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The Indiana Daily Student Magazine | Issue 3 | Spring 2014

BAD

Get the dirt on these dirty jobs

5

of the most notorious Hoosiers

COVER BAND KEEPS THE KING OF POP ALIVE


RECREATIONAL SPORTS

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812.855.SRSC recsports.indiana.edu


VOLUME 8, ISSUE 3 | TABLE OF CONTENTS | SPRING 2014

Connected

Power

Bad

Consumption

EDITOR’S NOTE In our society, the word bad may be associated with criminals, losing a game, or cheating on exams. But, we’ve also been guilty of binge-watching TV shows on Netflix instead of studying for that upcoming test or ordering Pizza X breadstix to our dorm or apartment. We’ve all paid $10 to see an awful movie at the theater. And most of us have all experienced rejection from that dream job or internship. In this issue, we broke down the good, bad, and ugly of IU basketball, we counted calories in Chipotle burritos and Jimmy John’s Beach Clubs, and we found some of the weirdest crimes ever committed in Bloomington. Everyone’s bad in his or her own way, so we’re not here to judge. Take a peek, and see for yourself.

CLAIRE ARONSON — EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

12 T H E K IN G H A S R ET U R N ED

6

7

TI P J AR

K N OW - IT- A LL

How to handle that awkward moment when your roommate gets broken up with

What you should be wearing to that IU football game

DEPARTMENTS

2 BETTER YO U

Remember when mullets and mood rings were a thing?

4 Behind the bad news blues

Inside magazine, the newest enterprise of the Office of Student Media, Indiana University at Bloomington, is published twice an academic semester: October and November, and February and April. Inside magazine operates as a self-supporting enterprise within the broader scope of the Indiana Daily Student. Inside magazine operates as a designated public forum, and reader comments and contribution are welcome. Normally, the Inside magazine editor will be responsible for final content decisions, with the IDS editor-in-chief involved in rare instances. All editorial and advertising content is subject to our policies, rates, and procedures. Readers are entitled to a single copy of this magazine. The taking of multiple copies of this publication may constitute as theft of property and is subject to prosecution.

10 N O T O R IO U S

Not everyone that graduates from IU goes on to be successful with their degree

The spirit of Michael Jackson makes a stop in Bloomington, silver glove included

16 S P R AY ED, S C R AT C H ED, A N D S C R IB B LED

He transforms plain walls into graffiti masterpieces

Think twice before giving someone a thumbs up

CO N FESSI O N S

February 18, 2014 Vol. 8, Issue 3 www.idsnews.com/inside

8 K N OW - IT- A LL

FEATURES

20 D IR T Y J OBS

The people who rid rats from restaurants and keep our water flowing

24 IT S TA R T S W I T H A B A D WORD

Skirting around the topic of race

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Claire Aronson Missy Wilson MANAGING EDITOR Dianne Osland PHOTO EDITORS Sarah Boyum and Anna Teeter COPY EDITOR Rebecca Kimberly DIGITAL DIRECTOR Michela Tindera FEATURES EDITOR Rachel Wisinski

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

ART DIRECTOR

Matt Bloom

Ryan Drotor and Roger Hartwell

DEPARTMENTS EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR OF PRESENTATION

Kathryn Moody

Emma Grdina

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

MARKETING MANAGERS

Avery Walts and Sarah Whaley

Timothy Kawiecki and Katie Swintz

Indiana Daily Student EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Gage Bentley MANAGING EDITORS Tori Fater and Kate Thacker

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Tyler Fosnaugh IU STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR

Ron Johnson NEWSROOM 812-855-0760 BUSINESS OFFICE 812-855-0763 FAX 812-855-8009

C OV E R P H O T O B Y S A R A H B OY U M IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 1


B E T T E R

Y O U

POLL: What’s the worst movie you’ve seen in the past year? This Is The End, Grown Ups 2, The Hangover Part III, The Room Honorable mentions go to: Sharknado and Spring Breakers

Brea ki ng t hose ha bits BY RACHEL WISINSKI

With only so much time in a day, we look for ways to simplify our responsibilities. In the process, we develop some habits we probably could have done without. Here are some of those bad habits and ways to help you focus. Procrastinating It’s easy to choose Netflix instead of your econ textbook on a Monday night. But you can’t wait until the week before an exam to finally break the binding and still expect an A. Procrastination is a bad habit most students engage in. “I procrastinate sometimes, but I try not to,” junior Michelle Bouillon says.

Your wardrobe’s most embarrassing moments B Y R E B E C C A K I M B E R LY

1990s

Sometimes it can be hard to tell at the time — that pink velour sweatsuit was so cute, right? But then we look back and cringe at what we used to wear. Here’s a look at some of the worst trends from the past few decades.

Wallets on chains: A pocket for your wallet works just as well, really.

1980s

Skater style: Think skate shoes, T-shirts, and studs. Most people who dressed like this weren’t even “skaters.” Mood rings: These were amusing for about five seconds, but definitely not fashionable. Zigzag parts: Because straight parts in your hair just weren’t good enough.

Perms: Ah, ’80s hair. Did they not know they looked ridiculous? Not to mention how bad perms and all of that product is for your hair.

Parachute pants: These tried to make a comeback, but let’s hope they don’t become mainstream.

Mullets: Another painful memory in the history of hair.

2000s

Stirrup pants: For those times when you really needed your pants to stay attached to your feet. Shoulder pads: In the ’80s, shoulder pads weren’t just for football players. Legwarmers/aerobic wear: This was even worse if it wasn’t worn for the purpose of working out.

Short denim mini-skirts: These were a middle school staple, and they used to say, “I’m a part of the in crowd.” Now, not so much. Popped collars on polos: And layered polos with popped collars. Usually worn by “preppy” boys. Chunky hair highlights: Ideal for when you want to look like a zebra, but not the rest of the time. Platform flip-flops: It’s a good thing these aren’t in style anymore because they’re pretty impractical. Unless you just want to give yourself a little height boost, of course. Frosted tips/spiked hair: Justin Timberlake did it, so it was cool, right? No.

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If you can find the motivation to complete your assignments, you’ll be well on your way to overcoming this bad habit. “I think about if I have my work done, I’ll be able to do what I want to, like hanging out with friends or watching TV,” Michelle says. “The sooner I get my work done, the faster I can relax later.” Skipping class You’ve hit the snooze button one too many times and missed class. No biggie. But for classes with a strict attendance policy, skipping too many can become a death sentence for your grades. Alex McCormick, associate professor in the IU School of Education, says classes are set up a certain way to expedite learning through more than just reading. “When students skip class, they miss out on whatever experiences the instructor has designed to facilitate learning, such as organized class discussions, Q&A, demonstrations, debates, guest lectures, group work, etc.,” Alex says.

ABC

He also says it’s a financially unintelligent decision because tuition is paying for the education, which doesn’t happen when the student is not present. Eating habits Between work for classes and student organizations, not to mention the financial burden, eating a decent meal can be tough. Katie Shepherd, registered dietitian at the IU Health Center, says students often don’t look for the easiest foods, which are usually processed. They also do not get enough rest, causing them to turn to caffeine and sugar instead of healthy meals. In order to change these habits, Katie says setting a goal, writing it down, and telling a friend can help you be more accountable for the changes. Planning meals and packing lunches for the long days on campus can be most helpful in starting to break bad eating habits. Spending too much money Having a social life has a price. You and your roommates get Starbucks every other day. A friend you haven’t seen for a month wants to meet for lunch. It’s your other friend’s birthday, and you promised her dinner and a night at the bars. Plus, you need a new outfit for your date this weekend. Though not essential, these expenses are part of the college experience.

$

Daniel Spore, adjunct lecturer in the Kelley School of Business finance department, says students may be able to save money if they compare prices of products and services across different stores and shops. “If you can walk a block and save $3 on a transaction, then do so,” Daniel says.

STOCK PHOTO


POLL: We asked 100 students what their guilty pleasure is and got some funky answers. Eating all of the brownies in the pan, pretending I’m Beyonce, Phil Collins’ entire discography, “Barbie: Life in the Dream House” webseries, filling out this survey

COUNTING CALORIES

JIMMY JOHN’S BEACH CLUB

LONG ISLAND ICED TEA

820 42.5

UP TO

CALORIES

GRAMS OF FAT

With self-reported freaky fast delivery and seemingly healthy sandwiches, Jimmy John’s might look like a good choice. But the popular turkey-provolone-avocado Beach Club on standard French bread packs it in. To build that spring break bod, stay away from this beach. SOURCE: JIMMYJOHNS.COM

700

BY DIANNE OSLAND

Bring it on, 2014. It’s been more than a month since your well-intentioned resolution to lose weight or stay fit, but it takes more effort than just four weeks to make (and keep) the habit. Inside has rounded up some of the more sneaky bad-for-you foods aroun around town to keep you on track and in the know.

CALORIES

PIZZA X BREADSTIX

CHIPOTLE BURRITO

148

~1000

CALORIES

PER STICK, 8 IN A BAG

Celebrate the weekend with a cheap but strong Long Island Iced Tea? Think again. This heavy-hitter cocktail combines 3-5 shots of different alcohols (i.e. 300-500 calories) plus cola or whatever sweet mixer you choose. Drop that mini pitcher and try something lighter if you’re counting on keeping off the flab this winter.

When the late-night munchies hit, consider skipping the call to order some sticks. Three of those will put you near 500 calories and adding sauce will tip the scales. But if you can’t resist, keep in mind the pizza sauce puts you at 50 calories an ounce, while the garlic butter pours on 200 calories per ounce.

SOURCE: LIQUOR.COM

SOURCE: PIZZAXBLOOMINGTON.COM

P H O T O S B Y S A R A H B OY U M A N D A N N A T E E T E R

CALORIES

Maybe you’ve heard the tortilla itself is 300 calories, or maybe you’ve decided to forget that little fact. But the nutrition calculator adds up — if you’re buying your burrito, it’s not only full of integrity (thanks, all-natural ingredients), it’s also full of a lot of other stuff that will keep you longer at the gym. SOURCE: CHIPOTLE.COM

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 3


C O N F E S S I O N S

Behind the blues AS TOLD TO DIANNE OSLAND

What defines the genre of blues?

When music professor Andy Hollinden realized there was no class on the history of blues music, he decided to make it happen. Blues is historically a black art form, and Andy didn’t feel qualified to teach it as a white musician. But when no one stepped forward, either he was going to do it, or no one was. Andy bought and listened to blues music almost exclusively for a couple of years, read every book available, and then offered the course Z385 History of the Blues. We sat down with him to get an education on the often melancholic, but highly influential, blues. What are the origins of blues music? Nobody knows for sure when it started. The best guess is that it was created by the generation born after the Civil War when black musicians had the freedom to do what they wish and travel. It really was a new art form, modern and hip, created by young people.

There’s the 12-bar blues chord progression, so if you want to go home right now and write a blues song, you already have a template to use. But what’s really at the heart of blues is what blues musicians describe as working between the notes. It’s the bending of notes, the sliding between the pitches that you can do with your voice, and bending notes on your slide guitar or harmonica. You can’t put it into words — you just have to feel it. That’s what puzzled white academics when they would try to write down in European music notation what black musicians were doing, because it didn’t conform to their system. People think it’s simple to play the blues. It’s only simple to play it poorly. How did the blues change over the years? The first wave of blues music on record began in 1920. The big blues stars were glamorous professional black women who traveled the vaudeville circuit singing blues songs in these variety shows. In 1925 or ’26, country

blues began. Typically they were men who accompanied themselves on guitar. After that, you began to see the blues being recorded more in the cities, in more of a smooth, sophisticated style. In the 1930s, you’re going to start to see small combos forming that include bass and drums. By the end of the ’30s and early ’40s, people started to experiment with amplifying their guitars, and people started calling it rhythm and blues. What about today’s blues music? At the end of the ’50s and into the ’60s, there was the blues revival. Young white music lovers started to search out those old blues records that had been recorded and released decades prior. That music seemed like the most real music they’d ever heard, so a lot of people wanted to not play pop music or rock pop music and instead go back to the roots or the beginning. By the end of the 1960s, blues music and rock music had become so intertwined again the difference between the two became so small. To my ear, it hasn’t changed a whole lot since the 1970s.

LISTEN TO THE BLUES Andy offered us these songs to give a sense of that real blues flavor. Victoria Spivey “Black Snake Blues” Mississippi John Hurt “Spike Driver Blues” Tommy Johnson “Canned Heat Blues” Charley Patton “High Water Everywhere, Part 1” Skip James “Devil Got My Woman” Geeshie Wiley “Last Kind Words Blues”

Not all hoarders are created equal AS TOLD TO CLAIRE ARONSON

When people think of hoarders, the TLC Show “Hoarding: Buried Alive” often comes to mind. But does the reality TV show accurately portray all hoarders? IU communication and culture and American studies professor Susan Lepselter says hoarding is not the same for every person, as the meaning of hoarding changes over time and different periods of history. We sat down with her to understand more about hoarding. In 2014, who would be considered a hoarder? From a position of a professor who sees it in a social lens, I wouldn’t even say there is one thing, and that’s what I think is really interesting about it. If 4

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you watch a hoarding show on TV, you see somebody who has a cat problem — the typical cat lady. You see her trying to solve all her loneliness with all these cats, then you may see someone who is really rich and can’t stop buying

things and has piles of gifts for their grandkids and 14 toasters. Then you may see someone who is really poor and living in subsidized housing that is living in trash. Then you may see someone who keeps picking things up off the street because they think it one day may come in handy, and because they grew up in the Depression, they want to save things because they were taught to be thrifty. The person who is saving things because it may come in handy one day is really different than the person that is living in garbage, and that person is really different from the rich person that is buying too much.

Why is the hoarder seen as bad in our society? The hoarder is seen as crazy when the thing they want to keep has private value. One thing about the hoarder is that the stuff they tend to value doesn’t necessarily have value for other people. The hoarding behavior is on a spectrum with a lot of the struggles people have with stuff. People are suffering with this. It is really a life challenge to struggle with order and disorder in this way, and people can get help.

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y W I L L R OYA L


My parents will love this!

it to I can’t wa n my use this o profile! LinkedIn

Visit myseniorportrait.org or call 812-855-9737 to schedule your FREE portrait session.

Feb. 26 - 27

10 a.m - 6 p.m. • Frangipani Room

Freshmen to graduating Seniors —We want all students in the book. PHOTOS BY STEPH AARONSON; BOULDERING PHOTO BY ETHAN BENNETT

idsnews.com/arbutus

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 5


T I P

J A R

Breaking the bad news B Y K AT H RY N M O O DY

How do you help someone who has just heard some of the worst news of their life? It’s awkward (only because you mean well — not because you’re a terrible person) and hard and more than a little mind-boggling. Especially if that someone is your best friend, roommate ... or yourself. Whether it’s you or a friend who is confronting a difficult experience, Inside found ways to (we hope) make the process a little bit easier. We spoke to Nancy Stockton, director of Counseling and Psychological Services at IU, to get some tips. Quick disclaimer: While we are some smart cookies, this article isn’t meant to replace professional help. There’s absolutely no shame in contacting CAPS or other services. Remember, every student gets two free sessions at CAPS, no questions asked — because everyone goes through hard times. You were rejected for a job/ internship

A death of someone close

Remember the importance of trying again and never giving up.

It will hurt. Though it depends on the closeness of whoever passed away, try to find a balance between being easy on yourself and not expecting to do everything you ordinarily do.

“There are legends of stories of authors or creative people or people trying for jobs who share stories of piles of rejections before they got success,” Nancy says. Getting that dream job could take many years and many attempts — and that’s OK. Normal, even. Just make sure you get back in the saddle eventually. As the friend: In this situation, it’s important to be a shoulder to cry on if needed, Nancy says. You can also help remind your friend about anything positive learned from the experience, be it a botched interview or typos on an application. Because even Steve Jobs needed that friend at some point. You ended a relationship (especially if the relationship was unhealthy) If you are broken up with, you have to learn to accept that you probably did all you could have done, Nancy says. If you broke up with someone, sometimes the hardest part is getting the other person to recognize that there isn’t a chance of getting back together. As the friend: After some serious empathizing, try to help your friend see both the strengths and the weaknesses of the relationship, especially if your friend got out of an unhealthy, even abusive, relationship. Your friend may linger on the times the ex was sweet to him or her and forget to give the situation a more balanced view.

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“Most of us feel better to maybe compartmentalize things a bit,” Nancy says. Ease yourself into grieving. As the friend: Honestly share that you might not know what to say, Nancy says. But make sure your friend knows that you are there to listen to them, especially since some people may have delayed reactions to the news.

Turn that frown upside down BY SARAH WHALEY

You rolled out of bed this morning and could just feel it. Gray skies, sleeping 20 minutes past your alarm and nothing to eat for breakfast: the day is going to be bad. Nancy Stockton, director of Counseling and Psychological Services at the IU Health Center, says around 20 to 25 percent of students experiencing anxiety report waking up feeling their day will be awful. One might call this feeling intuition, but a rational explanation usually exists. Cathlene Hardy Hansen, director of health and wellness education at the IU Health Center, and her staff said sleep deprivation, hormonal cycles, stress, and a poor diet can contribute to waking up with negative predictions about the day. Though feeling a day is going to be bad does not mean anything, it can affect our attitude, performance, and productivity. The good news is this cycle of negativity can be broken. After all, if our mind has enough power to convince us the day is going to be bad, it also has enough power to convince us the day will be good — or at least more bearable and productive. Here are some ways to turn a bad day around: Make your bed. Your mom has been telling you to do it since you were 4, but now leaving the sheets rumpled seems logical. As soon as class gets out, you climb back in anyway. But Cathlene says, “Organizing externally helps you organize internally.” Feeling like the day is going to be bad might prevent you from being productive, but starting with something small like making your bed will give you a jumpstart. Center yourself. Practices such as prayer, meditation, and deep breathing are gaining ground as viable psychological treatment options. CAPS offers Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction as a clinical service, which aims to increase attention and awareness. Cognitive Control Lab postdoctoral research assistant Anand Ramamoorthy says an example of a centering exercise is to close your eyes and pick five sounds out of your environment to focus on one at a time. Share a laugh. “Try to be around happy people,”says Azar Nikravesh, health educator for smoking cessation. “Avoid places, situations, or people who make you sad.” Popular science has been telling us for years that laughter is contagious, but test it yourself. Grab a group of friends and a silly BuzzFeed video to see how long you can last without at least cracking a smile.

Face your fears. Anand and Azar agree: acknowledge your problem and face it head-on. “What is the worst thing that can happen?” Azar says. “Face that, and then say OK.” An ignored problem will not disappear by itself. “A longer term solution to an intense negative perception is to process going through it and not going around it,” Anand says. Acknowledge you feel bad — then move on. Find the fun. Registered dietitian Katie Shepherd says, “Make sure to plan something that you enjoy or that is fun, even if it is for 15 minutes.” Katie says she sets aside time to read for pleasure. Having something to look forward to later in your day will give you a welcome break from dealing with problems that arise and help refresh your mood.


K N O W - I T- A L L

WEIRD CRIME: in 2012, Corey J. Hamersley shot 32 bullets into a house and at a police officer while naked and allegedly tripping on LSD, earning him the nickname “naked gunman.” Corey was convicted on attempted murder charges this year.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UgLY GOOD C O AC H E S

SPI R I T W E A R

T R A N SP O RTATI ON

Inside draws the lines on some of the best and worst parts of IU past and present (no Clint Eastwood spaghetti westerns included). BY DIANNE OSLAND

BA D

UGLY

BRANCH MCCRACKEN (1938-65)

KELVIN SAMPSON (2006-08)

THE BOB KNIGHT CHAIR TOSS (1985)

Not only is Assembly Hall’s court now named in his honor, but hall-of-famer McCracken also led his teams to put two of the five banners on the wall.

Sampson won over fans at first with the recruitment of Eric Gordon, then marred the storied program with allegations of several NCAA recruitment violations. Once a cheat, always a cheat.

Right in the midst of a HoosierBoilermaker showdown, a fiery Knight protests a foul call against his team, sending a red plastic chair tumbling across the court.

DAD’S VINTAGE SWEATSHIRT

INDIANA BASKETBALL SNAP SHOOTER SHIRT

THE FRESHMAN GIRL’S TAILGATE CROP TOP

Perfectly worn-in, this is the sweatshirt straight out of your dad’s 1970s wardrobe, unlike the ones at the IU bookstore.

It wasn’t enough to own the candy stripe warm-up pants worn by the IU men’s basketball team, but now IU Athletics has put a price ($124.98) on looking just like you could share the court with Yogi and Will.

Buy a cheap crewneck Hoosiers T-shirt at Tracks. Take a pair of scissors to it. Fringe. No sleeves. Deep V. Maybe someday the Interfraternity Council will add these torn-up tees to the nohandles policy at tailgate. Maybe someday IU football will make it to the Rose Bowl.

BIKING

THE WALK FROM BRISCOE TO SWAIN HALL

THE LINE FOR THE X BUS

Speed past the walkers, avoid falling into someone’s lap on an overcrowded bus, and forget the grief of Bloomington’s new city parking meters.

P H O T O S B Y S A R A H B OY U M A N D A N N A T E E T E R COACH PHOTOS COURTESY OF IU ARCHIVES

The excitement of living in the newly renovated Disco Briscoe dims when you realize that “easy N&M” astronomy class is a whopping 1.2 miles away. And you just missed the A bus.

Parking at the stadium just became a bigger pain when the Campus Bus Service cut the number of running X buses from four to two per day. The already long line at the Indiana Memorial Union bus stop just got longer.

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 7


K N O W - I T - A L L

“The Room” — Johnny the Banker’s life is changed when his fiancé starts seducing Mark, his best friend, for reasons no one is sure about. Maybe she got tired of Tommy Wiseau’s inexplicable accent. A bad movie classic with extreme quotability.

And the Award goes to...

“Surf Nazis Must Die” — In the post-apocalyptic future, a woman’s grandson is murdered by neo-Nazi surf punks. Naturally, guntoting Grandma decides bloody retribution is the only way to go. “Santa Claus Conquers the Martians” — Martians are sad because they don’t have anyone on Mars to give their kids presents, so they kidnap Santa. Doesn’t go well for them, apparently.

B Y K AT H RY N M O O DY

“It’s so bad it’s good.” Not something you can often say about terribly made things. Movies are a strange exception. Unlike other poorly made things, the terribleness of a movie can actually be a part of its charm. IU has a club dedicated to watching movies of just this type: the Terrible Movie Club. “Pretty much everyone can enjoy bad movies if they are strong enough,” says Amanda Kelly, senior and founder of the Terrible Movie Club. She and six friends enjoyed watching bad movies as a stress reliever and outlet. Since they lived in Collins LivingLearning Center, they realized it’d be easy to make it a club and share the experience with others. The group has a sort of

“She’s Too Young” — A Lifetime movie of epic proportions. A woman discovers her 14-yearold daughter is having sex with multiple people, leading to an STD outbreak. Or something. “Disco Worms” — This animated film about earthworms who want to make the world’s greatest disco band actually has some awesome music, Amanda says. But it’s still hilariously strange.

“standard” for bad. They can’t just be painful to watch, she says. They have to be funny bad — a good mix of bad dialogue, corny effects, and general low-budget crappiness. The club has a Facebook group (“Terrible Movie Club”) and typically meets on Tuesday nights. Anyone, even those living outside of Collins, is welcome to attend. Most of the club’s communication is through the Facebook group.

Off hands

IDIOTA MEANS:

Are you an

idiot? I N : Brazil Pair with overbite and grunting

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CORNA Your wife is unfaithful. I N : Brazil, Colombia, Italy, Portugal, Spain MEANS:

Widely varying

Some movies the club has watched in the past. Many of them can be found on Netflix or in their entirety on YouTube. “Rubber” — A tire has destructive telepathic powers and becomes obsessed with a woman. Featuring “Goodyear” as Robert the Tire. “Thankskilling” — “A homicidal turkey axes off college kids during break,” is what it says on IMDb, and we don’t really know a better way to describe it.

“Foodfight” — Charlie Sheen voices a super-sleuth dog who must unite popular brands like Chef Boyardee and Mrs. Butterworth to fight the evil Brand X. Hilary Duff was also somehow on board for this movie. “It is kind of a metaphor for Nazis,” Amanda says. “And a children’s movie with sexual overtones.” As if the terrible ’80s quality animation (it was made in 2012) wasn’t enough.

Hand gestures translate into different things around the globe and in various cultures. B Y W I L L ROYA L So you may want to think twice next time you throw around that thumbs up.

THUMBS UP M E A N S : I’m going to jam my finger up your butt. I N : Middle East, West Africa, South America, Thailand

POOP FACE M E A N S : Go rub poop on your face. I N : Greece Stronger with two hands

CUTIS

OK

Screw you and your whole family. I N : India, Pakistan

MEANS:

MEANS:

I bite my thumb at you

IN:

Asshole Brazil, Germany

In Turkey, it’s an insult to gay people

P H O T O I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y A N N A T E E T E R


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Mind your I's and U's In the 1940s, an etiquette manual, written by then-IU medical student John Visher, was illustrated in LIFE Magazine. Here are some of our favorite rules.

E. THIRD ST. ATWATER EYE CARE CENTER

Don’t collect pins. Though wearing a boy’s fraternity pin does not signify formal engagement on Indiana campus, it is considered very bad taste to wear more than one at a time. Don’t smoke where ashtrays are not provided. Don’t “periscope” (peek) over a fellow student’s shoulder, whether you are cribbing or just checking up on progress.

S. FESS

Don’t wake roommates when you come in late from a date to regale them with accounts of good time you had. And don’t throw your clothes all around room while undressing.

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Make your eye appointment today.

www.opt.indiana.edu


The radicals, the cult leader, the serial killer

Notorious BY JAKE WRIGHT

Searching through the thousands of files in the IU Archive, you may stumble upon a little-known folder marked “Alumni-Infamous.” Filled with newspaper articles, web printouts, and notes from IU faculty and staff, the folder gives a look into parts of IU’s history that aren’t regularly bragged about. The University is lucky to boast a long list of successful and famous alumni, but there are some who once walked the paths of campus whose actions didn’t win them notoriety as distinguished former students. These are not all the IU students listed in that folder, but these are the ones who have truly earned the title of infamous Hoosiers.

The radicals William Harris, Angela (DeAngelis) Atwood, and Emily (Schwartz) Harris were probably seen as typical students when they attended IU in the late 1960s. Just a few years after leaving their Hoosier roots, though, the three became founding members of the 10

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Symbionese Liberation Army, were linked to a number of crimes including murder and were the kidnappers of actress and newspaper heiress Patty Hearst. While on campus, Emily was known as a straight-A student and an active member of her sorority, Chi Omega. It was through the greek system that Emily met her future husband, William, a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Emily was enrolled on the Bloomington campus from 1965 to 1969, graduating with an English degree. After graduating, she briefly taught at Binford Junior High. William attended IU on and off from 1963 to 1970, graduating with a degree in education and speech. He then obtained a master’s degree in education at IU from 1971 to 1973. William attended


All former Hoosiers

IU after a combat-free tour in Vietnam, joining the group Vietnam Veterans Against War once on campus. William was reportedly very involved in the anti-war movement. Angela, who was active in the theater department and played Perdita in “The Winter’s Tale,” also met her husband, Gary Atwood, at IU. The Atwoods were married in Beck Chapel on May 8, 1971, a year after graduating. Angela was enrolled from 1966 to 1970 and graduated with a degree in education. The Atwood’s marriage didn’t last long. In June 1973, Angela divorced Gary, joining Emily and William Harris in Berkeley, Calif. While in California, the three became involved with the Black Cultural Association, a group that educated prisoners at the California Medical Facility at Vacaville, a psychiatric prison. It was through that organization that they met the other founding members of the SLA. The SLA was founded to “unite all oppressed people into a fighting force and to destroy the system of the capitalist state and all its value systems.” The SLA’s acts of domestic terrorism started with the killing of an Oakland, Calif., school official and quickly led to the high-profile kidnapping of Patty Hearst in February 1974. Only two months later, in April, a tape was released by the SLA with Patty saying she had joined the group’s efforts. About 12 days later, Patty was seen on surveillance robbing a bank with the other members of the SLA. On May 17, 1974, Los Angeles police surrounded the SLA safe house, and six members, including Angela, were killed in the shootout that ensued. William and Emily were able to escape and were on

the run with Patty and new SLA members for more than a year. On April 21, 1975, while robbing another California bank, SLA members shot and killed 42-year-old Myrna Opsahl with a shotgun. Myrna was at the bank depositing a church collection. The SLA remained at large for another five months before finally being caught and arrested in September 1975. William and Emily served eight years in prison but just for the kidnapping of Patty. At the time, the SLA could not be linked to the murder of Myrna because they wore masks during the robbery. After being released in 1983, Emily divorced William and reportedly became a computer programmer. After more than 25 years of no one being charged with Myrna’s murder, new forensic technology allowed the FBI to link shotgun shells removed from the body to those found in an SLA hideout. Patty was granted immunity for testifying against her former companions, and in 2002 William and Emily, along with three other SLA members, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder. William received a seven-year sentence and Emily received eight. Patty put the entire blame of the murder on Emily. In her autobiography, “Every Secret Thing,” Patty said after the murder Emily said, “Oh, she’s dead, but it doesn’t really matter. She was a bourgeois pig anyway. Her husband is a doctor.” Emily was released after her supporters collected the $1,000,000 bail. William and now Emily Montague are still alive and no longer serving prison time.

F I L E P H O T O S . P H O T O O F A N G E L A AT WO O D C O U R T E S Y O F I U A R C H I V E S A N D PHOTO OF JIM JONES COURTESY OF THE JONESTOWN INSTITUTE.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

Photos from left: William Harris, Emily (Schwartz) Harris, Angela (DeAngelis) Atwood, James “Jim” Jones, Herbert Baumeister

IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 11


The king has returned.

B Y AV E RY WA LT S P H OTO S B Y S A RA H B OY U M


Joseph Bell, who joined the Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bad lineup in 2007, performs at the Bluebird Nightclub.

Few people throughout history leave a mark on the world that is internationally recognizable. Even fewer gain a legacy of dedicated imitators.

Michael Jackson was one of those people.


A

single silver sequined glove commands the attention of every pair of eyes at the Bluebird Nightclub. Gazes dart left to right, up and down, and every way in between, never breaking connection with the hand. The array of lights attract the reflection of every sequin to create a blinding, almost mesmerizing trance. Who’s Bad, a Michael Jackson tribute band, moonwalked its way to the Bluebird Nightclub this January in front of a packed house of loyal MJ fans. For one night only, the “King of Pop” returned to the stage with a six-piece band and two alternating Jackson performers. Michael Jackson’s musical legacy is nothing short of influential. He rose from his family band, the Jackson 5, in the 1970s to become one of the biggest pop stars in the world in the 1980s and ’90s. With success and power came controversy, and in Jackson’s case, a string of incidents and allegations in his personal life. This collection of events ranges from supposedly sleeping in an oxygen tank to accusations of child molestation and dangling his child over a balcony in Berlin, according to The Guardian. Who’s Bad, the longest-running Michael Jackson tribute band, has chosen to carry on the positive facets of Jackson’s life. Formed in 2003, Who’s Bad is backed by professional musicians and performers whose repertoires include Broadway performances and experience with Jackson’s own choreographers. The band continued to gain momentum through the years, especially after Jackson’s passing in 2009. Taalib York started as the group’s original Jackson performer, and Joseph Bell joined the lineup as the second Jackson performer in 2007. Bloomington has hosted Who’s Bad before and as Joseph describes, boasts an audience of “true Who’s Bad fans.” “It’s always very special for us to come here and perform for this crowd,” Joseph says, in a soft, light-hearted voice much like Jackson’s. “We love Bloomington. We’ve come here for a long time, so this is our crowd.” Who’s Bad’s career began on the college venue circuit, but with success came the expansion of events and crowds. Joseph says the personality of college crowds allots more freedom and energy. “No matter where we play, everyone sort of turns into the same type of audience,” Joseph says. “Everyone loves Michael’s music so much, they just let go.” The crowds at the Bluebird, ranging in all ages and walks of life, line the wooden stage and arched brick walls and become one as they dance together, welcoming Taalib and Joseph. Taalib, who has written for labels such as Motown and Def Jam Records, took the stage first. The two impersonators take turns performing as Jackson, each emulating a different iconic look from his long-spanning career. “When we started working together, he chose his favorite songs, and I chose mine,” Joseph says. “We can both do the majority of all of them, but we have

Taalib York, who started as the original Michael Jackson performer in Who’s Bad, dances at the Bluebird Nightclub.

our specialties. We deliver what the audience loves.” The group as a whole performs on stage like a modern-day Jackson 5, except in a more monochrome black and red look rather than ’70s flashy garb. In unison, they each align themselves in a row, instruments held low, and scoot forward without missing a single note. Their smiles feed off the audience and vice versa. Their energy contradicts their 11:30 p.m. show time. Who’s Bad has performed for audiences around the world, from Romania to China. In 2010, they sold out 50 venues in the United Kingdom, including London’s famed O2 Arena. “That was phenomenal,” Joseph says, clutching his hand to his heart. “That whole year was a very special and responsible time because we felt like the mission increased, and being there was definitely a privilege.” Frank Dileo, Jackson’s friend and manager, attended a Who’s Bad performance at the Cannery Ballroom. After the show, Frank shared words of encouragement and praise with the band. “He told us how much he loved that show and how much he thought Michael would be proud of us,” Joseph says. “How could you get more of a validation than Michael’s manager saying that to you and your tribute to such a great artist?” Who’s Bad celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, and Joseph sees no end in sight. “I believe Michael’s legacy will go on, music will go on,” he says. “It’s international, and it’s around the world. I believe there will be more expansion, more attention, and who knows, maybe it will grow into something more phenomenal.”


Sprayed, scratched, and scribbled P H OTO E S S AY B Y A N N A T E E T E R

In the same way a painter approaches a blank canvas with a dripping paintbrush in hand, junior Jake Huber assesses a drab wall, spray can at the ready. A billboard, a box truck, a wall: Anything big enough to hold his graffiti masterpieces is a canvas. When he's not creating the graffiti art, Jake photographs his friends at work. He's recently received commissioned jobs in fraternity houses, campus buildings, and a box truck for a soap company.

Chat Smits helps paint a box truck for Sabun, a local soap company.

Jake was commissioned to paint a box truck for Sabun, a local soap company.

Jake was commissioned to paint this piece for WIUX.

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COURTESY PHOTO


IDSNEWS.COM/INSIDE • INSIDE MAGAZINE 17


James “Jim” Jones founded the cult People’s Temple Christian Church Full Gospel. In 1978, he led 914 people to commit mass suicide.

NOTORIOUS FROM PAGE 10

The serial killer

There isn’t much known about Herbert Baumeister’s time at IU. He studied anatomy and attended IU on the Blooomington and Indianapolis campuses from 1965-70, but never obtained a degree. Herbert’s life after IU, from the outside, was a model of the American dream. He married in 1971, had three kids, and founded the successful Indianapolis thrift store chain Sav-A-Lot. But under the family man, unknown to even his wife, the notorious Hoosier would soon be revealed. It all started in the early 1990s when investigators from the Marion County Sheriff’s Department and Indianapolis Police Department began looking into the disappearances of gay men in the area. The first big lead came in 1993 when a man contacted investigators saying he met someone named Brian Smart in a gay bar who tried to kill him. The man reported that he followed Brian back to his house where they engaged in autoerotic axphixiation, but Brian started to take things too far. The man said he believed Brian had also killed one of his friends. Two years passed before Brian was seen again. But in November 1995, police were supplied a license plate number by the same man who spotted Brian before. From this it was discovered Brian was actually Herbert. Police informed Herbert he was a suspect in the disappearances, but without enough evidence they were unable to obtain a search warrant. As time passed, Herbert’s wife, Julie, became more and more wary of her husband’s mood swings and erratic behavior. She later told police her son had found a skull and bones on the property, but Herbert told them it was an old skeleton his father had kept. In June 1996, Julie filed for divorce and granted police permission to search the 18-acre property in Westfield, Ind., named Fox Hollow Farm. Investigators waited until Herbert was on vacation, and during their search they discovered the remains of 11 men. Only eight could be identified. Herbert escaped to Ontario, where he committed suicide. He left behind a note that listed his failing marriage and business as his reason for killing himself. He never

18

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confessed to the murders. The bodies of nine more men discovered in rural areas along I-70 between Columbus, Ohio, and Indianapolis were linked to Herbert after Julie informed investigators her husband made almost 100 trips to Ohio for what he said were business trips.

The cult leader For the future leader of a mass cult, James “Jim” Jones’ time at IU was mostly spent alone. He never declared a major while on campus but was registered as a student from 1948 to 1951, 1952 to 1953 and then again in 1959. He never completed an undergraduate degree from IU, but he eventually finished an education degree from Butler University. It was during his hiatus from school that he founded his future radical cult, the People’s Temple Christian Church Full Gospel. Eventually, Jim felt there were anti-minority feelings in Indianapolis, which was against the loving values he preached. So in 1965 he moved the church to Ukiah, Calif. In 1973, the church once again moved to Jonestown, Guyana, in hopes of making a utopian settlement. The “utopia” only lasted until 1978 when Jim led 914 people to commit mass suicide by a cyanidelaced fruit drink. The bodies of 638 adults and 267 children were found at the compound. Jim also ordered U.S. Rep. Leo J. Ryan and four others investigating the church to be gunned down in Guyana while trying to escape. Anyone who resisted suicide was shot or injected with the poison. Jim’s freshman year roommate from IU, Kenneth Lemons, said in an Indiana Daily Student article published days after the mass suicide that Jim had no friends in the dormitory, and he wanted it that way. In a Herald-Times article, Kenneth said he remembered Jim showing radical religious and political views while at IU. He also told of an instance where Jim repeatedly stabbed him with a hatpin through the mattress while Kenneth was on the top bunk in their room. “He considered himself above everyone else and pored over the Bible, often rambling about his religious philosophies,” Kenneth said in the HeraldTimes article.

Sources: “Patty’s Got a Gun: Patricia Hearst in 1970s America,” IU Office of the Registrar, IU Archives, FBI Records, Los Angeles Times, “Salvation and Suicide: Jim Jones, The Peoples Temple, and Jonestown,” truTV’s crime library

LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHAN JONES, RIGHT COURTESY PHOTO


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DIRT Y JOBS

B Y M AT T B L O O M P H OTO S B Y S A RA H B OY U M P H OTO I L L U S T RAT I O N B Y A N N A T E E T E R


Sylvia Garrison : HEALTH INSPECTOR

THE PHONE ON SYLVIA GARRISON’S DESK RINGS JUST AS SHE IS LEAVING FOR LUNCH. “Sorry, I have to take this,” she says. She turns around in her swivel chair, picks up the receiver, and tucks the phone between her cheek and right shoulder. “Sylvia Garrison, Monroe Country Health Department.” A manager of Baked! of Bloomington was on the other line. Sylvia nods and twirls a pen through her fingers as she listened to the receiver. “Right, handicap bathrooms,” she says.

A pause. “Floors, walls, ceilings — they’re easily cleanable. The issue for you guys is the city of Bloomington’s new grease trap requirement,” she says. “It gets really expensive, I’m going to tell you right now.” Sylvia is the head supervisor of the Monroe County Health Department’s food safety division. For nearly four decades she has devoted her life to evaluating and educating communities on food safety across the country.


Her team protects, promotes, and improves the health of all people in Monroe County by enforcing sanitation laws regarding food. Through unannounced inspections, the health department maintains strict standards for local restaurants and their cleanliness. At any time, inspectors from her office can show up and evaluate businesses for violations. Sewage backup, infestation of rodents or insects, and gross uncleanliness warrant an immediate closure. If minor violations are present, the office has the ability to ticket establishments and even take them to court. Although no longer a health inspector, Sylvia has worked in all caveats of public health — witnessing firsthand the good, the bad, and the ugly of the food service industry. During an unannounced inspection several years ago while working in Washington, D.C., she says she uncovered a “severe rat infestation.” Sylvia’s eyes widen as she squirms in her chair a little bit. “They were nesting below the booths customers sat and ate at,” she says. “They were large — definitely city rats.” Customers called her the previous day to complain about rats running around the restaurant floor during lunch hours, leaving droppings and gnawed food. She says the restaurant was shut down immediately following the inspection. Winter is always a hectic time in her Bloomington office. Hundreds of annual renewal papers of local restaurants and renewal contracts filter are in a stack on a table next to the door — which has a small plastic basketball net fixed to its top. The phone rings at least three times every hour. A water pipe in the Health Department burst the night before, relocating a dozen employees until repairs are made. Sylvia says it’s what keeps her young. Sylvia’s mother was a dietitian who taught her the importance of food safety. After receiving a bachelor of science in environmental safety from IU, Sylvia embarked on a career that would bring her to corporations, local governments, and schools

Health inspector Sylvia Garrison checks temperatures in the freezer at Bub’s Burgers & Ice Cream.

Sewage backup, infestation of rodents or insects, and gross uncleanliness warrant an immediate closure.

— ultimately landing her back in Bloomington. Monroe County has about 600 licensed food establishments — a general term that includes restaurants, bars, taverns, grocery stores, school cafeterias, and food trucks. She says the Health Department and the Bloomington area restaurants work together to form mutually beneficial relationships. “We look at ourselves as educators,” Sylvia says. “Restaurants will call us personally, and they want us to know about their violations. They actually tell us the problem and what steps they have taken to mediate the issue. We have a great relationship with each other.” By teaching employees and managers basic hygiene, Sylvia and her team prevent the spread of illness. She says her main concern is protecting the health of those at a higher risk — the elderly and children. The picture frames around her office symbolize Sylvia’s values of community and relationships. “We do an incredible job for the amount of staff we have,” Sylvia says. “I just realize how frustrating it is for the public when problems threatening their health appear. That’s what


Bob Barnes : DISTRIBUTION MECHANIC BY RACHEL WISINSKI

keeps me young and loving my job. The community and diversity, the youngness — it never gets boring in Bloomington.” Sylvia takes a long tube of paper from a pile in the corner of her office. She opens it and reveals the plans for a new restaurant in Bloomington. She says some people underestimate the responsibilities involved with opening and operating a restaurant. She has to review plans to make sure the building will allow for proper food storage and ventilation. Health inspections used to be about floors, walls, and ceilings, but the focus has turned to critical violations such as time and temperature control, potential for cross contamination, and personal hygiene. “Dirty floors are gross, but they don’t make people sick,” Sylvia says. She starts to gather her things before the phone on her desk rings again. Stopping for a second to read the caller I.D., she weighs whether to answer or sneak out quickly. “I think I’m going to have to take this, give me a minute,” she says.

Bob Barnes was bundled head to toe. Two or three sweatshirts, a coat with insulation, a hood to keep his face warm, and thick, warm snow boots. The distribution mechanic for the IU Physical Plant was called Jan. 7 with a new task. An 8-inch thick water line had snapped in half. The line supplied the Herman B Wells Library and surrounding buildings with water. In below freezing temperatures, Bob and other plant workers spent close to 30 straight hours in a ditch fixing the line. Temperatures ranged from a maximum 12 degrees to a new minimum for Jan. 7 in Bloomington, minus 9 degrees. “It’s nothing uncommon to work out in the cold like that,” Bob says. “It was quite chilly, but I’m not really bothered by it.” Bob’s crew had to cap the line, shutting off the water for eight miles. It was less of a problem because most students were still at home for winter break at the time. The job required they take the water line completely out and replace the broken section. Though there weren’t any setbacks, it wasn’t always pleasant. The temperature made everything more difficult. “The worst thing was that the water was spraying up in the air on us, and it was freezing on our clothes,” Bob says. His hands and toes got cold. He’d even used a rain suit to keep the water off. Affected buildings went without water for the entire day. The task took from about 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. the following day. Bob and the crew took breaks to warm up. The 55-year-old said one thing makes the job different from when he started in 1979. “I’m getting older, so it’s rougher on me,” Bob says. “But it hasn’t changed much in the way we fix things.” Safety isn’t an issue because Bob is always on his toes and watches what he is doing. He has a wife at home to think about. Bob’s primary responsibility is fixing problems with campus water and steam lines. The campus can’t operate without them, so it’s an important job, Bob says. Bob and his crew usually spend their time underground anyway. They fix the problem, and nobody ever notices it was one. There is always something to do — mainly something with emergencies outside campus buildings. Kevin Bucy, manager of utility distribution for the IU Physical Plant, says Bob responds to emergencies well. “He always seems to get the nasty jobs,” Kevin says. But Bob doesn’t mind it. “It’s a good job,” Bob says. “I couldn’t ask for a better job, and that’s why I’ve been here almost 35 years.”


E S S AY

It starts with a bad word L E A H J O H N S O N talks about what it means to be black in Americaa

I was 17 years old when I realized not everyone views blackness the same way I do. Six of my closest friends — he we referred to ourselves as “The Krew” — had just had one of our infamous sleepovers. It wass high school in the purest sensee of ly the word. The one with the holy ense combination of a car and a license drove us around the small suburb that night. We watched some romantic comedy. We gossiped about classmates. It was just another one of those nights that pepper your adolescence, painting your senior book with something to reminisce about. And though I didn’t find the beauty in its simplicity, not once did the six of us acknowledge the fact that we hailed from different ethnic and racial backgrounds. Not because we didn’t see them, but because they didn’t matter. The next morning, we decided to go for one last hurrah. We were

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y W I L L R OYA L

going to make a stop to find find our prom dresses. Inside the shop, the walls were lined with gowns that had obviously seen better days, and behind the register sat an older woman. My friends and I dispersed throughout the store, grabbing dresses from hangers, occupying changing rooms. It wasn’t until I picked up a white gown with a four-digit price tag that the attendant had an issue with us. “Don’t you want to try on something else — something less

expensive, maybe?You maybe? You wouldn’t want to get it dirty, after all,” she said, casually removing the garment from my hands. I left the store that day and never spoke of it again. The experience, though — the image of the look she gave me as I picked up the gown, the way I was dismissed — rattled around the inside of my brain for the extent of my adult life. I came to college a year later, once again conscious of the fact that for the second time in my life

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I was going to be the minority. P People, whether consciously or u unconsciously, were going to lo at me incredulously when I look a answered questions correctly in a le lecture. I was going to become the d de-facto voice for my entire race in d discussions about socioeconomic d disenfranchisement. I was going to b become the villain for encouraging o open conversations about what it m means to be black in America. What makes this pill even h harder to swallow is constantly fa facing folks who don’t want to talk a about race. Perhaps the idea of not ta talking about it makes it easier to d with, or maybe we just don’t deal th think it needs to be discussed. I c can’t say that I have an answer. All I know is race gets treated like a “ “bad” word way more often than it should. Here’s the thing. There’s a s soapbox component to being a minority enrolled in a posts secondary institution. For me, at l least (see how naturally it comes t be an advocate for an entire to demographic?). The lack of faces that look like mine necessitates the asking of “tough” questions. Whether it’s getting kicked out of the store that day or getting strange looks for being black and upstanding in a country that demonizes both my color and my socioeconomic status, it is clear to me that we have a long way to go before we can call ourselves a post-racial America. Are things as regressive as they have been? No, definitely not. Are they as good as they could be? No, obviously not. All it takes is a conversation to begin to change things. It starts by saying a bad word.


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Feb. 18, 2014  

The Bad Issue. Inside Magazine, published twice a semester, is a product of the Indiana Daily Student at Indiana University.

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