPIRITUAL HOME IS IN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH, IN WHICH I HAD BEEN RAISED, BUT WHICH I HAD LEFT SEVERAL YEARS EARLIER.

The retreat was difficult—we were woken up by a gong at 4:30 a.m. and spent numerous sessions in silent meditation. On the seventh day of the retreat, God broke through and

A couple of years later, after some graduate studies in philosophy, I pursued full-time volunteer work through the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. My work placement was with Legal Aid of North Carolina, in a special unit offering legal services to migrant farmworkers. The Jesuit Volunteer Corps introduced me to Ignatian spirituality. Ignatius’ way of bringing together his mysticism

with a pragmatic approach to engaging with the world resonated deeply with me. Thoughts of a religious vocation started to surface. I entered the Jesuit novitiate in 2009, drawn to the Society by Ignatian spirituality and the Jesuit commitment to living a faith that does justice. Both of these aspects of my life have been deepened considerably throughout my years as a Jesuit. In August 2018, I was assigned as the new Secretary of the Office of Justice and Ecology of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States. Our mission is to advocate, network, and educate for social and environmental justice. Having been born together so many years ago in Thailand, my religious faith and desire to work for justice are one. Trying to imagine either without the other seems empty. How might God be calling you to use your gifts to transform the world? 32


Reflections on hope

A S AC T I VE D ISC IP L ESHIP SPON SO R : Boston College School of Theology and Ministry

T H E S PIRIT OF H OP E is central to all that we do at the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry (“the STM”). Theology for the sake of ministry depends on it. In a world and church plagued with crises, hope allows us to find God amidst brokenness, and to work toward a vision that is not limited by sinful structures and existing ways of being. We asked members of our community at the STM to share their understanding of radical hope and how it inspires them to prophetic action.

STM has allowed me to encounter a community that gives me a concrete view of what kindness, integrity, honesty, and love look like in the Church.” Hosffman Ospino, associate professor of Hispanic ministry and religious education, wrote that, “Radical hope exists in a world where women and men are free to imagine possibility as a pathway to becoming fully human. When people grow in awareness of that which is possible, they work prophetically to achieve it. The School of Theology and Ministry prepares pastoral leaders and theological scholars to inspire others to imagine possibility and live with radical hope.”

HOPE, BY ITS VERY NATURE, BECKONS US TOWARD A PARTICULAR, RADICAL TYPE OF DISCIPLESHIP.

Kat Clarke, a student in our dual degree MA/MSW program expressed that, “Encounters of hope allow us to concretely envision what the world could be and give us the footing to trust that we can act prophetically because a better world on earth is real and is possible. Being part of the

Hope is cultivated at the STM both in and out of the classroom. Vanessa Miranda, master of divinity student, reflected, “I see radical hope and prophetic action at the STM through our students’ dedication to kinship with the marginalized. Whether it is participation in the Prison Ministry Initiative or El Salvador delegation, STM students understand that the kingdom of God manifests through relationships with the marginalized.” Hope without action clearly misses the full picture of its prophetic call. Hope, by its very nature, beckons us toward a particular, radical type of discipleship, one that must be nurtured and celebrated by communities of faith. At the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry, we seek each day to inspire this hope in all members of our community.


Sojourners is building a movement TO C HANG E THE WORLD SPON SOR : Sojourners

S O J OUR NERS began in the early 1970s, at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Ill., when a handful of students began meeting to discuss the relationship between their faith and political issues—particularly the Vietnam War and civil rights. Sojourners equips Christians who follow Jesus, but also sojourns with others of different faith traditions and all who are on a spiritual journey. Sojourners includes evangelicals, Catholics, Pentecostals, and Protestants; progressives and conservatives; blacks, whites, Latinos, and Asians; women and men; young and old. Sojourners works with traditional churches but also reaches out to those who can’t fit into them. Sojourners is both a media and advocacy organization. Sojourners magazine, published monthly, gives a Christians a faithful

perspective on news and culture, including profiles and interviews with the leading theologians, activists, and artists of our time. Sojourners offers ideas and inspiration for living out the biblical call for social justice, gives tools for teaching and preaching, and looks at the latest books, music, and films. Sojo.net is a platform dedicated to amplifying diverse and often unheard perspectives. Committed to movements advancing justice and peace, sojo.net covers a wide array of topics ranging from personal stories to global concerns. SojoAction, the advocacy arm of Sojourners, works on the most pressing issues facing our world. This includes campaigns on climate justice, economic justice, humane immigration reform, racial justice, women and girls, and voting rights. Sojourners works to better equip, resource,

and mobilize supporters to engage in transformational change. A biblical call to justice has been Sojourners’ mission for nearly 50 years. With partners and

SOJOURNERS ARE CHRISTIANS WHO MAKE THE CASE THAT AN ACTIVE FAITH REQUIRES JUSTICE. fellow sojourners, Sojourners seeks to inspire hope and build a movement to transform individuals, communities, the church, and the world. 34


jvc builds community

THR O U G H COUNT ER- CULTU RAL FO RMATIO N PRO G RAM SPON SO R : Jesuit Volunteer Corps

C O NSIDE RIN G CONTEM P OR AR Y NEW S contains stories of scandal, traumatic events and natural disasters, our capacity for human suffering can appear insurmountable. Nevertheless, one thing is certain—where there is pain, there is an opportunity for THERE IS A healing.

There are over 11,000 former Jesuit Volunteers, who, like Kristen Schenk, learned valuable lessons about humanity from their term of service as a Jesuit Volunteer.

“The relationships and friendships I formed with my Belizean colleagues and the families I came to know were GLARING incredibly life-giving and showed me so much about the strength, NEED FOR A MORE resiliency, hope, and inner The challenge we are facing, resourcefulness that I believe while many sequester themselves COUNTER-CULTURAL are a part of the human spirit,” in dimly lit rooms laughing at APPROACH TO said Schenk, who served from memes, is to seek the answer to 2008-2010 in JVC’s international COMMUNITY the question: how can we bring program. more people together in this fight BUILDING. for peace and justice? After returning from Belize, Schenk spent several years In this time of transition within working in Catholic peace and justice ministry the Church, ushering in a more counter-cultural before undertaking graduate studies. Eventually, approach to community building becomes a this lead to Schenk’s current position as a necessity. One such answer is for young leaders chaplain: to join the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. JVC is a 1-2 year long formation program where Jesuit Volunteers “I get to be a small part of people’s stories live together while in a full-time role at a nonprofit and help them feel heard, valued, and organization. Each year, over 200 JVs in the U.S. empowered as they deal with great and in countries abroad lean into the challenge, challenges through this ‘ministry of healing, and graces that come with a deep presence.’ I’m so grateful for my time as a JV exploration of living out a faith that does justice. and the ways it weaves through my life and vocation each day.” Ready to learn more about the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and its impact on the lives of its volunteers, communities, and over 11,000 alumni? Please visit jesuitvolunteers.org and complete an application online today!


helping central americans ST AY W I TH T H EIR COM MU NITIE S SPON SO R : International Samaritan

I N 1 994, Fr. Don Vettese, S.J., while carrying out his Jesuit assignment as president of St. John’s Jesuit High School in Toledo, Ohio, traveled to Guatemala City, Guatemala with a group of students. There, in the presence of a bleeding child surrounded by trash and stench in the middle of the municipal garbage dump, Fr. Vettese connected in a profound way, what he calls “conversion of heart.” The students whom he accompanied asked a question, “Can’t we do something?” And, they did. They launched a worldwide social service, now called International Samaritan. Since the 1960s, rural Guatemalans have fled the countryside to escape the atrocities of thirty years of civil war. This resulted in 40% of Guatemala’s population living in urban slums. Thus, thousands arrive in Guatemala City with no employment and resolve

themselves to recycle and scavenge in the municipal dump to survive. In more recent years, thousands of Guatemalans have sought refuge in the United States because of narcotrafficking, gang violence, high unemployment, extortion, corruption, and extended periods of drought not seen in previous decades. International Samaritan works tirelessly to address education in Guatemala so that teenagers and young adults pursue their education, become gainfully employed, and remain in Guatemala.

an International Samaritan scholarship to pursue his dream of becoming a mechanic. He graduated from school and works for an automotive parts distributor, supporting his family. “The scholarship program changed my life. It gave me motivation to study and stay in Guatemala. It helped me do what I wanted to do. . . . Now I am saving money to buy a car and house,” says Lopez. For more information on International Samaritan’s programs, please visit intsam.org.

One example of the pressures faced by young Guatemalans is Miguel Lopez. His father asked him to journey without documentation to Florida from Guatemala. Miguel wanted to remain close to his mother and siblings, but knew he would likely end up working in the municipal trash dump by the age of 12. Miguel was offered 36


generation faith essay contest WRITT EN BY : Ashley McKinless SPON SO R : America Media

“ A C HURCH that does not listen...cannot be credible,” Pope Francis said in his opening remarks to a worldwide meeting of Catholic leaders on the topic of young people. The pope said the church needs to listen “to those young people who often do not feel understood by the church” and are “not accepted for who they really are.” The editors at America Media could not agree more. That is why we invite high school and college students to share their experience as Catholics in our annual Generation Faith Essay Contest. In recent years, I have had the privilege of reading

hundreds of essays from young Catholics about the ways that their faith has pushed them to pursue justice and engage in acts of mercy—and the ways that their faith has been challenged by the failure of the church to live up to the radical call of the Gospels. Past contest winners have written about experiences as diverse as living through the Arab Spring, overcoming porn

addiction, and struggling with depression and anxiety. I invite you to share your story for a chance to win $1,000 and have your essay published in America magazine. Learn more about the Generation Faith Essay Contest at www. americamagazine.org/ generationfaith2020

“A CHURCH THAT DOES NOT LISTEN . . . CANNOT BE CREDIBLE.”


small earth stories R EADERS RE F L E CT O N CL I M A T E C H AN G E

SPON SO R : National Catholic Reporter

“Social problems must be addressed by community networks and not simply by the sum of individual good deeds...The ecological conversion needed to bring about lasting change is also a community conversion.” Laudato Si’: On Care of Our Common Home I N HIS LAU DATO SI’ ENCYCLI CAL, Pope Francis calls for a radical community change to address the climate crisis. As individuals, where do we start? How can we bring about this transformation? National Catholic Reporter, the independent Catholic news source, has reported on environmental issues for decades. This fall we launched EarthBeat, a reporting project that looks at climate change from a faith perspective. EarthBeat offers a reader-generated feature, Small Earth Stories, to highlight specific ways in which readers respond to climate change in day-to-day life. By sharing individual stories, readers connect and unite as a community so that together we may face the climate crisis.

Among the stories at NCRonline.org/SmallEarth, you’ll find: • An Oakland high school teacher supporting his students during the climate strikes • A Boston area woman petitioning her local town council to prevent investment in fossil fuel systems in new developments • A writer in upstate New York finds joy in composting. What’s your Small Earth Story? Share it with us at NCRonline.org/SmallEarth. To read Small Earth Stories and other climate coverage, visit NCRonline.org/SmallEarth. Activists and aspiring writers should plan to attend National Catholic Reporter’s Small Earth Stories IFTJ lunch session on Sunday, November 17. Check your program for details.

“We hope Small Earth Stories will be both inspirational and practical,” said Bill Mitchell, NCR Climate Editor, “It’s already become both in our household, if only in a small way. It turns out composting isn’t that difficult, even in an apartment.” 38


protect your fingers

WO R K E R S RIG H T S A ND THE U NIVE R SITY FO O D CHAI N SPON SO R : Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and

the Working Poor at Georgetown University

chicken fingers. Research from the National Employment Law Project reveals that Tyson Foods and Pilgrim’s Pride, the two largest poultry processors in the United States are two of the most dangerous places to work, reporting a disproportionate number of work-related amputations and hospitalizations compared to AND companies of a similar size.

“ W H AT makes Georgetown University special?” posed a headline in the education section of the Washington Post in March, 2018. Was it the school’s Jesuit heritage? The access provided COLLEGES by its valuable location in the UNIVERSITIES HAVE nation’s capital? Or perhaps the university’s unique and path THE OPPORTUNITY breaking efforts to atone for the TO SHAPE THE sale of 272 slaves in 1838? In this instance the answer was not nearly so profound. “Sometimes, it’s the chicken fingers,” explained Sarah Larimer. Interviewing numerous students and alumni, the article celebrated nostalgic recollections of Chicken Finger Thursday, a culinary tradition at the Leo O’Donovan Dining Hall which will mark its twentieth anniversary in 2020. Chicken fingers are fun. What’s not so fun are the chronic ongoing workplace safety problems in the poultry industry, the provider of the celebrated

WAY THAT FOOD IS PRODUCED BY ACTING COLLECTIVELY, PURCHASING IN SCALE, AND INSISTING THAT DIGNITY AT WORK AND HUMAN RIGHTS ARE RESPECTED BY EMPLOYERS.

Many of the food systems from which we benefit have taken measures to improve their ecological sustainability in the past decade but the need for social sustainability has not entered into the equation, with too many workers working in debilitating extremes of heat and cold while risking lifechanging injuries that could easily be avoided.

We don’t have to always purchase the cheapest options for our dining halls and cafeterias. Colleges and universities have the opportunity to shape the way that food is produced by acting collectively, purchasing in scale, and insisting that dignity at work and human rights are respected by employers. None of this will be easy, though, and the resistance from agribusiness will be considerable. To do so we intend to form a coalition of students, staff, and faculty to deliver a better deal for food production workers in America. Patrick Dixon is a research analyst at the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. He will be speaking more about this subject on the panel Advancing Human Rights Through Food Procurement Standards at Jesuit Universities. For more information please email pmd47@georgetown.edu.


PIC TURED: The National Memorial for Peace and Justice features 800 6-foot monuments to symbolize thousands of racial terror lynching victims in the United States.

a journey for justice S T A N DIN G before the National Museum for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama, nine students and two faculty members from the Jesuit School of Theology bowed their heads. “Blood on the leaves and blood at the root,” crooned Billie Holiday over a student’s phone. This was their moment of contemplation before entering the museum, which honors the lives of the estimated 4,743 lynched in this country between 1886 and 1968. A man—a stranger—stopped to join their contemplative moment. The museum was one of many stations in a semester’s journey for the class from Berkeley exploring race, justice, and theology. They examined the ways theology is twisted in support of racism—today and in the past—and how they as people of faith can do more to speak out against injustice. The

SP O NSO R: Jesuit School of Theology at

Santa Clara University

civil rights pilgrimage traced sites in the American South that give witness to the Freedom Movement of the 1950s and 60s. “We had to ‘come and see,’” says Alison Benders, interim dean and senior lecturer, who led the course and the trip. Before leaving, the class read works about race in America. Writings by Bryan Massingale and James Cone (black theologians), and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Erika Lee (cultural historians), filled the syllabus. But the key to understanding was bearing witness. “I hope to translate this notional knowledge to experiential knowledge—head to heart,” says Benders. Through the pilgrimage, the class saw their readings—and the world we live in—differently. Masters of Divinity student Calvin Nixon notes that the class put them in some uncomfortable

places, but that is where they, as servants of God, could do their best work. “How else can we accompany our brothers and

HOW CAN WE ACCOMPANY OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS WHO ARE MARGINALIZED IF WE DON’T ATTEND TO THOSE UNSETTLING PLACES? sisters who are marginalized if we don’t attend to those unsettling places?” he asks. “I am under the belief that we are who we are because someone loved us and attended to us.” This story was adapted from the original story which ran in the Santa Clara Magazine.

40


WHY JVC? Transformative experience Develop life-long relationships Help a nonprofit fulfill its mission Gain valuable career skills Financial assistance grants Some AmeriCorps scholarships available Graduate school scholarships for our alumni Network of over 11,000 alumni

APPLY ONLINE ! jesuitvolunteers.org

We at the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) think the world should be a more just and hopeful place for all members of our human family. What do we do? JVC matches young leaders with roles at nonprofit organizations aligned with their skill set. We offer ongoing accompaniment and support while Jesuit Volunteers (JVs) live in intentional community with other JVs, learning and growing together in our four core values: spirituality, simple living, community and social justice.

Intentional community US and International Placement Options Variety of Career Fields/Types of Service Five formation retreats Analyze the root causes of social injustice


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JVCNORTHWEST.ORG We welcome applicants from all ways of life and with lived experience, especially those from communities with whom we serve.

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An 11-month commitment to Live Compassionately, Offer Healing, & Share in Liberation. BSVM offers Service Placements in Healthcare, Social Service, and Education. bonsecoursvolunteerministry.org

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WE GO NOT TO DO,

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IN COMMUNITY WITH OUR NEIGHBORS

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Experience service that will inspire a lifetime of being a person of faith who works for justice.

WE GO TO ENCOUNTER... the face of Christ in each person

PARA ENCONTRAR...

el rostro de Cristo en cada persona Contact apply@rostrodecristo.org to learn more about our postgrad volunteer program and our immersion service-learning trips for high school and college students in Ecuador.

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Social problems must be addressed by

COMMUNITY NETWORKS

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– Laudato Si’

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WIDE OPEN Proud to Support the Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice For more information call 1.888.SCRANTON or visit scranton.edu


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June 21-27, 2020

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Join the Ignatian family in praying for a consistent ethic of life prior to the March for Life gathering. Fr. Timothy Kesicki, S.J., president of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the U.S., will be the main celebrant for the Ignatian Mass for Life.

January 24, 2020 Washington, D.C. igsol.net/mass4life


Can one meal change lives? Oxfam Hunger BanquetŽ events can. Oxfam designed these events to bring statistics about poverty to life. Students will leave with a greater understanding of hunger, poverty, and their root causes—and will feel motivated to do something that makes a difference. PHOTO: KEITH LANE/OXFAM AMERICA

Learn more about these easy-to-host events and download a free toolkit at oxf.am/isn.

#oxfamhungerbanquet

Committed to living a faith that does justice Engaging students in social justice-related activities through immersion experiences, advocacy trips, speakers, workshops, class work, and much more! Continue your Catholic education at John Carroll.

Learn more and schedule a visit at jcu.edu.


If you want to explore life’s meaning; if you want to be challenged and inspired to CHANGE A WORLD wounded by inequality, hatred, and ecological degradation; if you want to grow spiritually by drawing on the riches of the Christian tradition in open dialogue with others, come join us in the SERVICE OF FAITH and the PROMOTION OF SOCIAL JUSTICE. DISCERNMENT:

UNDERGRADUATE:

GRADUATE:

Each of us has a purpose in life—although it often takes a supportive learning community to refine that purpose. Xavier will help you understand your unique gifts and passions and, with the tools of Ignatian discernment, you will learn practices to help you live toward your life’s purpose.

Our undergraduate program enables students to relate scripture & tradition to their life experiences, to be global in outlook and dialogical in method, and to act responsibly in the promotion of peace and justice. Visit Xavier.edu/ theologydepartment.

Our Institute for Spirituality and Social Justice empowers students spiritually, morally, and intellectually for a variety of vocations and career options, or for personal enrichment. Classes presented in a variety of formats (traditional, online, evening, condensed 8-week) allow students to explore theology and social justice, biblical studies, spirituality, world religions, and pastoral ministry.

INSTITUTE FOR SPIRITUALITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE Call 513-745-2894 or visit xavier.edu/ISSJ


Loyola University Maryland, anchored in Baltimore, attracts students who are eager to shape their lives—and their communities—according to their ideals. Ideals that include principled leadership, critical thinking, eloquent expression, large-hearted ambition, concern for others, and a boundless commitment to service and justice. Explore our degrees, certificates, and executive education at www.loyola.edu.

STRONG TRUTHS. WELL LIVED.


In Special Consultative Status with the United Nations

Jesus asked, “Which of these was neighbor to the man who fell to the robbers?” “The Samaritan traveler who came upon him and showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.” LUKE 10:36-37

Over 40% of all the world’s waste is disposed of in open air garbage dumps. The communities close to these dumps have extremely high levels of poverty, low life expectancy, and limited access to both education and healthcare. Founded by a Jesuit in 1994, International Samaritan has spent 25 years working hand in hand with people living in these communities to help them break out of poverty. We serve in seven nations across three continents, helping hundreds of families thrive by providing education, housing, and medical care.

Become a Samaritan. Learn how you can stop and change a life by visiting intsam.org.

Witness. Accompany. Volunteer. Advocate. Learn more at www.intsam.org.


is pleased to be part of the Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice! WHO AM I?

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A CHURCH TAKES ON SEXUAL ABUSE PAG E 2 8

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WALTER BRUEGGEMANN ON GOD’S PECULIAR HOPE PAG E 3 2

Sojourners is an independent, award-winning magazine of faith, culture, and politics. Since 1971, we’ve taken bold, prophetic stands to articulate the biblical call to racial and social justice, life and peace, and environmental stewardship.

Special offer for IFTJ attendees: Get Sojourners for $1 an issue! Visit sojo.net/IFTJ

Where Christians turn for a faithful perspective on news and culture.


J U LY 1 9 - 25 , 2020

S H I N E Y O U R L I G H T. B R I G H T E N T H E W O R L D. What does it mean to have a faith that does justice? How can you make a change in your community? Join us for the Be the Light Youth Theology Institute. Be the Light is a week-long experience that immerses students in the lights and shadows of Buffalo, New York. Students learn about Catholic theology and Ignatian spirituality before taking these lessons home to their communities. Stay on campus at Canisius College, grow your faith, and be a light in your world! A W E E K LO N G E X P E R I E N C E O F FA I T H, J U S T I C E & S E RV I C E FOR RISING HIGH SCHOOL SOPHOMORES, JUNIORS & SENIORS

To learn more about the Be The Light Institute at Canisius College, please visit canisius.edu/BTLI.


School of Theology and Ministry

Preparing leaders and scholars who inspire others to imagine possibility and live with radical hope. A graduate school offering:

On-campus and online

Master of Divinity Master of Arts in Theology and Ministry Master of Theological Studies

courses are available.

Full and partial tuition scholarships are awarded to post-graduate volunteers.

Dual degrees with: Social Work Mental Health Counseling Nursing Business

Our application fee is waived for applicants who are current post-graduate volunteers.

Learn more about our formation opportunities, vibrant community, financial aid, and academic resources at bc.edu/stm. connect with us facebook.com/bcstm instagram.com/bcstm twitter.com/bcstm

stmadm@bc.edu 617-552-6506


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XAVIER

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H I G H

REMEMBERING THE JESUIT MARTYRS OF EL SALVADOR AND THEIR COMPANIONS

Ignacio Ellacuría, S.J.

Amando López, S.J.

Joaquín López Ignacio Martíny López, S.J. Baró, S.J.

Segundo Montes, S.J.

Juan Ramón Moreno, S.J.

Celina Ramos

Elba Ramos

30 West 16th Street • New York, NY 10011 (212) 924-7900 • www.xavierhs.org

January 25-28, 2020 | Washington. DC Are you a college student? Are you interested in social justice and advocacy? Participate in the Young Leaders Initiative at CSMG 2020—the central Catholic social ministry conference presented by the U.S. bishops and 16 other national Catholic organizations. Join 500+ Catholic social ministry professionals and students from colleges around the U.S. to pray, learn, voice concerns to legislators, and network. Make sure your campus is represented!

Campus interest forms due Friday, November 1, 2019.

Join Us!

catholicsocialministrygathering.org


Building communities of faith and lifelong homes for people with and without intellectual disabilities Contact: P.O. Box 21471 Washington, DC 20009 Phone: (202)740-4007 Email: join@larche-gwdc.org

Apply now at www.larche-gwdc.org


SERVE

Engage your entire school community, including alumni, in your next service project with an exciting YouGiveGoods online event raising goods to support any cause, any charity. No fees, no commitment. Visit YouGiveGoods.com or contact us for more info at 877-526-4483 or CustomerSupport@yougivegoods.com.

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Graduate Internship Program At Villanova University, we seek men and women of generous spirit who are committed to supporting the work of Campus Ministry.

• Full Tuition Remission

Interns are graduate students who reside and work in resident halls, where they model and build Christian community. They offer students opportunities to develop personally and spiritually through liturgies, service projects, small group discussions, and retreats. The internship spans two years of academic and ministerial work, including at least one summer of coursework.

• Living Stipend Applicants seeking admission in Fall 2020 must have completed their undergraduate degree by August 2019 and have at least one year of volunteer or work experience.

For more information and to apply to the program, visit pastoralministry.villanova.edu.

For additional information contact: John Edwards, john.p.edwards@villanova.edu or call [610] 519–3507.

• Room & Board

The priority application deadline for funding consideration is February 1, 2020.


Jesuit Refugee Service/USA

Come visit jrsusa.org, where you’ll find stories of refugees’ journeys, toolkits for your community, school, or parish, and ways you can help displaced people around the world.

ACCOMPANY    I    SERVE     I    ADVOCATE @JRSUSA

@jrsusa_photos

@JRSUSA


for and with Radical Hope and Prophetic Action

[Images from Loyola's local Pico-Union Neighborhood]


COMMIT TO A WORLD THAT

COULD BE

APPLY NOW FOR DOCTORAL, MASTER’S, AND CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS Learn more: usfca.edu/education

CHANGE THE WORLD FROM HERE


We Put the Teach in Catholic Social Teaching. Access 2,500+ real-world issue resources that bring Catholic Social Teaching to life in classrooms and conversations. Prayers, lesson plans, a digital social justice calendar, and more are available to members, with new content that aligns with important Church and justice dates sent to your inbox monthly. Sign up today to join a community of justice educators around the globe.

Learn more: educationforjustice.org


“The defense and promotion of human rights and integral ecology is an ethical horizon that we share with many other people of good will, who are also seeking to respond to this call.” GC36, Decree 1, #27

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the Jesuit Conference’s Office of Justice and Ecology serves as the primary advocacy voice of the Jesuits in the U.S. and Canada. Join us as we call for just migration policies, meaningful criminal justice reforms, economic and racial justice, and reconciliation with Creation and the most vulnerable.

Put YOUR compassion into Action! Learn more at Jesuits.org/justice

Migrants and refugees are pictured on a large bronze statue in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Sept. 29, 2019. Pope Francis attended the unveiling of the statue after celebrating a Mass for World Day of Migrants and Refugees. (CNS photo/Paolo Galosi)

Following Jesus, serving the Church, promoting justice - all for the greater glory of God.

Find your calling. beajesuit.org


THANK YOU TO OUR IFTJ INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS $2,500+ Robyn and Vince Caponi In Honor of 15 years of ISN $1,000+ Ann Magovern and Kate Carter | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. James and Cate DeGraw In Honor of 15 years of ISN Melissa and Al DiLenardo In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Loretta Holstein| In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Anonymous | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. $500 Michael R. Anderson, M.D. In Honor of 15 years of ISN James and Sue DiPiero | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Richard Fiesta | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Robin Smith and Bill Plante In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. $250 The Alison Family | In Memory of the Jesuit Martyrs and Elba and Celina Ramos Gordon and Joan Cavanaugh | In Memory of Rev. Charles Curries, S.J.

Charles L. Conlon, M.D. | In Honor of 15 years of ISN Carol and Joseph Corgan | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Barbara and Paul Fuller In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J., 15 years of ISN, and the Jesuit Martyrs and Elba and Celina Ramos Barry J. Gilman | In Memory of the Jesuit Martyrs and Elba and Celina Ramos Bill Hobbs | In Honor of 15 years of ISN John and Kelly Kleiderer In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Dennis and Pam Lucey | In Honor of 15 years of ISN Corinne O’Connell | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Suzanne Polen | In Memory of the Jesuit Martyrs and Elba and Celina Ramos Jane McCarthy Santoro | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J. Sarah Signorino | In Honor of 15 years of ISN Dominic Tarantino | In Memory of Rev. Charles Currie, S.J.

Commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Jesuit martyrs and their companions, the tremendous impact of Charlie Currie, S.J., and the 15th year of Ignatian Solidarity Network. We are proud to be members of “a faith that does justice.” I SN BO A RD O F DI RECTO RS

THANK YOU TO OUR ISN MEMBER INSTITUTIONS ISN’s work would not be possible without the many schools, parishes, and ministries that make up our institutional membership.

2019-2020 ISN Member Institutions* High Schools Bellarmine College Preparatory Bellarmine Preparatory School Bishop Canevin High School Bishop O’Dowd High School Boston College High School Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School Brophy College Preparatory Canisius High School Carondelet High School Cheverus High School Creighton Preparatory School Cristo Rey Jesuit High School De Smet Jesuit High School Fairfield College Preparatory School Fordham Preparatory School Georgetown Preparatory School Gonzaga College High School Jesuit College Preparatory School Jesuit High School Jesuit High School Portland Loyola Academy Loyola Blakefield Loyola High School of Los Angeles Loyola School Marquette University High School Newton Country Day School of the Sacred Heart Notre Dame San Jose Notre Dame School of Manhattan Presentation High School

Regis High School Regis Jesuit High School Rockhurst High School Sacred Heart Preparatory Scranton Preparatory School Saint Peter’s Preparatory Saint Ursula Academy St. Bonaventure’s College St. Ignatius College Prep St. Ignatius College Preparatory St. Ignatius High School St. John’s Jesuit High School and Academy St. Joseph’s Preparatory School St. Louis University High School St. Paul’s High School Villa Maria Academy High School Walsh Jesuit High School Xavier High School College & Universities Boston College Canisius College College of the Holy Cross Creighton University Fairfield University Fordham University Georgetown University Gonzaga University John Carroll University Le Moyne College Loyola Marymount University

Loyola University Chicago Loyola University Maryland Marquette University Regis University Rockhurst University Saint Joseph’s University Saint Louis University Saint Peter’s University Santa Clara University Seattle University University of Detroit Mercy University of San Francisco University of Scranton Villanova University Xavier University Parishes Church of St. Ignatius Loyola (NY) Church of the Gesu (OH) Gesu Church (MI) Gesu Parish (WI) Holy Trinity Catholic Church (DC) Immaculate Conception Parish (NM) Old St. Joseph’s Church (PA) Our Lady of Guadalupe (CA) Saint Francis Xavier Church (NY) St. Agnes Catholic Church (CA) St. Aloysius Church (WA) St. Alphonsus Rodriguez Church (MD) St. Anthony’s Parish (NY)

St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church (MO) St. Francis Xavier Parish (AZ) St. Ignatius Church (MD) St. Ignatius Loyola Parish (CA) St. Ignatius of Loyola Parish (MA) St. John’s Catholic Church (NE) St. Leo Church (WA) St. Mary Student Parish (MI) St. Peter’s Catholic Church (NC) St. Robert Bellarmine Chapel (OH) St Thomas More Catholic Community (MN) Other Organizations Ignatian Spiritual Life Center Jesuit Schools Network Jesuit Social Research Institute Jesuit Volunteer Corps Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest Kino Border Initiative National Christian Community of USA NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice Network of Sacred Heart Schools The Father McKenna Center UNCW Catholic Student Center *List accurate as of 10/20/19


THANK YOU F OR M A K ING T HE T E ACH - IN POS SIB LE MAGIS LEVEL SPONSORS

LOYOLA LEVEL SPONSORS

XAVIER LEVEL SPONSORS

ARRUPE LEVEL SPONSORS

IF T J S T E E R ING COMMI T T E E

Megan Barry Loyola University Chicago Christine Boyle Saint Peter’s University Cecilia Calvo Jesuit Conference Office of Justice and Ecology Teresa Cariño St. Ignatius Parish Gianna Carleo Rockhurst University Matt Carroll Sacred Heart Atherton Jamie Coley Parent, Walsh Jesuit High School John Dougherty Saint Peter’s Preparatory Elise Gower Loyola University Maryland Susan Haarman Loyola University Chicago Craig Hannick St. Louis University High School Ryan Heffernan Boston College Ken Homan, S.J. Boston College School of Theology and Ministry Billy Kavula Boston College Griffin Knipp Marquette University Spencer Liechty Xavier University Alex Lupo Loyola Academy Donald A. MacMillan, S.J. Boston College Yasamin Mahallaty Georgetown University Katie McCann Dominican Academy Eli McCarthy Conference of Major Superiors of Men Kevin McDonald Notre Dame High School Erin McDonald University of Detroit Mercy Meg Olson NETWORK Ted Penton, S.J. Jesuit Conference Office of Justice and Ecology Ian Peoples, S.J. The Jesuit Post Tim Poole St. Joseph’s Preparatory Kristen Pungitore St. Joseph Academy Maura Rocks Christ the King Jesuit College Preparatory Will Rutt Brophy College Preparatory Kelly Tadeo Orbik Creighton University Maura Toomb Estevez Northeast Province of the Society of Jesus Caitlin-Marie Ward Jesuit Conference Office of Justice and Ecology Joanna Williams Kino Border Initiative Joan Wilson Spring Hill College Devi Zinzuvadia St. Ignatius Church


Lighting the way to a more just world Creighton students engage in over 1 million annual hours of direct service and advocacy for justice in our local communities and around the world. We blend our mission-driven culture with a top-tier Jesuit education to create a transformative experience. Opportunity Awaits With 9 schools and colleges and more than 140 academic offerings, you can find your passion at Creighton. True to our Jesuit roots, we prepare students for something more. At Creighton, students take part in research, study abroad, experience internships and make a difference through service to others.

Nationally Recognized Named a top higher education institution by Kiplinger, The Princeton Review, the Center for World University Rankings and Forbes in their lists of top colleges and universities for 2019 and 2020. Becoming the largest Catholic health professions educator in the U.S. Leading among Catholic universities for number of Goldwater Scholars— 23—since 2005.

Visit our campus and see our mission in action: creighton.edu/IFTJ #ChooseCreighton

Profile for Ignatian Solidarity Network

Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice 2019 Program Book  

Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice 2019 Program Book  

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