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Inland Empire Weekly Features, Lifestyle & News You Can Use!

Vol 12, NO. 28

THIS WEEK

Gloria’s Corner and Words To Think About

Cope Middle School students go back in time for Pioneer Days

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March 02, 2017

Humane Society

of San Bernardino Valley accepting

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Pet Hero

nominations

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Congressman holds immigration town hall with SBVC DACA students

IECN

.com

IECN PHOTO/ YAZMIN ALVAREZ

Students at Cope Middle learned the ways of the Old West during Pioneer Days Feb. 21. Johnnycakes were made for students to enjoy.

Redlands recently took a trip back John Stevens, brought history to in time for a lesson in history. life for students Feb. 21 when Oak Days, an educational Pioneer From panning for gold to whipping up a stack of Johnnycakes, activity spearheaded by Cope’s History, cont. on next pg. students at Cope Middle School in eighth-grade U.S. History teacher

By Yazmin Alvarez

Job, resume workshop March 4 for Inland residents The Grove High School is small in numbers, big in Montessori approach to sports

he Humane Society of San Bernardino Valley is accepting nominations for the 2017 Pet Hero Awards. Members of the community are encouraged to nominate an animal that has helped them or their family, or a member or members of the community through a difficult time, a lifethreatening situation, or another special way that made a difference. Pet Heroes will be presented with an award during the HSSBV 2017 Walk for the Animals on Saturday, May 20, 2017 at San Manuel Stadium (home of the Inland Empire 66ers). The Walk for the Animals begins at 8:30 am, with the Pet Hero Awards Recognition at 11:00 am. Nomination forms can be picked up at the HSSBV (374 W Orange Show Road, San Bernardino), or online www.hssbv.org. Nominations will be accepted now through April 3rd. All nominations are welcome, as there are many different ways a pet can be a hero to you. For more details on the Pet Hero Awards or the Walk for Animals please visit www.hssbv.org or call (909) 386-1400 ext. 224.

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INSIDE ONE SECTION, 16 PAGES

Gloria’s Corner Words To think About Legal Notices Opinion

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HOW TO REACH US Inland Empire Community Newspapers Office: (909) 381-9898 Fax: (909) 384-0406 Editorial: iecn1@mac.com Advertising: sales@iecn.com

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COURTESY PHOTO

A workshop is planned March 4 at the Rialto Resource Center to help job seekers in wastewater operations land a job for an upcoming position in Los Angeles. Veolia Water North America, The Inland-area become candidates for By Yazmin Alvarez Metropolitan Water District of a pre-apprentice program availhandful of area residents Southern California and the able through the Metropolitan American Water Water District. are better prepared for African the job market after a Leadership Coalition hosted a The guided workshop offered recent workshop held at the Rialto resume building and job information workshop to help job seekers Resource Center. Workshop, cont. on next pg. Representatives from Rialto’s in the city and throughout the

Got News? Send information to Inland Empire Weekly Community News Editor Yazmin Alvarez at iecn.yazmin@gmail.com or call 909-381-9898 ext. 207.


Page A2 • March 2, 2017 • Inland Empire Community Newspapers • Inland Empire Weekly

IECN PHOTOS/YAZMIN ALVAREZ

Students at Cope Middle School got a hands-on lesson from the Old West during Pioneer Days Feb. 21. Below: U.S. History teacher John Stevens. History, cont. from front As part of the day’s events, Glen’s Stone Soup Farm’s Farm eighth-graders cooked up Johnnyto School Program led Old West- cakes from cornmeal and milk batinspired activities to help students ter, made campfire coffee, panned visualize a current lesson taught in for gold, took up archery and U.S. History teacher’s John danced around to classic tunes played on the washboard. Stevens five classes. “This really does bring history to “The students really enjoy the life and puts them right in it,” said hands-on learning experience of what it was like in the pioneer Stevens about the events. “It’s a great way for them to learn through days,” Stevens said. experience.” Workshop, cont. from front

tips, resource information from representatives and opportunities to update resumes with the needed wordage to land the job for 17 available positions with the company, and there’s opportunity for more, said Veolia Rialto General Manager Clarence Mansell. An information workshop for an upcoming position and promotion into a Wastewater Treatment Operator with the City of Los Angeles

C

is planned March 4 at 9 a.m. “Our goal is to help get job seekers through that first phase and getting them through the doors,” Mansell said. Those interested are asked to bring a copy of their resume. Computers will be available for job seekers to update their resumes. For more information visit the Rialto Resource Center at 141 Riverside Ave. in Rialto or call 909-874-6000.

NCNW hold Care Packet Service Day to provide for homeless

ontinuing their efforts to serve, members of the National Council of Negro Women’s Inland Empire Section’s visited Meadowbrook Park and Mary’s Mercy Center in the City of San Bernardino on February 4th to give out over 200 hygiene care bags to the homeless. “Our Section chose to collect items to prepare and give out ‘blessing bags’ to the homeless as a part of a regional Black History Community Service project initiative started this year by NCNW Southern California Co-Convener Dr. Helena Johnson,” said Inland Empire Section President, Milele Robertson. “Our members stepped up, donating much needed items for these men and women, but so did our community partners.” The I.E. Section’s Director of Communication Kimberly Clark secured the help of Sam’s Club in Riverside that enlisted volunteers for the day, Sam’s Club in Ontario that donated 200 bags with giveaway items, and Thrivent Financial in Ontario, which donated funds to support the outreach. “Without their support,” said Clark, “our event would not have been able to

serve so many. We appreciate their enthusiastic partnership.” “We were happy to help,” said Kern Wilson, Club Manager of Sam’s Club in Riverside. “Sam’s Club is always willing to donate our services when needed in our community. In fact, we do this quite often and we look forward to future opportunities to work with NCNW.” -moreResponding to the NCNW I.E. Section’s Facebook recap of the event, Financial Associate Tara Walker also expressed Thrivent Financial’s pleasure in being part of the event. With these partners’ help NCNW members collected several hundred blessing bags filled with toothpaste and toothbrushes, chapsticks, socks, wash cloths, soap, batteries, sunscreen, lotion, and a variety of other essential hygiene items. Having a key partner on the receiving end was equally important to the event’s success. Mary’s Mercy Center provided a great location to connect with people in need. According to Marsha Olguin, director of Mary’s Mercy Center, 250 to 300 people come through the Center each day seeking food,

@iebikecooks

Lights for Life

clothing, shelter, showers, and other needs. After enjoying a hot, healthy meal individuals also received a blessing bag from NCNW members and Sam’s Club volunteers. “We are always willing to work with NCNW to assist the people who come through our doors,” said Olguin. “There is never too much that can be done to help others.” ~ National Council of Negro Women’s Inland Empire Section


Gloria’s Corner Now to March 11 - the Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art presents Man Up! Masculinity in Question at the Museum, 5885 Haven Ave, Rancho Cucamonga. For ticket information visit: www.chaffey.edu

Gloria Macias Harrison

Incentive: The In-N-Out Cover to Cover Reading Club Program is back at all four San Bernardino City Libraries! Sign up now for the program which begins Saturday March 4. 2017 and ends Saturday, April 15, 2017. Readers’ age 4-12 who read five (5) or more books by April 15 will receive a certificate for a free hamburger, cheeseburger or grilled cheese sandwich from In-N-Out. Each registered child has the opportunity to receive up to three (3) certificates by reading up to 15 books by April 15. Visit one of the following libraries and register: Feldheym Library, 555 W. 6th Street - 909-381-8235; Rowe Library, 108 E. Marshall Blvd., 9883-3411; Villasenor Library, 525 N. Mt. Vernon, 909-383-5156; or Ingram Library, 1505 W. Highland Ave., 909-887-4494. Thank you In-N-Out for sponsoring this incentive to encourage reading among our children. A hamburger and a good book to read, life couldn't be better!

Now to March 24 - California State University San Bernardino's Anthropology Museum presents Re/Collect: Memories of Childhood, curated by Dr. Arianna Huhn, with the assistance of Arlene Gutierrez, Brent Bella, Casey Lee and Lauren Adams. The objects on display and their stories embody the biographical stories of the Inland Empire community members. Additionally the Museum takes this exhibition as a starting point for investing in the community as a repository - a collection of valued individuals, experiences, and lives that reflect the beauty and depth of the human experience. The Museum is located on the third floor of the Social and Behavioral Sciences building (SB306) at the CAUSB campus, 5500 University Parkway. For information call: 909.537.5502

Now - April 2 - San Bernardino County Museum presents Over Here, Over There: In Times of War. This exhibit not only honors those who made sacrifices made by the soldiers in the conflict but also those making sacrifices on the home front.

Now to April 8 - the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art presents "Enduring Vision and Linked in Tradition: Selected Works by Four Generations of African American Women Artists" this exhibit feature the works of Samella Lewis & Betye Saar, Lois Marilou Jones, Elizabeth Catlett, Gwendolyn Knight, Art Exhibits, Theatre & Semi- Mary Lovelace O'Neil, Nanette Carter, Alison Saar, Lesley Saar, nars: Eve Sandler, Elizabeth Sunday, Exhibits & Theatre: Kenturah Davis, and Lisa C. Soto.

Inland Empire Community Newspapers • March 2, 2017 • Page A3

This event is part of Cal State San Bernardino's celebration of Black History Month and Women's History Month. The Museum is located on the Cal State campus, 5500 University Parkway. For information call: 909.537.7373 or visit: raffma@csusb.edu

Now to May 20 - the Robert and Fullerton Museum of Art presents "Not Ready to Make Nice: Guerrilla Girls in the Art World and Beyond", an exhibit organized and circulated by Columbia College Chicago. This exhibition of Guerrilla Girls, a major presentation of the collective, illuminates and contextualizes the important past and ongoing work of these highly original, provocative and influential artist who champion feminism and social change. Admission is free. The Museum is located on the Cal State campus, 5500 University Parkway. For information on Museum hours and parking call: 909. 537. 7373.

Now - July 31, 2017 - the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art presents Journey To The Beyond: Ancient Egyptians In The Pursuit Of Eternity at the Cal State San Bernardino Campus, 5500 University Parkway in San Bernardino. Museum hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 pm., Thursday 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., closed on Sunday and Friday. The focus of this exhibit is the ancient

Egyptians' attitude toward life and death. For information call: 909.537.7373 or visit: raffma@csusb.edu Save the Date:

Friday, March 3 - Kiwanis of Greater San Bernardino present Inaugural Golf Tournament: CNH Mid-Year South at Indian Hills Golf Course, 5700 Country Club Drive, Riverside starting at 7:00 a.m. for registration and practice with a Shotgun Start at 8:00 a.m. Lunch, awards and drawings at noon. Proceeds from this event go towards scholarships for local high schools and pediatric doctors at Loma Linda Hospital. For information call Joe Guerra at 951.660.8909

of Women's Clubs (GFWC) present the 2nd Annual International Women's Day Luncheon at Sierra Lakes Golf Club, 16600 Clubhouse Drive, Fontana from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 8 - California State University, San Bernardino presents the Inaugural Lecture of the Rabbi Hillel Cohn Endowed Lecture on the Contemporary Jewish Experience at 7:00 p.m. at the campus' Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art. Featured lecturer is Rabbi David Ellenson, Ph.D., one of the leading Jewish scholars of our times, will speak on "American Judaism at a Crossroads: Crisis, Challenge and Opportunity". The Lecture is open to the public at no charge. To RSVP call 909.537.5004 or inFriday, March 3 - Redlands, CA vitereply@csusb.edu Kids will host Dr. Seuss Storytime Celebration from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at the YMCA of the Wednesday, March 8 East Valley, 500 E. Citrus Ave., Redlands International Women's

Saturday, March 4 - Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Rialto City Clerk Barbara McGee, the National Council of Negro Women Inland Empire Section, Women's Club of Rialto and the League of Women Voters San Bernardino Area present Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business Brunch from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 2225 N. Alder Ave. This event honors dynamic women who represent the community. Vendor booths and gift basket raffles will be available. For information and tickets call: 909.820.2519

Day

Thursdays, March 9 - the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art at CSU San Bernardino presents "The message from the Ones" Lucille Clifton: An Evening of Art, Poetry & Music from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. A brief panel discussion will be followed with poems by poet and scholar Lucille Clifton, performed by her daughter Sidney Clifton and a selection of music performed by Shana Blake Hill and Victoria Kirsten, pianist. The Museum is located on the CSU Sunday, March 5 - the Rialto campus, 5500 University Parkway. information call: Lions present Annual Pancake For 909.537.7373 Breakfast at El Kiosco Mexican Restaurant, 916 S. Riverside Ave from 8:00 to 9:30 a.m. This event benefits the Lions Sight and High To submit an event or info for School Scholarship projects. For Gloria's Corner please email information call: Soledad at gloharrison@me.com 909.820.7595 Deadline is Friday noon of each week. Also visit: www.iecn.com Monday, March 6 - Rotary Infor online news. ternational and General Federation


Gloria’s Corner

Inland Empire Community Newspapers • El Chicano • Colton Courier • Rialto Record • Inland Empire Weekly • March 2, 2017 • Page A3

Now to March 11 - the Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art presents Man Up! Masculinity in Question at the Museum, 5885 Haven Ave, Rancho Cucamonga. For ticket information visit: www.chaffey.edu

Gloria Macias Harrison

Incentive: The In-N-Out Cover to Cover Reading Club Program is back at all four San Bernardino City Libraries! Sign up now for the program which begins Saturday March 4. 2017 and ends Saturday, April 15, 2017. Readers’ age 4-12 who read five (5) or more books by April 15 will receive a certificate for a free hamburger, cheeseburger or grilled cheese sandwich from In-N-Out. Each registered child has the opportunity to receive up to three (3) certificates by reading up to 15 books by April 15. Visit one of the following libraries and register: Feldheym Library, 555 W. 6th Street - 909-381-8235; Rowe Library, 108 E. Marshall Blvd., 9883-3411; Villasenor Library, 525 N. Mt. Vernon, 909-383-5156; or Ingram Library, 1505 W. Highland Ave., 909-887-4494. Thank you In-N-Out for sponsoring this incentive to encourage reading among our children. A hamburger and a good book to read, life couldn't be better!

Now to March 24 - California State University San Bernardino's Anthropology Museum presents Re/Collect: Memories of Childhood, curated by Dr. Arianna Huhn, with the assistance of Arlene Gutierrez, Brent Bella, Casey Lee and Lauren Adams. The objects on display and their stories embody the biographical stories of the Inland Empire community members. Additionally the Museum takes this exhibition as a starting point for investing in the community as a repository - a collection of valued individuals, experiences, and lives that reflect the beauty and depth of the human experience. The Museum is located on the third floor of the Social and Behavioral Sciences building (SB306) at the CAUSB campus, 5500 University Parkway. For information call: 909.537.5502

Now - April 2 - San Bernardino County Museum presents Over Here, Over There: In Times of War. This exhibit not only honors those who made sacrifices made by the soldiers in the conflict but also those making sacrifices on the home front.

Now to April 8 - the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art presents "Enduring Vision and Linked in Tradition: Selected Works by Four Generations of African American Women Artists" this exhibit feature the works of Samella Lewis & Betye Saar, Lois Marilou Jones, Elizabeth Catlett, Gwendolyn Knight, Art Exhibits, Theatre & Semi- Mary Lovelace O'Neil, Nanette Carter, Alison Saar, Lesley Saar, nars: Eve Sandler, Elizabeth Sunday, Exhibits & Theatre: Kenturah Davis, and Lisa C. Soto.

This event is part of Cal State San Bernardino's celebration of Black History Month and Women's History Month. The Museum is located on the Cal State campus, 5500 University Parkway. For information call: 909.537.7373 or visit: raffma@csusb.edu

Now to May 20 - the Robert and Fullerton Museum of Art presents "Not Ready to Make Nice: Guerrilla Girls in the Art World and Beyond", an exhibit organized and circulated by Columbia College Chicago. This exhibition of Guerrilla Girls, a major presentation of the collective, illuminates and contextualizes the important past and ongoing work of these highly original, provocative and influential artist who champion feminism and social change. Admission is free. The Museum is located on the Cal State campus, 5500 University Parkway. For information on Museum hours and parking call: 909. 537. 7373.

Now - July 31, 2017 - the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art presents Journey To The Beyond: Ancient Egyptians In The Pursuit Of Eternity at the Cal State San Bernardino Campus, 5500 University Parkway in San Bernardino. Museum hours are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 pm., Thursday 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., closed on Sunday and Friday. The focus of this exhibit is the ancient

Egyptians' attitude toward life and death. For information call: 909.537.7373 or visit: raffma@csusb.edu Save the Date:

Friday, March 3 - Kiwanis of Greater San Bernardino present Inaugural Golf Tournament: CNH Mid-Year South at Indian Hills Golf Course, 5700 Country Club Drive, Riverside starting at 7:00 a.m. for registration and practice with a Shotgun Start at 8:00 a.m. Lunch, awards and drawings at noon. Proceeds from this event go towards scholarships for local high schools and pediatric doctors at Loma Linda Hospital. For information call Joe Guerra at 951.660.8909

of Women's Clubs (GFWC) present the 2nd Annual International Women's Day Luncheon at Sierra Lakes Golf Club, 16600 Clubhouse Drive, Fontana from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 8 - California State University, San Bernardino presents the Inaugural Lecture of the Rabbi Hillel Cohn Endowed Lecture on the Contemporary Jewish Experience at 7:00 p.m. at the campus' Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art. Featured lecturer is Rabbi David Ellenson, Ph.D., one of the leading Jewish scholars of our times, will speak on "American Judaism at a Crossroads: Crisis, Challenge and Opportunity". The Lecture is open to the public at no charge. To RSVP call 909.537.5004 or inFriday, March 3 - Redlands, CA vitereply@csusb.edu Kids will host Dr. Seuss Storytime Celebration from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at the YMCA of the Wednesday, March 8 East Valley, 500 E. Citrus Ave., Redlands International Women's

Saturday, March 4 - Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, Rialto City Clerk Barbara McGee, the National Council of Negro Women Inland Empire Section, Women's Club of Rialto and the League of Women Voters San Bernardino Area present Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business Brunch from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at 2225 N. Alder Ave. This event honors dynamic women who represent the community. Vendor booths and gift basket raffles will be available. For information and tickets call: 909.820.2519

Day

Thursdays, March 9 - the Robert and Frances Fullerton Museum of Art at CSU San Bernardino presents "The message from the Ones" Lucille Clifton: An Evening of Art, Poetry & Music from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. A brief panel discussion will be followed with poems by poet and scholar Lucille Clifton, performed by her daughter Sidney Clifton and a selection of music performed by Shana Blake Hill and Victoria Kirsten, pianist. The Museum is located on the CSU Sunday, March 5 - the Rialto campus, 5500 University Parkway. information call: Lions present Annual Pancake For 909.537.7373 Breakfast at El Kiosco Mexican Restaurant, 916 S. Riverside Ave from 8:00 to 9:30 a.m. This event benefits the Lions Sight and High To submit an event or info for School Scholarship projects. For Gloria's Corner please email information call: Soledad at gloharrison@me.com 909.820.7595 Deadline is Friday noon of each week. Also visit: www.iecn.com Monday, March 6 - Rotary Infor online news. ternational and General Federation


OPINION&LETTERS Page A4 • March 2, 2017 • Inland Empire Community Newspapers

2519 womensevents@rialto.gov

34th annual A Run Through Redlands

or

YOUR COMMUNITY COMMENTARY! All letters must be signed.

March 5 - 7 a.m.

By Yazmin Alvarez

M

March into these events annual hometown events

arch is full with events to get you involved in your community. Here’s a look at a few upcoming things in your hometown: Rialto Institute of Progress

March 2 - April 27

The Rialto Institute of Progress offers residents and business owners insight on how the city’s local government works and ways to promote transparency between residents and city hall. The eight-week program will be held at the Rialto Civic Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Thursday. Class is limited to 40 Rialto residents or Rialto business owners. Registration is required and can be made by calling 909-421-4991. 11th annual The State of Women March 4 - 9:30 a.m.

2225 N. Alder Ave., Rialto

The national women’s history event will be honoring trailblazing women in labor and business in the Inland Empire. Event is hosted by Mayor Deborah Robertson, Rialto City Clerk Barbara McGee, The National Council of Negro Women Inland Empire Section, Women’s Club of Rialto and the League of Women Voters San Bernardino Area. Event includes brunch and vendor booths beginning at 9:30 a.m. Program is scheduled to begin at 11:30 a.m. Registration is required 909-820-

The Run Through Redlands is involves three races: a 5k, a 10k and a half marathon. The 5k course is almost entirely flat and the 10k course features fewer climbs and will include running through historic Smiley Heights. The half marathon course will have less elevation gain than previous years and will include running through Prospect Park, the Redlands Country Club area, Redlands Community Hospital and Smiley Heights on the way back to downtown Redlands and the finish at the Redlands Bowl. Information and registration is still available and can be on race day or at www.redlandsrun.com

Inaugural Charity Rummage Sale March 9 - 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 10 - 7 a.m. to noon

932 W Cypress Avenue, Redlands

Building A Generation will be hosting a rummage sale to help raise funds to continue to provide programs to students in the Redlands Unified School District. The group is in need of items to re-sell at the rummage sale. All donations are tax-deductible. 2017 Pet Hero Awards

The Humane Society of San Bernardino Valley is accepting nominations for the 2017 Pet Hero Awards. Community members are encouraged to nominate an animal that has helped them or their family, or a members of the community through a difficult time, a life-threatening situation, or in another special way. Pet heroes will be presented with an award during the HSSBV 2017 Walk for the Animals May 20 at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino. Nomination forms can be picked up at the Humane Society at 374 W Orange Show Road, San Bernardino, or online www.hssbv.org. Nominations will be accepted through April 3. To learn more visit www.hssbv.org or call 909-3861400 ext. 224.

Views expressed in Opinion & Letters do not necessarily reflect the views of IECN

Please include your name, address & phone number for verification purposes only. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

La Verne one of the best-run cities in California

I couldn’t imagine living anywhere else! My husband and I moved to La Verne almost 20 years ago, just before our son started kindergarten. We still talk about what a great decision it was for us and our kids.

I think we have one of the bestrun cities in California. We have our own fire and police departments. Response times for both of these departments is 2–3 minutes. Our police department’s motto is “No call is too small” and they mean it. We have a great chief and our officers are top-notch!

Our city manager, mayor, and council have always made great choices for our community. We have wonderful programs for youth and senior citizens. A 30year tax was passed a few years ago, which pays for improvements to our schools. As a result, there is a new state-of-the-art performing arts center and several new gyms, among others things.

We, as a community, know the importance of schools and I’m so happy my kids were able to go through the Bonita Unified

School District.

La Verne has several traditions, but two of my favorite’s are our annual Fourth of July parade, and Santa and the fire department visiting every street in La Verne on Christmas morning. Although La Verne keeps up with the times, it still manages to keep its smalltown feel, which is why we love it so much! Denise Fisher, La Verne

We must take a stand against gender wage gap I believe that the growing gender wage gap in the United States, specifically in California, is concerning for today’s working women and future generations.

As a teenage girl who will be graduating in a few months and going off to college, I am dismayed with the lack of progress

we have seen these last few years in the pay-equality race.

As a whole, our society has become much more progressive. Therefore, I do not understand why we still have discrepancies with females’ wages.

I believe both women and men should take a stand against the

growing wage gap and let it be known that whatever your gender, race or sexual orientation is, there should be equality in the workplace in every regard. Jenna Prescott, Chino

Politicians first line of defense in war on police

he tragic death of a Whittier police officer at the hands of an active felon is another copkilling blow to our seriously damaged society at the hands of felon-friendly Gov. Jerry Brown and the anti-police former President Obama.

As a retired deputy sheriff who began my long career patrolling the unincorporated East Whittier area in the early 1960s, I am outraged by this and the continuing war against the police.

Hopefully, President Trump can turn things around. Lest we

forget, the police are our first line of defense. Daniel B. Jeffs, Apple Valley

IECNInland Empire Community Newspapers E-mail us your opinions, (909) 381-9898 • FAX 384-0406 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 110, Colton, CA 92324 • Office Location: 1809 Commercenter West, San Bernardino, CA Letters are printed in the order they are 92408 received and are subject to editing for clarity.

Deadline is Tuesdays at noon. Readers may also submit their perspectives online at iecn1@mac.com • For advertising inquiries email sales@iecn.com Colton Courier

Gloria Macías Harrison Bill Harrison Co-Publisher General Manager Diana Harrison Martinez Managing Editor Diana Harrison Martinez Community News Editor Yazmin Alvarez Community News Editor Anthony Victoria Advertising/Classified Sales Bruce Martinez

Published weekly on Thursday. Adjudicated as a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of San Bernardino County, State of California, case #73036 and therefore qualified to publish legal notices.

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Established 1910.

Publisher

Established 1876.

RIALTO RECORD

Denise Berver Published weekly on Thursday.

El Chicano

Established 1969.

Published weekly on Thursday. Adjudicated as a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of San Bernardino County, State of California, case #154019 and therefore qualified to publish legal notices.

Inland Empire Weekly Established 2005.

Published weekly on Thursday. Adjudicated as a newspaper of gen- As a community newspaper of Fictitious Business Name Danielle Vasquez eral circulation by the Superior Court general circulation. & Accounting of San Bernardino County, State of Graphic Artist/Web Mgr. Michael Segura CI RCULAT IO N California, case #26583 and thereVERIFICATION BDM I Circulation nterprises fore qualified to publish legal notices. OF CALIFOR-

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Inland Empire Community Newspapers • March 2, 2017 • Page A5

Words to Think About: In Favor of Immigrants

I

By G. W. Abersold Ph.D.

love our country. Ever since I knew the meaning of the word patriot, I’ve been one. I’m also in favor of immigrants entering our country. My ancestors were immigrants from Switzerland and England. Stella’s parents came from Greece. I have grandchildren that have one parent from Costa Rica, Puerta Rico and Mexico. I have close friends from Pakistan, from Vietnam, from Thailand, from Mexico, from Canada, from Iran, from China, from Japan from Tonga and from Portugal. I regularly see doctors: from Egypt, from Poland, from Korea, from Vietnam, from Taiwan. And a dentist from the Philippines. A question. Where did the early citizens of our country come from? The answer. The Native Americans originally came from Russia. The earliest settlers came from England,

from Spain, from France; from Sweden, from Portugal and from Germany. Then I think of the countries I’ve visited, without staying longer than 4-5 months-84 of them. Which brings me to the ill-advised decision by President Donald Trump’s regarding Muslims. First of all his grandparents came to America from Germany as immigrants. Then his mother came to America as an immigrant from Scotland. Third, his first wife Ivana and his third wife, Melania, came to America as immigrants from Slovakia and Slovenia. It has often been said that our nation is made up of immigrants. Too true. There are more than 500 tribes of Indians in the USA. They were here when the first immigrants arrived. Before the Pilgrims at Boston’ before the settlers at Jamestown, Virginia, before the explorers at St. Augustine, Florida. This land was not our land in the beginning. The Athabascans migrated from Alyeska (Alaska) between 15,000 and 20,000 years ago. They spread out and various groups developed their own cultures, dialects and became Navajos, Cherokees, Pechangos, Mirangos; Serranos and hundreds of other tribes. When the whites arrived, they were the immigrants. That makes the descendants of all three-Boston, Jamestown and St. Augustine-illegals. That also refers to the colonies and the founders of our country. Descendants of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Franklin, Han-

cock etc. were illegals as well. It wasn’t until the early 1800’s that records of citizens were taken. In fact, the records were somewhat fuzzy until the 1900’s. The early black population was excluded when it came to citizenship. The early records depicted citizens as white and landowners. The letter of the law made all blacks il-

like us; they have jobs like us. For all intents, they are citizens. Most of them are second generation citizens. They assume their parents were legit. The same applies to former Mexican citizens. The ones I know are second and third generation from Mexico. Their parents came many years ago as workers. Immigration

legal immigrants. A dark period in our country about immigration is the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1892. After being in the USA and working on the railroad, they were mistreated and abused. An example is Redlands. Some Chinese were even hung and others killed by bullets. Oriental Street is a sorry reminder in downtown Redlands. The Chinese were housed in shacks. An equally sorry moment was the aftermath of the Korean War. A personal friend of mine and a veteran came home from the Korean War and was denied access to swim in the Redlands public pool. He was Hispanic. There is another area of immigration that needs attention. I’m referring to immigrants from Canada and Mexico. I know approximately thirty (30) people from Canada that are assimilating into U.S. citizenship. They look like us; the speak

laws were loose and seldom observed. Their children and grandchildren assumed they were citizens. In fact, I even speak better Spanish than many of them do. The news for several days has focused on the immigration ban issued from the White House by President Donald Trump and his Executive Orders. They were focused on seven countries. I’ve been especially concerned about Iraq. The situations that have really upset me were those that were shut off from entering the U.S.A. They were legally qualified. They also had aided our military forces, laying their own lives open for martyrdom. Several even had loved ones waiting for them. But they were sent back to Iraq. What a shame. Religion of choice has not been; nor should be. It has often been dominated by extremists. For example, Islam. The vast number of

IN MY OPINION, I BELIEVE THAT ANYONE WHO CAN VOTE AND DOESN’T, HAS VIOLATED THEIR GOD-GIVEN TRUST.

Americans have judged Islam by ISIS, which is not Islam. It would be like judging Christianity by the KKK. The clan professes a fundamentalist view of Christianity. To become one a person must profess to be born again and believe in the inerrancy of the Bible; and of course, to be pure white. I’m also concerned with refugees with Green Cards. They are protected by law. Here are a few facts I’ve learned about them. 1. A Green Card holder can travel abroad and reenter the United States. 2. After 5 years they can apply for citizenship. 3. They can apply for government financial aid. 4. Can work for any US employer. 5. They may have access to security clearance and receive Social Security benefits. 6. They can start their own business. 7. They can purchase a home and have a mortgage. 8. They can own cars and firearms. 9. They can live in any State and live there permanently 10. They can become a real estate agent or a life insurance agent. However, they do not have the right to vote, but can contribute to a campaign. IN MY OPINION, I BELIEVE THAT ANYONE WHO CAN VOTE AND DOESN’T, HAS VIOLATED THEIR GOD-GIVEN TRUST. Amen. Selah. So be it.


Page A6 • March 2, 2017 • Inland Empire Community Newspapers

Congressman holds immigration town hall with SBVC DACA students

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By Anthony Victoria

ongressman Pete Aguilar hosted a town hall at San Bernardino Valley College last Thursday to discuss issues concerning the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and other related immigration questions. Aguilar (D-San Bernardino) began the meeting by assuring undocumented students that his office is doing everything possible to address their concerns. “It’s important for us to be vigilant,” Aguilar said to approximately 40 students in attendance. “It’s important for you to understand your rights and know who’s here to help.” Also present were officials from the Guatemalan and Mexican Consulates. The foreign governmental offices provided students with information regarding their legal rights. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) last week released a series of documents that revealed the President’s immigration objectives. Trump intends to revive programs such as Secure Communities and 287(g) to find, apprehend, and deport immigrants that pose a potential risk to public safety or national security. DACA, the program created by the Obama administration to suspend deportation proceedings and provide work authorization for immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, was notably left off DHS Secretary John Kelly’s memos. Yet,

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these individuals may still face deportation under the new directives. Two DACA recipients have been arrested and placed in detention by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials this month. Both men are facing possible deportation. Immigrant rights leaders say the detention of 22-year-old Jesus Alonso Arreola Robles of Los Angeles and 23-year-old Daniel Ramirez Medina of Seattle, Washington demonstrates the uncertainty surrounding DHS’ immigration enforcement. “[Robles’ and Medina’s] detention came out of a long term strategy to further criminalize the immigrant community,” said Alondra Naves of the Inland Empire Immigrant Youth Coalition. “At this point any infractions, however small they may be, might make people a target.” Aguilar admitted that he’s not optimistic regarding Trump’s immigration priorities and hopes he and congressional colleagues could receive more answers from DHS in the upcoming weeks. “I will continue to ask questions until they answer them,” Aguilar said. Enrique Salomon Rosas, the Chief Consul of the Mexican Consulate in San Bernardino, and staff say they are collaborating with Guatemalan, Honduran, and Salvadoran Consulates to provide resources to nationals residing in the U.S. Both Guatemalan and Mexican Consular officials expect immigration policy to change rapidly, and therefore encourage nationals to not commit crimes or resort to the use

San Bernardino County libraries

celebrating Dr. Seuss, Read Across America

By Yazmin Alvarez

he San Bernardino County Library is celebrating the gift of reading with a lineup of events and programs now through April at its 32 branches. Going on now and continuing through this weekend, the libraries are taking part in Read Across America, sharing the joy of literacy and celebrating beloved author, Dr. Seuss’s birthday. Read Across America is the National Education Association’s reading initiative and awareness program that calls for every child in every community to celebrate reading on March 2, the birthday of Dr. Seuss. Each branch will host a specialthemed storytime or event featuring popular Dr. Seuss stories, and select branches will even include crafts, activities and offer opportunity drawings and more. The Feldheym Central Library will be offering a Read Across America storytime at 10:30 a.m. in the Bing Wong Auditorium, 555 W. 6th Street in San Bernardino. Special guests Mayor R. Carey Davis and CHP Officer Brian Alvarez will be reading to children and retired children’s librarian, Mary Chartier, will be leading members of the audience in an interactive story as part of the celebration. The program is free and open to the public. The Rialto Branch Library will host a Dr. Seuss Birthday Party March 2 from 3 to 5 p.m. and

everyone is invited to revel in festivities. Pin the heart on the Grinch, a scavenger hunt and rhyming games among others will be part of the fun to be had, said library officials. For those who check out 10 books, library staff will offer a mystery incentive item for an additional prize. The event is free and open to the public. In continuing the celebration for reading, the county library is once again partnering with In-N-Out Burger for it’s Cover to Cover program, kicking off March 4 and continuing through April 15. As part of the program, children ages 4-12 who read a set of five books will receive an achievement award and voucher for a free hamburger or cheeseburger. Each child may earn a total of three awards and vouchers for the duration of the program. The Cover to Cover program is an aim at promoting reading among children during spring. To participate in the Cover to Cover program, visit any of the 32 San Bernardino County Branch Libraries to register. Participants must be between the ages of 4 and 12, and a parent or guardian will need to sign to acknowledge reading accomplishments. To learn more about programs and events offered at each San Bernardino County Library branch, visit www.sbpl.org or www.facebook.com/SBPLfriends/ For more information on NEA's Read Across America, visit www.readacrossamerica.org.

PHOTO/ANTHONY VICTORIA

Congressman Pete Aguilar (D-San Bernardino) speaking to about 40 undocumented students at San Bernardino Valley College during a Dreamers town hall on February 23.


BUSINESS & SERVICES

Inland Empire Community Newspapers • March 2, 2017 • Page A7

MUSIC LESSONS

NAIL CARE

FINANCES

FINANCES

POOLS

HEALTH SERVICES


Page A12 • March 2, 2017 • Inland Empire Community Newspapers

World Seafood in SB serves up choice, fresh seafood

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By MJ Duncan

erch from New Zealand, crappie from Lake Superior, cod and halibut from Alaska are a small sample of the fresh, lake and ocean fish featured at World Seafood in San Bernardino. Steven Wuo opened his restaurant on February 4 at the former Mug site, and includes oysters, scallops and jumbo shrimp at competitive prices. A former resident of San Bernardino, Wuo has owned several commercial properties in the city dating back to the early 80’s, and noted through the decades he has gained an understanding of what residents want. He purchased the property on Highland in September, and is no novice to the restaurant industry; his experience includes owning import and retail seafood ventures in the Los Angeles area, and a running his family-owned piano bar and

steakhouse in Alhambra. “I want to bring high-quality seafood that you can’t readily get in this area such as crappie, regarded as a superior fresh water fish in the culinary arena, and offer it at a reasonable price,” Wuo said about his choices of fish. “I run this restaurant like a fish market, but I only sell cooked products, that is what I believe will make me stand out from other restaurants.” Wuo put perch on the menu because its mild flavor is palatable to a range of taste buds, and its versatility. Fish and chips are made with Alaskan cod and portions are generous - a large order for $15 provides one pound of fish, or approximately 13 large pieces. Patrons can request salmon and halibut be grilled, and for $9.50 diners are served half-a-pound of fish. “I wanted to see what took the place of The Mug, and I was happily surprised by the quality of my lunch,” said San Bernardino resi-

dent Philip Anderson. “It’s always dubious to try seafood being so far inland, but my filet of sole was outstanding and very fresh.” Wuo, whose family immigrated here from Taiwan in the 70’s and currently lives in Duarte, says the community has been warm and welcoming since he opened his doors. His business has been mainly fueled by word of mouth, and he is confident that this will be a successful venture. His goal is for World Seafood to become a destination restaurant. “I bought this property because I liked the location, and if I didn’t it may have stayed vacant,” he said. “I am excited about bringing something special to San Bernardino and making a difference in the seafood business in the city. World Seafood is located at 1588 W. Highland Ave. in San Bernardino, and is open everyday from 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., phone number is (909) 474-9437.

PHOTO COURTESY/WORLD SEAFOOD

World Seafood is located at the former Mug site on Highland Avenue in San Bernardino.

The Grove High School is small in numbers, big in Montessori approach to sports

PHOTO/HARVEY COHEN

First year baseball coach Chris Brady at The Grove High School in Redlands conducts a light workout in preparation of 2017 season.

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By Harvey M. Kahn

he Grove High School in Redlands is a small high school with big hopes to build a respected athletic program. It's now better known for its student-operated farm and produce market where Grove Athletic Director Kramer Gudgeon serves as business manager. In his second year, Gudgeon wears many hats at The Grove including head coach of the Ravens soccer team, teaching business, and being a member of its board of directors. Despite an enrollment that hovers around 130 students, The Grove has been a member of the California Interscholastic Federation since 2005. It plays at the Division 7 level against parochial schools in the Majestic League. The Grove is making progress in two of the seven sports it competes. This season Gudgeon led the school into the CIF-playoffs. Two seasons ago softball coach Kendall McCarthy led The Grove into the post season. With good hitting down the lineup, the softball team looks capable of returning to the playoffs this season. It features pitchers Caroline Fox, Kennedy McCarthy and senior slugger Christen Freeman. The Grove baseball team has

always been another story due to lack of interest. Former coach Obrey Brown got the team off the ground in 2004. By the next season, the Ravens were competing. Brown guided the team to its best season ever in 2007 with a 6-9 record but had to resign after four years when his son began playing baseball in Palm Springs. "It was very hard for me to step away," Brown said. Brown knows what first-year Ravens baseball coach Chris Brady is going through. He recalled that many of his players had little baseball skill. "I didn't have a catcher or pitcher. We had our pitcher's throw a high arching pitch. Yes. Sort of like slo-pitch softball which could baffle batter's enough to keep us in some games," explained Brown. "I remember one of our hitters got a hold of one and sent it over the fence. He was so excited that he missed touching every base on his home run trot. He was then called out." Progress eventually came. He told of winning one game when his player stole home. The team was soon able to perfect a pickoff play at third base. "I had one rule. Show up on time for practice." Current coach Brady could face a greater challenge. Due to a last minute coaching vacancy, Brady was hired two weeks be-

fore the season opener. There were seven players at a recent practice just ten days before the first game scheduled for March 3rd at Crossroads Christian. "I'm a little concerned. I'm hoping for at least three more. We'll get more," says Brady. Gudgeon, who played soccer at Redlands East Valley High, assured there will be a baseball team this season, saying that at least two more players are expected. "It's always a numbers game at small schools. We hired a coach (Brady) because he is able to individualize practice according to vastly different skills levels, said Gudgeon. According to available records, The Grove has been able to field only three baseball teams in the past eight years. Gudgeon says the past is over and he wants to help build a respectable athletic program. He explained that The Groves is a charter school under the jurisdiction of the Redlands Unified School District and uses the Montessori approach to learning. When asked for a short definition of Montessori, Gudgeon called it "learning by doing." Gudgeon said The Groves uses the Montessori approach on its athletic fields as well, where winning is important but not that important! "Sports is one part of our education plan. We use it to teach skills that could help later in life. We're not a sports school. We just want to see students show improvement in whatever they do." Senior softball player Elizabeth Escobar agreed that it's rewarding to see her team grow in confidence on and off the field. "We expect to win but we learn from our mistakes. I'm learning so I can become a coach. We expect to have fun." Escobar might try out at Chaffey or SBVC next year. "Some of us do wonder how we'd do playing baseball at a bigger high school. I think I'd do well," said freshman Daniel Larrance, one of the more experienced players. "I'm used to a Montesorri education, so I'll stay here." Like Larrance and teammate Daniel Ortiz, senior Colin

LeMasters can excel at every position. He played as a freshman and sophomore and stayed at The Grove that had no baseball team last year. "No. We didn't have a team last season and we didn't

win much before that," said LeMasters. "It's been hard for me because I've always been on winning all-star teams before. It's OK. I'll stay, compete and have some fun."

Inland Empire Weekly 03 02 2017  
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