__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

The Indiana Daily Student Magazine | Volume 9, Issue 1 | Fall 2014

Never daunted

Early mornings. Long hours. Heavy instruments. Do you have what it takes to be in the Marching Hundred?

PLUS learn the secrets of IU’s elite runners AND our style tips for fall


VOLUME 9, ISSUE 1 | TABLE OF CONTENTS | FALL 2014

Inside this INSIDE COVER STORY

EDITOR’S NOTE Things are a little different around here. For eight years, INSIDE has served you as a themed magazine. But, entering our ninth year, we decided that limiting ourselves to a single word wasn’t good enough. Now, we serve you as a magazine all about IU all the time. Food, fashion, life hacks, and our awardwinning feature reporting— all of it, right here, right now. Ever wanted to know what it was like to join the Marching Hundred as a total newbie? Follow Emily as she marches in her first game ever. Heard of oil pulling? We hadn’t either. We tried it for you. Want to know what’s really going on in your professor’s head when you text under the table? We asked. The answers are inside. That’s just a smattering of what can be found in our Fall issue. Things are changing, but stick with us. I guarantee it’ll be fun.

12 Terrible weather can’t stop the Marching Hundred. Especially on their first day. DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

KNOW IT ALL

OFFICE IN THE ROAD

2

8

Toaster ovens are the appliance du jour. Check out our recipes.

CONFESSIONS

4

Four ways to get on your prof’s bad side. Plus, our tips to get that rec letter.

TIP JAR

7

She’s watched campus from her tiny post for 16 years.

RUNNING JUST TO RUN

18

All of the work, none of the recognition. Meet the IU Run Club.

A C C I D E N TA L R A C I S T ?

The street of a thousand flavors. Our beginner’s guide to 4th street.

22

What do Iggy Azalea and Miley Cyrus have in common?

KATHRYN MOODY — EDITOR-IN-CHIEF COVER PHOTO BY ADAM KIEFER October 14, 2014 Vol. 9, Issue 1 www.idsnews.com/inside Inside magazine, the newest enterprise of the Office of Student Media, Indiana University at Bloomington, is published twice an academic semester: October and November, and February and April. Inside magazine operates as a self-supporting enterprise within the broader scope of the Indiana Daily Student. Inside magazine operates as a designated public forum, and reader comments and contribution are welcome. Normally, the Inside magazine editor will be responsible for final content decisions, with the IDS editor-in-chief involved in rare instances. All editorial and advertising content is subject to our policies, rates, and procedures. Readers are entitled to a single copy of this magazine. The taking of multiple copies of this publication may constitute as theft of property and is subject to prosecution.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Indiana Daily Student

ART DIRECTOR

Kathryn Moody Chelsea Coleman PHOTO EDITOR Ashley Spesard COPY EDITOR Emily Ernsberger DIGITAL DIRECTOR Theresa Graham FEATURES EDITOR Jessica Campbell FEATURES ASSISTANT Alexis Benveniste DEPARTMENTS EDITOR Avery Walts ASSOCIATE EDITOR Elisa Gross EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Alexa Tupper and Feyi Alufohai

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Michael Majchrowicz MANAGING EDITORS

Evan Hoopfer and

Rebecca Kimberly MANAGING EDITOR OF PRESENTATION

Lacey Hoopengardener

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Brent Starr IU STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR

Ron Johnson NEWSROOM 812-855-0760 BUSINESS OFFICE 812-855-0763 FAX 812-855-8009

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Roger Hartwell MARKETING MANAGERS

Caroline Hoven and Caroline Tanonis

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 1


K N O W

I T

A L L

Tasty toaster oven treats The toaster oven has made a comeback not unlike that of Britney Spears in 2007. Once a household staple, it was replaced by microwaves, only to become popular again today. We came up with five easy meals for IU students that can be made exclusively with a toaster oven, and the results were scrumptious. BY ALEXA TUPPER

SNACK Homemade pita chips Pita chips taste delish, plus, when you’re making your own chips you can control portion size.

Ingredients

How to

Pita Bread

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit

Olive Oil

Cut the pita bread open down the middle to form two equal circular halves

Seasonings of your choice

Lightly brush with olive oil and top with seasonings Bake until the bread reaches a crispy texture Break into bites and dip away

LUNCH Hot ham and cheese sandwich A ham and cheese sandwich is simple and tasty. Your wallet will also be pleased because all the ingredients are available at the C-Store.

Ingredients

How to

2 slices of bread

Adjust the toast setting to your liking

2 slices of cheese

Slide in each slice of bread and toast until golden brown

2 slices of ham

Remove bread and place cheese and ham on slices Place back in toaster and let toast until it reaches your desired level of completion

DESSERT S’mores Baking s’mores in a toaster oven is easier than making them on a stove or your dorm microwave. Not to mention your roommates will love the leftovers.

Ingredients

How to

Graham Crackers

Set oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit

Hershey’s Chocolate Bar

Place chocolate and marshmallow on one half of the graham cracker, placing it in the oven and waiting five minutes or until the chocolate is melted and the marshmallow is golden brown.

Marshmallows

Top with remaining graham cracker

2

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY SPESARD


We tried it: oil pulling B Y AV E RY WA LT S

C

STEP ONE Purchase the coconut oil, which will set you back about $8. STEP TWO Take the plunge. I decided to give myself a

week of experimentation. As for the amount of time to

swish the oil around in your mouth, 20 minutes was asking a lot. The 45-minute strength core class at the SRSC doesn’t involve that much muscle activity. Instead, I gave the oil five minutes to work its supposed magic. The oil has the texture of candle wax, and when scooped out, looks like the shavings of a bar of soap. Sounds appe appetizing right? It sstarts out as a solid and pr progresssively melts in the mouth, a sensation which induced immediate disgust. The lack o of taste was the only thing keepi keeping me goin going. After the eternal five minutes I spit the oil out into a napkin because it will cause clogging in a sink drain. The suffering was over. THE RESULTS This is the part where I confess my sins. After only two days of trying oil pulling, I stopped. The feeling of solid to liquid mixed with the five minutes of constant muscle movement had me thinking this is not the life I wanted for myself. However, my teeth did feel clean after the first attempt. CONCLUSION Leave coconut oil for food. Thanks anyway, Gwyneth.

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 3

BLENDED DRINK STATION SKY LOUNGE, STUDIO 531

CAMPUS POOL • CLUBHOUSE • HUGE FITNESS CENTER 24 HR STUDY • BALCONIES • W/D IN ALL UNITS SECURE ENTRY • ON-SITE MANAGEMENT STUDIOS – 5 BEDS • 1:1 BED TO BATH

TenthAndCollege.com 812-339-8777

Tenth & College RA

ND

T&C Village

T&C Horizons

NEW!

B

oconut products are the new black and have been for a while. The newest craze comes in the form of oil pulling, a ritual Gwyneth Paltrow swears by. Oil pulling, coconut oil specifically, dates back 2,500 years as a form of traditional Indian medicine called Ayurveda. The process involves swishing around coconut oil in your mouth uth for 20 minutes, es, and then spitting it out. This ancient method is said to whiten teeth, improve overall oral al health, and nd relieve miigraines and nd allergies by drawing out and collecting bacteria in the mouth. However, the back of the bottle recommends it as an oil for cooking or as a massage oil for the skin and hair. INSIDE’s inquisitive minds wanted someone to try it out, and I became the guinea pig. The results of this health fad are less than favorable.

Studio 531

Morton Mansions Morton Grad

STUDIOS - 5 BEDS

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 3


C O N F E S S I O N S

THE BEST WAYS TO...

If you want that letter of recommendation, you have to fo

1

TEXTING IN CLASS

“It bothers me when students try to hide their cell phones,” says professor Michael Oakes from the Kelley School of Business Department of Finance. “My class is pretty open, and I understand if you’re using it as a calculator or something. But they try to text under the tables!”

3

BEGGING

“What really gets to me is when they come at the end of the semester and plea for a letter grade or ask for extra credit,” says philosophy professor Leah Savion. “They don’t realize they’re not unique. Sometimes they have a whole sob story and I can’t give them special treatment because then I’d have to give opportunities for extra credit to the whole class.” And don’t forget that your professor is human, too. “It makes me feel bad when students say, ‘I can’t get into Kelley because of you.’ I envy professors who seem rigid and tough because they can easily say no. I carry it with me. I’m always depressed for about a week after a semester because of it.”

4

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

BY THERESA GRAHAM


ANNOY YOUR PROFESSORS

ollow the rules. Watch out for these four professor pet peeves.

2

BIASED EVALUATIONS

“One time, I had a student plagiarize,” says English professor Jennifer Fleissner. “As a professor, I had a choice on what disciplinary action to take. I took her into my office and gave her a chance to confess, but she didn’t until I asked her outright. I didn’t give her an ‘F’ for the paper or fail her, but I could have. And then she gave me a bad evaluation! She described the situation as humiliating. That really got to me!”

4

NOT READING

The secret to professor Radhika Parameswaran’s heart? Simply doing the assigned readings. “It’s a big issue for me when students don’t, because then the class discussion ends up being dominated by me,” says the journalism professor. “The class is less dynamic and less lively unless they did it and brought it with them.” Plus, according to Parameswaran, being prepared with the readings benefits students the most. “It’s like if you’re making a fire and they’re supposed to bring the wood,” she says. “And the match is my job.”

To win over that tricky professor... Making sure you stay away from your professor's bad side could pay off in the end. IU's Career Development Center suggests forming close relationships with your professors, since they can be great resources for getting started in the professional world. "Request letters of recommendation from professors who know you well," they say. "Ask that they touch on specific qualities or achievements you'd like highlighted."

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY SPESARD

Make sure you request the letter at least five weeks in advance of when you need it. Don’t pressure your prof with a short turn-around time—you’ll probably be turned down. Be sure to provide your resume, a due date, and any other relevant materials if they accept. And, as the website mentions, don't forget one crucial part: show your appreciation. "Remember to thank your recommenders," they say. "Cross your fingers!"

II D D SS N N EE W W SS .. C CO OM M // II N N SS II D D EE •• II N N SS II D D EE M MA AG GA A ZZ II N N EE 5 5


T I P

J A R

Transform your summer favorites

Fall is here, and a change in temperatures means a change in what we can wear. One of the best things about fall is feeling warm and comfortable in a great outfit. If your budget can’t afford a total wardrobe overhaul, give your summer outfits a cold weather makeover. With INSIDE’s chic and cozy fashion tips, you can feel like summer all year ‘round.

BY FEYI ALUFOHAI

The Denim Jacket

Layering

A staple for any fashionista on a budget is a denim jacket. It is perfect for any season, including those late, chilly nights from the summer. To add a twist to the everyday jean jacket, try wearing a hoodie underneath, allowing the hood to show, giving you a chic, laidback look while keeping you warm in the crisp autumn air..

Another way to stay warm and look great is to layer your clothing. A fall must have is a chunky knit sweater. An alternative to wearing your sweater with jeans is to wear a sweater over a summer dress with a pair of tights and boots. The carefree feeling of summer doesn’t have to sit in the closet.

Accessorizing

Make It Yours

We all need a pair of shoes that can withstand jumping in puddles during the rainy fall days. A solid boot can do just that. A great way to stay warm is to pair the boots with wool socks. Another must-have is the beanie. Throwing on a beanie not only keeps you warm and looking fresh—it can save you from a bad hair day. If that doesn’t convince you, we don’t know what will.

The true beauty of fall fashion is comfort, so during this fall season, try out different styles and looks. Do not hesitate to step out and try new things. The most important aspect of transitioning to fall fashion is making sure it fits your own personal style.

6

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY SPESARD


Side by side, worlds apart. BY ALEXIS BENVENISTE

4th Street

4

2

Dunn Street

Kirkwood Avenue

Grant Street

In the 1980s, what used to be just another street of homes in Bloomington turned into a mecca of cultural cuisine. Fourth Street is lined with colors and smells unlike any other street in Bloomington, with unique cuisines like Thai, Indian, Tibetan, Italian, and Turkish scattered along the street. While each restaurant has developed its own unique personality and following, the street has undergone plenty of changes throughout the year. Did you know that Siam House, one of the go-to Thai restaurants on Fourth Street, actually used to be a German restaurant? It was run by the same man who now owns the Irish Lion. INSIDE decided to dive into some Fourth Street discovery to see what the famous Bloomington street is all about.

5 Anatolia is unbeatable, with a Turkish, Mediterranean-infused menu that always gives you what you pay for. I ordered the stuffed grape leaves and added beef to the dish. Each meal comes with a salad, a side of rice, a soup of your choice, and free bread. They also give you free Turkish tea, leaving you feeling warm and cozy at the end of your meal.

You don’t have to travel far to eat your favorite ethinic cuisine

5

7

6

3

1

6 Mandalay sets an authentic ambiance with their decorative atmosphere and delicious food. I tried the coconut chicken curry, and it was savory, delicious and the perfect amount of spicy. I squeezed a few limes into the delicious dish for a citrus kick. The dish also came with a side of rice, which can add a little extra texture.

3rd Street

200 ft. 1 Siam House is a Fourth Street classic with both indoor and outdoor seating, and traditional Thai food. Try their curries and pad thai.

3 India Garden is known for their fresh Indian breads and their unbelievable buffets. Try their sizzling tandoori chicken for a flavorful and savory meal.

2 Taste of India’s buffet restaurant is sure to please with both northern and southern Indian cuisines. Try their tikkas for a delicious taste of India in Bloomington.

4 Dami is known for their Asian and Korean food, and most of their dishes are flavored with gochujang, a sweet but spicy Korean chili paste.

7 My Thai is a Bloomington classic. They serve authentic Thai dishes that will definitely leave your taste buds happy throughout your entire meal. The pineapple fried rice is unbelievable, and their pad thai is a wonderful go-to dish as well. Like most of the restaurants on Fourth Street, My Thai has a very cozy and authentic atmosphere. GRAPHIC BY CHELSEA COLEMAN

Come see what you’re missing

The Atwater Eye Care Center offers the best vision care in the area. Expert eye doctors. Our licensed optometrists are committed to excellent patient care. State-of-the-art facilities. The ultramodern Atwater Eye Care Center is equipped with the optical industries’ latest technology. Free parking and handicap accessibility. Our center is conveniently located. Full-service eyewear center. Let our consultants show you the largest selection of frames in the area. Convenient hours. We strive to meet the needs of all.

OPTOMETRY

ATWATER EYE CARE CENTER

744 E. Third St. 812-855-8436

Make your eye appointment today. www.opt.indiana.edu

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 7


Meet Marcy Vaughn. For 16 years, she’s seen it all from her

office in the road. S TO RY A N D P H OTO S B Y A S H L E Y S P E S A R D


A

chilly wind whips the windows of the small metal booth. The two chairs inside do not leave much elbow room, and the constant stream of buses rattle the entire structure. Despite the chill, the tiny space grows comfortable. The woman inside is average height with long, gray hair that falls down her back and blows in the wind when cars pass. Even with unpleasant drivers, she is warm and cheerful, and her infectious smile expels the sharp, cold air. Drivers tap on the glass and excuse after excuse is tossed in through the fast-food style sliding door. Marcy Vaughn has heard it all. For 16 years, Marcy has been the traffic controller in the small metal booth directly across from the School of Public Health and the Indiana Memorial Union. The service access roads that the booth blocks are some of the quickest shortcuts

through campus. However, during the day, vehicles without permission cannot take it. Ballantine Hall, Woodburn Hall, the Fine Arts building, and the IU Auditorium are all on these streets, but IU students and faculty are unable to drive past to drop off or pick people up. Marcy’s job is to monitor the incoming vehicles and make sure no one without the right permit enters the service roads that pass through the pedestrian-prone area of campus. Simply put, her position doesn’t please everyone. During the day, vehicles come to Marcy’s window and she turns the majority of them around. “It’s like I threw this booth up five minutes before they pulled up to it,” says Marcy. “‘I’ve always been able to go up through here’ they say. Really? I’ve been here 16 years.” Brent Dukes, a recent graduate of IU who crossed the street by Marcy’s booth nearly every day had no idea that her job even existed.

BE A LIFESAVER AT BIOLIFE. ANDREA BioLife donor

It doesn’t matter who you are or what you do, your plasma donation has the potential to save countless lives. RECEIVE UP TO

$240

PER MONTH! VISIT BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM TO LEARN MORE AND SCHEDULE YOUR DONATION.

1565 S Liberty Dr Bloomington, IN 47403 812.334.1405 Located 1 mile north of Walmart All BioLife donor eligibility criteria must be met to protect the donor’s health and product safety.

NEW DONORS OR DONORS WHO HAVEN’T DONATED IN SIX MONTHS OR MORE, PRESENT THIS COUPON AND RECEIVE $120 IN JUST THREE DONATIONS. Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a total of $30 on your first, a total of $40 on your second and a total of $50 on your third successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by 11.29.14 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with any other offer. Only at participating locations.

$120


Marcy Vaughn’s booth is located in the middle of 7th Street in front of IMU circle drive.

“I didn’t even know there was a person in there,” he says. Workers with jobs like Marcy’s are often forgotten or underappreciated. However, they do much more than meets the eye. Jodie Figg, the reservations manager at the IMU, works with Marcy regularly and appreciates her thorough knowledge of parking rules that impact visitors at the hotel. “If there’s a development with parking, she is usually my go-to person. She knows the rules and regulations of parking and I always check with her,” says Jodie. There are additional hazards to Marcy’s job apart from being overlooked. Besides being threatened by people whose vehicle are not allowed through the entrance, Marcy has been approached several times by angry recipients of parking tickets, an aspect of IU Parking Services that she has no control over. 10

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

“I’ve had a couple of guys, they get mad, and you get cussed at and they throw them at you, and different things, or they’ll say, ‘I want to pay this here’ and I just say ‘Uh, you can’t,’ I can’t even accept money here,” she says. Marcy’s official job description is to deal with the traffic flow on campus, but over the years she has assumed a second clandestine role as observer. She is originally from Bloomington and grew up on the IU campus. Now that she has worked there so long, Marcy is one of the most astute observers of the evolution of the cultures of both the campus and Bloomington in general. “The people have changed,” she says, as the third X Route bus of the hour rumbles past. “You see the way people dress over the years has changed.” From the buildings to the students, IU is never static, although Marcy has noticed that things tend to come back,

especially fashion. “You start to see some of it repeat itself. The miniskirts, and the ones that wear the dreadlocks and the tie-dye; you know that was in style in the ’60s. The ’60s and the ’70s and some of the ’80s are coming back. The bell bottoms and the straight legs are from the ’50s. Guys used to wear the straight legs and now the girls are doing it, too. The poodle skirt hasn’t come back quite yet. But they’ll all be here.” The cycle makes sense to Marcy, but she does not welcome all the trends back. “I haven’t seen MC Hammer pants again yet, but when I do I know it’s time to tell my boss, it’s time for me to retire,” she says, laughing, this time as a black limousine slid along. Aside from students’ fashion, the geography of campus and the town has been drastically altered in Marcy’s lifetime. Looking out of her window

she glances toward the IMU parking lot and her face goes soft. “That used to be the [baseball] field,” she said as she points to rows of filled spaces. The lawn of the School of Public Health sparks the same type of musing. “And then this lot over here was grass,” she says. “They actually had bunkers on it during World War II.” Change seems to define Marcy at her job, but its true impact is within her family. Once divorced and now remarried, she has seven children. “It’s kind of large.” Marcy described. “I have step-children, but they’re not stepchildren. So I actually have four boys and two girls.” After she became friends with Marcy during a chance meeting, Media School career services director Marcia Debnam witnessed an addition to C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E 2 4


Hey sweat: CU L8ER, 4VR.

Steak & Seafood Thursday 5pm - 8pm Friday & Saturday 5pm - 9pm

Menu Featuring

Dr. Thomas L. Jackson Lucretia A. Johnson, LA www.siapsonline.com Southern Indiana Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery, LLC DeLor Medical Spa 2540 North Park, Ste B Columbus, IN 47203 812-376-8997

Sweaty armpits? Not cool. Ever. Underarm sweat? Under control.™ www.miraDry.com

Steaks · Seafood · Lobster · Pasta Chicken · Burgers · Appetizers, Homemade Soups and Salads Homemade Desserts All menu items prepared to order Full bar service · Great wines, liquor and beer

A Great Weekend Getaway

Darlene’s at HOTEL

NASHVILLE

245 N. Jefferson Street · Nashville, Indiana

812-988-8400 · www.hotelnashville.com


12

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1


} TRIED & TRUE B Y K AT H RY N M O O DY P H OTO S B Y A DA M K I E F E R

Emily Warren, a freshman who has never marched before in her life, is about to join the Marching Hundred’s long tradition—and the Midwestern religion known as “marching band.”

}


Liliana Palacio and Emily Warren walk with their fellow band members towards shelter after an announcement was made that unsafe weather conditions have delayed the events of the football game. The announcement was made just as members of the Marching Hundred were taking the field for their pre-game show.

} 14

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

T

he cold rain splashes in pools and soaks Emily Warren’s white baseball cap. Her Marching Hundred uniform turns a darker and darker red as water seeps in. Nothing feels dry anymore. Nothing has been dry since the rain started, on and off, at 7:30 a.m. But the rain is heavier now than it has been all morning. “You got it!” the drum major, student leader of the band, says to her, patting her on the shoulder. She nods, pulling her sandy blonde hair back, but it doesn’t matter. She’s never marched before. She’s preparing to march in a storm with a huge

instrument she doesn’t play. And if she messes up, everyone will see. The opposing team’s color guard fights off wet flags determined to stick to their bodies. The Marching Hundred stands ready. But Emily is tired. They had just marched here all the way from the Gladstein Fieldhouse in parade formation. The parade formation, which includes spinning, jumping, and lifting her 30 pound sousaphone, is no Sunday stroll. The Indiana State University Sycamores finally clear the field. The drum major, Bang Co, leads the walk from the east side of the stadium toward the field. But just as the band moves into position, an all too familiar announcement—the same they’ve heard all morning—plays

}


“INDIANA, OUR INDIANA, INDIANA, WE'RE ALL FOR YOU! WE WILL FIGHT FOR THE CREAM AND CRIMSON, FOR THE GLORY OF OLD IU NEVER DAUNTED, WE CANNOT FALTER IN THE BATTLE, WE'RE TRIED AND TRUE INDIANA, OUR INDIANA, INDIANA, WE'RE ALL FOR YOU!” — IU FIGHT SONG, A MARCHING BAND STAPLE

over the speakers: “Due to the presence of lightning in the area, all activities on the field have been delayed …” Bang’s shoulders slump. The marchers look at each other. Today, they can’t get five minutes on the field without nature spitting on them. They barely made it through “In the Navy,” the first song of the half-time show, during practice this morning. Emily wonders, briefly, if she’ll remember her marching order at all. Emily and all of the other marchers plod toward the north side of the stadium and up a skinny staircase to try and reach the outer concourse. The bottom step is completely flooded. “We need an ark!” someone shouts. * * * he only remnant of marching band at Emily’s Massachusetts high school is four old uniforms from the ’70s. Competitive marching band “isn’t as much of a thing” out where she’s from. “In the South and the Midwest, it’s like a religion,” she says. “I have no idea why it hasn’t caught on out where I’m from.” But, she’s come to realize, a lot of things are different here than in her home state, even the slang. Things aren’t “wicked cool” around here, people say “pop” instead of “soda,” and when she calls sprinkles “jimmies,” no one understands what she is saying. She didn’t really expect to end up as far away from

T

home as she is. Emily’s played in ensembles since fifth grade. She’s trained in both trombone and baritone for pep band back home, but her main instrument of study is the bassoon. She auditioned for the Jacobs School of Music program after her private lessons instructor, a Jacobs alum, urged her to. It would be a reach, Emily thought, but she gave it a shot. When she auditioned for the bassoon program, she was accepted on the spot. She knew she couldn’t give up an opportunity to study at one of the country’s best music schools—even if that meant moving somewhere where she knew absolutely no one at all. But one of the music school’s requirements is two years of marching band. “If I hate it,” she had said, “then at least I can get it over with freshman and sophomore year.” * * * and camp began in a humid, smothering heat, the kind that feels like you just soaked in a hot bath with your clothes on. The asphalt on their “football field”—blue lines painted in the north parking lot of Assembly Hall— melted and stuck to their shoes while they marched. Band members of all years participate in band camp, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day, during the week before classes start. Marching drills for 12 hours straight, with only breaks for meals. Emily also juggled learning the marching order for two

Live the Good Life Millennium and bloom Apartments Stop by for a tour and check out our newly renovated 24-hr Fitness Facility + Indoor Heated Pool

812-558-0800

B

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 15

mpm-living.com

bloom-living.com


instruments: her baritone, a horn type instrument for half-time, and the sousaphone, which she only carries as a matter of decorum for the pregame show. She doesn’t even have a mouthpiece to play it. Sixteen sousaphones must march in pre-game, and this year there are only 14. Emily and a trombone upperclassman named Alan just happened to be picked as the extra two. “They came up to me and said, here is your sousaphone, you are going to do it,” she says. “And I said, ‘Okay.’” The instrument wraps around her neck and drapes down to about mid-thigh. It hangs heavy on her neck vertebra and her left shoulder, a constant weight. Sousaphone players call their high-step maneuver a “swagger,” as they must sway their instrument side to side in order not to slam their knees against it. She hasn’t come out completely unscathed. Toward the end of band camp, she sprained her ankle trying to

do a three-spin on her right ankle—the way a marcher, who can rarely turn right, normally turns right. She moved her whole body, but her foot stayed in place. She couldn’t walk for a couple of days. She also had to learn things that many older band members do almost by instinct—dance moves, for instance. Do all the moves right or else you’ll crash into someone and hurt them. On the practice field, Emily has red dot markers and bright blue lines to help her find her positions. On the real field, it’s just 100 yards of white paint and fake grass. * * * pstairs in the concourse, band members are clumped in tight quarters around a TV screen showing an empty field. Pre-game is happening. Pre-game isn’t happening. Will the game be cancelled? No one knows. Emily has been carrying her heavy sousaphone this

U

whole time, and it is starting to annoy her. After a few long minutes, they are herded back down to the D. Ames Shuel Academic Center under the east side of the stadium. It is stuffy and smells like old, wet wool. People try to sit in their military-style regalia. The uniform: thick red overalls over running shorts and their issued t-shirts that read “Keep Calm and Play 14” on the back. A red jacket made for broad shoulders with a secret compartment for their music that zips on the side. Pure white shoes, white gloves, a boxy hat with a feather, and a lot of buttons for one person. “It’s a great day to be in band!” someone says while band members funnel into the hall. Upperclassmen joke about ways to avoid doing pre-game. These are the people that took Emily in immediately upon arriving to IU. They asked her out to lunch and provided a smattering of tips, like the best times to go to the dining halls

Emily Warren plays the final song of the Marching Hundred’s half-time show alongside her fellow band members. 16

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

or best ways to walk to class. They understood her passion for music, and what it was like to march for 12 hours in the sun. “I’m glad that I did it,” she said of joining the band. “I met this amazing group of people and have this awesome group of friends now that I wouldn’t have had if I hadn’t done it.” Finally, news breaks: they will not be doing the pre-game show. A kind of cheer erupts. Emily is relieved. “I’m so fucking happy,” she says. A tiny smile. * * * espite the weather, the Marching Hundred is in full form once they reach the stands. Their antics are a tradition. They play the Jaws theme on opponent’s third downs and then shout in an attempt to distract the enemy. When a fight almost breaks out on the field, they chant “Jerry! Jerry!” in honor of Jerry Springer’s dramatic tabloid talk show. “Dude,

D


seriously?” they yell when a flag is called. “Seriously, dude?” Emily eyes her band mates while they move along to the music for cues, and for some songs she still needs her book, but she picks up on it quickly. She bops side to side with her baritone. Occasionally, she puts her sprained ankle up on the bleacher in front of her, rolling it. They stand the whole half before the show, and it hurts after a while. But at least the rain has finally ended. The sky is brighter and the clouds, while still a heavy gray, roll on, harmless. And then it is time to play. They file down the same skinny set of stairs that flooded earlier in the day. They set up on the north end of the field before the teams clear out. The turf squashes in lumps under their feet. Emily’s face is taut. But then the fans begin cheering, and the band moves onto the field. The broadcast cameras train on them. The fans know their name. It’s the

Emily Warren plays the final song of the Marching Hundred’s half-time show alongside her fellow band members.

Marching Hundred. It’s why Emily is beginning to fall in love. “It’s very cool knowing that, at the end of the day,” she said, “you’re in a group that others look up to in awe and say ‘Wow,

I can’t do that.’” The band moves into position. Emily is in the very front, on the east side. She holds her baritone in exactly the right way, has her music ready out in front of her for their half-time

show based on hits from, of all eras, the ’70s. The announcer begins. “This show will put you at grave risk of Saturday Night Fever!” And Emily is ready. The show starts, and she is off.

See where your bus is in real time

bt.doublemap.com


They run. That’s it. They receive no endorsements, no scholarships, no fancy shoes, no professional coach. But they all want the same thing. They run for the pleasure of running.

Running just to run. BY JESSICA CAMPBELL P H OTO S B Y G RAY S O N H A R B O U R

LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHAN JONES, RIGHT COURTESY PHOTO


IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 3


Members of the IU Run Club gather at the IU Tennis Courts before practice.

Y

You may have witnessed them: running along Third Street in the late afternoons, dancing at Dunkirk in candy-striped cross country shorts, or shoveling down two or three $4 Scholars Inn burgers before running back to the stadium to add on a few more miles for the day. Some are new, running for fun and keeping the Freshman 15 off, and some are old, following pre-

20

INSIDE MAGAZINE l ISSUE 1

designed workouts and strategizing for the end of the season national meet. They are the IU Run Club. Sara Brown, for instance, did not start off her IU career like this. She was recruited during her senior year of high school in Lilburn, Georgia to run cross-country and track for the IU women’s varsity running team. Sara, now a junior studying speech language and pathology, spent her freshman year

as a redshirted Division 1 athlete. The lack of racing and transition to college life was hard for the back of the pack runner. Sara’s freshman year was brutal. She battled through bronchitis, sinus infections, and mono throughout the spring season, and was forced to forfeit the track period. Over the summer she recovered enough for a decent summer training plan. But when she returned to


running in the fall of 2013, Brown knew something was not quite right. “I was not doing well,” she said describing her first couple practices of the 2013 season. “It was a snowball effect. The worse I was doing, the worse I was mentally.” She first thought about quitting in October, and by Christmas break she was done. During a winter practice, the women’s team was doing 16x400 meter sprints on the indoor track. Sara was halfway finished and running a slower pace than she desired. Her teammates rushed around the track flying past her. Through each set, Sara kept pushing her body and mind. Just keep going. Sara prides herself in never quitting workouts, even if it is at a “grandma-like” pace she says. This was different. She walked off the track and out of the building. It was her final varsity workout. But Sara’s running was not over. She stumbled upon the IU Run Club, one of the 35 club sports sponsored by the Recreational Sports program. “It was a really hard decision to quit the team,” Sara admits. “I did not hate running, I was just unhappy. I found out about Run Club through the manager of the varsity team, Dustin Spanbauer (who happens to be one of the IU Run Club’s favorite running locales N Walnut Street

Griffy Resevoir Gr iffy La ke

N Dunn Street

Cascade Park

IU Cross Country Course N Walnut Street

N College Avenue

State Road 46

E 17th Street

coaches of the club).” Trying not to be “show-offy”, Sara did not reveal her past status at first. But she was welcomed kindly. She was a fellow runner, so already part of the team. “The club is so supportive,” she adds. “It is a group of people getting together and going for a run. They are motivated group of people.”

M

Motivation. Dedication. Reputation. The run club has incorporated all of these traits each season since Indiana Running Company manager, Ben Bartley, created it in 2002 while he was attending IU. The club is part of the National Intercollegiate Running Club Association, an organization governing all events and communication amongst college running, cross-country, and track clubs. Over the years, the club has grown and flourished due to its participants die-hard commitment towards its success. Nine board members, elected each year, direct the club. This year the club has about 60 members, and is headed by junior Cameron Nowrouzi. The year is split up into cross country and track and field seasons, with a national championship meet at the end of each one. Last year, the men’s team took home first place from the NIRCA Cross Country National meet held in Hershey, Pennsylvania, beating out teams from all over the country. Out of 300 runners, four IU men, Philip Rizzo, David Eichenburger, Nikolas Jeftich, and Ryan Wells, placed in the top 15. The women came in eighth, with Kathryn White placing 14th as IU’s lead runner. In the T&F meet, held in Bloomington last spring, both the men and women’s team placed fifth, as well as third in the men’s half-marathon category. Most people are unaware of the club’s history and rankings. And the pressure of what it takes to continually place in the top ten. Emily Odle, a senior majoring in anthropology, says intimidation stops many people from joining the team.

“We have a reputation that the club is overwhelming and too serious,” she says. “But we have people who want to train and do workouts and we have people who just want to run with others.” According to Cameron, there are about 40 people that attend practice everyday so far this year. In the past it has been difficult for the team to gain and keep new members. “People would sometimes feel intimidated or feel that the intensity may be to hard for them to do recreationally even though we do encourage all levels to come out,” he says. “This year we seem to have a lot more people who are willing to stick around and put in the hard work that the club does, since they can see that we won nationals last year. They are willing to put in the hard work because they want to win as much as we do and become a part of a winning tradition.” This broad range of goals and abilities is what makes the club special. The social aspect of the group is what drew Emily to the club, and back into running in general. Emily transferred to IU her sophomore year after running for Olivet Nazarene University in Illinois for a year. Due to personal issues, Emily withdrew from school to be closer to home, and applied to IU. Though she had heard about the run club through a friend, Emily had no plans on running for another team. “I went on a running hiatus for about two to three months,” she says. “I felt lost without my coach and teammates at Olivet. I became disinterested in running and only ran when people made me.” Emily’s best friend Katy White, one of the club’s top runners, forced the reluctant athlete back into her running shoes a few days before the 2012 Fall season began. “During that run I knew I was going to run again,” she said, adding in that her other option was to try out for the rowing team. “I didn’t know what I wanted from C O N T I N U E D O N PAG E 2 4

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 21


Accidental racist? INSIDE explains cultural appropriation

B Y K AT H RY N M O O DY I L L U S T RAT I O N B Y S T E P H A N I E Y I N C H E N N I U

We know you still love Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy,” even though the summer is over and you ought to move on. And we know you secretly tried to twerk like Miley when her album dropped last year. But let’s be straight. Iggy’s flow takes cues from AfricanAmerican style hip-hop, but she’s a very tall, very white Australian. And Miley’s twerk was seen as a bizarre new trend, even though black women had been practicing the dance in hip-hop culture for years. This phenomenon—cultural appropriation—has been going on for decades. But there’s a lot to it. What is cultural appropriation and why are you telling me about it? Cultural appropriation, as defined by Professor Susan Scafidi of Fordham University, is “the theft or borrowing of intellectual property, traditional knowledge, cultural expression, and artifacts from someone else’s culture without permission.” This definition is the preferred definition by Julian Glover, a graduate student in public affairs at IU and a longtime activist and researcher in the progressive movement. “Many times, people will do this to make a profit,” says

Julian. “Or to seem more edgy or cool.” Music has been appropriating sounds since before the Jazz Age. Hip-hop’s been the more recent face of this trend. Another highly relevant example: the wearing of Native American headdresses at music festivals and parties. Such a symbol is like wearing a purple heart—a symbol of high honor and distinction that must be earned— for no reason but to look cool, Julian says. Not cool at all. You’ll also be able to see examples of this all October long. Costumes that depict other cultures are popular this time of year, and we’re sure you’ve seen stuff like this at parties. Oh. Is it really that bad? Some argue that this imitation is the natural way of things. New Wave music from the 1980s evolved out of black disco culture, but they often paid homage to their roots, making it more acceptable, says Eric Love, director of the Office of Diversity Education at IU. This imitation can even be a form of flattery. But it can easily cross a line into inappropriate, he adds. Some arguments note that this theory of imitation ignores how dominant cultures can take aspects of other cultures and make money off it in a way

the originators couldn’t. The nuance of said form of expression often gets lost in translation. Hip-hop and jazz music both began as counter-culture musical movements before they were appropriated by white artists and transformed into the various forms we see today. There’s really not enough room in this column to address every shade of gray in this argument. People of all races like jazz. People of all races like hip-hop. Is that so bad? “When you borrow and are still racist or sexist, that’s bad,” adds Love. Wait. I’m not a racist! I’m not oppressing people! Are you sure you aren’t overreacting? A white person who listens to jazz or hip-hop, for example, isn’t a racist, okay? But a lot of people think race is no longer an issue, and that simply isn’t true, says Julian. “It doesn’t affect us directly, maybe, but it affects us every single day,” he adds. And that includes these issues of cultural expression. I don’t think anyone is mad that people enjoy these artists or their music genres. It’s important to recognize the issues at hand, though, and, on top of that, to generally recognize your

Recycle your style and receive cash for your gently-used, trendy clothes. What’s more, browse our racks for the one-of-a-kind finds at an everyday value.

privilege in your own life (and privilege is a topic for a whole ‘nother column, trust us on that). Okay. As long as you aren’t calling me a racist. How can I appropriately not appropriate? Oh, you’re cute. Unfortunately, it’s not a super easy fix. A lot of times, it’s easier to twerk and say you are “standing in solidarity” with people of color than actually engage, but that’s not really saying anything, says Julian. So what can you do? Go to events where you are the minority. Get invited to participate. Learn to see cultures in ways beyond dance moves and pieces of clothing. At IU, you don’t have to go far to find acclaimed cultural centers. DISCLAIMER The writer of this piece is a white woman, and I recognize it is sort of awkward that a white person is writing a piece on cultural appropriation—that’s why I went to the experts. This column also only briefly touches on appropriation as a whole. We encourage you to do your own research and to ask questions. If you have any comments about how this piece was represented, please let us know.

1145 S. College Mall Road 812-333-4442 PlatosClosetBloomingtonIN.com @platosclosetbloomington


nice run and others want to kick some ass.”

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PAG E 2 1

the run club yet, but I was comfortable and felt accepted, so I just kept coming.” Acceptance into the family is Run Club’s secret weapon. The ease of integrating oneself into a group of like-minded (crazy, as some say) people helps transform the club from just a sports group to an actual team. Both from former varsity levels, Emily and Sara agree that the club functions as an actual college sport, without the added benefits and pressures. “People had scholarships and the caliber to run for other Division 1 or 2 teams and decided to come to IU for the education and college experience,” Sara says. “We have people who were big in high school and are training just as hard as other school’s varsity teams.” Sara said the two teams have similar goals and interests, but more is expected of the varsity team. “Everyone on the varsity team are motivated, but there are a lot of extra factors,” Sara acknowledges. “There is free stuff, scholarships, and a higher expectation of you. At Run Club, everyone is motivated, but their motivation comes from their own personal goals. Some people want to go for a

T

The club meets every weekday evening at varsity tennis courts. They stretch and double-knot their shoe-strings while Cameron checks in people for attendance, and updates them on any new information or upcoming meets. Once all routes are established for the nights run, different groups htake off. The fast sub-7 minute fellas head for Cascades Park for a hilly workout, while the long distance-minded ladies make their way to the cross-country field for a longer workout. The route and mileage for Emily depends on the training formula she and volunteer coaches Josh Foss and Dustin have premade. With a top placement in mind at Nationals, Emily bases her daily schedule around her running workouts. She shoots for 55 to 60-mile weeks, including two to three faster workouts, recovery runs, a long on the weekends, and any supplemental activities she can fit in, such as weightlifting and swimming. Adding the hours spent in running clothes with the time spent in class, doing homework, and fitting in meals, Emily’s schedule does not allow for frequent late night trips to the bar or Netflix marathons. “Some people don’t get it,” she says, adding that her life is frequently described as ‘sacrificing her college experience.’ “The love of running makes it worth it. Knowing that there are others going to bed early to

run in the morning gives me a sense of community.” Even without the pressure of a coach or a mandatory attendance policy, those showing up each day at practice are there for the love of running and the shared commitment. “It is hard to keep motivated,” Emily confesses, “especially when we have the ‘don’t have to run and no one will know’ kind of environment. But that is the beauty of Run Club. You are free to train and get out of it what you want.” At 6 p.m. each weeknight, Sara and Emily stand in the parking lot, surrounded by fellow student runners. Practice begins, and everyone takes off, loosening out their legs with each stride. Throughout campus people make room for the group charging towards them down the sidewalk. They look like simple runners, but they more than that.

C O N T I N U E D F R O M PAG E 1 0

Vaughn’s family. “I knew that she was pregnant,” Marcia said. “We started chatting, ‘how you feeling and all,’ and then she shared with me that this baby was going to be significantly younger than her older children.” Marcy’s youngest daughter,

who is now 13, was a surprise to Marcy and her husband. Marcia remembers Marcy’s daughter playing outside her booth on warm afternoons as a child. “I literally watched her go from expecting her, to seeing her little girl playing and frolicking around on what we used to call the HPER bank,” Marcia says. “Now she’s 13, and the last time that I saw her she was about the same height as her mom.” Marcy’s IU beginning was a surprise to her and her family. She was looking for any job, and never thought she would get so lucky. “A friend of mine was a bus driver at that time and he got hold me and said, ‘go into parking, they have an opening,’” she says. “I said I don’t know if I can walk and write tickets. He said, ‘Nuh-uh. This is your kind of job, honey.’” Her friend proved right. Marcy, as a traffic controller at IU for 16 years, is one of the few people that inhabit the margin between fixedness and fluctuation. Surrounded by all the buildings that have gone up and come down and the thousands of students that have passed through, she remains a point of strange stability in the middle of a busy road. As a mother and wife, she is anything but confined by her small metal booth. But she still commits herself to her job every day. “There are days that I don’t want to get out of bed and I sure don’t feel like driving to Bloomington,” she says. “But I’m going.”

Your IU student magazine Catch the next issue in December.

DISCOVER For inquiries about advertising in future editions of Inside magazine, contact IU Student Media at 812-855-0763 or email advertise@idsnews.com. con


“It opene d my eyes to all of the dif

fere options ne nt housing

- Joey Ma lloon ll

ar campu

s.”

Fair Atten dee

R I A F G N I S 14 U 0 O 2 H FA L L T OE TH

“It was ee eat to s really gr

tions– p o e h t all of prize.” on a

and I w

Jarosik - Carey Attendee Fair

Play your cards right. If you're looking for a place to live on or off campus, the Housing Fair is your one stop shop for finding your new home.

Wed., Nov. 5 • IMU Alumni Hall Need more time? Stop by Feb. 4 for the Spring Housing Fair. TO

THE

HOUSING FAIR FA L L 2014

idsnews.com/housingfair


Love IU? Then we’re your Credit Union!

IU Credit Union members enjoy: • Free Checking • Online & Mobile Banking • Apps for Android™, Apple™, and Kindle Fire™

• Full-Service Campus Branch • Surcharge-Free ATM Network • Shared Branching • And so much more!

www.iucu.orgg

It’s easier than ever to join IU Credit Union! IU Credit Union is open to residents in more than 50 Indiana counties. Open your account online at iucu.org. It’s time you started enjoying the benefits of Credit Union membership!

We started a credit union and created a community. Federally insured by NCUA

812-855-7823 • iucu.org

Profile for Inside Magazine

Oct. 14, 2014  

The Fall Issue. Inside Magazine, published twice a semester, is a product of the Indiana Daily Student at Indiana University.

Oct. 14, 2014  

The Fall Issue. Inside Magazine, published twice a semester, is a product of the Indiana Daily Student at Indiana University.

Advertisement