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Safe spaces provide support for diverse communities

Managing the space in long-distance relationships is possible

She owns her space while standing just over 5 feet

page 12

page 18

page 24

The Indiana Daily Student Magazine | Volume 11, Issue 4 | Spring 2017

THE SPACE ISSUE

TO INFINITY AND BEYOND How we interact with space — zero-gravity and otherwise


Inside Cover

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VOLUME 11, ISSUE 4 | TABLE OF CONTENTS | SPRING 2017

Natural

Identity

Transition

Space

DEPARTMENTS

EDITOR’S NOTE Space is not something we usually sit and ponder on a day-today basis. It’s something understood. We want personal space, we value our space when we want to get work done, we love making a space our own with little decorative pieces and color. But again, it’s something we simply expect to just kind of be there. In this issue, we challenged that notion. Space can be both abstract and concrete. It can be simple and complex. It can be someone’s highest achievement (literally) and someone’s biggest enemy when it comes to love. “To infinity and beyond” is not just a spacey reference from Buzz Lightyear — although clever as that would make. It also represents what this issue does with the concept of space. Literal space is just the start. Go beyond this page and fall in love with this issue as much as we at Inside did.

4 K N OW - IT- A LL

The difference between t h i s and this.

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5

T IP J A R

C O N FES S IO N S

Shh ... it’s a secret.

When spacing out becomes an art form.

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FEATURES

8

BETTER YO U

Get your mind right.

A C O U P LE O F P EO P LE W H O A R E O U T O F T H IS WO R LD ( LIT ER A LLY )

IU takes to the stars.

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18

YO URS, MI N E & O URS

12

Make the space. Don’t let it make you.

A RO U N D H ER E, S A FE IS H O ME

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W E H A D T O G ET A ‘S PAC E J A M’ R EFER EN C E IN H ER E S O MEH OW

Inside magazine, the newest enterprise of the Office of Student Media, Indiana University at Bloomington, is published twice an academic semester: October and November, and February and April. Inside magazine operates as a self-supporting enterprise within the broader scope of the Indiana Daily Student. Inside magazine operates as a designated public forum, and reader comments and contribution are welcome. Normally, the Inside magazine editor will be responsible for final content decisions, with the IDS editor-in-chief involved in rare instances. All editorial and advertising content is subject to our policies, rates, and procedures. Readers are entitled to a single copy of this magazine. The taking of multiple copies of this publication may constitute as theft of property and is subject to prosecution.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kennedy

Coopwood

ART DIRECTOR Mia Torres

Yulin Yu COPY EDITOR Sara Miller WEB EDITOR Taylor Hurt PHOTO ASSISTANT Andrew Williams PHOTO EDITOR

LDR? NP.

Finding support when it’s needed most.

ES S AY

Small, but mighty.

Relevant(ish) movie reviews.

April 11, 2017 Vol. 11, Issue 4 inside.idsnews.com

D IS TA N C E MA K ES T H E H EA R T G ROW FO N D ER

Indiana Daily Student EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Hannah Alani MANAGING EDITORS Jordan Guskey and Lindsay Moore MANAGING EDITOR OF PRESENTATION

Emily Abshire

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Roger Hartwell MARKETING MANAGERS

Ashley VanArsdale DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Faishal Zakaria IU STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR

Ron Johnson NEWSROOM 812-855-0760 BUSINESS OFFICE 812-855-0763 FAX 812-855-8009

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Fill in the spaces A game of Inside Mad-Libs , reader! (GREETING)

If you’re reading this that means you’ve picked up the latest issue on space. Throughout these

you’ll read about IU all-stars whom have (PLURAL NOUN)

actually

among the stars, and

movies (ADJECTIVE)

(PAST-TENSE VERB)

to watch when you’ve finished reading. You’ll also learn about the spaces between letters,

(PLURAL NOUN)

relationships endure,

(ADJECTIVE)

that couples in long-distance

spaces for marginalized students on (ADJECTIVE)

campus and how to

your living space. We’ve also included (VERB)

for getting in the right headspace to tackle stress as a student. (PLURAL NOUN)

during classes? (VERB)

Yeah, we have a story about that too. From the front cover to the back, you’ll see that space can take on a variety of forms.

Now don’t space out on us, you’ve got a magazine to read!

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K N O W - I T - A L L

SPACE FACT The first typeface to appear on the moon was FUTURA. “Here men from the planet earth first set foot upon the moon July 1969, A.D. We came in peace for all mankind,” is proudly inscribed on a plaque in the German typeface.

TYPE TALK

Breaking the fourth wall of magazine design and discussing a few typographic space terms Ascenders extend above the mean line of a word. MEAN LINE

BASELINE

galaxy alaaxy

A typeface’s x-height is a key characteristic. It’s the measure of a lowercase “x”from the baseline to the mean line.

We’ve all been there. It’s the night before a big paper is due and you’re struggling to make the page limit. When desperate times call for desperate measures, consider these typeface tips.

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Kerning is the space between individual letters — not consistent throughout a word. Sometimes you need to adjust kerning in words like “dwarf planet” if the “w” is too close to the others. Leading is another form of typographic space. It refers to the space between the baselines of successive lines of text.

Descenders extend below the baseline of a word. BY MIA TORRES

MAKING THE PAGE LIMIT

Tracking is the uniform spacing between letters. A line of text can be tracked “in” likethis or“out” l i k e t h i s .

Loose leading looks like this. See? Lots of space. And tight leading looks like this. Very close. Very cozy.

If you’re not tied to Times New Roman, try out one of these typefaces if you need to make four pages inch closer to eight.

On the opposite end of the spectrum and past the limit? Try out a lighter typeface to reduce your page count.

Stuck with 12 pt. Times New Roman? There’s always the good old bump-up-the-size-ofyour-periods trick.

Lucida Sans Typewriter

Gill Sans light

Times New Roman.

Courier New


C O N F E S S I O N S

Jessica Chipley

OUT OF THE MARGINS

David Pecar

When the doodles in your notebook get more attention than the actual notes

W

hile doodling in class is something all to familiar to us students, these two take it to a whole other level. Jessica Chipley was in sixth or seventh grade when she started doodling in her notebook. Back then, she wasn’t so good at drawing. When she looks back at her old work, it’s to critique it for quality. Now, she doesn’t finish a doodle she isn’t pleased with. As a sophomore Media major with a concentration in film and media studies, Jessica hopes to get into the movie screenwriting business. She’s from San Ramon, California, and her favorite movie genre is action, but she admits it isn’t easy to write action screenplays. Many of her drawings are actually condensed comics featuring characters she created. “Most of my doodles are semiconcept art for stories that I have in my head or on my backburner,” she tells Inside. Sometimes she uses her drawings to understand how

characters interact. A lot of her skills are self-taught, but she says what it boils down to is understanding how the body works. In the past, art students have suggested she take a human anatomy class. Unsure whether it stems from the amount of movies she’s watched (which is more than the average weekend-only movie watcher), she thinks her understanding of the characters’ physical interaction is more than sufficient. Since many of her drawings end up as sketches for future cinematic projects, she likes to keep them separate from her class notes. She has a special notebook to channel her creativity, but sometimes there’s no time to wait, so she flips to a blank spot where her notes ended for the day. She said she draws more in bigger lectures — which is disappointing because she doesn’t have many of those this semester. “For the most part, I don’t like

doodling on the same page I’m currently taking notes on. So when I start to doodle, I’ll usually flip to a page where the notes are already done.” She’s never gotten into hot water with her drawings — not that she would expect to. Professors assume she’s taking notes, so even if they do see her lose focus, it’s better than getting caught on her phone. Senior David Pecar doesn’t mind doodling in the margins of his notes. He has a separate notebook as well, but his drawings normally sprawl from one page to another. He’s been drawing for as long as he can remember. His thoughts wander if he doesn’t doodle. “I wouldn’t even consider it to be art, what I’m doing,” he says. “It’s just really what my hand chooses to do.” For David, the act of taking notes is enough to cement the information in his brain. He says he has trouble focusing when he doesn’t have a pen or pencil in hand, but he puts whatever he’s

using down whenever he has to speak or participate. He doesn’t see his drawings as daydreaming, so interrupting them to raise his hand or participate isn’t a distraction. “Most of my notes devolve into doodles pretty quickly.” Unfortunately, David’s professors have commented on his in-class habits before, though the content of his doodles have gotten him into trouble at least once. In an episode reminiscent of a scene from the movie “Superbad,” he was caught in his sophomore year of high school drawing the words “Pen Island” comprised entirely of penises. David studies journalism with a minor in marketing, and he says more than anything his studies have shaped his worldview. His next step will probably be attending law school. As to the question of whether he’ll doodle once he gets there? “Oh, for sure,” he replies. BY JESSE NARANJO

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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T I P

J A R

(NOT SO) HIDDEN GEMS Lesser known study spaces in one of the most familiar buildings on campus

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ight pop tunes flood the room as the smell of coffee and the sound of distant chatter flow throughout the entire space. It is a typical weekday in the Indiana Memorial Union, with study spaces filled to capacity. Within its nearly 2,000 acres of land, the IU campus has many designated study spots available to students that allow them to work in a welcoming environment. Although the main level of the IMU is a popular area for those late night cram sessions, many students tend to find alternative spots to get away from the noisy crowds.

1. Alcove near Alumni Hall Michelle Bliley, a sophomore at IU, says she likes to study away from larger groups. One of her favorite spots on campus is the hidden alcove above the entrance to the IMU near Alumni Hall. There are about a dozen wooden desks and chairs that sit firmly in their positions, ready to host study sessions. “I like that it’s far away from all the other people,” Michelle tells Inside. “I can still hear the music from the coffee shop but not as much talking as if I was sitting in Starbucks.” She came upon the spot after her freshman year Chemistry partner showed her the area as her go-to alternative from the commons. Rarely ever having trouble finding a seat, she gets to enjoy the nice secluded atmosphere of the cozy enclosure.

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1

2

2. Near State Room East Located on the second main floor of the building, there is a small section of desks situated next to State Room East. Freshman Cassie Utecht was wandering through the building midsemester in search of a place to do her homework and stumbled upon the section. “I feel like nobody really knows about it, so I try to come here for most of my studying,” she explains. Cassie has a distaste for the crowds of Wells, so coming to her once unknown location is the ideal escape. 3. Near bowling alley Previously on a quest for a smaller location, freshman Garrett Ankney, found a home at the desk chairs available in between the billiards room and bowling alley. In this separated pathway, there are televisions and gaming devices available to students to use in between classes (or when classes don’t seem as appealing as the games).

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“As long as I have music playing, the bowling and pinball machines aren’t a distraction,” Garrett says. He says he tries to avoid Wells and looks forward to searching for smaller, hidden locations that are more conducive to his studying rituals. B Y A LY M A L I N G E R

PHOTOS BY ANDREW WILLIAMS AND MIA TORRES


B E T T E R

Y O U

A HEALTHY HEADSPACE Where to go on your journey to making mental health a priority

A

s we know, physical health is very important and vital to a happy, fulfilling life. Getting out and being active is something every physician, trainer and mom will encourage you to do. In this little space I have, I’m not going to waste it telling you the same thing that you’ve heard your entire life. Rather, I will tell you — and stress its importance — that mental health can have a huge impact on your overall well-being and should not be taken lightly. Often times we’re too busy or too stressed to even think about clearing our mind and being still in the moment (which contributes to stress so it actually doesn’t make any sense). All this leads to is burn out, unhealthy habits and bottling things up, which will eventually slow you down on your journey to success. But that ends here. It’s time to get in the right headspace to set yourself up for success. Allow me to point you in the right direction with some options to help get this done ...

CAPS IU Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is the go-to all your mental health concerns. From just providing someone for you to talk to outside your friends and family, to making sure you leave with more than enough information on how to manage your life as a student, they’ve got you covered. They provide assistance on time management, relationship concerns, anxiety, stress, depression, sexual assault/abuse, academic concerns and more. I can’t stress how important CAPS is to IU and the resources they provide really allow you to pinpoint and tackle specific areas of your student life. Take control of your mental state! Health Center, 4th floor 600 N. Jordan Ave., Bloomington, IN 47405 (812) 855-5711

WELLNESS CENTER

OASIS CENTER

The Wellness Center is another good one. This is the ultimate howto space on campus. They provide services on how to eat right, get enough sleep (something I still can’t seem to grasp), control your stress levels, have healthy relationships, make safe sexual choices and more. Sometimes you need to go back to the basics. Any and everything is up for grabs when it comes to learning here. They also provide good stress management techniques that include massages! Enough said.

The Oasis Center is here for those dealing with drug or alcohol concerns. They provide counseling and programming assistance to help you work through those habits and emerge better than before. It is a safe, judgement free information center waiting to get you in the right headspace. Whether it be prevention, education or intervention, take advantage of the center, for yourself or for a friend.

900 E. 7th St., Room M005 Bloomington, IN 47405-7000 (812) 856-4468

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BY KENNEDY COOPWOOD

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A couple of people who are out of this world (literally) Purdue’s not the only Big Ten school with galactic stars

I

’ve never been to space. For someone who won’t look over the guardrail at malls because of an irrational fear of heights, the prospect of going into the endless void of space feels a bit too much. I’m sure space is cool. There are stars there and maybe Jimmy Neutron’s abandoned spaceship and possibly little green aliens who have three fingers that light up and can talk to dolphins through telepathy. Of course, this is all conjecture. I’ve never been to space and I’m fairly confident

that most of you—the loyal readers—have not ventured into the great beyond either; unless my writing is prominent in the space-travel community. If so, I would like to take a moment to thank you for your time and request that you talk to United Airlines so I get better snacks on my cross-country flights. Even though most people associated with IU probably wouldn’t even watch Gravity in IMAX, we have among us two venerated individuals who made it beyond the final ozone layer

Dr. Mae Jemison

I’m not saying she’s accomplished everything possible for a human being, because I don’t know if she’s ever bowled a 300, but she’s probably come pretty damn close. Also, I wouldn’t bet against her somehow finishing ten frames with a 301. “I always knew I’d go to space,” she once said, and she was right. What she probably didn’t know is how many lives she would affect for the better along the way.

Astronaut, engineer, entrepreneur, physician, educator, very-bigbusiness-card-haver-to-fit-all-ofher-titles, Dr. Jemison is currently serving as the Poling Chair of Business and Government for the Kelley School of Business. Having been a NASA astronaut for six years, she was the first woman of color to go to space and the first astronaut to appear on “Star Trek.” She also served as a Peace Corps Medical officer in the 1980’s and did research for the Centers for Disease Control researching various vaccines.

and floated their way into history, Dr. Mae Jemison and David Wolf. “Who are these wonderful people?” you may ask. “Sit down and let me provide you with two short profiles,” I reply. B Y G R E G G OT T F R I E D

MEET THE TRAPPIST-1 PLANETS While it’s not looking like we’d be able to move to them after all, still, take a second to learn about the seven planets that make up the TRAPPIST-1 system that were discovered back in February.

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TRAPPIST 1B ORBITAL PERIOD 1.51 days DISTANCE TO STAR 0.011 AU PLANET MASS 0.85 M earth

TRAPPIST 1C ORBITAL PERIOD 2.42 days DISTANCE TO STAR 0.015 AU PLANET MASS 1.38 M earth

TRAPPIST 1D ORBITAL PERIOD 4.05 days DISTANCE TO STAR 0.021 AU PLANET MASS 0.41 M earth

PHOTOS FROM WIKIMEDIA COMMONS


David Wolf Although he earned a degree in electrical engineering from Purdue University, we won’t hold it against Wolf because he eventually made the two-hour drive from West Lafayette to Bloomington and earned a medical degree from Indiana University’s School of Medicine. Like every IU student upon receiving a diploma, Wolf went on to join the staff of the Johnson Space Center to investigate the physiological effects of microgravity. He is also a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medal, the NASA Inventor of the Year and the Carl R. Ruddell scholarship award for research in medical ultrasonic signal and image processing, all of which make him the sole-owner of the most impressive LinkedIn page. Wolf has been to space four times and is a veteran of seven spacewalks totaling over 41 hours.

TRAPPIST 1E ORBITAL PERIOD 6.10 days DISTANCE TO STAR 0.028 AU PLANET MASS 0.62 M earth

TRAPPIST 1F ORBITAL PERIOD 9.21 days DISTANCE TO STAR 0.037 AU PLANET MASS 0.68 M earth

TRAPPIST 1G ORBITAL PERIOD 12.35 days DISTANCE TO STAR 0.045 AU PLANET MASS 1.34 M earth

TRAPPIST 1H ORBITAL PERIOD ~20 days DISTANCE TO STAR ~0.06 AU PLANET MASS Unknown

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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Yours, mine & ours

Sharing a living space doesn’t mean you can’t make it your own

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B

efore arriving to IU, many of us were spoiled with our own room. Even those who shared a room with a sibling certainly weren’t used to splitting half a room with someone unrelated or, more daunting, a mere stranger. While I certainly took for granted the luxury of having my own room before I started school, I’ve become quite familiar with adapting to new living situations. From sleeping in a dorm to a sorority house to an apartment, each one comes with its own perks and its own surprises. The key, I’ve learned, is to recognize what works and expand on that in order to make the space comfortable and all your own.

Dorm life I was one of the fearless freshmen who decided to really spice up my life by sharing a room with a complete stranger from the Washington, D.C. area. I won’t lie, the first night when all you can hear is each other’s heavy breathing as you attempt to fall asleep is very bizarre.

headphones to your laptop when watching Netflix will do amazing things for the situation and your roommate relationship. An important tip that can be hard to grasp immediately is that you don’t have to converse with your roommate 24/7. Just like you, your roommate has an appreciation for the solitude found behind a book or movie. Of course, you should chat and hopefully be friends, but don’t feel like silence is awkward. In such small quarters, you’ll quickly find that silence is your key to sanity. This space can easily be made to feel at home. Just fill your space with the things you had in your room at your parents house (only, just half of them).

One big house Lodging in a sorority has unbelievable perks. The worries of sleeping beside a stranger aren’t a problem because you get to share a space with someone you’ve already gotten to know and have grown to become great friends with. It’s a nice situation, because unlike the coldness of sharing a hallway with people you don’t know, you are familiar with all of the women or men in the rooms beside you.

However, the good thing about living with a stranger is that they aren’t one for very long. While I lucked out and had a roommate that became a best friend, sharing a room still requires a great deal of consideration for the other person.

Academics aren’t forgotten in the slightest in this setting either. In my house, there is a large designated space filled with comfortable chairs and desks to create the perfect atmosphere to get work done. The only downside can be if you really are longing for some alone time, you will have a hard time trying to fulfill that desire.

Little things like asking if it’s OK to turn off the lights or plugging in

Thankfully, all houses are located on campus allowing for easy escapes to

Wells or the Union for space and quiet. When in this living situation, don’t be afraid to add your own flavor to the house. This can mean decorative or just personal flare that is recognized by your housemates. Be bold in your presence.

Apartment living While I’ve quite enjoyed the other two living environments, I didn’t truly feel like an adult until I settled into my very own apartment for the first time. There is a sense of ownership in moving into your room and thinking, ‘this is my space!’ If you are one for privacy and isolation, then there is no other way to go. It’s back to the good ole’ days with an apartment, as you have your own room again. You finally have a place that you may decorate as you wish and stay up until the crack of dawn in without worry of disturbing someone a few feet away. However, there is a catch. Firstly, apartments, for the most part, are not on campus and require some form of transportation to get to class each day. In addition to transportation, a bigger space that is all yours comes with your commitment to frequently filling the fridge and consistently cleaning. Naturally, with freedom comes responsibility. My advice is be sure you are ready. Having an apartment with no food in the fridge is not something you want to be proud of. Once you’ve done that, you’re good to go. Making this space yours is the easiest in this situation because apart from the stationary furniture, your canvas is blank. Have at it. BY ADELE POUDRIER

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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Around here, safe is home Community centers offer support for minority groups in Bloomington Words by Christine Fernando & photos by Yulin Yu

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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Individuals in diverse communities have different needs and concerns. How do cultural centers create a safe space for them? Organizations around campus are dedicated to creating a safe space that caters to specific groups while embracing the diversity within their communities. Among them at IU are the Asian Cultural Center, First Nations Educational and Cultural Center, Helene G. Simon Hillel Center, NealMarshall Black Culture Center, La Casa Latino Cultural Center and the LGBTQ+ Center. Together, these organizations work to create a campus where minorities feel safe. On campus, La Casa and the LGBTQ+ Center share many intersections — including being neighbors on the same street.

Embracing Latino diversity Potted plants and white shutters greet students as they enter through the front door of La Casa Latino Cultural Center. Inside, students chatter while working on homework. One student taps a pencil on his chin as he leans back in a dark wooden chair, hovering just in front of the pale blue wall. Downstairs, a plaid blanket lies on a couch, ready for students. La Casa Director Lillian Casillas says students often choose to nap there. “It’s no coincidence that La Casa means ‘the house’ or that it’s in an actual house rather than a normal building,” Lillian tells Inside. “We really want this to be home.” The word Latino refers to people from Latin America, the Caribbean, South America and Central America. As a result of this wide geographic spread, it can be difficult to cater the space to the needs and concerns of everyone 14

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within the diverse Latino community. “It can be easy to generalize, but this community is so diverse that you really just need to listen to what the individuals want.” By listening, she said La Casa can be a space for the community to build and evolve themselves, which makes it welcoming to everyone. “La Casa is what you want it to be.”

Empowering the undocumented Another challenge for building a safe space for the Latino community is to make sure undocumented students feel secure — a task that is only made more difficult by the current political climate. “These days especially, undocumented students feel like they can’t trust anyone,” Lillian says. “They feel there’s no where they can go, and it can be so isolating.” Her response is to recognize the struggles of undocumented students when talking to students at La Casa. By pointing out the elephant in the room without pressuring them to “out” themselves, undocumented students see that at least someone is thinking about them — a venture that goes far in quelling fears. La Casa also helps undocumented students connect with employers and assists them in making realistic education plans. Because most undocumented students don’t qualify for financial aid or in-state tuition, money becomes another concern many students need help with. “It’s like a relay race,” says

Lillian. “Someone at their high school pushed for them so that they ended up here. Now, we pick up the reins.” As they face politicians calling for stricter immigration policy and news about undocumented immigrants being detained, many undocumented students feel powerless. At La Casa, Lillian places power back in the hands of undocumented students. “We give them the power of choice. We give them options. We give them the power to control their own futures.”

Above Students study in the dining room area of La Casa.

Standing at the intersections When she heard the LGBTQ+ Center had just moved from a single room in the back of the Office of Student Ethics to the house it’s in now, Lillian dragged a group of students at La Casa to welcome them to the neighborhood. Doug Bauder, director of the LGBTQ+ Center, said Lillian was like a shepherd guiding a flock of sheep who were digging their hooves into the ground. “Some of them were these big, macho guys,” he tells Inside, while flexing his biceps jokingly. “I don’t think they really wanted to come to the ‘gay house.’” But they did, and Doug says he got the impression they learned a lesson on acceptance. The interaction kicked off two decades of friendship between him and Lillian. In his office, he even has a photo of him beside her. Their friendship has carried over to a cooperation between the centers — a cooperation that is apparent in their new Latinx initiative, which is dedicated to

serving the intersections between the centers. Doug says he needs to be aware of the racial and ethnic diversity within his center while Lillian says she needs to be aware that the Latino community includes people of all kinds of sexualities and places on the gender spectrum. Creating a safe space for their communities therefore means working together, he says. “For those at the intersection between both communities, they have a unique set of concerns and struggles. We need to recognize that and make them feel secure in both centers.” Lillian says having the resources and encouragement of both communities means students at the intersections can build a wider support network. “They don’t just have one community behind them,” she says. “They have two. They have supporters across campus, across centers, across divides.” C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 1 6


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Doug Bauder’s office at the LGBTQ+ Culture Center. C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 4

The toolbox for building a safe space Mounted on the wall at the LGBTQ+ Center is a wooden “Welcome Home” sign. Doug knows creating a safe home for the LGBTQ+ community involves allies creating a safe space within themselves so that LGBTQ+ individuals feel comfortable approaching them. He says humor, listening skills, curiosity, a desire to understand and an ability to ask questions respectfully all serve as tools in building a safe space across all genders, races and sexualities. “Another factor is showing students they have something to offer. It means listening and learning from them instead of assuming you know all the answers.” Lillian also sees how vital listening can be. First, she says she must get to know La Casa members on a human level. Next, she needs to listen for their

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needs and especially for shifts in behavior. It was through paying attention to shifts in behavior that she was able to get a girl contemplating suicide the assistance she needed. She tells Inside that it’s not uncommon for members of minorities to face mental obstacles, so it’s especially important for her to listen. Doug says using language that is inclusive is another way to build a safe space. These efforts may involve being careful to use appropriate gender pronouns and understanding different types of sexuality. “A lot of people like to have a label that can describe their own experience,” he says. “When we aren’t using words that include those labels, it can reflect that we aren’t a space catered to them.” But part of building a safe space falls on the individual. He says students at both centers should look for safe spaces within themselves by tapping into their own hearts. “Realize the strength in you. Know you have a brain, a good

heart, an inquisitive mind. You have everything you need. You are safe in your own mind, within yourself.”

Overcoming threats Despite best efforts to create a safe space, Doug says he sees constant threats to that security, especially during the Trump Administration. As a result, people from the LGBTQ+ and Latino communities often don’t feel heard. “You can’t be afraid to talk about it with students. And you certainly can’t be afraid to talk it through with people who approach with ignorance,” he says. “You need to be respectful and calm but express your own viewpoint.” Lillian says even within the center, she wants to challenge students to be understanding of all minorities. While La Casa is a safe place, she said she doesn’t want it to be a place for people to hide or continue their own prejudices. But even when one of her

students says something with underlying prejudice, she said she tries to understand their perspective and push them to challenge their own viewpoints. “I don’t want to be combative,” she says. “It accomplishes nothing.” But of course when people choose to be argumentative instead of understanding one another, walls go up. “But we don’t need any more walls. We need bridges!” Doug on the other hand, isn’t too worried about how safe students feel within the center’s walls. He says he has that covered. What he is worried about is what students face when they walk out the door. “I just want them to feel loved, accepted and worthwhile. I want them to have the confidence to take on the world even during these difficult times.”

Read about other communities and their sacred spaces online at inside.idsnews.com


“I just want them to feel loved, accepted and worthwhile. I want them to have the confidence to take on the world even during these difficult times.�

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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Distance makes the heart grow fonder Long-distance relationships bring their challenges, but we take them one day at a time Words by Maia Rabenold

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For one couple, the challenge of long-distance came later in their relationship. After constantly spending time together, they had to experience life without the other by their side. For another, separation came earlier and distance is all they’ve ever really known.

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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Rusty & Alyssa, 2 years For IU seniors Rusty Brost and Alyssa Randazzo, who live next door to each other, daily life has become a joint enterprise. With just a few steps between them, space in their relationship is nearly nonexistent, but they still carve out time alone.

“That’s fine, you were prepared,” Alyssa assures him.

They met in 2014, when Alyssa joined IU’s Singing Hoosiers in her sophomore year. Rusty, who had joined the year before, noticed her as soon as she walked in.

Rusty studied abroad in Ireland two years ago, but since Alyssa and Rusty’s relationship was brand new, the space wasn’t too hard to deal with. Last summer, however, Rusty and Alyssa were five hours apart after Rusty landed an internship in Ohio. This put their relationship, now in full swing, to the test after spending so much time together nearly every day for a year.

Alyssa tells Inside that she views Singing Hoosiers as where she met the love of her life.

“That really put it into perspective,” says Alyssa. “You miss each other more, and that’s important.”

After several months of being friends, they finally made the step to a first date in January of 2015 at Malibu Grill. Rusty was nervous.

Alyssa and Rusty are both looking for jobs in the Chicago and Indianapolis areas for next year, but they will continue to live separately before they make the jump to sharing the same space.

Rusty says he had topics to talk about, just in case conversation didn’t go exactly as he planned.

Jonny & Anni, 1 year When it comes to space, Jonny Gooder and Anni Kline have always had too much. Between her studying abroad in Italy, then him in China, and now her in Ireland, daily Skype calls are often their only option for closing the distance between them. They met in early 2015 when Anni was visiting friends in Bloomington. It just so happens that she ended up at a house show that Jonny’s roommates, who were a band, were playing. “I had been looking at her the whole night,” says Jonny. While he was in China, which was a 12-hour time difference from Anni, he would wake up early in the morning to talk to her the night before, or late at night to talk to her the next day. This time traveling for love continued into this semester with Anni in Ireland, now with only a four-hour time difference. Even when they are both in Indiana, Jonny, a junior here at IU, is still two hours away from Anni, a junior at Taylor University in Upland, Indiana. They make trips to see each other on the

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weekends, but Jonny says it’s hard to just share the highs and lows of the week instead of consistently getting to have meals and do homework together like other couples. Nonetheless, he and Anni both value communication, which helps to normalize their long-distance relationship. Anni even studies communication at Taylor so that definitely comes in handy! “We’re always close, no matter the physical proximity,” Jonny says. Even so, nothing can beat being in the same physical space. They breathe easier when they are together. Jonny and Anni have successfully navigated a long-term relationship, but the couple has had enough of it. They wait in expectation for the day when the word space only means departing for a days’ work. “You just get to be and hug and sit with each other. You just know that the other one loves you because they’re just there with you.”


Advice from the editor on how to keep your LDR solid Let me start off by saying longdistance relationships are hard, yes, but they are very much manageable if you put the work in. Having been in an LDR the majority of my collegiate career, I can attest to having my fair share of struggles, sometimes solely because of the distance. And being a student on campus definitely doesn’t help. Everywhere you turn, you’re reminded of the fact that your significant other is out there somewhere and not close to you (as they should be at all times!). But it’s okay, you’ll be united soon enough and this will all be over! Until then, remember these short tips. You got this. BY KENNEDY COOPWOOD

Find ways to cope with the distance Find something to remind you of them so you don’t feel lonely throughout the day. For example, I have a bottle of my boyfriend’s cologne that I put on each day (okay, some days I skip it if I’m rushing) to just carry a little piece of him throughout the day. This may be extreme for some people but my sense of smell is my strongest sense so it resonates with me. Do something that makes you feel better about the distance. Quality time is still a thing When people think of quality time, of course they think about dates, movie nights and cuddle sessions. But it’s important not to neglect quality time that could be had in a long distance relationship. Skype, Facetime, or day-to-day phone conversations are even more important in these situations and mean the world to your partner.

You have to be willing to be a little extra

Don’t let the distance keep you from getting to know each other

What I mean by this is that no conversation in physical proximity is going to be interpreted the same through a computer screen or phone. Humans were made for faceto-face interaction that allows us to intercept body language, depict tone and comprehend facial expression. When these are taken away, we lose that natural human communication.

I can’t stress this enough. This is 2017 and there’s no excuse as to why you can’t get to know someone who isn’t in another city, state or even country.

Things that could possibly be received better in person may come off a certain unintended way through wavelengths. For this reason, you have to do a little more to make your significant other comfortable and understanding of whatever it is you are trying to relay to them. Have patience Without this you can pretty much just call it quits.

Think outside the box, send voice messages (apparently that’s a thing now), video messages, write letters; anything that will keep the relationship going strong will be received and appreciated.

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Use the technology and resources you have to communicate and get a feel for one another as best as you can. This way, the distance doesn’t feel as big as it is and the times you do see each other aren’t spent going over the basics. Distance does not make you guys strangers.


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P H O T O S F RO M M OV I E S T I L L S DATA B A S E


We had to get a ‘Space Jam’ reference in here somehow Space movie reviews that are nonetheless true

T

here are plenty of stars out there, but no better than the ones we find in the movies. From Mars to Bugs Bunny to Kevin Spacey, the concept of films revolving around space has been a staple in the industry since the camera was invented. Here are a few of our favorites (or less so). “2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY” (1968) This technically brilliant masterpiece will make you want to gaze at a night sky in wonder. “STAR WARS: EPISODE IV - A NEW HOPE” (1977)

“CONTACT” (1997) Robert Zemeckis’ sciencefiction classic features a fantastic performance from Jodie Foster. It expertly balances entertainment with sweeping examinations of big ideas. “STAR WARS: EPISODE I - THE PHANTOM MENACE” (1999) A really long episode of “Wacky Races,” in which Jar Jar Binks makes his first appearance on the screen and in our infuriated everlasting conscience. “STAR WARS: EPISODE II - ATTACK OF THE CLONES” (2002)

Luke Skywalker is the literal definition of teenage angst as the most-popular marketing ploy of all time comes to life.

A teenager and his much-older female companion make googly-eyes at each other until the ending credits.

“CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND” (1977)

“STAR WARS: EPISODE III - REVENGE OF THE SITH” (2005)

Steven Spielberg’s follow-up to Jaws features some of cinema’s best space imagery. (Be sure to check out the 1998 director’s cut.)

Hayden Christensen may not win Best Actor, but he’s definitely a nominee for Most Actor.

“STAR WARS: EPISODE V - THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK” (1980) Stellar fights in a city made of clouds make up for C-3PO complaining for half of the movie. Also, a little green monster who is somehow both adorable and terrifying becomes a teacher. “E.T.” (1982) Young Drew Barrymore costars with 2017’s Macaulay Culkin, who plays the titular character. “STAR WARS: EPISODE VI - RETURN OF THE JEDI” (1983) “Maury,” but in space. “SPACEBALLS” (1987) Star Wars, but Jewish.

“THE KNOWING” (2009)

Can’t forget about Kevin Spacey! “THE USUAL SUSPECTS” (1995) Spacey delivers another AcademyAward winning performance as Verbal Kint. In a cast of stars he shines brightest. “AMERICAN BEAUTY” (1999) This eccentric movie is deep and funnier than you would expect. Spacey won an Academy Award for his titanic performance as Lester Turnham. “21” (2008) Despite some annoying whitewashing, “21” remains a good movie to watch on a rainy Saturday. Spacey’s performance as an amoral and brilliant professor introduced him to a new legion of fans.

This movie should be shot into outer space and never seen again. “MOON” (2009) “GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY” (2014) The fat guy from Parks and Rec teams up with a raccoon and Vin Diesel voicing a tree, because that’s apparently a thing that happens now. “INTERSTELLAR” (2014) Matthew McConaughey hides behind a bookshelf in space? We don’t know. We didn’t really understand it.

One of the best science-fiction films ever made. Extra points since it’s the only movie that features Kevin Spacey in space. “HORRIBLE BOSSES” (2011) After Spacey’s character decides to promote himself when he’s already the boss, the movie pretty much sends him on a downward spiral.

“THE MARTIAN” (2015) This well-casted movie is one of the more fun space films. Donald Glover steals the show as an eccentric scientist.

“SPACE JAM” (1996)

“ARRIVAL” (2016)

One of the worst baseball players of all time remembers he’s good at basketball. Bugs Bunny is there for some reason.

Amy Adams plays charades with aliens in order to prevent the Earth’s destruction. BY IDS WEEKEND

INSIDE.IDSNEWS.COM

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E S S AY

Standing small Own the space you take up, no matter how little it may be I’m always the go-to practice dummy for lifts and tricks in dance rehearsal. Growing up, the other kids always wanted to pick me up because I was light and huggable. And if you think I have any option but the back middle seat in a full car ride, you’re wrong. I get it, I’m small. I’ve been called “cute” and “sweetheart” for as long as I can remember and probably will be for the rest of my life. While sometimes it’s endearing or sweet, sometimes it’s just annoying. Can’t you

take me seriously? As a 5’1” female, I’m reminded nearly daily of my definition of space. I can shapeshift and squeeze into new spaces and situations very easily. But even so, sometimes I feel cramped in my airline seat, even though I don’t take up all of it. During a summer in New York City, I crammed in on the subway every morning on the 6 line to Midtown Manhattan. Things got cozy, and I definitely got bumped and smushed, especially when people weren’t 100 percent certain I was there. Don’t get me wrong, I can weave in and out of crowds with less effort than most people, but the fact that I don’t take up much space at all often entices people to further encroach the space that I do have. This happens in line at the store, at concerts, and in planes, trains and automobiles. Time and time again, I’ve seen BuzzFeed or Odyssey articles about short girls that tell you some of the advantages of your size that include free piggy back rides (I’ll admit it, I still enjoy those every once in a while) and spending less money

on clothes and accessories (you bet I still shop in the kid’s section for sneakers and Vans). But then there are always those bullet points like “nobody feels threatened,” “enjoy the shadow of tall people” and “people are always willing to carry things for you because they assume you’re too short to do it yourself.” I don’t want people in my life to feel threatened. However, if I want to be an editor-in-chief someday and command the attention of a room, I do need people to take me seriously. What I gather from articles like these and the general consensus on shorties, is that we aren’t taken quite as seriously and are seen as less independent. Several studies have even shown that shorter people typically get paid less than taller ones. People of a smaller stature are often underestimated. Maybe it’s that we remind people of a Chihuahua or, as one of my friends so fondly calls me, a bonsai tree. I don’t fill a space physically like some people do.

But instead of viewing it as a weakness, I count it as a strength. From the time I was a kid until this day, my mom has always told me I am “tiny but mighty.” A small, headstrong woman can go a long way, and she never stops surprising people. Whatever space it is that you take up, own it and don’t let anyone ever tell you how big or small it is. Don’t let someone tell you that you’re too heavy to model or play a certain sport. Don’t let someone tell you you’re too tall to wear heels. Never let anyone tell you what’s normal or expected. When we start doing that, the world changes.

BY LAUREN SAXE

Your IU student magazine Catch the next issue in Fall 2017.

DISCOVER For inquiries about advertising in future editions of Inside magazine, contact IU Student Media at 812-855-0763 or email advertise@idsnews.com. con


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April 11, 2017  

The Space Issue. Inside Magazine, published twice a semester, is a product of the Indiana Daily Student.

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