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Energy Efficient Hydraulics and Pneumatics Conference November 15-17, 2011 Sheraton Chicago O’Hare Airport Hotel, Rosemont, Illinois

Hosted by the International Fluid Power Society (IFPS), the FPDA Motion and Control Network (FPDA), and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA)

Saving energy and money with fluid power This first-of-its-kind event is designed for engineers and technicians who seek information on how to design and maintain energy efficient hydraulic and pneumatic systems, within these fluid power end-use markets: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Agricultural Machinery Automotive Chemical Processing Class 4-8 Trucks Construction Machinery Food Processing Lawn & Garden Material Handling Medical Equipment Metalworking and Machine Tools

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Mining Machinery Off-Shore Drilling Oil & Gas Machinery Packaging Machinery Plastics Machinery Paper Machinery Power Generation Printing Machinery Semiconductor Wind Power and many more

Fluid power (hydraulics and pneumatics) is used in dozens of industries and hundreds of applications to precisely control the movement of machinery and material. Yet many engineers and technicians working in those industries do not fully understand the design concepts critical to developing efficient fluid power systems and the diagnostic and maintenance techniques essential to keep those systems operating at peak efficiency. These concepts and techniques can result in significant energy and cost savings for companies that use hydraulics or pneumatics, as well as for the customers they serve, making fluid power a more competitive technology choice.

The conference schedule will include breakthrough presentations from fluid power component manufacturers, distributors, and system integrators, showcasing innovative approaches and emerging technologies in energy efficient fluid power design and maintenance. Networking events are being organized to help participating engineers and technicians engage with technology providers from fluid power manufacturing and distribution companies. Sponsorship opportunities will be available for fluid power manufacturers and distributors, and other companies interested in supporting this event and connecting with engineers and technicians from a wide array of fluid power’s end-use market industries.

For all the details and how to register, go to www.nfpa.com/Events/EEHPC.htm.


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contents Tech Direc tory 2 0 1 1 | Vo lu m e 1 8 | Is s u e 9

Features

8 10 14 18 26 The Little Leaks That Keep Men Poor By Brendan Casey

A Brief Overview Of CorrosionResistant Piston Rod Coating Technology

Departments 04 Notable Words 06 Air Teaser 07 All About Air 12 Web Marketplace 13 Product Review

How much coal does that valve burn?

tech directory listing

tech directory matrix

Richard F. Bullers, CFPPS Senior Applications Engineer SMC Corporation of America

37 High-Speed Linear Servo Valve

C lo s e -u p

v ie w o f la s e r c o a ti n g o f a c y li n d e r ro d

17 IFPS Certification Spotlight 32 Association News 38 Classifieds

An overview of its structure, specifications, and applications

Publisher’s Note: The information provided in this publication is for informational purposes only. While all efforts have been taken to ensure the technical accuracy of the material enclosed, Fluid Power Journal is not responsible for the availability, accuracy, currency, or reliability of any information, statement, opinion, or advice contained in a third party’s material. Fluid Power Journal will not be liable for any loss or damage caused by reliance on information obtained in this publication.

Official Publication of The International Fluid Power Society


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NotableWords Publisher Innovative Designs & Publishing, Inc. 3245 Freemansburg Avenue, Palmer, PA 18045-7118 Tel: 800-730-5904 or 610-923-0380 Fax: 610-923-0390 | Email: AskUs@ifps.org www.FluidPowerJournal.com

The Path of Least Resistance I’ll bet most of us who have succeeded as engineers, technicians, or mechanics in fluid power can relate to spending the summers of our youth tearing apart bicycles and old strollers with the intent to build our next sweet ride. Possibly our dad or a retired neighbor showed us a few basics of mechanics and let us use their old tools. Or maybe a science or technology teacher, who let us get our hands dirty and build robots or tear apart small engines and refurbish them, inspired us. Encouraging young people to continue wrenching on things, to take science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes in high school and beyond, and eventually pursue a career in fluid power is a challenge. Your average teenager will take the path of least resistance, doing the absolute minimum to meet the requirements to get by. But instead of asking “How do we keep them from following this path?” maybe we By Marti Wendel, CFPS, CFPE, should ask “How can we make a career path in Territory Manager, The Paquin fluid power the path with the least resistance?” Company; Chair, Fluid Power Inspiring and mentoring are just parts of Educational Foundation (FPEF); the puzzle that prompts students to stay in the and VP of FPEF for the International STEM fields and possibly choose fluid power as Fluid Power Society (IFPS) their final careers. The Fluid Power Educational mwendel@paquin.com Foundation (FPEF) strives to encourage students to pursue a career in fluid power at all levels of development. Through the FPEF, scholarships are provided to high school students who have participated in FIRST, a robotics competition for grades 9-12 (www.usfirst.org). Persuading colleges and technical schools to offer classes in hydraulics and pneumatics with electrical integration in a hands-on learning atmosphere is also imperative. Through the Key School program, the FPEF has certified 18 colleges or tech schools and two high schools that meet these stringent criteria of hands-on classes within their fluid power curriculums. The FPEF also provides scholarships to Key School students who have demonstrated their dedication to fluid power and maintain the necessary GPA. In the past, grants for equipment have also been given to Key Schools. I am proud to be involved with the Fluid Power Educational Foundation as a board member for the past four years, donor, and currently as Foundation chair. The FPEF has been supporting students who are studying hydraulics and pneumatics for almost three decades. We currently have a nine-trustee board and are a standing committee of the International Fluid Power Society. The newly formed “strategic alliance” between the two organizations has already shown great promise. The FPEF is financially assisting individual students, which directly affects their potentials for success in fluid power, and we continue to look for ways to promote fluid power education to all ages, securing the future of fluid power innovation. Please join me in promoting careers in fluid power to today’s students. To learn more about FPEF or if you have interest in providing financial assistance, please visit the FPEF Web site at www.FPEF.org. We can also mentor a FIRST team, volunteer for an IFPS committee, educate people about the amazing careers where energy-efficient fluid power is used, or be the dad or neighbor who encourages the gang to include brakes on their freshly manufactured go-cart. If we hope to eventually bring well-trained employees to our personnel departments and exceptional resumes to our inboxes, those of us who have chosen this field need be advocates of our profession. We need to make sure young people of today are familiar or possibly even proficient with fluid power components and principles prior to choosing their career in fluid power, the path of least resistance. 4

Tech Directory 2011

Associate Publisher: Marc Mitchell Art Director: Quynh Vo Editor: Kristine Coblitz Account Executive: Bob McKinney VP Operations: Lisa Prass Accounting: Donna Bachman, Debbie Clune Publishing Assistant: Sharron Sandmaier Operations Assistant: Tammy DeLong Circulation Manager: Andrea Karges International Fluid Power Society 1930 East Marlton Pike, Suite A-2, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003-2141 Tel: 856-489-8983 | Fax: 856-424-9248 Email: AskUs@ifps.org www.ifps.org 2011 Board of Directors President & Chairperson Jon Jensen, CFPPS, CFPECS, CFPAI SMC Corporation of America Immediate Past President Rickey L. Rodeffer, CFPMT, CFPS, CFPMIH, CFPAI The Boeing Company First Vice President Patrick J. Maluso, CFPMHM, CFPS, CFPAI Western Hydrostatics, Inc. Vice President Education James F. Simpson, CFPS, CFPMM, CFPAI Nusim Assoc. Fluid Power Consultant Treasurer Tom Blansett, CFPS, CFPAI Eaton Corporation Vice President Membership & Chapter Support George Bufink, CFPMMH, CFPAI American Electric Power - retired Vice President Certification Wayne C. Farley, CFPMMH, CFPAI American Electric Power Vice President Marketing & Public Relations Mark Perry, CFPHS - Fitzsimmons Hydraulics Directors-at-Large Justin Sergeant, CFPS - Open Loop Energy, Inc. Bismarck (Bill) Castaneda, CFPHS - Automation Tech, Inc. Jeremiah Johnson, CFPHS - Caterpillar, Inc. Samuel Skelton, CFPPS, CFPAI - SMC Corporation of America Jean Knowles, CFPS, CFPE - Spencer Fluid Power, Inc. A subsidiary of Applied Industrial Technologies Marti Wendel, CFPS, CFPE - The Paquin Company, Inc. L. David Ruffus, CFPAI, CFPMHM, CFPMHT Georgia Power Company Richard Bullers, CFPPS - SMC Corporation of America Michael Anderson, CFPS - Motion Industries Bill Jordan, CFPMHM, CFPAI - Altec Industries Dan Helgerson, CFPS, CFPPMT, CFPAI Cascade Steel Rolling Mills, Inc. Rance Herren, CFPS, CFPCC - National Oilwell Varco Honorary Directors Robert Firth John Groot, CFPPS Raymond Hanley, CFPE/AI-Emeritus Robert Sheaf, CFPAI, CFPE, CFPMM, CFPMT, CFPMIT, CFPMMH, CFPMIH, CFPECS IFPS Staff Executive Director: Donna Pollander Certification Manager: Sue Tesauro Communications Manager: Adele Kayser Membership Coordinator: Sue Dyson Certification Coordinator: Connie Graham Certification Coordinator: Diane McMahon Administrative Assistant: Beth Borodziuk Bookkeeper: Diane McMahon Fluid Power Journal (ISSN# 1073-7898) is the official publication of the International Fluid Power Society published bi-monthly with four supplemental issues, including a Systems Integrator Directory, Off Highway Suppliers Directory, Tech Directory, and Manufacturers Directory, by Innovative Designs & Publishing, Inc., 3245 Freemansburg Avenue, Palmer, PA 18045-7118. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part of any material in this publication is acceptable with credit. Publishers assume no liability for any information published. We reserve the right to accept or reject all advertising material and will not guarantee the return or safety of unsolicited art, photographs or manuscripts.


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New Problem:

AirTeaser

By Ernie Parker, AI, AJPP, AJPPCC, S, MT, MM, MIH, MIP, MMH, Fluid Power Instructor, Hennepin Technical College, EParker@Hennepintech.edu

The teaser is posted on the IFPS Web site (www.ifps.org) and also printed in the Fluid Power Journal. Submit your information via the Web site, or fax it to 856-424-9248 attn: Donna Pollander. Anyone who submits the correct answer before the deadline date will have his/her name printed in the Society Page newsletter and in Fluid Power Journal. The winner will also be entered into a drawing for a special gift.

ESA 2011 Fall Technical Conference November 6-8, 2011

Embassy Suites Pittsburgh International Airport Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania www.2esa.org

For the last Air Teaser problem (Manufacturers Directory issue), you were to calculate the instantaneous SCFM needed for the valves and plumbing to handle. The answers were 14.78 SCFM for the extension and 6.42 SCFM for the retraction. This time, calculate the SCFM for the same following problem solving for what the air compressor needs to deliver: • • • • • • •

Cylinder is a 4" x 10" x 2" rod 2 second extension time 1 second retraction time 1 second dwell time Extension force is 800 lbs. Retraction force is 100 lbs. Dual regulators are used and the required pressure is 75% of regulator setting to cover inefficiency of the circuit. • The valve is mounted directly on the cylinder. The 75% regulator setting will cover for the lost of air in the air lines between the valve and cylinder.

Previous Problem:

Winner:

Harold Lawson, CFPPS Air, Inc., Franklin, MA

(From Manufacturers Directory issue)

When working with pneumatic systems, it is important to know both the SCFM requirements when a cylinder is extending as well as retracting. However, the instantaneous SCFM can be much higher than the SCFM that a compressor needs to supply. Calculate the instantaneous SCFM the valve and plumbing need to handle for the following problem: • • • • • • •

Cylinder is a 4" x 10" x 2" rod 2 second extension time 1 second retraction time 1 second dwell time Extension force is 800 lbs. Retraction force is 100 lbs. Dual regulators are used and the required pressure is 75% of regulator setting to cover inefficiency of the circuit. • The valve is mounted directly on the cylinder. The 75% regulator setting will cover for the lost of air between the valve and cylinder.

Solution Extension F = PA: 800# / 12.566 in² = 63.66 PSI Calculate for inefficiency: 63.66 / .75 = 84.88 PSI Find Compression Ratio (CR): (84.88 + 14.7) / 14.7 = 6.77 CR Find volume of cylinder: V=AxL 12.566 in² x 10” stoke = 125.66 in³ / cycle X 30 cycles / min. = 3769.92 CIM / 1728 = 2.18 CFM X 6.77 (CR) = 14.78 SCFM to extend Retraction F = PA: 100# / 9.42 in² (EREA) = 10.6 PSI Calculate for inefficiency: 10.6 / .75 = 14.15 PSI Find CR: (14.18 + 14.7) / 14.7 = 1.96 CR Find volume of cylinder: V=AxL 9.42 in² x 10” stroke = 94.2 in³ / cycle X 60 cycles / min. = 5652 CIM / 1728 = 3.27 CFM X 1.96 (CR) = 6.42 SCFM to retract

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ALL aboutair

ANATOMY OF A CYLINDER CUSHION

F

or the sake of this review, we are neither critics nor advocates but observers. A pneumatic cylinder propelled with gusto must soon stop or be stopped. The dart from a blowgun will exit the barrel and continue on a one-way flight. The piston and rod assembly in the cylinder must stop and be retracted to prepare for the next cycle. The common cylinder cushion traps compressed air and provides reduced end-ofstroke impact similar to automobile air bags. The economics of producing more with the same resources, people, equipment, floor space, etc., encourage faster cycle rates for automation and production equipment. This may require machinery and pneumatic cylinders to complete each stroke or cycle faster. Conventional flow (speed) controls for pneumatic cylinders limit the speed of travel. This also reduces the end-of-stroke impact but slows total average velocity. To cause the cylinder to go faster, simply remove the flow control or increase the flow rate through it. With “the need for speed,” any manner of decelerating or reduction of velocity adds time to the cycle. The cushion option that is available with many cylinders allows high speed for most of the stroke. The end-ofstroke impact is cushioned with trapped air. In Fig. 1 the piston and rod assembly of an air cylinder is propelled forward. The cylinder depicted has a rod end cushion. At this point, the exhausting air is unobstructed allowing high speed forward. In Fig. 2 the cushion spud [1] has entered the cushion seal [2] and blocked the main outlet flow. Exhaust flow will

divert to the small passage that may be controlled with a needle valve [3] or fixed orifice. In Fig. 3 the piston has made full travel and bottomed against the head of the cylinder. Cushioned impact deceleration avoids violent crash stops. In Fig. 4 the pressure is reversed to retract the cylinder piston and rod. Another function is the reverse flow check valve. This allows free flow to put pressure on the face of the piston quickly. Without it the cylinder may be slow getting started until the cushion spud clears. One cushion design employs a seal [2] that acts as a check valve for reverse flow as well. Cushions are available for either end or both ends of most cylinders. If you have cushions and don’t like them, take out the cushion seal. You will see the difference. Electronics can control the exhaust flow from a cylinder with greater sophistication, but the ubiquitous, venerable, mechanical cushion abides.

by Thomas W. Kreher, CFPPT, Applied Pneumatic Controls, Inc., OIL SMOKE® www.applied-pneumatic.com

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The Little

Leaks That Keep Men Poor By Brendan Casey, HydraulicSupermarket.com

With more storm clouds appearing on the economic horizon, it’s now more important than ever that every dollar spent on operating and maintaining fluid power equipment is a dollar well spent. Furthermore, it’s imperative that the fluid power equipment you design, repair, or maintain doesn’t leak money. Hydraulic systems are often considered perennial consumers of oil and in turn, make-up fluid is an inherent cost of operating hydraulic equipment. But to calculate the real cost of one or more “minor” leaks on a hydraulic machine, the expense associated with all of the following need to be considered: • Make-up oil • Clean-up • Disposal • Contaminant ingress • Safety

Make-Up Oil

The cost of make-up oil should be the most obvious cost of hydraulic system leaks. I say “should be” because many hydraulic equipment users fail to consider the accumulative effect on the cost of one or more slow leaks over time. Consider a piece of hydraulic equipment losing 0.5 cc of oil per minute. That’s 30cc per hour, and 720 cc over 24 hours – perhaps not a significant loss. But over a month this equates to 22 liters (263 liters over the course of a year). Assuming an oil cost of $3 per liter, the annual cost is around $800.

Clean-Up

Where there are oil leaks, there is almost always a clean-up cost to consider. Clean-up costs include • labor; • equipment required to empty sumps and drip trays, and degrease machine surfaces; and • consumables such as detergents and absorbent material. Assuming it costs $20 per week in labor, equipment, and consumables to clean up the piece of equipment discussed above, the annual clean-up bill totals more than $1,000.

Disposal

I can remember a time, not so long ago, when waste oil companies used to pay for the privilege of emptying waste oil tanks. These days they bill you to take it away. Environmentally acceptable disposal of waste oil and absorbent material containing waste oil costs money. Assuming transport and disposal cost of $1 per liter, the annual disposal costs attributable to the leakage rate discussed above amounts to $263.

Contaminant Ingress

Where oil leaks out, contaminants such as air, particles, and water can get in. Costs to consider here include:

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Fax. 219-477-4194 Web. www.yuken.org Circle 237

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• component damage and fluid degradation as a result of contaminant ingress, • downtime caused by equipment reliability problems, and • removal of ingested contaminants.

Safety

In many situations, oil leaks can pose a safety hazard. Like the costs associated with contaminant ingress, the costs associated with the hazards posed by oil leaks are difficult to quantify—short of a lost time accident actually occurring. However, active management of the safety risk posed, through for example, more frequent clean-up than may otherwise be necessary, skews this cost to a quantifiable area.

Adding It Up

The annual cost of oil leaks on the hypothetical piece of hydraulic equipment considered above amounts to over $2,000 per year in make-up fluid, clean-up, and disposal costs alone. As you can see, if multiple pieces of hydraulic equipment are involved, the accumulative cost over an extended period of time can be significant. But what about hydraulics’ fluid power cousin, pneumatics? One of the advantages that pneumatics has over hydraulics is its clean-ness. Trouble is, air leaks are much easier to ignore than oil leaks because they don’t draw attention to themselves in the same way. You don’t need to worry yourself with clean-up and disposal costs. Contaminant ingression is possible, but is generally not a major concern. And unless the leak is significant, safety is not usually a big issue either. So that leaves make-up fluid (air).

Make-Up Air

While air is free, clean and dry compressed air is not. In considering the cost of make-up air for a pneumatics system, the following need to be considered: • Depreciation (wear and tear) of the compressor • Conditioning costs: filtration, drying and lubrication • Energy cost of compression The ideal leakage rate is of course zero, but when calculating the free air delivery (FAD) required by a pneumatic system, a rule of thumb is to allow for leakage of 10% of total flow rate. Consider a 10 cubic meter/minute system leaking one cubic meter/minute. The power required to compress one cubic meter (35.3 cubic feet) of air per minute to a pressure of 6 bar (90 psi) is approximately 5.2 kW. At an electricity cost of $0.10/kWh, this leakage is costing over 50 cents per hour in energy costs alone. In a 24/7/365 operation, that amounts to $4500 per year!

Quantifying Losses

While a leakage rate of 10% of flow rate may sound high and would be unsustainable in a hydraulic system, air leakage rates as high as 25% are not unheard of, even in apparently well-maintained pneumatic systems. The actual leakage rate of a system can be calculated using the following formula:

QL = QC x t/(T + t) Where: QL = System leakage rate (cubic meters/minute) QC = Compressor FAD (cubic meters/minute) T = Time between compressor cut-out and cut-in (minutes) t = Time between compressor cut-in and cut-out (minutes) In a case study I read about recently, the pneumatic systems of two plants were surveyed for leaks using ultrasonic leak-detection equipment. In the first, a small plant, which took two hours to survey, 27 leaks were discovered. The calculated energy cost of these leaks was $9,000 per year. In the second, a much larger plant, which took two days to survey, 260 leaks where discovered. The calculated energy cost of these leaks was over $90,000 per year! This amount of waste should never be allowed to occur, especially not in the current economic climate. Don’t let it happen on your watch.

About the Author

Brendan Casey is the founder of HydraulicSupermarket.com and the author of Insider Secrets to Hydraulics, Preventing Hydraulic Failures, Hydraulics Made Easy and Advanced Hydraulic Control. A fluid power specialist with an MBA, he has more than 20 years experience in the design, maintenance, and repair of mobile and industrial hydraulic equipment. Visit his Web site: www.HydraulicSupermarket.com

Circle 238

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Tech Directory 2011

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FIG. 1: Very long cylinder rod undergoing coating process

A Brief Overview Of Corrosion-Resistant Piston Rod Coating Technology

T

he large hydraulic cylinders used for dam gate and other valve opening and closing applications typically are expected to last from 30 to 50 years. In recent years, however, an increasing number of hydraulic cylinders are failing in the field due to piston rod corrosion. A fairly common example is the failure of plasma spray coated piston rods cited by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineering Construction bulletin on Jan 15, 2009. Unfortunately, laboratory tests do not predict the complete failure modes for these brittle mechanically bonded coatings. When rod coatings are compromised, they expose the rod substrate to corrosion attack. Corrosion can occur in a number of forms such as uniform, pitting, crevice, galvanic, stress, or other types. Piston rod coatings are difficult to repair and replace when they fail. It usually can be done, but in most cases it is an unplanned expense that requires special approval and can take months of coordination and execution. Once approved, typical times for the actual repair can be anywhere from three weeks to several months.

Piston Rod Coatings

Electroplated hard chrome coatings can be applied to the surface of piston rods in various thicknesses. Chrome acts as a wear-resistant coating with good lubricity partly because numerous micro-cracks in this coating help capture hydraulic oil, which improves rod seal lubrication. Those micro-cracks, however, also are passageways for the atmosphere to gain access to the base material. Plasma spray piston rod coatings are applied with a spray gun that impinges the powder on to the sub10

Tech Directory 2011

the substrate, and cause piston rod distortion. Fusion clad coatings generally are not as hard as plasma and thermal coatings, but when applied properly with the correct choice of coating material, they provide excellent corrosion resistance.

Other Factors

Coated piston rods need to be finished to produce a surface roughness profile that will optimize rod and seal life without compromising the coating’s anti-corrosion properties. Surface finish parameters including average maximum profile height, bearing ratio, skewness, and some others need to be carefully specified and controlled to assure optimum performance in the field. Application-specific structural integrity considerations, including the diameter of the rod and the material from which it is fabricated, also influence the selection of coating technologies and materials. For example, a long-stroke piston rod can bend with its own weight due to piston rod sag creating microcracks in brittle coatings. The duty cycle also must be considered. Some applications require constant motion while others need only a few cycles a day or even less. In hydropower applications, seasonal variations typically play a role on the extent and frequency of stroke. Every application has its own set of challenges including static and fatigue generated by shock, vibration, side load, eccentric loading, torsion, and buckling. In addition, factors like rod orientation, length and diameter, temperature, geographic seismic requirements, as well as the rules of governing bodies such as the Det Norske Veritas (DNV), ABS, DV, Lloyds, and others, all have a influence on the coating choice and performance.

strate. The speed of the deposition process results in a porous, lamellar grain structure with particles being flattened at the site of impact on the piston rod surface. In most cases sealants are used to close the porosity. Plasma spray coatings are generally brittle. Since they are mechanically bonded, factors such as substrate cleanliness, kinetic energy, temperature, powder properties, cooling rates, and others all influence bond strength. Thermal spray piston rod coatings such as HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) use an oxygen fuel mixture that is ignited in a combustion chamber and propelled with the powder on to the piston rod surface at high kinetic and thermal energy. The coatings generated are usually denser and less porous and brittle than plasma spray coatings. Although adhesion is better than plasma spray, these coatings are still mechanically bonded and typically exhibit a lamellar grain structure. Plasma transfer arc (PTA) welding and laser cladding both create a fusion weld attachment with the piston rod surface that has excellent adhesion. The deposited metallic coating is far more ductile than plasma or thermal spray coatings. This gives it an ability FIG. 2: Laser coating of a cylinder rod to absorb impact and handle abrasive scratches without adjacent cracking and bending from long piston rods. The PTA process imparts more heat to the surface than laser cladding, which can affect coating hardness, increase iron pickup from

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By: Bilal Said, Chief Engineer , Eaton Corporation

The Coating Certification Process

Meeting the Joint Industry Project’s (JIP) “Guideline For Qualification Of Wear And Corrosion Protection Surface Materials For Piston Rods” through the joint industry standards 3247 and 3295 is the “gold standard” for Highly Corrosion-Resistant Alloys (HCRA). Eaton’s recently completed DNV certification of its Eatonite™ laser cladding as an HCRA provides an example of how the process works. Eaton started by performing extensive powder coating and application technology testing and analysis to identify the combination that optimally addressed customer requirements. Results were evaluated for robustness of cladding processes, corrosion resistance, coating hardness, ductility, process control, and metallurgical evaluation. Most of the pre-evaluation work was done in conjunction with the DNV laboratories in Høvik, Norway, and Columbus, Ohio. Through this process, Eaton developed its own exclusive powder and proprietary laser application processes to optimize cladding performance. The DNV certification was divided into three key phases. In the first phase, DNV reviewed the background documentation related to the technology and the manufacturing procedure specifications. As a part of the certification basis, a critical parameter list was developed. Typical documentation included • design basis including description of the technology, functional limitations, and main data,

• • • • • • •

reliability targets and acceptance criteria, reference of applicable codes and authority requirements; principles of storage, transportation, installation, commissioning, operation, maintenance, and abandonment; interface requirements; environment; functional loads; principles of manufacturing and quality assurance; data sheets for chemical pre-treatment products and masking material where applicable; and coating applications (including control of essential process parameters and instrument settings).

The purpose for this phase was to understand and review the documentation of the critical parameters and overall certification plan, and identify key challenges and uncertainties. The second phase of the certification process consisted of on-site audits of the coating procedure during the manufacturing and finishing process. During the onsite audits, a review of the quality control measures and acceptance criteria for the finished Eatonite clad coating was conducted. The purpose of this phase was to ensure that the coating tested during the certification was representative of the metallic cladding. The final phase confirmed that the functional requirements and target reliability/functionality as stated in the guideline can be met through the battery of prescribed tests per JIP 3247. Eatonite successfully completed all three phases and was certified as the

first, and to date the only, cylinder coating to fulfill the “Guideline For Qualification Of Wear And Corrosion Protection Surface Materials For Piston Rods.” In practical terms, that means the coated cylinder rods deliver the mechanical performance of traditional SAE 4130 steel piston rods, combined with the corrosion resistance expected for materials like Inconel 625, giving customers the best attributes of both materials. The involvement of international organizations like DNV working cooperatively with industry leaders promises a new generation of HCRA coatings. Corrosion may be an inevitable natural process, but new materials and technologies like Eatonite are giving engineers and end users improved tools for the fight to control it. For more information, visit www.eaton.com

FIG. 3: Close-up view of laser coating of a cylinder rod

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web

www.alfalaval.us/fluidpower

www.alloysandcomponents.com

Alfa Laval

Alloys & Components, Southwest

Keeping fluid cool and clean are key to prolonging the life of any hydraulic system. Alfa Laval offers a wide range of cooling and cleaning solutions that increase the performance of your hydraulic system. Visit www.alfalaval.us/fluidpower to download our hydraulic oil cooling reference charts to quickly size an oil cooler for your needs.

Browse our Web site for information on the products we offer! • Hard Chrome Plated Rod • Honed ID Cylinder Tubes • Continuous Cast Bronze Bars • Continuous Cast Aluminum Bronze Bars • Aluminum Bars & Ductile Cast Iron • Ductile Cast Iron • Alloy Bars • Heavy Wall Mechanical Tube All the Hydraulic Hardware You'll Ever Need! Contact us at sales@alloysandcomponents.com or call toll free 800-441-1994.

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www.argo-hytos.com

www.clippard.com

www.cyber-tech.net

Argo-Hytos, Inc.

Clippard Instrument Lab., Inc.

Cyber-Tech, Inc.

ARGO-HYTOS manufactures sophisticated filter solutions, mainly applied in hydraulic and lubrication systems as well as in transmissions. The range of solutions that have been implemented extend from stationary industrial plants to mobile applications. Contact us at: ARGO-Hytos, Inc. P.O. Box 28 • Bowling Green OH, 43402 Phone 419.353.6070 • Fax 419.354.3496 info.us@argo-hytos.com www.argo-hytos.com

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Clippard Pneumatic Control Devices Clippard’s complete line of Minimatic® Control Devices includes over 5,000 standard products. Some of the many products offered include valves, cylinders, fittings, modular components, push buttons, stainless steel cylinders, electronic manifold cards, circuit analyzers and pre-piped manifold subplates. Visit www.clippard.com to find complete product information and specifications, engineering drawings, ordering information, literature downloads, useful calculators, technical assistance, distributor information and more. Visit our web site for more information, or call 1-513-521-4261 Circle 259

Cyber-Tech, Inc. designs and manufactures custom industrial grade control handles, control pendants, mechanical and proportional joysticks with a consistent reputation for being rugged and reliable, while delivering a level of customer service that is superior in the industry. Visit our website and give us a call so we can assist you in your control needs. www.cyber-tech.net 1.800.621.8754

Circle 261 www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


productreview

www.yatesind.com Yates Industries

Filter  Micron LA-MAN Corporation ®

The SuperStar .01 Micron Filter is designed to be installed at the point of use to efficiently remove moisture and contaminants from air lines to improve and extend the life cycle of tools and equipment. It is a four-stage filter designed to operate most effectively within 25 feet of the point of use. By incorporating a charcoal absorption element, the filter offers a standard 0.01 Micron rating with flow ranges of 50 scfm, 75 scfm, or 100 scfm and pressure ratings of 250 psi. Additional features include built-in differential pressure gauges and automatic float drain. www.laman.com

Yates Cylinders Offer: • H6 Series - Heavy Duty Hydraulic (3000 PSI) • H4 Series - Medium Hydraulic (up to 1500 PSI) • A4 Series - Heavy Duty Steel Air (250 PSI) • A2 Series - Aluminum Air (250 PSI) • Air/Oil Intensifiers • All Stainless Steel Cylinders • Air/Hydraulic Welded & Mill Type Cylinders • Special Cylinders per Customer Supplied Prints and Specifications Yates Industries, Inc. Yates Industries South, LLC 23050 Industrial Dr. E. 3401-J Highway 20 St. Clair Shores, MI 48080 Decatur, AL 35601 586.778.7680 ph 256.351.8571 ph 586.778.6565 fax 256.351.8571 fax Circle 262

www.yuken-usa.com Yuken/ALA Industries

Developing Innovative Hydraulic Pumps and Valves. ALA Industries is the Yuken Master Distributor in North America Visit our website to find out about our products or to find a distributor close to you. We have distributors across North America. Our website offers product literature and information on Yuken’s certifications. We feature a “Members” section for checking inventory, reviewing service manuals, as well as downloadable and interactive pricing. Call or email us. The staff at ALA Industries is always willing to serve you to meet your hydraulic needs. ALA Industries Limited 1150 Southpoint Drive, Suite D • Valparaiso, IN 46385 Phone (877) 419-8536 email: alaindustries@yuken-usa.com

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How much coal does that valve burn? Richard F. Bullers, CFPPS Senior Applications Engineer SMC Corporation of America

Back when gasoline was 35 cents a gallon, the term “environmental technology” was not well known. Engineers did not often promote the benefits of building low-energy consumption pneumatic valves among their peers. Recycling or conservation of resources was seldom discussed with any seriousness. In reality, the conversation was more likely to have turned to the muscle cars of the day and how much horsepower they would generate. This “bigger-is-better” philosophy not only produced big block engines with three carburetors, but also pneumatic valves with large direct solenoids and bulky steel construction. Then one day some of us woke up to find out the meaning of an Arab Oil Embargo. Suddenly the thought that our energy supply was cheap, plentiful, and secure evaporated. A typical pneumatic solenoid valve of that era may have consumed 6 Watts of power and lasted 10 million cycles. Today a pneumatic valve can be operated with power consumption as low as 0.1 Watt with a life of over 200 million cycles. This is an amazing 60 times less energy with 20 times the life. How is this now possible?

The Transition to Modern Valve Design

As industrial automation produces ever more sophisticated machines with the advance of robotics, benefits of weight reduction and power conservation in pneumatic valve design are beginning to find their role in a larger strategy of environmental technology. Optimizing solenoid valve design may seem a trifle affair when compared to reducing gasoline consumption for an automobile, but every unnecessary ounce of material and unit of energy expended have a collective and negative impact. The vast majority of energy used to manufacture and operate virtually every modern object we use every day is electricity generated from coal.

The Transferable Benefits of Energy Conservation There are over 600 coal-fired electricity plants operating in the United States today. A typical 500-megawatt coal plant will discharge 10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide; 10,200 tons of nitrogen oxide; 720 tons of carbon monoxide; 125, 000 tons of ash; and 3,700,000 tons of carbon dioxide in addition to tons of other disagreeable waste products.1 We don’t need an alarmist to remind us we do not want ourselves or our children breathing pollution, but this issue is often as invisible as the air. It’s not just asking about what we can change over the next decade, but how our very next decision in regards to purchasing and applying pneumatic valves can work to both our immediate and long term advantage.

1

Union of Concerned Scientists: Webpage, How Coal Works

Fig.1

Power Amplification T h e S o l e n o i d / P i l o t Va l v e

One technique that dramatically lowered the energy consumption of a pneumatic valve was using the concept of flow amplification. A very small 3-port, 2-position, direct-solenoid valve is used to operate a much larger air-operated valve. The small soleCommon Pressure Supply noid results in low power consumption (Fig. 1). To Main & Pilot Valve At the heart of this transformation is the development of advanced design direct solenoid valves that are diminutive in both size and power consumption. The solenoid pilot valves have also undergone specific design changes to improve their performance and use less energy. As valve design evolved, materials changed from zinc die cast to anodized aluminum, to engineering plastics. This has resulted A B in valves with streamlined shapes and lower mass. The internal passages, spool and sleeves, and poppet designs changed to increase flow capacity. The advent of serial communications systems that use coded signals to operate individual solenoids on banks of EA EB valves mounted together on a common manifold has elimiLarge Air Piloted Main Valve nated cumbersome wiring harnesses and improved electrical efficiency. Now entire networks of valves can be controlled, monitored, and programmed from a remote location. 14

Tech Directory 2011

Small Direct Solenoid Pilot Valve

PE

www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


The long-term benefits of reducing energy consumption are the short-term rewards that can be realized by machine builders, maintenance personnel, plant managers, or anyone applying pneumatic valves. The most immediate profit for end users is from a reduction in electricity consumption, but for everyone there is a strategic advantage gained from the “transferable benefit” created. Transferable benefits are gains you make that can be passed along to your customers, shareholders, employees, or anyone in general. It is a reduced cost, a “green machine,” a reputation as an environmentally conscious company that can boost a bottom line, beat a competitor machine’s operating costs, or gain business from public awareness. Imagine competing on a reduction in operating costs by positioning yourself as an energyefficiency leader in your industry. In conclusion you might wonder; how much coal does that valve burn? Twenty times, thirty times, sixty times more then it needs to? Look at the valves you have in service, compare your energy costs, and explore your alternatives. An epiphany can not only be enlightening, but also profitable.

The replacement of old energy-inefficient pneumatic valves can be done as part of a major overhaul or simply as a replace-as-needed strategy. This also provides several opportunities. One is to check the valve to ensure it is not oversized. Another is to conduct an energy audit. Energy audits are an effective tool in identifying waste and making a plan for corrective action. According to Hank van Ormer, Air Power USA, Inc., “Compressed air conservation and optimization programs in any compressed air system will generate significant energy savings opportunities, plus probable improvement in productivity and quality.”2 You’ve been changing to energy-efficient light bulbs in your house, so why wouldn’t you change the same old valves you’ve been using all these years? Check the power consumption of any valve product you have in service and ask if there is another way of doing the same job with less energy. When purchasing a valve, ensure the flow capacity and valve function are correct and make it a “trifecta” by getting the lowest wattage valve possible. for energy-efficient machines. 2 Shop What do you do when you buy a water heater, stove, refrigerator, air condi-

practical techniques for energy savings

tioner, furnace, or virtually any other appliance? You look at the Energy Star3 rating, of course. Ask the machine builder to explain what the power consumption of their machine is and how their product was designed with energy savings in mind. If you are contracting with a machine builder, make low power consumption one of the stated design goals. Ask them for a return on investment analysis for operating costs versus machine purchase price. This will provide incentives for manufacturing a machine that will pay for itself in a reasonable amount of time and help you determine if the price is right.

How can cost savings from the application of pneumatic valves be achieved? energy-efficient pneumatic valves 1 Apply whenever possible. Where previously a valve may have used 6 Watts to operate, the same valve now could be operated for a 10th of a Watt. This is an amazing 60 times less energy use. Not all applications can reduce their energy consumption by this amount, however significant gains can be made with a modest amount of effort.

Fluid Power Journal 2010 System Integrators Directory The Many Faces of a Compressed Air Audit ENERGY STAR is a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. More information is available at: www.energystar.gov 2 3

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Circle 243 www.ifps.org | www.fluidpowerjournal.com

Tech Directory 2011

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practical techniques for energy savings

How can cost savings from the application of pneumatic valves be achieved?

Build energy-efficient machines. the correct amount of air pressure. 3 For 4 Use a machine build, this sounds like a naïve statement, but in reality it is Pressure is energy and energy is money. Using more energy than required

simply a matter of using a straightforward approach, technical challenges notwithstanding. The lines are not always clearly drawn between practicality, manufacturing costs, or competitive advantage, however there are basic techniques that can be applied. A lwa y s c o n s i d e r a m e c h a n i c a l a d v a n t a g e . The amount of motive power necessary to do any task can be greatly reduced by the use of gears, levers, springs, and other practical mechanical devices that reduce the force required to achieve the work required. U s e p o w e r a mp l i f i c a t i o n . A low-power valve can be used to operate a larger air-operated valve to advantage in many applications.

Av o i d l o n g p e r i o d s o f c o n t i n u o u s solenoid energizing. • For 2-port and 3-port valves, use Normally Open types when seldom actuated to the off position and Normally Closed types for opposite scenarios. • For 4-port and 5-port valves, consider the use of a 2-position double solenoid valve when long periods of air output are required. This type of valve only requires a momentary signal to shift and can remain for very long periods of time in an actuated position. • A “UPS” system (uninterrupted power supply) may be a better alternative as part of a redundant safety system than relying on the interruption of continuous power supplied to a solenoid valve to initiate a stop sequence.

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Tech Directory 2011

for a single actuator adds up over time. Producing more pressure in a plant than is necessary multiples the effect. • Consider “check type” regulators or using a check valve in parallel with a standard regulator to reduce pressure for the non-working stroke of an actuator that only requires high force in one direction. • Check load ratios and actuator sizing carefully to reduce unnecessary consumption. • Reduce the volume between directional control valves and actuators to eliminate waste and improve response time and control. • Reduce the compressed air pressure for the entire plant if only one or two applications are running at a higher pressure by using air intensifiers at point of use. the use of “air blow” applications. When 5 Avoid air blow is required, use efficient nozzle designs with minimum operating times and careful sizing techniques.

the “OFF” switch. 6 Use If the machine is not is use for a shift, a day, or a week, why supply

pneumatic energy to it? Use a shut-off valve with a tight leakage specification to conserve energy.

Circle 245 www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


IFPS

CERTI FIC SPOTL ATION IGHT

Mobile Hydraulic Technician (MHT) The International Fluid Power Society is the only organization that provides comprehensive technical certification offerings for all professionals in the fluid power and motion control industry. Additional questions can be found in the certification section of www.ifps.org.

Test Your Skills 1. When installing a hydraulic Chevron V-packing, the first two V-rings are installed with the split ring joints: A. 45 degrees apart B. 90 degrees apart C. 120 degrees apart D. 180 degrees apart E. 360 degrees apart

2. What is the maximum U-joint angle for a shaft that is 45 inches long? A. 5° B. 6° C. 7° D. 8° E. 9° 3. The washer on the adjustable SAE O-ring fitting shown in the figure (on right) is used to: A. lock the nut B. seal the fitting C. compress the O-ring D. position the fitting E. set the depth of the fitting

Fitting

Check nut

Back-up washer 0-ring S.A.E. O-ring fitting

Answers: 1 = D 2=E 3=C

IFPS defines a Mobile Hydraulic Technician as an individual who applies fluid power theory and related knowledge to test and troubleshoot operational mobile hydraulic systems and applications. A Mobile Hydraulic Technician reads mobile schematics, performs basic cylinder and hydraulic motor calculations, and is able to supervise system installations and commissioning. All technician certifications require a three (3)-hour written and a three (3)-hour job performance (handson) test. Mobile Hydraulic Technician Summary: • Sets up and tests systems and components under direction of engineering and scientific staff • Recommends modifications to circuit and components to improve performance • Supervises system installation, flushing, and commissioning • Provides leak-free piping • Knows how, where, and when to take fluid samples and read lab reports • Establishes ISO cleanliness level for a system • Devises the Target Cleanliness Chart • Understands accumulator use and operation • Understands hydrostatic drives • Sets pump load sensing and compensator controls • Understands basic electrical controls and their application • Calculates decompression volume • Understands regenerative circuits and their use • Understands sequence and counterbalance circuits and associated valving • Performs troubleshooting and supervises required replacements, repairs, or adjustments

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www.ifps.org | www.fluidpowerjournal.com

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Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

“Control Reliable” Machine Guarding Safety Devices & Controls for OSHA and ANSI Compliance www.pinnaclesystems.com (800) 569-7697 22

Tech Directory 2011

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tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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Performance, Reliability, Sustainability Take Control with Woodward’s Family of Precision Servovalves & Actuators

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tech Directory 2011

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Circle 246 www.ifps.org | www.fluidpowerjournal.com

PH: 800-521-7918 FAX: 810-953-1385 3181 Tri-Park Drive Grand Blanc, MI 48439 Circle 247 Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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1A Total Safety A & A Manufacturing Company Inc. ABZ, Inc. Activant Adsens Technology, Inc. Air Logic Airline Hydraulics Air Logic Airmo, Inc. ALA Industries, Ltd. All Sensors Corp. Allen Orton LLC Almo Manifold & Tool Company American Aerospace Controls, Inc. American Cylinder Co., Inc. American Sensor Technologies, Inc. AMETEK Automation & Process Technologies Anderson Metals Corp., Inc. Applied Industrial Technologies ARGO-HYTOS, Inc. ASCO Valve, Inc. Ashcroft Inc. ASI Inc. Assured Automation ATOS S.P.A. Attica Hydraulic Exchange Corp. Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol Div. Automation Systems Interconnect, Inc. Axiomatic Technologies Corporation Balluff, Inc. Behringer Corp. Beswick Engineering Co., Inc. Bimba Manufacuring Company Birmingham Hydraulics Inc. Bosch Rexroth Pneumatics Brand Hydraulics Bray Controls, Div of BRAY Int’l Inc. Brennan Industries Inc. Burkert Fluid Control Systems CADSYM Canfield Connector Canimex inc. Central Illinois Mfg. Co. (Cim-Tek) Filtration) CIM-TEK Filtration Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc. Coilhose Pneumatics Command Controls Corp. Component Sourcing International LLC Continental Hydraulics Control Enterprises, Inc. Controlled Motion Solutions, Inc. Cox Instruments CPV Manufacturing, Inc. Cross Mfg. Inc. CS Unitec, Inc. Custom Sensors & Technologies (CST) Cyber-Tech, Inc. Dakota Fluid Power DEL Hydraulics DELTA Computer Systems, Inc. Differential Pressure Plus, Inc. Donaldson Company Inc. Duplomatic Hydraulics Dwyer Instruments, Inc. DynaQuip Controls EAO Switch Corporation Eaton Hydraulics Electro-Sensors Inc. Electroswitch Elma Electronic Emmegi Heat Exchangers, Inc. Energy Manufacturing Co., Inc. Enfield Technologies Engineered Sales, Inc. Exair Corporation Fabco-Air, Inc. Falcon Surplus FAMIC Technologies Inc. Faster Inc. FCI Automation Feroy Company, Inc. Flint Hydraulics, Inc. Flodraulic Group Flodyne Controls, Inc. Flow Technology Flow-Tek, A Subsidiary of BRAY Int’l Inc. Fluid Line Products, Inc. Fluid Power, Inc. Fluid Power Products, Inc. Fluidtechnik USA,Inc. Force America Futek Advanced Sensor Technology Inc. FW Murphy Galtech Canada Inc. Gefran Gems Sensors & Controls GS Hydraulics, Inc.

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Tech Directory 2011

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Tech Directory 2011

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www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


nti om ete Po rs we -R rS ota upp ry Pre lies ssu AC re /DC Ga Pro uge ces s sL ogi Pro cC por on tro tio nal ller Pro s( V a por PL lve C’s tio sn ) Hy al V Sc d rau alv rew es lic Ter -P min neu Se als rvo ma tic Va lve Sig s nal Co nve Sig rte nal rs Co -C nve urr So ent rte ftw rs /Vo are -V lta o ge lta Ste ge/ ppe Cu rM rre o nt t Sw ors itc hes -F Sw luid itc Lev hes el -L Sw i mit itc hes -P Sw ho itc toe hes lec tric -P Sw res itc s u hes re -P Sw rox itc imi hes ty -P Sw ush itc Bu hes tto -S n Sw ele itc cto hes r - Te Tra mp nsd era uce tur rs e Tra Ac nsd cel uce ero rs Tra me -C nsd ter urr uce ent r Tra Tra snsd Flo nsd w uce uce r rs Tra -F nsd orc e, uce L oad rs Tra -P Ce nsd osi ll uce tio n rs -P Tra osi nsd tio (Ab uce n( sol rs 1V ute - Po pp) En siti Tra cod on nsd er) uce rs Tra -P ns osi tio (In duce n( cre rs En me - P DA o n T) s t al E itio Tra nsd nco n (M uce der agn rs ) est - Po ric tiv sition Tra e ns -A (M duce nal agn rs og Sig est - Po nal r s i c i t Tra tiv ) e - ion nsd SSI uce ) rs Tra Po nsd siti uce on rs (M Tra agn P osi nsd est t ion uce ric (Po tive rs Tra -P ten ) nsd res tio uce me sur t e rs er) - Te mp era tur e

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Tech Directory 2011

29


Source Fluid Power Spartan Scientific SPC Sang-A Pneumatic Corp. Spectronics Corporation Spencer Fluid Power Suco Technologies, Inc. Sun Hydraulics Corporation SVF Flow Controls, Inc. Swift-Cor Precision, Inc. Switches Unlimited Switching Solutions Inc. SymCom, Inc. The Knotts Company The Oilgear Company Thomas Products LTD TopWorx UFI Filters UHI, LTD Ultraflo Corporation United Electric Controls Universal Grinding Corp. Universal Hydraulics International, LTD Validyne Engineering Corp. VEST, Inc. Vindum Engineering, Inc. Voith Turbo Inc. VOSS Fluid GmbH Wandfluh of America, Inc. Webster Intruments Weiss Instruments, Inc. West Coast Fluid Power Western FluiDyne Western Hydrostatics, Inc. Western Integrated Technologies, Inc. WIKA Instrument Corporation Wilson Company Winters Instruments Wojanis Supply Co. Womack Machine Supply Company Young Powertech Inc. Yuken/ALA Industries

Circle 248 30

Tech Directory 2011

lS eF yst req em uen s rs c ctr y - AC Dri ic M ves o Ele tor ctr sica DC lA En ctu clo ato sur rs es Fie ldb us Tec Fie hn ldb olo us gie Tec sFie hn ASI olo ldb gie us Tec sFie De hn vic olo ldb eN gie us et sTec Fie E hn the ldb o log rne Pro us T ies t IP fiD ech - In riv ter e nolog link Fie i e sldb BT Pro us fib Tec us Hu hn DP ma olo , ngie Ma sSe Jo chi yst r n c eI os ick nte -A rfa Jo nal ces yst og ick (HM Sig - In nal I’s) Jo teg yst ral ick A mp -N Jo lifi on yst er - co ick nta -P cti Lig ote ng ht (Ha n tio Cu ll) me rta ter ins Lig hts , Il lum Po ina ten tio tio n m ete Po ten rs -L tio ine me ar ter sPu shb utt on

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Circle 249 www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


nti om ete Po rs we -R rS ota upp ry Pre lies ssu AC re /DC Ga Pro uge ces s sL ogi Pro cC por on tro tio nal ller Pro s( V a por PL lve C’s tio sn ) Hy al V Sc d rau alv rew es lic Ter -P min neu Se als rvo ma tic Va lve Sig s nal Co nve Sig rte nal rs Co -C nve urr So ent rte ftw rs /Vo are -V lta o ge lta Ste ge/ ppe Cu rM rre o nt t Sw ors itc hes -F Sw luid itc Lev hes el -L Sw i mit itc hes -P Sw ho itc toe hes lec tric -P Sw res itc s u hes re -P Sw rox itc imi hes ty -P Sw ush itc Bu hes tto -S n Sw ele itc cto hes r - Te Tra mp nsd era uce tur rs e Tra Ac nsd cel uce ero rs Tra me -C nsd ter urr uce ent r Tra Tra snsd Flo nsd w uce uce r rs Tra -F nsd orc e, uce L oad rs Tra -P Ce nsd osi ll uce tio n rs -P Tra osi nsd tio (Ab uce n( sol rs 1V ute - Po pp) En siti Tra cod on nsd er) uce rs Tra -P ns osi tio (In duce n( cre rs En me - P DA o n T) s t al E itio Tra nsd nco n (M uce der agn rs ) est - Po ric tiv sition Tra e ns -A (M duce nal agn rs og Sig est - Po nal r s i c i t Tra tiv ) e - ion nsd SSI uce ) rs Tra Po nsd siti uce on rs (M Tra agn P osi nsd est t ion uce ric (Po tive rs Tra -P ten ) nsd res tio uce me sur t e rs er) - Te mp era tur e

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Circle 250

Tech Directory 2011

31


Associationnews

IFPS | International Fluid Power Society

IFPS Newly Certified professionals Dennis Garrett, CC The Boeing Company

Craig MacCready, MHM Aztec Machine & Repair

Jerry Smith, ECS C.W.C.C./DCE

David Arrington, MHM American Electric Power Co.

Brian Graham, MHM American Electric Power Co.

Chad Manley, S, PS Walt Disney World Co.

John Storey, CC The Paquin Company

Michael Barnard, CC The Boeing Company

Steve Hargett, CC Eaton Corporation

Brian McKenzie, ECS The Boeing Company

Michael Taylor, CC The Boeing Company

Robin Bright, CC The Boeing Company

Tim Hastings, CC Pirtek USA

Hap Moran, CC Pirtek USA

Shawn Thomas, PT CWCC - DCE

Vasiliy Cheban, CC The Boeing Company

Rance Herren, ECS National Oilwell Varco

Scott Mosur, HS Oshkosh Truck Corporation

Steve Thompson, CC The Paquin Company

David Collier, MHM American Electric Power Co.

James Hooper, MHM C.W.C.C./DCE

David Penning, CC St. Louis Hydraulics, Inc.

Brian Tritle, HS EHA

Lee Dannar, MHM Aztec Machine & Repair

Emil Hufgard, CC The Paquin Company

Mark Perkins, HS Hydraquip Corporation

Rocky Ulrey, CC Eaton Corporation

Harold Dean, Jr., ECS C.W.C.C./DCE

Jeff Isom, MM, PM, IHM, MHM Snohomish County Waste

Lucas Roush, MHM American Electric Power Co.

Stephen Walls, MHM American Electric Power Co.

Alfonso Diaz, CC The Boeing Company

Terrance Kieswether, MIH, CC Eaton Corporation

David Sewell, CC The Boeing Company

Joe Freeman, MHM Aztec Machine & Repair

Jackie Lawson, MHM American Electric Power Co.

Gregg Shiroda, MHT DTE Energy

John Frey, CC The Paquin Company

Mark Lidstrom, CC The Boeing Company

Bradley Smith, HS Electro-Hydraulic Automation Inc.

Certification Levels Available

Phil Alspach, MHM American Electric Power Co.

32

CFPAI Certified Fluid Power Accredited Instructor

CFPPS Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Specialist

CFPMHT Certified Fluid Power Mobile Hydraulic Technician

CFPAJPP Certified Fluid Power Authorized Job Performance Proctor

CFPECS Electronic Controls Specialist

CFPPT Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Technician

CFPAJPPCC Certified Fluid Power Authorized Job Performance Proctor Connector & Conductor CFPE Certified Fluid Power Engineer CFPS Certified Fluid Power Specialist (Must Obtain CFPHS, CFPPS) CFPHS Certified Fluid Power Hydraulic Specialist

Tech Directory 2011

CFPMEC – in development Mobile Electronic Controls CFPIEC – in development Industrial Electronic Controls CFPMT Certified Fluid Power Master Technician (Must Obtain CFPIHT, CFPMHT, & CFPPT) CFPIHT Certified Fluid Power Industrial Hydraulic Technician

CFPMIH Certified Fluid Power Master of Industrial Hydraulics (Must Obtain CFPIHM, CFPIHT, & CFPCC)

CFPMM Certified Fluid Power Master Mechanic (Must Obtain CFPIHM, CFPMHM, & CFPPM) CFPIHM Certified Fluid Power Industrial Hydraulic Mechanic CFPMHM Certified Fluid Power Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic

CFPMMH Certified Fluid Power Master of Mobile Hydraulics (Must Obtain CFPMHM, CFPMHT, & CFPCC) CFPMIP Certified Fluid Power Master of Industrial Pneumatics (Must Obtain CFPPM, CFPPT, & CFPCC) CFPCC Certified Fluid Power Connector & Conductor

CFPPM Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Mechanic

www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


International Fluid Power Society | IFPS

Attention Fluid Power Distributors, Manufacturers, and End-users Interested in improved safety, improved reliability, greater efficiency, and reduced liability? Certify your workforce with IFPS certifications! If you have ten or more fluid power or motion control mechanics, technicians, or specialists ready to become certified or need to recertify, get onboard with the IFPS Corporate Package Program.

2012 IFPS 2012 Spring Meeting February 29–March 3, 2012 Embassy Suites USF Tampa, FL IFPS 2012 Annual Meeting September 26–29, 2012 Embassy Suites South • Anaheim, CA

Associationnews

2013 IFPS 2013 Spring Meeting February 27 - March 2, 2013 Location TBD   IFPS 2013 Annual Meeting September 25 - 28, 2013 Location TBD

The Corporate Package includes • Substantial discount on individual memberships and certification tests • Substantial discount on all books and publications • Discounted advertisements in The Fluid Power Journal Depending on the level of the corporate commitment, companies are entitled to between 10 and 40 individual memberships, and between 10 and 40 certifications tests, which include Specialist tests or any Mechanic / Technician written and a Job Performance test. For additional information, visit www.ifps.org/ Membership or contact The International Fluid Power Society at 800-308-6005.

IFPS EVENTS Visit www.ifps.org for registration information. IFPS Connector & Conductor (CC) Review w/ Job Performance Test 10/26-27, 2011 Pirtek - Rockledge, FL  11/1-2, 2011 Eaton - USA – Maumee, OH IFPS Hydraulic Specialist (HS) Certification Review 12/12 -14, 2011- Eaton-USA – Maumee, OH “Load Sensing Valves in Mobile Hydraulic Systems” Web Seminar – 10/6/2011 “Tips & Tricks for Test Taking” Web Seminar – 12/8/2011 IFPS Annual Meeting - Chicago, IL September 14-17, 2011 Hilton Lisle/Naperville Lisle, IL (Chicago area) Energy Efficient Hydraulics and Pneumatics Conference November 15-17, 2011 Sheraton Chicago O’Hare Airport Hotel, Rosemont, IL Circle 251 www.ifps.org | www.fluidpowerjournal.com

Tech Directory 2011

33


Associationnews

IFPS | International Fluid Power Society

IFPS Certification Testing Locations Individuals wishing to take any IFPS written certification tests are able to select from approximately 325 convenient locations across the United States and Canada. The IFPS is able to offer these locations through its affiliation with The Consortium of College Testing Centers (CCTC) provided by National College Testing Association (NCTA).   To register for an IFPS written certification test: 1.  Fill out an IFPS Certification Test Application including your desired location by visiting www.ifps.org. 2.  Submit your application with payment to IFPS Headquarters. 3.  Upon receipt of your application, you will be e-mailed instructions. Testing dates for any locations listed below are as follows:  November 2011 Tuesday, 11/1 Thursday, 11/17

 October 2011 Tuesday, 10/4 Thursday, 10/20

 December 2011 Tuesday, 12/6 Thursday, 12/15

 January 2012 Tuesday, 1/3 Thursday, 1/19

 February 2012 Tuesday, 2/7 Thursday, 2/16

 March 2012 Tuesday, 3/6 Thursday, 3/15

 April 2012 Tuesday, 4/3 Thursday, 4/19

If you have any questions, please call IFPS Headquarters at 800-308-6005 or e-mail Connie Graham at cgraham@ifps.org.

ALASKA

University of Alaska Anchorage Anchorage, AK

ALABAMA

Alabama A&M University Normal, AL

Irvine Valley College Irvine, CA

University of AL in Huntsville Huntsville, AL University of Alabama at Birmingham Birmingham, AL

Florida Atlantic University Boca Raton, FL

National Test Center San Diego, CA

Florida Gulf Coast University Ft. Myers, FL

National University San Diego, CA Santa Rosa Junior College Santa Rosa, CA

ARKANSAS

Northwest Arkansas Community College | Bentonville, AR

ARIZONA

Arizona Western College Yuma, AZ Coconino Community College Flagstaff, AZ Eastern Arizona College Thatcher, AZ Glendale Community College Glendale, AZ Mesa Community College Mesa, AZ Northern Arizona University Flagstaff, AZ Paradise Valley Community College Phoenix, AZ Pima Community College Tucson, AZ Rio Salado College Tempe, AZ

Skyline College San Bruno, CA The Taft University System Santa Ana, CA UC San Diego Extension San Diego, CA University of California Irvine, CA Yuba Community College Marysville, CA

COLORADO

Community College of Aurora Aurora, CO

Community College of Denver Denver, CO Fort Lewis College Durango, CO Front Range Community College Larimer Campus | Ft. Collins, CO Pikes Peak Community College Colorado Springs, CO Pueblo Community College Pueblo, CO University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder, CO

CALIFORNIA

Allan Hancock College Santa Maria, CA

University of Northern Colorado Greeley, CO

CONNECTICUT

California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, CA

Yale University | New Haven, CT

California State University, Fresno Fresno, CA

Delaware State University Dover, DE

Chapman University Orange, CA

Delaware Technical and Community College | Georgetown, DE

Foothill College Los Altos Hills, CA

34

Tech Directory 2011

FLORIDA

Brevard Community College Cocoa, FL Daytona State College Daytona Beach, FL

La Sierra University Riverside, CA

Jacksonville State University Jacksonville, AL

Arizona State University Tempe, AZ

Fullerton Community College Fullerton, CA

DELAWARE

University of Delaware Newark, DE

Florida Memorial University Miami Gardens, FL Florida Southern College Lakeland, FL

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, IL

University of West Georgia Carrollton, GA

Waubonsee Community College Grove, IL

Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA

HAWAII

BYU-Hawaii Laie, HI

IOWA

Hawkeye Community College Waterloo, IA

Indian River State College Fort Pierce, FL Miami Dade College Miami, FL

Western Iowa Community College Sioux City, IA

IDAHO

Brigham Young University Rexburg, ID

Polk State College Winter Haven, FL

College of Southern Idaho Twin Falls, ID

Santa Fe Community College Gainesville, FL University of Florida Gainesville, FL

Eastern Idaho Technical College Idaho Falls, ID Lewis-Clark State College Lewiston, ID

University of South Florida Tampa, FL Valencia Community College Orlando, FL

GEORGIA

Clayton State University Morrow, GA Columbus State University Columbus, GA Columbus Technical College Columbus, GA Darton College Albany, GA Georgia Gwinnett College Lawrenceville, GA

Ivy Tech Community College/ Bloomington | Bloomington, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Columbus | Columbus, IN

Ivy Tech Community College/ Indianapolis | Indianapolis, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Kokomo Kokomo, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Lafayette | Lafayette, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Lawrenceburg | Lawrenceburg, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Madison Madison, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Muncie Muncie, IN

University of Idaho Moscow, ID College of DuPage Glen Ellyn, IL

INDIANA

Ivy Tech Community College/Gary Gary, IN

Wartburg College Waverly, IA

Boise State University Boise, ID

Open Campus Florida Community College at Jacksonville, FL

Indiana University Indianapolis, IN

Ivy Tech Community College/ Evansville | Evansville, IN

University of Iowa Iowa City, IA

Hillsborough Community College Plant City, FL

Albany State University Albany, GA

University of Georgia Athens, GA

ILLINOIS

Ivy Tech Community College/ Richmond | Richmond, IN Ivy Tech Community College/ Sellersburg | Sellersburg, IN

College of Lake County Grayslake, IL

Ivy Tech Community College/ South Bend | South Bend, IN

Illinois State University Normal, IL

Ivy Tech Community College Terre Haute, IN

John A. Logan Community College Carterville, IL

Purdue University West Lafayette, IN

Lincoln Land Community College Springfield, IL Northern Illinois University De Kalb, IL

KANSAS

Johnson County Community College Overland Park, KS Kansas State University Manhattan, KS

Parkland College Champaign, IL

Georgia Southern University Statesboro, GA

Richland Community College Decatur, IL

Georgia State University Atlanta, GA

Rock Valley College Rockford, IL

University of Kansas Lawrence, KS Wichita State University Wichita, KS

www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


Associationnews

International Fluid Power Society | IFPS

University of Louisville Louisville, KY

KENTUCKY

Western Kentucky University Bowling Green, KY

LOUISIANA

Bossier Parish Community College Bossier City, LA

University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Minneapolis, MN University of Minnesota Morris, MN

MISSOURI

Avila University Kansas City, MO

University of Louisiana at Monroe Monroe, LA

Metropolitan Community College-Penn Valley Kansas City, MO

Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, LA

Missouri Western State University St.Joseph, MO

University of New Orleans New Orleans, LA

Southeast Missouri State University Cape Girardeau, MO

MARYLAND

Anne Arundel Community College Arnold, MD

St. Charles Community College Cottleville, MO

Carroll Community College Westminster, MD

State Fair Community College Sedalia, MO Three Rivers Community College Poplar Bluff, MO

Chesapeake College Wye Mills, MD College of Southern Maryland La Plata, MD

University of Central Missouri Warrensburg, MO

Frederick Community College Frederick, MD

Webster University St. Louis, MO

Harford Community College Bel Air, MD Hagerstown Community College Hagerstown, MD Howard Community College Columbia, MD University of Maryland College Park, MD

MASSACHUSETTS

North Shore Community College Danvers, MA University of Massachusetts Boston, MA

MICHIGAN

Baker College Online Flint, MI

MISSISSIPPI

University of Mississippi University, MS

MONTANA

Montana State University Bozeman, MT

The University of Montana Missoula, MT

NORTH CAROLINA

Kalamazoo Valley Community College Kalamazoo, MI

North Carolina Central University Durham, NC

Schoolcraft College Livonia, MI

Washtenaw Community College Ann Arbor, MI

MINNESOTA

Minnesota State University, Mankato Mankato, MN

College of Southern Nevada Charleston Campus Las Vegas, NV

The University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC

NORTH DAKOTA

Bismarck State College Bismarck, ND

NEBRASKA

NEW JERSEY

Brookdale Community College Lincroft, NJ Gloucester County College Sewell, NJ Mercer County Community College West Windsor, NJ

www.ifps.org | www.fluidpowerjournal.com

Harrisburg Area Community College-Lancaster Campus Lancaster, PA

College of Southern Nevada Cheyenne Campus North Las Vegas, NV

SOUTH CAROLINA

College of Southern Nevada Green Valley Campus Henderson, NV

Coastal Carolina University Conway, SC

College of Southern Nevada Henderson Campus, NV

Horry-Georgetown Technical College Conway, SC

NEW YORK

Brooklyn College - CUNY Brooklyn, NY

Rochester Institute of Technology Rochester, NY Central Ohio Tech College OSU-Newark | Newark, OH

OHIO

Midlands Technical College Columbia, SC Orangeburg Calhoun Technical College Orangeburg, SC Piedmont Technical College Greenwood, SC

Rhodes State College Lima, OH

Technical College of the Lowcountry Beaufort, SC

TENNESSEE

University of Akron Akron, OH

Middle Tennessee State University Murfreesboro, TN

Oklahoma State University Stillwater, OK Oklahoma State University-Tulsa Tulsa, OK

University of Oklahoma Norman, OK

Southern Adventist University Collegedale, TN Tennessee State University Nashville, TN

OREGON

Central Oregon Community College Bend, OR

Clackamas Community College Oregon City, OR Mt. Hood Community College Gresham, OR Portland Community College Rock Creek Portland, OR

Walters State Community College Morristown, TN

TEXAS

Austin Community College Austin, TX Collin Community College - Spring Creek Campus | Plano, TX

University of Houston Houston, TX University of Texas Brownsville Brownsville, TX University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX University of Texas El Paso El Paso, TX Victoria College Victoria, TX

Brigham Young University Provo, UT

UTAH

Weber State University Ogden, UT Old Dominion University Norfolk, VA

VIRGINIA

WASHINGTON

Central Washington University Ellensburg, WA

Western Washington University Bellingham, WA

WISCONSIN

Lakeshore Technical College Cleveland, WI

Marian University of Fond du Lac Fond du Lac, WI University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Oshkosh, WI University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI

El Paso Community College El Paso, TX

UW-Green Bay Green Bay, WI

Grayson County College Denison, TX Lamar Institute of Technology Beaumont, TX

RCC-SOU Higher Education Center Medford, OR

Lamar University Beaumont, TX

University of Oregon Eugene, OR

Tyler Jr. College Tyler, TX

Eastfield College Mesquite, TX

Portland State University Portland, OR

Southwestern Oregon Community College | Coos Bay, OR

Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX

Olympic College Bremerton, WA

The University of Memphis Memphis, TN

Abilene Christian University Abilene, TX

Texas A&M University-Commerce Commerce, TX

Utah Valley State College Orem, UT

East Tennessee State University Johnson City, TN

OKLAHOMA

Texas A&M University College Station, TX

Salt Lake Community College Salt Lake City, UT

The University of Toledo Toledo, OH

Northern Oklahoma College Tonkawa, OK

Texas A&M International University Laredo, TX

Davis Applied Technology College Kaysville, UT

York Technical College Rock Hill, SC

The Ohio State University Columbus, OH

Southern Methodist University Dallas, TX

Weatherford College Weatherford, TX

Spartanburg Community College Spartanburg, SC

Trident Technical College Charleston, SC

North Dakota State University Fargo, NC

Bellevue University Bellevue, NE

Harrisburg Area Community College York Campus | York, PA

University of Central Oklahoma Edmond, OK

Southeast Community College Lincoln, NE

Southwestern Michigan College Dowagiac, MI

NEVADA

East Carolina University Greenville, NC

Mount Olive College Mount Olive, NC

Michigan State University East Lansing, MI

Harrisburg Area Community College Harrisburg, PA

Franklin University Columbus, OH

Henry Ford Community College Dearborn, MI

Macomb Community College Warren, MI

San Juan College Farmington, NM

Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS

Ferris State University Big Rapids, MI

Lansing Community College Lansing, MI

HACC Gettysburg Campus Gettysburg, PA

Columbus State Community College Columbus, OH

Guilford Technical Community College Jamestown, NC

Lake Superior State University Sault Ste. Marie, MI

NEW MEXICO

PENNSYLVANIA

Bucks County Community College Newtown, PA

Eastern New Mexico University Portales, NM

Holmes Community College Goodman Campus Goodman, MS

Fayetteville State University Fayetteville, NC

Delta College University Center, MI

Raritan Valley Community College Somerville, NJ

University of Wyoming Laramie, WY Lethbridge College Lethbridge, AB Canada

WYOMING

CANADA

Midwestern State University Wichita Falls, TX

Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology Saskatchewan, Canada

Sam Houston State University Huntsville, TX

Thompson Rivers University Kamloops, BC Canada

Tech Directory 2011

35


Associationnews

NFPA | National Fluid Power Association

Inaugural Industrial Automation North America Tradeshow Includes Special Focus on Fluid Power and Special Discount for NFPA Members NFPA has partnered with the organizers of Hannover Messe to offer NFPA members and others in the fluid power industry a new and unique opportunity to connect with their customers in the industrial sectors at the inaugural IANA tradeshow, held in parallel with IMTS 2012, September 10-15, 2012 at McCormick Place, Chicago, Ill. Be part of the IFPE Fluid Power Zone NFPA members and non-members have the opportunity to exhibit in a dedicated display area showcasing the latest products, technologies, trends, and services for hydraulics and pneumatics at IANA 2012. Hosted by NFPA, the IFPE Fluid Power Zone is an excellent platform to attract key buyers from around the world. NFPA members receive a 10% discount off the standard booth price to exhibit in the zone.  Learn more • Additional information can be found online at www.ia-na.com.  • Contact Aryan Zandieh, Hannover Fairs USA, Inc., at (312) 924-1688 or e-mail: azandieh@hfusa.com.

Upcoming Events Energy Efficient Hydraulics and Pneumatics Conference (EEHPC)

November 15-17, 2011 Sheraton Chicago O’Hare Airport Hotel in Rosemont, IL The EEHPC is hosted by the International Fluid Power Society (IFPS), the FPDA Motion and Control Network (FPDA), and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA).

2012 NFPA Annual Conference

March 6 - 10, 2012 The Mauna Lani Bay, Kohala Coast, Hawaii

IFPEX 2012

April 17-19, 2012 NEC Birmingham 10% NFPA Member Discount Available to Exhibitors

Flange Lock™

Stops Leaking Hydraulic lines save time • save money • save labor • save oil • • • • • • • • • • •

No tools required No expensive hardware needed No more rags stuffed into hoses No more messy plastic caps The ultimate contamination control tool One hand installation Eliminate hydraulic oil spills & clean up Quick installation & ease of usage Safe for personnel & environment Industry acclaimed 100% Made in USA

For more information contact mike Pearl at 914.980.8890 or email: mike@flangelock.com

www.flangelock.com

Circle 253 36

Tech Directory 2011

Industrial Automation North America (IANA)

September 10-15, 2012 McCormick Place, Chicago, IL. Be part of the “IFPE Fluid Power Zone” a NEW and unique tradeshow designed to assist you in reaching your industrial automation customer market. Special NFPA member only discounts are available.

AG CONNECT Expo 2013 – January 29-31, 2013

R & R Rubber Molding, Inc. is certified to the American Association of Railroads M-1003. This certification demonstrates the commitment to fulfill our goal of total customer satisfaction. We are also compliant with ISO-9002-94 and upgrading to ISO 9001-2000.

Materials

• Fluoroelastomers • Nitrile-Buna • SBR • Millable Urethane (polyester) • Hypalon • Butyl • Neoprene • EPDM • Silicone • Fluorosilicone • Polyacrylate • Natural Rubber • Polyisoprene

Processes

• Compression Molded Rubber Parts • Transfer Molded Rubber Parts • Injection Molded Rubber Parts • Rubber-to-Metal Bonding • Cryogenic deflashing • Special packaging if required • RMA A2 tolerances

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL! R&R Rubber Molding, Inc. PO Box 3533 2444 Loma Avenue South El Monte, CA 91733 (626) 575-8105 www.rrrubber.com

WE SEAL THE DEAL SMALL JOB RUNS & PROTOTYPES

Circle 252 www.fluidpowerjournal.com | www.ifps.org


Fluid Power

Product

focus

High-Speed

Fig. 1: Appearance and structure

Linear Servo Valve

Development of the High-Speed Linear Servo Valve

Hydraulic controls are commonly used in mechanical drive systems for industrial equipment and machinery. In addition to the actuation of mechanical systems based on electric commands, they typically employ electro-hydraulic servo valves or proportional electro-hydraulic directional and flow control valves with sensors for position, speed, acceleration, pressure, and load control. The “high-speed linear servo valve” from Yuken Kogyo Co., Ltd. replaces conventional nozzle flapper-type electro-hydraulic servo valves. Incorporating a newly developed voice coil linear motor as a control actuator, the valve has been put into commercial use. The valve has been designed to provide a frequency response of 400 Hz or more, which is approximately twice that of nozzle flapper-type servo valves (100 to 200 Hz). It is intended for use in forging press machines. For commercialization, the valve has also been designed to offer long service life, high reliability (tolerance to hydraulic fluid contamination), and energy savings. It has been applied in a wide range of areas because of its performance and reliability.

Structure and Operation

The valve controls the flow and direction of hydraulic fluid by moving the spool for flow passage control. With the spool coupled directly to a compact, high-thrust voice coil linear motor, the valve operates under electrical feedback control using a dedicated high-speed amplifier. The valve structure is shown in Fig. 1. The valve comprises a body, a linear motor, and a position sensor, with a highpower neodymium-iron-boron (Nd-Fe-B) permanent magnet placed in a fixed position and a movable coil out of contact with the permanent magnet and the yoke. The position sensor is a noncontact high-response magnetic sensor. The valve has a simple structure and lightweight movable parts; it is user-friendly with high response and tolerance to hydraulic fluid contamination (allowing for a contamination level of NAS class 10).

Type

Specifications and Performance

The valve has been adopted in applications with a maximum operating pressure of 5,076 psi and a flow rate of 1 to 1,004 GPM. It supports a wide range of flow rates, performance requirements, and functions. Basically, the valve is a single-stage servo valve configured as described above and operates at a flow rate of 1 to 10.6 GPM, a frequency response of 450 Hz/-90°, and a step response (0 <=> 100 %) of 2 msec. At higher flow rates, the two-stage type of the valve is employed and operates at a frequency response of about 100 Hz/-90° and a step response (0 <=> 100 %) of 8 to 12 msec (representative performance).

Applications and Commercial Results

Because of its high response, the valve is used in injection molding machines that deliver a resin filling speed of 1,000 to 1,500 mm/sec in 8 to 12 msec and die casting machines that deliver an aluminum filling speed of 4 m/sec or a magnesium filling speed of 8 m/sec. Since the valve has excellent following capability, it is also used in various testing machines. The valve with tolerance to hydraulic fluid contamination is useful in steel-making facilities. The total sales volume of the valve since 2001 has been about 10,000 units.

Applicable industries/machines

Fig. 2: Components and features

Fig. 3: Response characteristics (representative example)

Table 1: Applicable industries/machines www.ifps.org | www.fluidpowerjournal.com

Tech Directory 2011

37


CIL-MM14 FPJ

1/27/10

9:58 AM

Page 1

Classifieds Advertising Index Company.....................................................Page......Circle Alfa-Laval........................................................12.........256 Alloys and Components..................................12.........257 Ametek Automation and Process Technologies....15.........243 Argo-Hytos Inc................................................25.........247 Argo-Hytos Inc................................................12.........258 Attica Hydraulic Exchange Corp.PPL............. CIII.........255 Brand Hydraulics...............................................5.........235 CEI (Control Enterprises Incorporated)............33.........251 Clippard Instrument Lab Inc.......................... CIV.........254 Clippard Instrument Lab Inc............................12.........259 Cyber-Tech Inc..................................................7.........236 Cyber-Tech Inc................................................12.........261 Dynamic Fluid Components............................31.........250 Flange Lock.....................................................36.........253 Flaretite Inc.....................................................16.........244 HMI Systems..................................................30.........249 Lehigh Fluid Power Inc....................................17.........242 Main Manufacturing Products.........................25.........246 OEM Controls Inc............................................16.........245 R & R Rubber Molding Inc...............................36.........252 Suco Technologies Inc....................................30.........248 Tobul Accumulator Inc....................................13.........241 TR Engineering Inc...........................................9.........238 Ultra Clean........................................................9.........239 VEST Inc..........................................................3.........234 Woodward HRT...............................................11.........240 Yates Industries Inc...........................................1.........233 Yates Industries Inc.........................................13.........262 Yuken/ALA Industries......................................13.........263 Yuken/ALA Industries........................................8.........237 Ad • Web Marketplace

HYDRAULIC FLANGES and COMPONENTS THE “SPECIAL” YOU WANT IS PROBABLY ON OUR SHELVES

NEW AIR JETS Unique design Multiple nozzles & orifices Pressure up to 200 psig #10-32 & 1/8-27 NPT In stock for immediate delivery

MAIN Mfg. Products, Inc. 800.521.7918 fax 810.953.1385 www.MAINMFG.com/fpj

FPJclassified2011_Layout 1 11/29/10 3:56 PM Page

Surplus Inventory Wanted We pay top dollar for surplus inventory and are always looking for: Hydraulics Power Transmission Pneumatics Electric Motors Engines Wheels & Casters

877-245-6247

SURPLUS CENTER

1015 West O Street, Lincoln, NE 68528 Contact Our Buyer Jeff Atkinson Phone 800-488-3407 Fax 877-474-5198 email jeff@surpluscenter.com www.surpluscenter.com Buying and Selling Surplus Since 1933

INSERTA® CHECK VALVES www.inserta.com

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Tech Directory 2011

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1. Do you specify, select, or influence the purchase of components & systems on new or existing machinery? 03  Yes 04  No If yes, in which technologies? (check all that apply) 05  Hydraulic 06  Pneumatic 07  Vacuum 08  Electronic Controls 09  None of these 10  Administration 11  Plant Operations 12  Engineering 13  Technical 14  Mechanical 15  Purchasing 16  Other

4. Number of employees at this location?

A  1-19

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B  Material Handling Equipment C  Mining Machinery D  Packaging Machinery E  Plastic Machinery F  Presses & Foundry G  Railroad Machinery H  Road Construction/Maintenance Equipment I  Simulators & Test Equipment

C  50-99

D  100-249

J  Snow Vehicles, Ski Lifts K  Steel Plants & Rolling Mills L  Truck & Bus Industry M  Textile Machinery N  Woodworking Machines O  Other (specify) P  Fluid Power Industry

E  250-499

5. What is the primary business activity at this location? In the Fluid Power Industry: 56  Manufacturer 57  Distributor 58  Education Outside the Fluid Power Industry: 59  Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) 60  End User of Fluid Power Products 6. In which region does your company do business? (check all that apply) 61  East 62  Midwest 63  Southeast 64  Southwest

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66  National

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7. My Company should be advertising in or submit an article to the Fluid Power Journal. Please contact this person: Name: ___________________________________ Title: _________________________________ Phone: ______________________________ 8. I wish to receive a free subscription to Fluid Power Journal:

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______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Signature Date 9. I would like more information on the following products: (Please check all that apply) 800  Accumulators 805  Filters 808  Hose & Tubing 801  Accessories 806  Gauges & Sensors 809  Hydraulic Fluids 802  Electronic Controls 807  Heat Exchangers, 810  Motors 803  Couplings & Fittings Heaters, Aftercoolers, 811  Pumps 804  Cylinders Dryers 812  Seals & Packing 10. I plan on purchasing the above products in the next: 68  0-3 months 69  3-6 months 70  6-9 months

71  12+ months

Please send Fluid Power Society Information (please check all that apply) 897  Membership 898  Certification 899  Training/Education

813  Vacuum 814  Valves 815  Software

F  500-999

G  1000+

www.fluidpowerjournal.com

3. Which of the following best describes your market focus? A  Aerospace I  Forestry B  Agricultural Machinery J  Furnaces C  Automotive K  Gas & Oilfield Machinery D  Civil Engineering L  Heavy Construction & Equipment E  Cranes M  Military Vehicles F  Drills & Drilling Equipment N  Construction & Utility Equipment G  Flame Cutting/Welding O  Machine Tools Equipment P  Government Related H  Food Machinery A  Marine & Offshore Equipment

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Tech Directory 2011 Expiration Date: December 31, 2011


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Which edition would you like to receive?  Print  Digital  Both 1. Do you specify, select or influence the purchase of components & systems, on new or existing machinery? 03  Yes 04  No. If yes, which technologies? (check all that apply) 05  Hydraulic 06  Pneumatic 09  None of These 07  Vacuum 08  Electronic Controls 2. What is your primary job title? (check only one) 10  Administration: Chairman, Pres., V.P., Sec., Tres., G.M., Owner, Bus. Mgr., Dir., etc. 11  Plant Operations: VP of Mfg/ Oper/ Prod., Plant Mgr./ Dir. Mgr., Supv./ Supt./ Foreman/ Safety Dir., etc. 12  Engineering: V.P. Eng., Eng., Des. Eng., Dir. of Eng., Staff Spec., Chief Eng., Senior Eng., Maint/Prod. Eng., etc. 13  Technical: Chief Tech., Fluid Power Tech., etc. 14  Mechanical: Chief Master Mech., Master Mech., Fluid Power Mech., etc. 15  Purchasing: VP/Dir. of Purch., Procurement Mgr., Buyer, Purch., etc. 16  Other: (please specify)______________________________________ 3. Number of employees at this location? A  1-19 B  20-49 C  50-99 E  250-499 F  500-999 G  1000+

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(View a sample of our paperless digital edition at www.fluidpowerjournal.com) 4. What is the primary business activity at this location? In the Fluid Power Industry Outside the Fluid Power Industry 56  Manufacturer 57  Distributor 58  Education 59  Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) 60  End User of Fluid Power Products 61  Other: (please specify)______________________________________ 5. Which of the following best describes your market focus? A  Aerospace A  Marine & Offshore Equipment B  Agricultural Machinery B  Material Handling Equipment C  Automotive C  Mining Machinery D  Civil Engineering D  Packaging Machinery E  Cranes E  Plastic Machinery F  Drills & Drilling Equip. F  Presses & Foundry G  Flame Cutting/Welding Equip. G  Railroad Machinery H  Food Machinery H  Road Construct/Maint. Equip. I  Forestry I  Simulators & Test Equipment J  Furnaces J  Snow Vehicles, Ski Lifts K  Gas & Oilfield Machinery K  Steel Plants & Rolling Mills L  Heavy Construction & Equip. L  Truck & Bus Industry M  Military Vehicles M  Textile Machinery N  Construction & Utility Equip. N  Woodworking Machines O  Machine Tools O  Other (specify)_____________ P  Government Related P  Fluid Power Industry

My company should be advertising in or submit an article to the Fluid Power Journal. Please contact this person: Name:_ ________________________________________Title:___________________________________ Phone:_ _____________________________________________


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FPJTD11