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C1 • Leader • 7 May 2014

2014 Spring

Bridal Guide

The Event of a Lifetime

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C2 • Leader • 7 May 2014

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All Dolled Up Get the perfect look for your wedding Jessica Tanner Leader Assistant Editor

Whether a bride considers herself a girly girl or not, stylish hair dos, pretty makeup and fancy nails are a must for any wedding. There are a variety of looks and styles a bride can have for her big day and selecting a stylist can help make the job easy and fun. Possibilities salon hairstylist, Lindsey Hess, who has 10 years experience as a hairstylist and nail technician, offered tips for brides hoping to create the perfect look on their wedding day. A month before bridal pictures, a brideto-be should consult a hairstylist. It helps to have an idea in mind as well as a photo, showing what particular style

they hope to accomplish. “Ninety Nine percent of all brides who come in have a picture (of the desired hairstyle) they found on Pintrest,” said Hess. But, don’t worry if you can’t decide on a style. Hairstylists can offer tips and direction that meet your personality. Although styles may change, depending on thickness and length of hair, hairstylists can improvise, creating a similar look for your hair. Trends right now are loose up-dos, as well as curls to the side. Brides are also keeping their hair down or partially up with plenty of curls. “The really tight up-dos on the top are not as in right now,” Hess said. Since hairstylists

Acrylic nails are a perfect way to add the final touches to a bride's makeover. A natural look or fun colors can be added to fit any personality.

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Loose up-dos and lots of curls are wedding hairstyles that are trending right now. Selecting the right hairstylist can ensure the perfect look on your big day. can be busy, it’s important to setup appointments in advance. Early planning can ensure brides get the day and time that works best. For any wedding hairdo, three hair appointments are necessary. First, a practice day should be set up well enough in advance to ensure the hairstyle is what the bride has envisioned. Another appointment will have to be setup on the day of bridal pictures and, of course, the day of the wedding. The practice day is crucial to the bride and hairstylist. During this time, the bride can decide what she likes and voice what can be done differently to give her hair the perfect look. “Hair should be

trimmed and colored a week before bridals or at least a week before the wedding day,” said Hess. “You don’t want it to look too fresh, so we do it a week ahead.” Depending on the thickness and length of a bride’s hair, plan to spend about 45 minutes to an hour on hair alone. Although appointments range from morning to the afternoon, when a bride needs a 4 a.m., slot to make it to her destination on time, these hairstylists make it happen. “We just cater to the brides,” said Hess. Creating a flawless look on your big day requires the perfect makeup. According to Hess, natural looks are in. Natural colors that bring out the eyes and

create dramatic eyes are popular. Lipstick that matches skin tone also provide a classic look. Makeup can be done the same day as hair. Although a practice day is not necessary, a bride can setup one if desired. A layer of foundation and eye shadow is applied before moving on to hair. When the hairstyle is complete, the bride heads back to the makeup table to have mascara, eyeliner, blush and lipstick applied. Makeovers range from $15-$20 while the three days of hairstyles can cost up to $70. But factors such as length and thickness will contribute to costs. Fancy nails can add the finishing touch to a bride's makeover. Acrylic nails with a

Changing your name after marriage If you’re planning on changing your last name once you’re married, there are a number of steps you’ll need to take to ensure that the process goes smoothly. You’ll want to start getting everything together no later than 1-2 months before the wedding to give yourself enough time to track down all the paperwork that you’ll need. Here is a standard list of the documents you’ll need to update, and companies you’ll need to contact: Social security card Driver’s license and registration Passport Your employer Your local bank Credit card/financial companies Healthcare providers

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Insurance companies Utility companies (cable, electric, etc.) Landlord/homeowners association Attorney (to update any legal docs) Contact your company’s human resources department to notify them that your name will change, and find out what paperwork you’ll be required to fill out to update your employee record. You may also need new business cards and a new email address. Next, work on your social security card paperwork as you may need your updated card first in order to change other items such as your driver’s license. See the Social Security Administration’s website for how to change the last name on

your social security card. See the state department’s website for instructions on how to obtain a passport with your new name. Finally, contact your local DMV for driver’s license and registration change forms, and your bank, healthcare providers and other companies for their specific forms. Besides needing a marriage license to become legally married on your wedding day,

you’ll also need it to obtain a marriage certificate after the wedding which you’ll provide to the entities above to prove that your name has in fact changed. After the wedding, pick up your marriage certificate from your city or town hall (check with them first as there may be a short waiting period of a few days or more after the wedding while they process your certificate).

Also request at least 2-3 extra certified copies of your marriage certificate while you’re there as you’ll be required to submit a certified copy of it when you update your social security card and passport (and possibly other items). From this day forward,
You shall not walk alone.
My heart will be your shelter,
And my arms will be your home.
–from “Illuminata” (1994), Marianne Williamson

white French tip are very popular amongst brides. While most choose to keep these colors natural, fun colors can be added to meet any personality. Shellac is also a great alternative. Shellac is a gel that goes on like finger nail polish but it’s sealed under a UV light to maintain a great look that lasts longer than regular nail polish (about two weeks). Nails should be done a couple days before bridal pictures. A couple days before the wedding, acrylic nails will require a back fill, while shellac nails should be reapplied or touched up. Prices range from $18-$35 and include designs that can be painted or stamped on,

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Leader • 7 May 2014 • C3

Roll ‘Em!

Remember the day with a video Ellen Cook Leader Editor

Everyone wants to have a reminder of the day they said, “I do.” While pictures can tell part of the story, nothing captures the moments quite like a wedding video. Some may consider having a video of the wedding an unnecessary luxury and that money could be better spent elsewhere in the planning. But most people w h o pay the price f i n d t h e y have a c h e ri s h e d memory that will delight long after the cake is eaten and the flowers have wilted. The decision to hire a professional videographer will provide the happy couple with a professionally produced

video, not the homemade camcorder edition put together by cousin Ned. A professional video will showcase all moments of the wedding from perspectives not easily captured by photography. In addition to showcasing the images of the wedding, the video will also share the sounds and emotions of the day. Here are some things to think

about: * Choose a videographer who will work in conjunction with the

wedding mood and parameters. You probably don’t want a videographer who uses bright lights that can be distracting. Nor do you want a videographer who pushes the camera in guests’ faces. Today’s professionals are inconspicuous and simply record the events as they unfold. * The videographer often works in tandem with the photographer. Some photographers have a videographer on staff, but it is fine to bring in your own. * A videographer will capture the things you may have missed during the busy day. He or she can serve as the eyes and ears for the things you’re not seeing and hearing. * Even in a world where people capture everything on their smartphones, a wedding video can serve as a family memento. * Although no one wants to think of a friend

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While photos of the wedding can be great keepsakes, a video is sure to catch those unique moments during the ceremony and the reception that will bring smiles for years to come. or relative passing away while planning their wedding, the fact remains that after a few years some of the people who attended may no longer be around. Having a wedding video may be the only last moving image and sound of that special person. * Sound is an intricate part of that special day, but is often the part that is overlooked as the day progresses. To relive the music and the words, a videographer is a necessity. Professionals who use wireless

microphones will produce a video with the best sound quality. * Work with your videographer so you don’t end up with closeup shots of your face or unflattering awkward glimpses of your guests. Talk about your preferences and even fears about being filmed (some people just don’t like watching themselves on TV), and the videographer can no doubt find solutions that will accommodate your needs. * Greeting guests can be full-time job dur-

ing a wedding, so a video will let you see what you didn’t see when it was happening. This is where a wedding video can prove invaluable. * Modern videographers offer high-resolution, edited movies. These can be delivered via Blu Ray DVD and ensure the best quality for your package. Having your day in video is definitely a memory worth the extra cost. Scrimp on other details if you must, but don't pass up the wedding video.

What’s my role? Best man, maid of honor have specific duties Special to the Leader

Being chosen as a best man or a maid of honor is a significant and meaningful honor. Those roles have evolved over the years, but these special participants must still perform some of the traditional duties of the past, including serving as the official witnesses to the ceremony. The following is a rundown of the various duties maids of honor and best men are now expected to handle once they’re chosen for these distinguished honors. Prior to the wedding Before the wedding takes place, the maid of honor will closely assist

the bride-to-be with many of the important decisions related to the look and feel of the wedding. She typically accompanies the bride to dress shops to select gowns for the bride and bridesmaids. Much in the same manner, the best man will assist the groom-to-be with choosing tuxedoes or suits and also with coordinating with the ushers to ensure they know when to go for fittings. Although the best man will serve as a sounding board for the groom, traditionally the bride and her bridesmaids have taken on the majority of the wedding planning, so the maid of honor can expect to play

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Keeping the groom cool, calm and collected, as well as looking his best on the big day, is the role of the best man.

a larger role than the best man. The maid of honor may be asked to delegate certain assignments, such as helping to find wedding vendors or addressing invitations. She may go with the bride for makeup and hairstyle trials. Together with the bridesmaids, she will plan a bridal shower party and a bachelorette excursion. She may select a wedding gift for the couple and present it on behalf of all the wedding attendants. The best man will coordinate the bachelor party and may be asked to assist the groom with selecting a honeymoon site or to come along to book the trip. Wedding day On the day of the wedding, the maid of honor and the best man will act as a support system for the bride and groom. The maid of honor will help the bride get dressed and help iron out any mini-emergencies that should crop up. The best man will help ensure all of the ushers are dressed and get the groom to the wedding on time. During the ceremony, the maid of honor

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The maid of honor will keep busy helping the bride during the days and hours before the wedding, as well as taking care of details after. will hold the bride’s bouquet while she participates in the wedding. The best man will keep the rings safe until they are needed. The maid of honor also will help adjust the bride’s train and veil as she sits and stands during the ceremony. Both will sign the marriage certificate as witnesses. At the reception, the best man is expected to give a toast and the maid of honor may share some words, as well. She also may accompany the bride to the rest-

room and assist her with managing the gown. After the wedding The best man will be in charge of returning the tuxedoes to the rental shop, if necessary. He also may drive the newly married couple to the airport so they can depart on their honeymoon. The maid of honor will assist the bride in changing out of her gown and into her travel clothes. Oftentimes the maid of honor takes the gown to the cleaners in the days following the

ceremony so the dress can be preserved.

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Thanks for the etiquette Jessica Tanner Leader Assistant Editor

Weddings are usually associated with a flood of gifts from family and friends helping the happy couple start their new lives together on the right foot. Whether those gifts be cash, registry items or a helping hand in the wedding, each should be given the proper thank you. Kara Welling, of Kara’s Koncepts Graphic Designs, offered some thank you tips. “Keep it simple and easy, do not turn it into another big wedding task or else it will not get done,” she said. Couples should plan to spend time writing thank you notes together, expressing gratitude to those who thought of them on their big day. Writing a few thank you cards here and there can help the couple avoid a giant stack to tackle after the honeymoon. Welling suggests making it fun by having a date night. Timing is important. Wedding etiquette says the couple has 90 days to get thank yous out after the wedding. But it’s better to send notes late than not at all. Obtaining a stationary that matches your announcements or using a photo from the wed-

ding with a personalized note on the back are great ways to tie your gratitude and your big day together. But inexpensive, thank you cards can also be purchased. Welling said postcards are a great way to save money on stamps. They also provide a smaller space so the couple won’t feel obligated to fill up a big empty card. Although you want to find something that matches your personality, keep in mind that the thank you is more important than the card itself. Don’t use preprinted cards with a general message and your signature, or a mass thank you on social medias. “Always hand write your thank yous,” said Welling. “Generic cards

with a pre-written saying are not genuine.” When writing names, always make sure they are spelled correctly and remember

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Thank you cards are the perfect way to express your gratitude for gifts and helping hands on your big day. Personalized postcards can be a fun way to show your appreciation.

to make every note meaningful and specific to each person. “Use a blue pen instead of black when writing your notes,” Welling

suggests, “It makes the card look more personable.” Referencing the gift and what it will be used for adds a personal touch. Mentioning the amount of a monetary gift helps confirm to the giver that the right amount was received. Make a list of those

who contributed in some way to the wedding and be sure to send them a thank you note. Verbal praise is always appropriate but should not be used in place of a written thank you. Anyone who provided an engagement, shower or wedding gift, gave money, hosted a party or shower, attendants in the wedding, those who housed guests, parents of the bride and groom, suppli-

ers and vendors, as well as employers who wished the couple well should all be included. Couples can ensure their guests know they appreciated the gifts and other efforts that went into their big day by following thank you etiquette. View example postcards provided by Kara’s Koncepts visit, http:// karaskoncepts.blogspot. com/search/label/ THANK%20YOUS

Including the mother-in-law Eric Marble Special to the Leader

One of my favorite parts about being a graphic designer is creating wedding announcements. I find it endearing, and sometimes comical, to watch the interaction between future bride and groom as they learn how to communicate their ideas to each other, all the while trying to please each other and not step on the other’s toes. I often hear things like, “If you like the way it looks, then I love it!” or “Do you think that is the best picture to use?” or “Why are you choosing all the pictures that show your face and the back of my head?” If you throw one of the mothers into the mix, things can get outright hysterical and even brutal. Here are a few tips for dealing with your future mother-in-law when you are designing your wedding invitations. 1. Remember, it is about her, as well. I once heard a mother-in-law tell her future daughter, “Well, this invitation is going out to my friends and family, and I don’t like the way it looks, so we are going to change it.” Awkward! Eventually we arrived

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at a design they both liked and everyone was happy, but there were definitely some tense moments there. The announcement should highlight the couple, but the parents are part of the celebration, and often funding the wedding, so you should find a way to compromise on ideas. Show her that you respect her opinion and she will be even more excited about you marrying her son. 2. Ask her opinion before meeting with the designer. Your mother-inlaw might be into leg warmers and oversized T-shirts, while you are into flats and boxy tops. Sharing your ideas and asking her opinion before meeting with the designer can prevent many conflicts. In addition to colors, pictures and layout ideas, decide on announcement text beforehand. Be sure to ask how to spell names, whether they want maiden names included, how they want the ex-spouses and those who have passed on recognized, etc. 3. Be on the same page as your future spouse. During one design session with a bride, groom and the groom’s mother, everyone had strong opinions. The groom ducked out of the fight early and

resorted to the neutral “Whatever you like is great!” mantra. But when it came down to the finishing touches the bride and mother-in-law started yelling at each other. Finally they turned to the groom and said, “You decide! Whose side are you on?” I could see the fear in his eyes, but he made the difficult decision and I cheered when he chose to stand by his bride. 4. Ask your mother-inlaw to help with something else. If you worry that you will not be able to design the perfect announcement with your mother-in-law in tow, discuss another responsibility you can assign to her instead. For this to work, the son should first discuss the assignment with her, and the task should be as meaningful as the announcement (don’t ask her to buy nut cups while you are designing). Last, show her a proof before you send the announcements to print. She may suggest minor changes, but this way you will protect the essence of the design. 5. Remember, she loves her son as much as you do. I often get to design for wedding groups where you can feel everyone’s excitement for the event. Most often,

when I design announcements, there is a lot of laughter, kind words and a great feeling of love. If you remember that your future motherin-law actually “grew” the groom, and then gave up her life and time to help him grow into the man you now love, it makes it easier to accept her help on announcements and throughout your marriage. Our society has placed a horrible stereotype on “mothers-in-law” which generally does not hold true. For the

most part, your in-laws will be a source of strength, stability and counsel in your marriage. If you remember how much influence for good they have had, and will have, in your future together, your life will be one of bliss. Eric Marble is the owner of Marketing Spot On and has been designing announcements, invitations, thank you cards, etc. for over 15 years. He has a wonderful wife of 13 years, and an awesome mother-in-law.

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While the day may be yours, allowing your motherin-law a say in some of the planning process will ensure that the years ahead will be happier ones.


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