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contents THE PRODUCT GUIDE August 2020 / Vol. 91 No. 06

DEPARTMENTS on the street ................ 18 deep focus ................ 22 pre-production ................ 26 exposure ................ 30 production credits ................ 134 stop motion .............. 144

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FEATURE 01 TIME, AGAIN Hoyte Van Hoytema, ASC, NSC, FSF, deploys largeformat cinematography to chase down Christopher Nolan’s elastic new spy thriller, Tenet. Photo by Melinda Sue Gordon, SMPSP

FEATURE 02 POWER PLAY Katori Hall’s new STARZ series, P-Valley, based on her theatrical production about the empowerment of Black women in the Delta, reinvents film noir for a new generation. Photo by Jessica Miglio, SMPSP

SPECIAL THE PRODUCT GUIDE

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54 72


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Publisher Teresa Muñoz Executive Editor David Geffner Art Director Wes Driver

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tyler Bourdeau

STAFF WRITER Pauline Rogers

ACCOUNTING

Glenn Berger Dominique Ibarra

COPY EDITORS

Peter Bonilla Maureen Kingsley

CONTRIBUTORS Debra Kaufman Kevin Martin Myles Mellor Valentina Valentini

August 2020 vol. 91 no. 06

Local

600

International Cinematographers Guild

IATSE Local 600 NATIONAL PRESIDENT John Lindley, ASC VICE PRESIDENT Dejan Georgevich, ASC 1ST NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Christy Fiers 2ND NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Baird Steptoe NATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Stephen Wong NATIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER Jamie Silverstein NATIONAL SERGEANT-AT-ARMS Deborah Lipman NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Rebecca Rhine ASSOCIATE NATIONAL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Chaim Kantor

COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE

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ADVERTISING POLICY: Readers should not assume that any products or services advertised in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine are endorsed by the International Cinematographers Guild. Although the Editorial staff adheres to standard industry practices in requiring advertisers to be “truthful and forthright,” there has been no extensive screening process by either International Cinematographers Guild Magazine or the International Cinematographers Guild. EDITORIAL POLICY: The International Cinematographers Guild neither implicitly nor explicitly endorses opinions or political statements expressed in International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. ICG Magazine considers unsolicited material via email only, provided all submissions are within current Contributor Guideline standards. All published material is subject to editing for length, style and content, with inclusion at the discretion of the Executive Editor and Art Director. Local 600, International Cinematographers Guild, retains all ancillary and expressed rights of content and photos published in ICG Magazine and icgmagazine.com, subject to any negotiated prior arrangement. ICG Magazine regrets that it cannot publish letters to the editor. ICG (ISSN 1527-6007) Ten issues published annually by The International Cinematographers Guild 7755 Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, CA, 90046, U.S.A. Periodical postage paid at Los Angeles, California. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ICG 7755 Sunset Boulevard Hollywood, California 90046 Copyright 2020, by Local 600, International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States and Canada. Entered as Periodical matter, September 30, 1930, at the Post Office at Los Angeles, California, under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscriptions: $88.00 of each International Cinematographers Guild member’s annual dues is allocated for an annual subscription to International Cinematographers Guild Magazine. Non-members may purchase an annual subscription for $48.00 (U.S.), $82.00 (Foreign and Canada) surface mail and $117.00 air mail per year. Single Copy: $4.95 The International Cinematographers Guild Magazine has been published monthly since 1929. International Cinematographers Guild Magazine is a registered trademark.

www.icgmagazine.com www.icg600.com


president's letter

A Town Like No Other This is excerpted from an email a member recently sent me: “The uncertainty circulating has created a fog which makes it hard to see beyond arm’s reach. While it is true that no one has any idea when this virus will be contained or cured, it’s hard not to feel like an orphan, left to figure life on his own… a bit dramatic, but the feeling is there. My wife and I are having a hard time deciding if it’s a good idea to abandon our sevenyear apartment… my hopes that work might start in August were crushed when I received another call from my UPM stating that the job was pushed to January. Following the pattern, I can’t help but guess January is the theoretical and desired start time for Productions, Studios, and Insurance Co. Please help. Words of advice. Guidance.” This email speaks to the uncertainty we all feel. Each of us has gone through periods of unemployment, but we have never experienced it all together, and all at the same time. It’s frustrating and frightening to know there is no target date for getting back to work. But while financial and health uncertainties weigh heavily, we must all continue to believe in our future because we make a product that is in demand and will continue to be so. When? No one knows. In March, there was talk of being back up in September, and that seemed in the far distance. Now, even that date may be optimistic. Advice? As a Canadian epidemiologist recently put it: “We are all in the same storm, but in different boats.” The best advice I can offer is to be cautious and do whatever it takes to stay healthy, so you can work when the call comes. Be as defensive as you can be financially. Consider taking advantage of the IAP withdrawal. Advocate with elected representatives to continue the federal unemployment assistance program. Find ways to help others in and out of our industry. Find emotional support everywhere you can. Your union sisters and brothers are a deep source of strength, and so is this Local, despite a capacity that’s been severely diminished by furloughs and staff reductions brought on by financial imperatives. None of those reductions were good for morale, but they were necessary. Unfortunately, the result has been that members’ calls don’t get returned as quickly and some issues may take longer to resolve. But I assure you our staff is working harder than it ever has to meet your needs. So, please be patient. In June, the National Executive Board voted overwhelmingly to secure another two-year commitment from our National Executive Director, Rebecca Rhine, confirming that bargaining remains a top priority for this membership. Returning to work safely has been the highest priority, and Rebecca, along

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with Associate National Executive Director Chaim Kantor, has protected our jobs at every juncture. They are the “A-Team” of bargaining. We have also renewed our efforts to broaden and strengthen our membership through inclusion and diversity initiatives. Our Local has ongoing relationships with such training organizations as Hollywood CPR, Manifest Works, and Brooklyn Workforce Innovations, and it is actively looking to connect with new programs in cities such as New Orleans, Chicago, and Atlanta. We have reached out to the ASC about a Town Hall– style meeting on inclusion and are anticipating that the SOC will partner with us as well. There is no quick fix for decades of racial inequality in this industry, but there are many opportunities for us to do better in this area, and we can and will. To remain financially viable, our Finance Committee, SecretaryTreasurer, and Assistant Secretary-Treasurer, along with Controller Glenn Berger, have worked tirelessly, so that when this is over, we will have a strong union. Political efforts continue because we will need to elect leaders in November who care about unions and working families; we must succeed at the polls. I have worked all over this country and around the world and can say without hesitation this membership is made up of the most capable and talented camera crews on the planet. Despite an uncertain present, the future remains very bright. Adversity can be divisive, or it can bring us together. Let’s choose unity. We can disagree but still fight together for our shared goals. Two people visit a Zen master. The first one says: “I’m thinking of moving to this town. What is it like?” The Zen master asks: “What was your old town like?” The first person responds: “It was dreadful. Everyone was hateful. I hated it.” The Zen master says: “This town is very much the same. I don’t think you should move here.” The first person exits, and a second person comes in, who says: “I’m thinking of moving to this town. What’s it like?” The Zen master asks: “What was your old town like?” The second person responds: “It was wonderful. Everyone was friendly, and I was happy. I’m just interested in a change.” The Zen master says: “This town is very much the same. I think you will like it here.” A lot is out of our control – for now. But we can choose who we want to be and what this union stands for. In this filmmaking town, we will survive, and we will thrive, and so will Local 600. John Lindley, ASC National President International Cinematographers Guild IATSE Local 600


Photo by Sara Terry

wide angle

I

f there ever was any doubt that “fluidity� is the new normal, or as sociologist Zygmunt Bauman described in his 2007 book, Liquid Times: Living in an Age of Uncertainty, that “social forms and institutions no longer have enough time to solidify and cannot serve as frames of reference for human actions and long-term life plans,� just take a look at our cover story for this month’s Product Guide Issue on the Christopher Nolan sci-fi thriller Tenet (page 36). Shot by Director of Photography Hoyte Van Hoytema, ASC, NSC, FSF, with a full Local 600 camera team, Warner Bros. had set Tenet for a July 17, 2020 release. Then COVID-19 came and the date was pushed to July 31, then August 12, then Tenet was (briefly) pulled indefinitely from theaters before a new U.S. release date was announced for Labor Day weekend (which still feels premature given COVID’s resurgence in so many U.S. cities). Our May cover story on Greyhound had a similar evolution: Sony Pictures originally had a May 2019 theatrical release, then the film was moved to May 2020, and then June, before being pulled indefinitely. While Warner Bros. and Nolan (who shot a large chunk of Tenet on IMAX and is an evangelist for the cinematic experience) are intent on reigniting in-person movie-going, Sony opted to sell Greyhound to Apple TV+ (resulting in a reported 30 percent of new viewership to the platform). Both studios have publicly stated their deep commitments to theatrical exhibition, albeit in an environment that guarantees safety for cinema patrons; yet it’s Apple that has new projects lined up from Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg into 2021 and beyond. How much does all this “platform fluidity� impact IATSE crafts teams and their on-set choices? Both Greyhound, shot by Shelly Johnson, ASC, and Tenet could never have imagined a COVID-19 scenario during production – key creative attributes like aspect ratio, composition, lens selection, lighting for backgrounds/VFX were all designed by the filmmakers for the biggest canvas available. Yet when I recently asked Johnson if he was disappointed about the

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lack of a theatrical release, he said, “At this point,� he was “just glad the film found an audience given all the uncertainty.� Securing an audience will not be a problem for the STARZ series P-Valley (page 54). Co-shot by Nancy Schreiber, ASC, and Richard Vialet, this project from first-time showrunner Katori Hall (Exposure, page 30) is based on Hall’s own 2015 play set in a Mississippi strip club. Hall describes the look as “Delta noir,� grungy and raw off-stage, vibrant, and saturated for the dancers around the pole. Vialet is a 35-year-old Black filmmaker from the Virgin Islands; Schreiber is a veteran ASC member with decades of awards. Their life experiences are quite different, yet both artists were united in wanting an inclusive production team to transpose the playwright’s vision about Black female sex-workers to television. Hall, who ended up using a different female director for each episode (most of them women of color), was open to hiring male directors “but when I asked [the male candidates] how they would bring a female gaze to the show, they never had an answer; probably because they’ve never had to think about it,� she shared with ICG writer Valentina Valentini. Hall wanted the show told from the female perspective even beyond the writing, “and the women who interviewed for the job were more in-tune with the historical misrepresentation, as they’ve had to combat that in their work,� she noted. Being in tune with Local 600 camera teams, despite this “age of uncertainty,� is always a priority of the vendors featured in our Product Guide (page 72); and despite the canceling of every major 2020 trade show, they still came through. Highlights include a firmware update to Flanders Scientific International’s 3000-nit HDR reference monitor, the XM310K, in Display; a new high-output, fully dimmable hard light (ReFlex R15) from Cineo in Lighting; the Mavic Air 2, a new compact folding drone from industry leader DJI in Capture; a 52-foot telescoping crane arm from Chapman/Leonard that can be transported through doorways as small as 60 inches in Support; and a mobile app from Technicolor, in our Workflow section, that provides a secure real-time window in a VFXreview or color-grade. Okay, so Bauman’s words about “liquid modernity� requiring us to “change tactics at short notice, to abandon commitments and loyalties without regret and to pursue opportunities according to their current availability,� do ring scarily true. But thank goodness we have the union members like those profiled in this August issue, and an industry support structure behind them that never wavers.

CONTRIBUTORS

Debra Kaufman Product Guide: Workflow “What amazing serendipity that we’re seeing cloud workflows mature just as the COVID-19 pandemic has made them essential. I believe we’re in for a very exciting time where the necessity of remote or safer workflows will accelerate innovation.� 012314545

678954 2 

Myles Mellor Stop Motion “It’s a privilege every year to create a crossword puzzle for ICG Magazine based on the year’s212 cutting-edge products and breakthroughs. I do watch a lot of films and TV shows, and it’s amazing to see how far cinematography has come. Creating the ICG puzzle is a joy in that I can bring entertainment to readers and a challenge relating to their field.�

11  11151!"1#$%&'5 (2

ICG MAGAZINE

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David Geffner Executive Editor

Twitter: @DGeffner Email: david@icgmagazine.com

Cover photo by Melinda Sue Gordon, SMPSP

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TENET

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P-VALLEY


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ON THE STREET

08.2020

Remote Workflows DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY/DIGITAL FINISHING ARTIST BY PAULINE ROGERS

LIGHT IRON COLORIST IAN VERTOVEC WORKING IN HIS HOME GRADING STUDIO / COURTESY OF IAN VERTOVEC/LIGHT IRON

There is nothing more crucial than the time a Local 600 Director of Photography and the Colorist, aka the Digital Finishing Artist, carve out when entering that darkened DI suite. Viewing the project frame by frame, they tweak richness, smooth or add grain, refine highlights and shadows and so much more. But what happens when mandates like “shelter in place” take precedent, altering a workflow that had already enjoyed a fair amount of remote

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collaboration? Has that relationship suffered or been enhanced by recent events? Reaching out to a variety of image-grading teams, we discovered results that were surprising and quite encouraging, and included everything from CDC-compliant post facilities to an array of remote streaming options. Here’s what they had to say.

(continued on page 20)


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ON THE STREET

MTI

STEVE PORTER, SUPERVISING COLORIST STEPHEN MCNUTT, ASC, CSC, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY For the finish of the Apple TV+ web series For All Mankind (see ICG Magazine, October 2019), not all that much has changed [due to COVID-19]. Steve Porter continues to work from MTI Hollywood, while Local 600 Director of Photography Stephen McNutt is at MTI’s “sister” facility, Finalé Post, in Vancouver, not far from his home base. “We’re using the same technology as before the pandemic,” Porter describes. “I color on a Sony PVM-X300 [4K reference monitor] and do an analysis pass through Dolby Vision that maps the HDR to SDR, which is displayed on an LG OLED. That signal is then sent via T-VIPS to the facility in Vancouver, and Stephen and I are able to discuss his vision for the show at that same time I’m creating mood and textures to allow him to make decisions and see scenes play out in real time. COVID may keep us apart but that doesn’t stop our ability to still be creative and do the best work we can. “MTI is washed every day. We self-isolate. We wear protective gear. There’s no chatting in the hallways,” Porter adds. “Coffee and bathroom runs are limited and treated carefully. It’s a conscious choice so that we can have access to the highest quality tools available, knowing we can handle higher nit rates.” McNutt gets the file of his final project so he can view it at his home on his 25-inch Sony OLED monitor, which is calibrated with McNutt’s own grading and DaVinci Resolve. “I won’t use it for remote grading, because it doesn’t match the main MTI monitor,” he explains. “But it helps me look at the density and color to see if anything is off. The greatest challenge now is that I can’t view the image in 4K or HDR remotely. So, they send an HDR copy to Finalé, and I will view it on their system. I’ve contacted the facility, and they are following the protocol. They have the room cleaned and are offering masks and gloves. I’m bringing my own. They are supplying disinfectant and sanitizers in the room and a fob for the restroom door to limit interaction.”

STEPHEN MCNUTT VIEWING GRADE IN SANITIZED “CLEAN ROOM” AT FINALE POST, BC / COURTESY OF FINALÉ POST

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GOLDCREST

NAT JENCKS, COLORIST JAY KEITEL, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS TEAGUE, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY When stay-at-home orders hit, the colorists at Goldcrest Post, New York, packed up their tools and moved – fast. Colorist Nat Jencks added another packing session – his apartment in Brooklyn. He’s moved into a friend’s editing facility in upstate New York, unpacking carefully (after boxes sat outside for a few days). His setup is as close to what he had in New York as possible. “What we were concerned about was how to get our DP’s up and running,” Jencks admits. “Could we get Sony X300 monitors in their hands? More than the cost, it was the logistics [that were of concern]. Ultimately, we found that for SDR work that iPad Pros were a great way to go. Working with Jay Keitel on She Dies Tomorrow, he has an accurate iPad Pro, where he can view links for comments with Frame.io. If we need to evaluate sharpness or things of this nature that don’t do well over streaming, we send him a full-resolution file via Signiant Media Shuttle, and he can download it to his laptop.” Keitel is working from his home loft in downtown Los Angeles. He says the stay-at-home protocol has provided new freedom – pushing images from his calibrated iPad Pro to various devices. “My large Sony monitor is calibrated for viewing in a lighted family-room environment,” Keitel explains. “I then look at the shots on my iPhone and the iPad. I will take them to a PC monitor that is set up in a darker environment. I also view them on another MacBook Pro in a very dark room. I often take the iPhone outside and inside as well, to have a look and see how it translates. I can see the result – for theater, for streaming – whatever. It’s almost like mixing music – I can find something in one and something in another and put it all together and talk about it with Nat.” Jencks is also working with Chris Teague on the pilot for HBO Max’s tentatively titled Vegas High. “Because we had only done a look-set and not an actual grading before the pandemic, it was important for us to have at least a little inperson grading time, which we did via Sohonet ClearView Flex,” Jencks explains. “It allows me to stream the output of my coloring system to Chris’s iPad Pro, laptop, and AppleTV [paired with an LG C9 OLED].” “There is only a one-second-or-less lag, so I can see corrections that Nat made in almost real time,” Teague adds. “It was an excellent workflow, and I could see it being used even after the pandemic. It could be very useful either to do a rough color timing that we then look over in the room together when we can, or to be in a situation where we set the look of a show on the first few episodes. Then we do a remote review of later episodes. It’s not a replacement for being in the room and looking at the same high-quality calibrated monitor together, but it was much better than I had expected.”


08.2020

LIGHT IRON

IAN VERTOVEC, SUPERVISING COLORIST, L.A. PATRICK SCOLA, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

UPPER LEFT: COLORIST NAT JENCKS / COURTESY OF GOLDCREST POST ABOVE: DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY TROY SMITH ON THE SET OF MIXED-ISH/ PHOTO BY BYRON COHEN/ABC LEFT: DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY JAY KEITEL

THE FOUNDATION

GARETH COOK, MANAGING PARTNER/COLORIST TROY SMITH, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY According to The Foundation’s Gareth Cook, working remotely was implemented swiftly and ended up being easier than expected. “There were different remote workflows in place, due to the stage of where shows were in finishing,” Cook shares. “Initially, the remote was slower on some shows than others. One workflow required sending color-corrected files through a porthole, at a speed that was dependent on bandwidth where the files were being received. Colorcorrected shows were downloaded and reviewed; notes were sent back and addressed; and the rest of the finishing process was continued,” Cook adds. Then, there was a second – more direct and fun – process that was used with Troy Smith as he finished this season of Mixed-ish. “Several years ago we created a proprietary system called FoundationLink, where we could feed images live from our facility and work with directors in hotel rooms,” Cook continues. “We decided to use that system for color review with Troy, where all he has to do is log into the Foundation site, with a two-factor secure setup.” Smith, who uses a MacBook Pro 16 and a BenQ highresolution external monitor, says Cook calibrated his monitor before each session. “Then when I logged in,”Smith explains, “we were able to seamlessly work together, making changes and adjustments in real time, just as if I were in the room. It’s painless and enjoyable. Both Gareth and I were extremely pleased with the results.”

Moving equipment meant to work in a dedicated machine room with specialized power and cooling, Light Iron’s engineering staff had hours to redesign the setup at colorist Ian Vertovec’s home in Los Angeles. They could, however, use Baselight ONE and an SAS RAID from their Dailies department. “We took an X300 monitor and a Blackboard 2 control surface from one of the color bays,” Vertovec recalls. “I was able to keep source media on an encrypted drive at home and remote into the Light Iron project database to share projects with my editors and VFX artists. “Working remotely, as I did with Patrick on his new feature, it’s a synchronized session that’s loaded locally, referencing my media and outputting 4K to my Sony X300. Baselight sends commands to another Baselight at Light Iron that is outputting HD to a hardware Streambox encoder. That encoder is streaming an HD image directly to iPad Pros that both Patrick and I have. On top of this, we are talking to each other over a Google Meet on another iPad. I have Slack on my phone that I use to communicate with my editor and Production, should any additional support be needed.” Having iPad Pros to monitor the stream was critical, as Vertovec had to see the compressed HD stream and understand any part of the image that may have been getting lost in translation. Both men knew the film had rich scenes, with pushed darker details that have a grainy texture. Since Scola didn’t have any high-end monitors available in his home, they had to work out an alternative. For these sequences, Vertovec sent Scola a sampled frame in TIFF file format so he could see that the original texture remained intact upstream of the compression. “It’s fairly simple for me,” Scola reports. “I view a live stream on the iPad Pro from Ian’s Baselight, and we communicate by phone. Once you turn off True Tone and adjust the brightness calibration based on the black levels proved by Light Iron, the iPad is fairly close to the image we need to see. Unfortunately,” he laughs, “the only fully dark, windowless room in my house is the bathroom! But even spending 16 hours on the floor in the dark is a welcome alternative to not working during quarantine.” Scola has loaded Moxion, a viewing app that provides a high-resolution version, which he can view on an LG OLED panel at home. “It works fine. I’ve graded theatrically in the past this way,” he adds. “Still,” Scola concludes, “I do thrive on the energy of the people around me, and that extends into the DI suite when grading a film. The relationship that forms with a colorist, the one you both form with the film, is built in the dark in those early sessions.”

THE PROD U C T GUIDE

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DEEP FOCUS

08.2020

Tari Segal DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTO BY PARRISH LEWIS

The switch from film to digital capture was a strange learning curve. Film lighting felt like painting with broad strokes, something to be imagined. Lighting for digital is so “instant,” and the shadow details can become distracting. As an over-thinker, I was suddenly spending more time at the monitor than behind the camera, trying to take light away. I benefited greatly from having been a gaffer. Working for other DP’s and being able to concentrate just on the light was an invaluable experience. I always had a light meter, practicing consistency with contrast, and problem-solving “impossible” lighting requests. Those experiences helped me better communicate with my gaffers as well as be able to step onto locations and see the immediate potential they offered.

I was introduced to Lisa Wiegand [ASC], who knew I was trying to establish myself as a DP in the indie world. She gave me freedom to run the set and eventually brought me on to three other series as her second unit DP. I learned the politics of the television world quickly. Wolf Films eventually offered me FBI [CBS Television]. Looking back, it is quite remarkable to be a woman heading up a procedural series for a network. I remember the first time I stepped onto a set as a DP. I had spent so much time prepping the visuals with the director and thinking: if I can imagine it then I can reproduce it. But the reality of running a set and communicating with a crew to create those visuals was a whole other side I had yet to experience. Being a great communicator, along with

working the politics of production, was something I developed on set. Today the image is no longer entirely ours. Directors, producers, and so many others on set can look at the DP’s monitor and offer an opinion. It can feel like a little bit of the magic of the cinematographer has vanished. What I would describe as “The Golden Age of the Cinematographer,” with Conrad Hall [ASC], Allen Daviau [ASC], and the like is gone. Phedon Papamichael [ASC, GSC] was my mentor. He, too, is part of the generation of masters who were true rock stars. DP’s coming up today will have a hard time finding that sort of place on the set. The digital age of filmmaking has made it harder to hold yourself apart. (continued on page 24)

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DEEP FOCUS

08.2020

PHOTO BY MICHAEL PARMELEE / CBS

“Having union crews at the forefront of this [new on-set landscape] will provide a stronger voice, which is needed to maintain image quality – and a safe workplace.”

I’m excited to test out Sony VENICE, as I have heard great things. What’s intriguing is being able to separate the sensor and have the body tethered. I’m reminded of the old ARRI M, which I wanted to hunt down for FBI. I’m always looking for more dynamic angles to place a camera, especially in a small picture car. For FBI, I wanted to “dirty up” the image by shooting on primes, with a strong desaturation of the color palette. I was able to get away with a lot more than I thought with the very supportive

producers. When it came to shooting the Most Wanted pilot, we wanted it to be different enough from FBI, while still living in the same world. I’ve overly adapted to living out of a suitcase [laughs] and never knowing where I’ll be for months. I love and crave it! On the set of Sideways, the sound mixer José Antonio García was lying on the back of a lift gate at lunch, and as I walked by, he said, “You know, it’s a gypsy kind of life we live.” That resonates. Shutdown has meant time to think about what

production will be like when we get back to work. There will be some major changes if we are to get back to work quickly and safely: how we hire our crew, location consideration, possibly even rate changes. That all may sound bleak, but I feel these will be temporary solutions. Having union crews at the forefront of this [new on-set landscape] will provide a stronger voice, which is needed to maintain image quality – and a safe workplace. I also expect to see a great surge in the technologies we use, like with monitoring and LED lighting, and that will be exciting. (cont'd on page 26)

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CONFUSION ABOUT DIFFUSION? TIFFEN TRIANGLE OF DIFFUSION CONTRAST REDUCTION

HA TIO LA

WARM PRO-MIST

ULTRA CONTRAST

SMOQUE

PRO-MIST

N

WARM BLACK PRO-MIST

IN

BLACK PRO-MIST

LOW CONTRAST

CR

DOUBLE FOG

EA

FOG

SE

PEARLESCENT BLACK PEARLESCENT

BRONZE GLIMMERGLASS

GLIMMERGLASS

BLACK GLIMMERGLASS

BLACK SATIN

HDTV/FX

BLACK DIFFUSION/ FX SATIN

BLACK NET

LEGEND

DIGITAL DIFFUSION/ FX

GOLD DIFFUSION/ FX

TIFFEN’S TRIANGLE OF DIFFUSION

WHITE HALATION DIFFUSION BLACK HALATION DIFFUSION WARM SOFT/FX

N

WARM HALATION DIFFUSION

N TIO

LU

HALATION Increase in halation, blooming, or spreading of illumination around highlights.

SO

ATMOSPHERE

SOFT/FX

SEEING IS BELIEVING Want to see in detail how each filter performs? Check out our diffusion filter test at tiffen.com/diffusion

RE

RESOLUTION & CONTRAST REDUCTION

RE

WARM RESOLUTION DIFFUSION

CT

BLACK SOFT/FX

DU

BLACK RESOLUTION DIFFUSION

IO

OPTICAL RESOLUTION DIFFUSION

This graphic illustrates the subtle differences and variations across Tiffen’s large range of diffusion filters. The location of each circle represents the filter’s effect in regards to Halation, Contrast, and Resolution characteristics, as well as the relationship of their effects to each other. Results may vary with different lighting, lens and atmosphere conditions. As always, test test test.

CONTRAST Reduction in contrast to brighten shadows for a muted, log-like look. RESOLUTION Reduction in resolution to assist with softening wrinkles and blemishes.

The Tiffen Company LLC. | 90 Oser Ave. Hauppauge, NY 11788 | ©2020 The Tiffen Company. All trademarks or registered trademarks are property of their respective owners. THE PROD U C T GUIDE

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PRE-PRODUCTION

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Patrick Loungway 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAULINE ROGERS PHOTO COURTESY OF PATRICK LOUNGWAY

“I wished to be at the same time among the enchanters and the enchanted, at the same time to have a secret hand in the play, and to enjoy, as an onlooker the pleasure of illusion.” “I have always liked this quote from Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship because it sums up the dual enjoyment to be had from both loving films as a viewer and devoting one’s life to them as a profession,” describes Local 600 Director of

Photography Patrick Loungway, whose long résumé in 2nd unit work reveals he’s been living just that dream. Loungway’s bio includes such massively complex franchise projects as Captain America: Civil War, Jurassic World, and the Pirates of the Caribbean series; The Hunger Games, Twilight, Suicide Squad, Ghost in the Shell, and Bill & Ted Face the Music. Growing up at the nexus of a new-age hippie lifestyle and a cutting-edge semiconductor

venture-capital trickle-down tech boom in Palo Alto, California, Loungway was just as likely to be disassembling a telephone as he was viewing films at local art theaters. His self-taught artistry was captured on 3-minute, 20-second Kodachrome 40 film cartridges, which eventually became his calling card, securing him a job with a burgeoning (at the time) Bay Area effects company called Industrial Light & Magic. “While in the model shop on Ghostbusters 2, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and The ’Burbs, I watched model makers such as Lorne Peterson, Steve Gawley, and Bill George,” Loungway fondly recounts. “Every touch and detail was rendered from the point-of-view of the camera lens. Foreground details were astonishingly detailed, and background elements were sometimes slapdash and impressionistic. “We had open dailies screenings every morning,” Loungway continues. “It was a master class, sitting in a darkened corner of that couchfilled projection room as the flashlight pointers critiqued the project. Shots evolved over the days on their journey to becoming ‘finals.’ It was photochemical, and anything that might be imagined in the director’s mind had to be built in the real world and photographed by cameras that were made to move under gravity’s rules.” Loungway recalls a discussion of his being a “skinny-enough guy” to drive the camera go-cart through a miniature tunnel set chased by a burning Nazi Messerschmitt miniature for Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. “Thankfully, they ended up with an unmanned sled approach,” he smiles. Transitioning into the Matte department, Loungway began shooting latent image plates. “I had the privilege of a close-up view of how cinematographers like Allen Daviau [ASC], Dean Semler [ASC, ACS], Robert Richardson [ASC], and Philippe Rousselot [ASC, AFC], among others, liked to work. We would go out on location for a week or two with the first unit to get what we needed to make the shot work.” But, Loungway says, matte work was not his passion. He began to build a reputation for stunt work and explosions via hundreds of music videos. That new and improved reel landed a spot in 2nd unit on The Ring, directed by Gore Verbinski and shot by Bojan Bazelli, ASC. Seeing the finished film in a San Francisco theater, with a paying audience, yielded “wildly disparate shots that, when assembled in the right order and duration, elicited genuine horror from a giant room of assembled strangers. It was the satisfying payoff I’d always been chasing,” he relates. Other highlights from his career include (continued on page 28)

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“CRONENWETH’S CINEMATOGRAPHY IS SUPERB” — AV CLUB

2 EMMY ® NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGR APHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMER A SERIES (ONE-HOUR)

JEFF CRONENWETH, ASC DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

WATCH A CLIP NOW

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PRE-PRODUCTION

shooting on Walt Disney Pictures’ Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (2006), with Dariusz Wolski, ASC, using full sails that required the convergence of many incongruent elements. “The ship needed to be traveling left to right; it had to be in backlight,” Loungway remembers. “And you couldn’t see land in the background. The sails had to be full. The ship had to be seen crashing through the white caps, and ‘Please get this all at sundown when the sun sets behind the island!’ “When all of the elements finally aligned, and we achieved perfection,” he continues. “We wrapped at sundown and raced our speedboat back to the bar. But the Black Pearl had to get back to shore in horrendous seas – running into the

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wind at about 1 1/2 knots with the deck awash with the vomit of 75 pirate extras. It made port just as Shenanigans was emptying at 2 a.m. The shot is in the movie, and it’s beautiful. The angry memo from the studio that came the next day has [fortunately] been consigned to the ash heap of history.” Loungway was three weeks into 2nd unit for Universal Pictures’ Jurassic World: Dominion, shot by John Schwartzman, ASC, at Pinewood Studios, U.K., when COVID closed everything down. “We were shooting a large night exterior chase sequence all weekend, and after wrapping at 7 a.m., we packed and evacuated on a 10 a.m. flight with all the other American cast and crew,” he laments. “The business section was like Rick’s American

Cafe from Casablanca, filled with displaced filmmakers!” Loungway’s not sure when production will resume. “We are shooting 35mm 4-perf and 8-perf and 65-millimeter film and are uncertain when the U.K. lab will reopen. The show is using the large 007 Bond stage at Pinewood, which is filled with magnificent sets, and we’ve yet to shoot a frame.” This veteran filmmaker says the industry may be forced to shift to more studio-based production, à la “The Mandalorian approach [from Disney+], which may be widely adopted,” he offers. “Of course, someone will still have to travel to the ends of the earth, set their alarm clock for 4:15 a.m. and shoot a sunrise,” he laughs. “And it’ll probably be me.”

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EXPOSURE

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Katori Hall SHOWRUNNER – P-VALLEY BY VALENTINA VALENTINI PHOTO BY TINA ROWDEN

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EXPOSURE

Katori Hall is a multi-hyphenate of epic standards – playwright, journalist, activist, actor. And now, still in her 30’s, she’s added showrunner to the list. A Memphis native, Hall has written and co-produced the West End and Broadway hit Tina: The Tina Turner Musical, while earlier this year, The Hot Wing King rounded out her three-play residency at New York City’s Signature Theatre. In 2010, she won the Olivier Award for Best New Play for The Mountaintop, which imagines the last night in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life. Hall has also directed music videos and written and directed a short black-and-white film. With such a deep background in the arts, Hall’s leadership on the new STARZ drama P-Valley, based on her play from 2015, Pussy Valley, would seem an obvious inspiration. But she credits motherhood as the best foundation for navigating a network series. “I learned how to make life-or-death decisions on little to no sleep,” Hall (only) half-jokes. “This thing they call ‘showrunner’ – ain’t nobody prepared for it. Even if they’ve been in the TV industry for a decade, writing, or working on a show, the learning curve is huge and there is no book, there is no school. Even the people who are showrunners and can mentor you, they’re too busy running their damn shows because it takes over your life!” Despite the many mountains to climb in series TV, Hall says she’s hooked. With multiple scripts in the pipeline and no immediate need to return to the theater (which she describes as “too expensive for the majority of the Black community to even be a part of”), Hall can’t wait for P-Valley to roar into living rooms and bedrooms. ICG contributor Valentina Valentini spoke with this dynamic artist about running her first show, writing and directing for the female gaze, and the long-overdue reckoning this industry must have with racial equality. 32

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Stage play to TV series is not a typical trajectory. How did you do it? Katori Hall: I started this process in 2009, and it took me about six years to gather all the research. I visited dozens of strip clubs and interviewed 40 dancers. I was focused on making this story an authentic truth, but it took a long time to land on the structure of the play, which ultimately became a slice-of-life story. In 2015, I got the all-clear from the Mixed Blood Theatre Company in Minneapolis. It was basically the only theater in all of America that would produce the play because of the nature of the story. The world at that time, in particular the theater world, wasn’t ready for a story about sex workers. Theater is a conservative art form. Even though they like to say they’re revolutionary, they’re not.

When did the idea to transform Pussy Valley into a series arrive? The moment it was produced! I saw this three-hour juggernaut on stage and immediately knew I’d written a TV show. It wasn’t a play, because the story didn’t end there – the club, all the dancers, all these customers coming in and out – it just begged for deeper exploration, and I immediately shifted to thinking about TV. I had gathered 10 years of stories to tell, and the characters that I had created for the play were a jumping-off point. When that pivot happened, I pitched it to all the networks and streamers, and STARZ bought the pitch. Then I quickly put together a writer’s room and worked for 32 weeks, using the play as a jumping-off point to find the story engine at the center of the show. I had to find what would bring audiences back week after week, season after season. What is your communication style like as a showrunner? As a writer, I’m extremely visual. It’s like I’m watching movies in my brain. In terms of communicating, my goal is to always have my audience feel a particular emotion. So I have to use words and images to articulate to my interpreters what I’m aiming for. I also read a lot. I ordered 30 books before this job, knowing that while I have the impulses of a director in terms of being able to articulate what I see in my head clearly, I didn’t always have the language. I’ve read so many books and articles about directing, editing, cinematography and film noir. Because I knew that I was the underdog in this situation and had so much to learn, I over-prepared. You hired a different female director for each episode – most were women of color. Was that a conscious move toward inclusivity? I was open to men when I was interviewing directors. What ended up happening was that I would always ask this one question: “What do you think about the female gaze, and how would you bring that to the show?” And the


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men never had an answer; probably because they’ve never had to think about it. I wanted the show to feel like it was from the female perspective even beyond the writing, and the women who interviewed for the job were more in-tune with the historical misrepresentation, as they’ve had to combat that in their work. The women I interviewed came to those conversations with ideas as to how to make this show feel the way that I wanted it to feel. Once I’d hired six women, I wanted to hire two more. And someone was always saying, “Oh, there’s a pipeline problem,” or “She isn’t experienced enough,” which was said of me as well. I didn’t have any experience creating and running a show and I was given a shot. So women are hired by different criteria than men in this industry? I feel women get hired off their credits and men get hired off their potential. I decided that I would hire women for what I thought their potential for promise was. A great example of this is with the season’s finale director, Barbara Brown. She started as a script coordinator for Ryan Murphy, where she’d gotten to direct a few episodes of Glee and American Horror Story and some others. She was in that Ryan Murphy world, which isn’t quite aligned with the gritty milieu P-Valley lives in, but she had worked with dance and music. After one of our EP’s saw her episode, he said he couldn’t believe it – that he would’ve never thought that Barbara could have directed it. It’s a stunning finale because she was one of those interviews where it was like, “Oh, my god, you understand exactly what’s in my head. You haven’t done this type of directing before, but I see that you thought about it and you have the skill set to do it.” Your two Directors of Photography, Nancy Schrieber [ASC] and Richard Vialet, could not have been more different in terms of life experiences. Why them? I loved having rotating DP’s on the show because each brought such a different approach to the lensing of this Delta Noir aesthetic we were building. Nancy’s forty-year résumé includes comedies, dramas, shorts, docs and everything in between. Having had such a diversity of tones and visual approaches under her belt, she gave us the freedom to be freewheeling in terms of the visuals, blurring the lines between fantasy and reality with aplomb. Having Richard completed the dream. He’s done extensive lensing of the narratives of Black characters – he’s worked with everyone from Tyler Perry to Oscar-winner Matthew Cherry. Seeing Cherry’s short 9 Rides, which is all shot at night, made me realize that Richard would be a boon to expressing our color palette of “neon and night.” And Richard’s intimate understanding of the different undertones of Black skin allowed us to push the boundaries when it came to color saturation, reflection and lighting diffusion. We were able to bring out the luminosity

in the skin of our darker-skinned actors. Together, they both brought such a great understanding of story and truly embraced our goal of the female gaze – Nancy from personal experience and Richard from a place of wanting to create images of the Black female body that were curated with care and intention.

The Black Lives Matter movement is enjoying a special moment, for all the wrong reasons, of course. Has that movement impacted Black content in film and TV? As a descendant of slaves, I’ve seen us Black folks struggling with the intersection of race and class ever since we were stolen from our motherland and brought here. I do see this as a moment of reckoning; a time of frustration and anger where the world is standing with us, and it has moved me. But I’ve learned to be wary of others’ awakening moments, with white people in America and around the world. The entertainment industry has mostly been run by white men, using their platform and resources to contribute to the cause and to support the movement. My fear is that it is performative; it’s palliative, a bandage, instead of digging down deep and destroying the roots of white supremacy. That requires a ton of work that I don’t think everybody is ready to do. It demands burning everything down, metaphorically speaking, and rebuilding our society. This industry is a reflection of society, and I am grateful that a lot of companies that have disseminated culture out into the world are stepping up. I just hope that when they post on their social media “Black Lives Matter,” they’re also saying Black stories matter. Historically, there aren’t that many people like me in this industry. Studio heads, agents, everyone, the whole shebang has to relook at their practices and history and decide on what they’re going to do. What is it like for you as a creator of media in this pivotal time? This amazing movement started in 2013 by Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi after Trayvon Martin’s murderer was let go, and this need for stories about Black people, with depth and nuance, has now become ever stronger. For so long we have been an embodiment of white people’s fears and fantasies, and it’s time for people to see us as flesh-and-blood human beings. Of course, that is what storytelling and art can do. I love that theater demands you be in the room with a person with whom you might not have had the opportunity to be in the room with before. I’m grateful that people were able to be in the room with Uncle Clifford in Minneapolis at Mixed Blood. But now, Uncle Clifford will be in people’s living rooms and bedrooms. That, to me, is one of the most powerful things about television – as a creative medium, it can be one of the most

transformative and useful tools for social change because you’re bringing people into your home who, if their characters are written in a nuanced way, you will see their humanity. They cease to be a Black man or woman you were afraid of. Has doing a TV show changed your outlook on live theater or vice versa? I hope that people who work with me say this too, but I feel as though TV is my jam. I love long-form storytelling. When I was a little girl, I thought I was going to be a novelist, and TV is now the visual equivalent of a novel. The fact that hopefully, over many years, I can allow people into this world, brings me great joy. Because of its accessibility, especially for those who are economically disadvantaged, TV is a stunning mirror for people to see themselves reflected. Do you think the women of P-Valley would stay mostly invisible to the world, if not for stories like this? One of racism’s most powerful tools is invisibility. And because we’ve been made to feel unseen and unheard, it has created a feeling of not mattering in this world. Like, if I cannot see myself, do I exist? In the stories that I create, these women, and these men, these people in the LGBTQ community are screaming and saying, “I exist!” And their existence is resistance. Television doesn’t have the same obstacle that theater does, of high ticket prices. My communities are not able to get inside of those spaces, so TV creates a level playing field; and, as I said, we need that mirror for people who haven’t always been able to see themselves in American media.

“I wanted the show to feel like it was from the female perspective even beyond the writing...”

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EMMY NOMINEE ®

OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE-CAMERA SERIES

★★★★ . “ NOT ENOUGH CAN BE SAID ABOUT THE

GORGEOUS CINEMATOGRAPHY BY ERIK MESSERSCHMIDT.

A MUS T-WAT CH.”

“THE SERIES CONTINUES TO

L OOK A M A ZING

AND FEEL UNNERVING THROUGHOUT.”

“ERIK MESSERSCHMIDT’S CINEMATOGRAPHY IS

SPEC TA CUL A R.”

THE PROD U C T GUIDE FYC.NETFLIX.COM

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Time, Again


Hoyte Van Hoytema, ASC, NSC, FSF, deploys large-format cinematography to chase down Christopher Nolan’s elastic new spy thriller, Tenet . by Kevin H. Martin photos by Melinda Sue Gordon, SMPSP


C Christopher Nolan’s pantheon of brainy, large-scale crowd-pleasers ranges from an exploration of the selfreflective sleight-of-hand in The Prestige to action-thrillers with a science-fiction twist like Inception and now Tenet. The latter, starring John David Washington and Robert Pattinson, postulates a fluidity to time, with startling reverse imagery that ups the ante on the espionage-oriented storyline. It reunites Nolan with many of his frequent collaborators, including Guild Director of Photography Hoyte Van Hoytema, ASC, NSC, FSF; Special Effects Supervisor Scott Fisher; and Visual Effects Supervisor Andrew Jackson. Tenet also continues Nolan’s dedicated pursuit of large-format capture, with the movie shot almost entirely in 65mm and IMAX. 40

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PROD U C T GUIDE NOLAN (ABOVE) IS ONE OF THE INDUSTRY’S BIGGESTTHE EVANGELISTS FOR LARGE FORMAT CAPTURE AND EXHIBITION, HAVING USED THE IMAX FORMAT ON HIS LAST FOUR FEATURES.


BIG PICTURE LIFE

Director of Photography Hoyte Van Hoytema: Chris and I are both very much committed to the large format. We want to use this type of technology in ways that help us tell our story, without compromising. That requires many collaborators who can help tame the beast and put [the format] in service to Tenet. The pushing of boundaries, as on Dunkirk, featured explorations of where we’d be able to place a camera and how we could move it. For Tenet, we had a custom camera head [built by Local 600 member Chris Bangma] that fit within a car and let us whip our IMAX camera around 360 degrees. A good story has a specific manner in which it should be told. That creates an ambition to put the camera in the right spot to capture the ideal perspective, so it’s a single-camera mindset. With multiple-camera shoots, it becomes much more of a fishing exercise, whereas we prefer to be much more precise – though we did use multiple cameras on our big, unrepeatable action scenes. Writer/Director/Producer Christopher Nolan: The director/DP relationship is at least as important as the one I establish with a lead actor. This is the third feature

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I’ve done with Hoyte, after working with Wally Pfister [ASC] for a lot of years. Hoyte and I have developed a very productive dialog creatively – sometimes spoken, sometimes instinctual, like musicians harmonizing together. Hoyte’s degree of artistic sensitivity, along with a brain that lets me see him as both engineer and artist, combines the purely creative with the ruthlessly pragmatic. The greatest DP’s help you find a storytelling balance between creative exploration and practical execution. Van Hoytema: Each film Chris and I have done together is unique and cannot be told with off-the-shelf equipment. So the way a lens is constructed and used makes that choice a crucial one. Throughout prep, I always talk with Dan Sasaki, at Panavision, who is the lens guru of our industry, in my view. Dan understands film language and possesses the knowledge and resources to devise solutions. Traditionally, IMAX cameras are limited in terms of f-stops. We pushed for lenses that would let us shoot in lower-light situations. IMAX has been mostly used for spectacle, for the epic. But I think that spectacle comes from more than just scope; it has to be balanced by intimacy, and it was important in Tenet to be able to follow the subtle developments happening with the main characters. Wanting to explore how IMAX could enhance quiet moments, we realized getting the camera in closer to subjects than had been possible before was a valid approach. Panavision’s IMAX has never been much of a medium for close-ups because the lenses wouldn’t focus close enough. 1st AC Keith Davis: Dan delivers like nobody else, making his housings and building our workhorse lenses: the 80mm was a go-to, while his 40mm was more rectilinear, not as bendy as the IMAX lenses, since Hoyte didn’t want to deal with the distortion inherent in IMAX glass. That focal length was not a typical part of the lens vocabulary Chris and Hoyte normally use, but this time it saw a lot of action. Dan also engineered lenses we called “micro macros” in 50 and 80mm, with a rail bellows system that let us magnify to a 1:1 ratio, for both inserts and some of the biggest close-ups ever seen in IMAX. The 5-perf cameras used Sphero 65 millimeters, and Dan put a maxi-PL mount on so we could use lenses on both cameras. Van Hoytema: Another innovation came from the Danish company Logmar Camera Solutions, which built a lightweight 65mm [Magellan] 5-perf camera. It has a guillotine and is both smaller and more quiet than other systems. Davis: We had the Logmar guys come out a few times to show us the progress. The developments they made during the film got me as excited as Hoyte, and I hope that

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“ The greatest DP’s help you find a storytelling balance between creative exploration and practical execution.” DIRECTOR CHRISTOPHER NOLAN

system just keeps getting better. We carried six IMAX cameras: three MSN’s, two Mark IV cameras, and a Mark III. There were also the ARRI 765, 765 studio, and the 65mm Panavision highspeed. That’s a lot of cameras on the truck, but we work by leapfrogging setups, so it was worth the expense. Nolan: For me, hiring is about looking at the work people have done in the past, but not necessarily in relation to what you’re looking to do. I look for excellence and judgment. When meeting, it’s more about discovering if there’s a common creative language, which is exactly what turned out to be the case with composer Ludwig Göransson. I found a freshness in his approach that was striking in how it shifts from where film music has been these last few years. Working for the first time with him and editor Jen Lame was a real pleasure. I joked with her when she first came on that this might be the hardest movie any editor has ever had to cut – and I’m not sure she would dispute that right now [laughs]. Working out all the aspects of portraying time running in different directions meant going beyond what was down on the page, as the execution lay with a successful translation of the visual. Editor Jennifer Lame: Among the many reasons I was so attracted to this job was the film aspect. One difference was having a large crew and a film department. They synched dailies and shipped them on a quick turnaround to wherever we were, so I was excited to have film dailies at every location, screening either 35mm reduction prints from the IMAX or 70mm 5-perf. It was a joy to watch with the HOD’s, and as an editor it was invaluable. I worked on AVID and tried to keep up to camera as much as possible, in case Chris wanted to look at something. Getting to work with Chris on the prologue during shooting was a good way to ease into some kind of shorthand and rhythm. The films I have worked on up until this have been more character-driven, so I enjoyed getting more intimate scenes to cut. I found myself spending more time on the quieter moments and perhaps slightly intimidated by the action. To get over that, I began to think of action as also driving the story forward, explaining, and fleshing out the character’s journey. When Chris saw I was intimidated by the action sequences, he reiterated this point; the story was always the driving force.

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Special Effects Supervisor Scott Fisher: Having done Dunkirk, we knew Chris would approach this project with a commitment to doing things safely in-camera. Traditional special-effects work is considered an older technology, but we benefit from tech advances as much as other areas of filmmaking. Motion control can enhance what we do, just like computer-controlled firing of sequenced pyrotechnic charges. Some areas that used to cause us to struggle to get them right are facilitated by the use of newer gadgets, and I find it fun to integrate that into our workflow. Plus, on Nolan films, there is always excellent support from visual effects if something practical wasn’t successful. Nolan: Visual Effects Supervisor Andrew Jackson was responsible for coming up with our safety net. We wanted it all in-camera, but if it couldn’t be done, what choices are there in postproduction? I like to say Andrew kind of bid himself out of a job because he helped us achieve such an enormous amount practically. The visual side of the film is huge in scale, but our VFX shot count is probably lower than most romantic comedies. [Lame estimates fewer than 300 shots.] There were still very complicated visual effects for the team at Double Negative, but Andrew’s expertise and background in on-set effects benefitted us enormously, allowing him to work well with Scott and with Production Designer Nathan Crowley on design, while helping with the stunt team and all of the other disciplines. We tried a lot of methods and procedures on the fly during shooting for portraying various time aspects, and Jen would sift through these elements so we could see what worked and if something additional was needed. Visual Effects Supervisor Andrew Jackson: One of the biggest aspects for us in pre-pro was defining the look of the forward and backward effects. When somebody is traveling backward in time, what impact does that have on those who are seeing this happen while not traveling backward in time? We had sections that were shot in reverse in the camera so that when they were shown reversed, they would be going forward [laughs.] It was quite a complicated puzzle to solve. Fisher: Chris is big on watching films for reference, so we looked at World War Two movies and war documentary footage. That is where we realized something about what makes stuff look real. It isn’t that the CG planes in Red Tails looked bad compared to these old movies, but rather what they had the planes doing that made things less convincing some of the time. When you’ve seen real-world objects in motion, your mind develops a default setting for how things behave, whether they are fish or aircraft.

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Jackson: I always shoot a lot of tests during prep, just to see what I can solve and get fully worked out ahead of time, and this also creates ready reference if something comes up later while helping determine the language of the story – a kind of snapshot, showing how the pieces might go together before the whole machine gets rolling. Some of this exploratory is done virtually as well, using CG. On just about every film, even the smallest-scale ones, I like to shoot a lot of practical elements that can be used either as reference or as sweeteners. I favor simple compositing of 2D elements over more involved CG solutions unless those are absolutely the only way forward, and that fits with the approach. I never mind spending time shooting elements, even if they wind up being replaced by CG, because the core of the shot remains practical, retaining the magic of the original.

INSIDE JOB


“I never mind spending time shooting elements, even if they wind up being replaced by CG, because the core of the shot remains practical, retaining the magic of the original.” VISUAL EFFECTS SUPERVISOR ANDREW JACKSON

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ROAD WARRIORS Davis: We did our prep locally, taking our gear along when traveling the world on the shoot. With a film this big, you don’t want an unmanageable package, because getting caught up in customs can keep you from staying on schedule, but you still have to anticipate. Going to India in monsoon season meant making sure we had appropriate weather bags, rain gear and coverings. Fisher: During prep, everything always proceeds forward at the same time, be it figuring out about boats in one location or car chases in another, while also thinking about how to do the jet-airplane scene. Fortunately, I have built relationships with guys overseas, which helps as you can pick back up with those reliable contacts, a lot of whom are UK-based, so you wind up with a team in each country. We did a lot of testing with different pyro formulas, since varying the frame rates was going to be an important aspect, getting together with Hoyte for that to discuss the reverse stuff and frame-rate ramping, so there were recipes we could carry throughout. Van Hoytema: I always have the ambition to use natural light because I love its richness, and it is something I can learn from. You always want to base your film reality on actual reality, but also deal with issues of consistency. I have recently warmed up to LED lighting, owing to the leaps made with color and control. I like the power ratios and the output power of the light itself. Manipulating and controlling existing environments is a lot more doable, and without taking up much space or throwing in extremely big guns, which lets us be much more flexible and able to tie into the light we find on location. I still like using HMI’s, and the 18K ARRIMAX is unmatched for outputting such a volume of hard light. Davis: My objective was to do this film as traditionally as possible, right next to the camera, using manual follow-focus, only aided by sonar like a Cine RT or CineTape – without too many bells and whistles, which is

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my preference as well as that of the director. But once we got into testing and I saw how much handheld was involved, I decided not to shy away from using the Preston. With monitors and other equipment, a small camera can quickly become as unwieldy as the largest format camera. We’d put the additional part on when needed, but tried to keep things small, especially when doing handheld. We used a backpack similar to what was used on Dunkirk, which let us keep as much off the camera as possible. Van Hoytema: I was lighting for the scene rather than just the shot. We will make adjustments for a given shot, but in achieving a fluid, visceral IMAX experience, it’s about capturing immense levels of nuance. It’s also a sharp eye that can unveil film trickery. Your approach is to be pure; if you light a whole scene, you figure out where the light would be coming from. If they are coming from stage lights, then you are working out ways that practicals work in-camera and for most of the shots. If that doesn’t work, then you start adapting in your mind to devise an alternative. But for me, it’s not ever a macro approach about shadows and such. I try to keep my light sources far from the epicenter of the set unless it is an on-camera practical. Aesthetically, I believe this gives me a controlled richness that works for the story. Jackson: Chris’ style of working is unique and set apart from that of most big Hollywood films. It focuses on what he considers important. Just as significantly, it does not focus on certain aspects that others consider standard. He has a good sense of what matters. I found myself worrying about certain bits on Dunkirk, but it turned out his instincts to ignore those were correct. As a result, I now feel more tuned-in to his working style. And he seems to appreciate my inclination to go off and explore possibilities for how to realize a scene. I did my own shooting of a car featured in the backward part of the car chase and latched onto the detail of wheels spinning the wrong way as it takes off, so dirt flies in the “wrong”

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direction. The dust kicked up by a car in a reversed shot hung there in space waiting for the car to come back through so it could disappear under the wheels. Some things we could shoot easily in reverse, but when you’re combining elements of both forward and reverse action in the same scene, you have to pick the ones that work best in their natural direction. Then others you will wind up playing backward to get their forward movement. Van Hoytema: Our car chase used previs, but it was not about camera angles at all, just a bird’s-eye view of the vehicles on the road and the chronology of events. Those beats were all meticulously worked out, so we knew what was happening and when it had to happen, but were free to devise camera setups to capture that action, rather than be locked down to some early idea of what might be the right shot. Time is not linear in this film, so to support that complex concept and make it readable and exciting, we needed to rethink our previs strategy. It’s quite a difficult exercise, like figuring out complex mathematical problems. Jackson: The car previs is exactly the way I prefer working, where it is used to block out the action and serve as a vital guide for dynamic action beats. That’s so much better than trying to make guesses about where the camera may wind up, because that decision is being made by Hoyte and Chris based on what they can see through the camera. Davis: The camera was on a remote head operated from a following vehicle for the car chase, with focus also wireless, since we needed to pull from the actors to the background action. I had a wireless feed that let me see where the camera was pointed. During rehearsal, I would get measurements for each position the actors got into. All the way back to prep, Chris had been asking how I would pull focus. Through RF Films, we had a long-range Preston that would let me maintain that control even if the car got far away. When we were overhanging on a jib

arm, that would also be wireless, though I still stayed near the camera with Hoyte and Chris to respond to instructions, so it became a combination of new school and old school. Fisher: We experimented with different approaches for flipping the vehicles, winding up with a variation on the old pole-into-the road deal, using black powder to fire it. There was a nitrogen-powered version to give the vehicle just the proper amount of roll to get the car to land on its roof. We tested that here until there was confidence, so on location, the car wound up just as we wanted it for take one. When I first read the plane stuff, the thought that went through my mind was dealing with a smaller jet. But when the 747 was chosen, that brought home the scale of what Chris wanted. The plane was just a hulk, not functional, so our calculations were based on its reduced weight. It took a lot to get the plane moving, and just as many steps to get it to stop just right on location. We bought some real aircraft brakes and got aviation guys to install them, but since the real deal is so expensive, we hooked up our own control system from scratch. Our crash building was kind of wedged in between a couple of very expensive buildings, so there wasn’t a lot of margin for error in doing this crash. The plane was built so tough it could have done a second take, but there was nothing left of the building at that point. Jackson: We’ve gotten very good, in the pure VFX world, at matching to an existing reference. But if you don’t have a solid starting point, it is much harder to invent the randomness of reality that sells the credibility aspect. Taking advantage of those random events is a big part of my job, and a big part of retaining what you get in the plate is realizing that you can create too much detail. You shoot the car in reality, and there’s going to be a certain amount of atmosphere in the air obscuring the hubcaps, so you don’t need to render those with complete clarity. In fact, it will hurt your final if you do. Just because you can build-in all these levels of detail doesn’t mean they should be on display in every shot.

“ I try to keep my light sources far from the epicenter of the set unless it is an on-camera practical. Aesthetically, I believe this gives me a controlled richness that works for the story.” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY HOYTE VAN HOYTEMA

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PHOTO FINISH

Van Hoytema: Our grading process is simple, without relying on DI tools as such. The film negative is a pure capture of your image, and using traditional lab timing, you shoot different colors of light through it to realize your print. Options for altering the image are limited, so it is the purest way to represent what you captured on set, allowing it to be reproduced with minimal quality loss. This approach is kind of like a mantra, one you commit to out of respect for the format itself. And Andrew, who has been meticulous about making sure his end matches original negative, is very much on board with this analog mindset being maintained throughout. Jackson: Chris wants a VFX neg that closely matches the neg he shot, with some movement toward the ultimate [color-timed] look of the scene. In the past, we put a look on the output-to-negative that got us close to the final but needed a lot of color iterations to get there. I thought we needed a new approach. After scanning, Fotokem’s colorists would create CDL’s for shots that you could apply to the scan of the negative to get the desired look. So Double Negative in London would deliver back to Fotokem a look that matched that original scan, and Fotokem applied their CDL. Any tweaks or changes to color timing could be made on top of our delivery, which made for a much simpler process. Nolan: When working on a large-scale for the big screen, I think showmanship is an excellent term for the impulse you feel as a filmmaker. I have been making this scale of film because I enjoy being able to transport an audience to a place they’ve never been before, a place they could never go. The immersive quality of large-scale cinema presents, on a technical level, enormous challenges, but from Wally and Hoyte on the camera side to Lee Smith and Jennifer Lame in editorial, along with Chris Corbould and Scott Fisher in effects, we’ve all been working on this grand canvas, which offers opportunities for these craftsmen and -women to showcase their genius.

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LOCAL 600 CREW Director of Photography Hoyte Van Hoytema, ASC, NSC, FSF Steadicam Operator Ross Coscia, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Keith B. Davis A-Camera 2nd AC Justin Zaffiro IMAX Camera Technician Scott Smith B-Camera 1st AC Raymond Milazzo B-Camera 2nd AC Jonathan Clark Loader Kalli Kouf Still Photographer Melinda Sue Gordon, SMPSP Visual Effects Director of Photography Dave Drzewiecki Aerial Director of Photography Hans Bjerno CALIFORNIA CREW Visual Effects C-Camera 1st AC Andrew Borham Visual Effects C-Camera 2nd AC Shannon DeWolfe Camera Operator Kristen Correll D-Camera 1st AC Jesse Cain

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Power Play Katori Hall’s new STARZ series, based on her theatrical production about the empowerment of Black women in the Delta, reinvents film noir for a new generation. by Valentina Valentini photos by Jessica Miglio, SMPSP / Tina Rowden / STARZ

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PHOTOS BY TINA ROWDEN

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I In the first episode of P-Valley – a new drama on STARZ that follows stripclub dancers in the Mississippi Delta – we meet Autumn Night (Elarica Johnson), a young woman who is escaping a turbulent past. Autumn is pulling herself up by her bootstraps – or, in this case, her platform heels – to begin a new life. And while she doesn’t have a plan, per se, her quick wit and determination indicate better times are ahead. P-Valley Creator/Showrunner Katori Hall shares a few character traits with Autumn Night – strength, ingenuity, creativity in survival. But unlike the character she created, this newcomer to television doesn’t do anything on the fly. When Hall’s theatrical production, Pussy Valley, which ran at Mixed Blood Theatre in Minneapolis in 2015, was to be made into a series, Hall immersed herself in the language of cinema – editing, cinematography and production design. Then she hired a team of filmmakers whose approach to visual storytelling would help illuminate the complexity of characters in P-Valley – a group of diverse people of color whose problems outside their beloved strip club, The Pynk, are only matched by the many power plays inside the venue. Hall’s alternating directors of photography were a study in contrasts. Nancy Schreiber, ASC, started as a gaffer in New York City in the 1980’s

before transitioning into becoming a Director of Photography in New York’s indie music and art scenes; Richard Vialet, a 35-year-old filmmaker from the Virgin Islands, garnered attention for music videos and short films, like Oscar-winner Matthew Cherry’s 9 Rides. The diverse camera crew included more than 50 percent women and people of color (and other departments, like longtime Key Grip Ray Brown’s team, were equally inclusive). Production Designer Jeffrey Pratt Gordon, a veteran of John Waters’ Baltimore-set films, was in perfect sync with his showrunner, down to the color of a character’s toothbrush. All of the eight episodes had a woman directing, with five of those being women of color. They shot at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta. While inclusivity was built into the fabric of P-Valley, so was the directive to tell the story from the perspective of the young women who call The Pynk home. “During our interview,

Katori had questions about how to avoid the male gaze,” Vialet recounts. “She wanted to avoid exploitation, and I completely agreed. I also did not want to exploit the way the dancers looked on camera, but at the same time, I didn’t want to treat what we were seeing on stage with kid gloves. These dancers are proud and powerful, and I felt the photography should support that.” Adds Schreiber: “Inside that club, we wanted to show these women in an element of power. Yes, we also shot the audience POV of the dancing, but it was never overtly sexual. We wanted the dancing to be shown in all its athleticism and its beauty; again, the power these women had when they were on stage needed to be shown in exact opposition to the challenging lives they had off stage.” One of the goals for the P-Valley team was to create a new kind of cinematic noir.

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Hall gravitated to the noir genre growing up, citing black-and-white films like The Maltese Falcon and Sunset Boulevard as influences. And while the contrast of light and dark has always intrigued her, the male-centric focus of the genre and the stereotypical roles (think porter or housemaid) given to Black characters did not. “Dark shadows tend to have a negative connotation,” Hall shares, “so I was interested in flipping the use of darkness on its head to embrace sharp contrast and shadow as a space of freedom. Black folks’ stories have rarely been treated with that elevated aesthetic, so I wanted to show that heightened visual story.” Hall says gritty or potentially dangerous worlds, like that found in her Mississippi Delta location, often end up looking like those in documentaries. She wanted P-Valley to be more like classic Hollywood cinema and impressed upon her team that with every scene that there should be a flow. She calls the look for the show “Delta Noir,” and urges her team to embrace bold colors and dark shadows, inspired by such modern neo-noir films as Drive, Zodiac, Devil in a Blue Dress, and No Country for Old Men. “The visual divide is a reflection of the grit of the world that the women are living in and the magic of the stage,” she adds. “I wanted lots of color, and I also wanted to see the tropes of noir through the eyes of women, where they’re the detectives/hunters, and the men are being hunted.” A- Camera/Steadicam Operator Dave Chameides, SOC, with whom Schreiber has worked for decades and praises for his versatility and incredible instincts when shooting movement and dance, says, “We tried not to shoot a TV show, which can be so formulaic. We never defaulted to a specific way

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of shooting. A lot of scenes played in one shot, and we were given full license to not shoot coverage if it served the story. Our amazing script supervisor, Amber Harley, was a huge asset in supporting these decisions.” B-Camera operator Janice Min, whose operating credits include the Emmy-winning House of Cards, says, “The show is about female empowerment, their sensuality and struggles as a family that comes together at The Pynk, and also with the familial ties they have outside the club. Within the greater overall vision Katori, Nancy and Richard had, I aimed to make my frames portray this dichotomy of strength and vulnerability, and to create a fluidity in their sensuality, power and kinship they share off and on the stage.” Hall worked closely with Episode 1 Director Karena Evans, known for her expressive Drake music videos. From the many visual cues Hall included in her script, Evans created a 130-page look-book that became a show bible. “In our very first conversation,” Evans recalls, “Katori explained how Delta Noir takes the organizing principles of traditional film noir and does a twerk on them. Somehow, I knew exactly what she meant, and could easily see the world she was envisioning.” Evans says that because Delta Noir is specific to Mississippi strip-club culture, she explored deep shadow play and high contrast, where characters moved in and out of pockets of light. Green was used sparingly (owing to Hall’s aversion), while pink and blue not only fit the club’s name but also enhanced the reflectivity and luminosity of Black skin tones. “I talked with Richard and Nancy about not using hard light for Black actors and using a


PHOTO BY TINA ROWDEN SCHREIBER RECALLS BRADFORD YOUNG, ASC’S ADVICE YEARS EARLIER THAT “‘YOU’RE DOING BLACK PEOPLE A DISSERVICE WHEN YOU OVEREXPOSE THEM.’ THE SKIN TONES OF OUR ACTORS WAS SO NUANCED AND DIVERSE,” SHE ADDS. “IT WAS IMPORTANT TO SHOW THAT BEAUTIFUL RANGE OF DEPTH AND TONE WHEN PHOTOGRAPHING OUR CAST.”

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RICHARD VIALET, WITH EVANS ON SET, SAYS “WE DIDN’T WANT TO EXPLOIT THE WAY THE DANCERS LOOKED ON CAMERA, BUT AT THE SAME TIME, WE DIDN’T WANT TO TREAT WHAT WE WERE SEEING ON STAGE WITH KID GLOVES. THESE DANCERS ARE PROUD AND POWERFUL, AND THE PHOTOGRAPHY HAD TO SUPPORT THAT.”

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EPISODE 1 DIRECTOR KARENA EVANS (L) ON SET WITH NANCY SCHRIEBER, ASC, CREATED A 130-PAGE LOOK-BOOK THAT BECAME A SHOW BIBLE. “IN OUR VERY FIRST CONVERSATION, KATORI EXPLAINED HOW DELTA NOIR TAKES THE ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES OF TRADITIONAL FILM NOIR AND DOES A TWERK ON THEM,” EVANS RECALLS.

lot of diffusion,” Hall adds. “I think there is this myth that to see Black people, particularly in dark places, you need to hit them with a lot of light. And we embraced the fact that it’s okay for Black people to be in dark spaces; it’s okay for them to step in and out of light, in and out of shadows. And that became a kind of a rule.” For a scene in Episode 2, when the character Lil Murda (J. Alphonse Nicholson) is in the back of Uncle Clifford’s (Nicco Annan’s) car at night, Hall didn’t want to see Lil Murda’s face until after his voice was heard and he moved forward. “You’re doing Black people a disservice when you overexpose them,” Schreiber recalls, citing Bradford Young, ASC’s advice from years ago. “The range of skin tones of our actors was so nuanced and diverse. It was important to show that beautiful range of depth and tone when photographing our cast. “Also, there has been a tendency to overpowder actors in film and television,” she adds, “but our embracing of natural shine brought out wonderful tonal variations. Plus, P-Valley is set in the hot South, where people are sweating, and no one has air conditioning.” Chief Lighting Technician Jon Ladd was instrumental in providing Vialet and Schreiber

with a vast array of lighting color options. But because Hall’s mandate for the club was both sleek and gritty, Ladd’s challenge was sourcing state-of-the-art lighting while maintaining the weathered look of the club’s stage-lighting instruments. “This was a 1950s southern juke joint turned stylishly gritty strip club,” Ladd explains. “We knew RGBA LED’s were needed to design our colors and for quick access, but we had to figure out how to camouflage them on camera so they would appear as old, shabby fixtures.” Schreiber and Vialet provided a show-andtell of fixtures to the producers before ordering those units, “so that Katori would know we were staying close to the reality of Uncle Clifford’s economic situation,” adds Schreiber. Ladd’s team hid Astera AX10s in empty Par-can housings and used ETC Source Four Series 2 Lustr ellipsoidals – since ellipsoidals have been used in theaters and music venues since they originated in the 1930s. They sprinkled these lights around the club, many to zone-light the stage, with the AX10’s 45-degree diffusion disks for front light, ETC Lustr 2s for backlight. For the main-stage pole, they used the Lustrs as front light to make a dancer pop out. When it

came to architectural points of interest, Ladd used Lustr 2s, which also helped control light on the patrons without having to place grip gear in the ceiling. “We didn’t use any moving light effects in the club other than a spotlight in the final episode,” Ladd continues. “Katori, Nancy, Richard, and I agreed that we didn’t want the TV audience to ask themselves, ‘Where did this rundown strip club get all those fancy lights?’ We did rig four moving lights in the ceiling for use as stationary lights that we could adjust without having to bring ladders and lifts in or having to clear the extras off the floor. This meant they had to be hidden from camera, so we used the smallest moving lights on the market – two ROBE Robin Pointes and two Clay Paky Sharpys – strategically placed in the ceiling, one each on either side of the stage.” The Pynk is the epicenter of P-Valley, and its interior was built entirely on stage. Finding a building that worked for the outside of the club proved difficult. Production Designer Gordon knew he wanted “a building that felt like it was on the wrong side of the tracks, deep in

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IN FINDING A LOCATION FOR THE PYNK’S EXTERIOR, PRODUCTION DESIGNER JEFFREY PRATT GORDON, A GEORGIA LOCAL, SAYS HE WANTED “TO BUILD A SENSE OF HISTORY...AND A BACKSTORY OF THE CHARACTERS WHO OWNED THE BUILDING BEFOREHAND. IT NEEDED TO FEEL LIKE IT’D BEEN THERE FOR GENERATIONS.”

the Mississippi Delta,” but he drove around for weeks with Location Scout Ekundayo Donegan before finding a crumbling, mold-infested, outof-code structure on the Tyler Perry Studios backlot, which was set to be demolished within weeks. “The most important thing for me was to build a sense of history into the place and a backstory of the characters who owned the building beforehand,” relates Gordon, a Georgia local. It needed to feel like it’d been there for generations. The design had to resonate with the South’s history; maybe it began its life as a cotton mill warehouse. There’s a large cotton motif in this story, and I wanted, in a subtle way, to reference that history, which, of course, can’t be viewed without the context of slavery.” Gordon says a strip club is a complex environment that begs such questions as: “Who holds the power? Who is in control? Who surrenders?” “Backstage is where we get to pull back the curtain and find out who the women are,” he adds. “It’s raw and not presented for show. It’s also a place of sisterhood, a reflection of self, love, and arguments; a place to face one’s true reality. The main floor, in contrast, offers fantasy – lights, smoke, mirrors. It’s a place for hope and acceptance, a place to be lost for just a little while.” Mirrors, of course, are a camera team’s nightmare, but Gordon says he relished the

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day he got to show Chameides how he built the eight stage mirrors on gimbals that could swivel in any direction. Gordon says he builds with the utmost awareness of the needs of the camera department, designing a Plexiglass floor that could be put in to capture specialty shots from underneath the stage looking up at the dancers. Inside The Pynk, Schreiber and Vialet used a trio of ALEXA MINIs, paired with vintage Panavision lenses, customized with the antiflare coating removed because “we wanted to get flares and broken imagery, keeping it less sterile and polished overall,” says Vialet. “But the flares also helped to push the fantasy that Uncle Clifford and these dancers are selling.” The lenses were PV Standard Primes decoated to varying degrees (subtle, medium and extreme). Schreiber and Vialet were interested in the soft feel of the vintage glass, and also the unique aberrations typical of the no-coats. “Due to the nature of the de-coating and the fact that some of them were done decades ago, there was a range of distinct personalities among the no-coats,” describes A-Camera 1st AC Alan Newcomb. “Guy McVicker and Ye Woo Kim at Panavision helped us to supplement our nocoat lineup with Ultra Speed primes and heavily detuned Primo zooms to cover us in situations where the characteristics of the no-coats went in a direction that wasn’t working for the scene, whether it was to achieve a cleaner look where

the no-coats were too intense, like windows in the frame, or to provide more intense flaring, particularly with the Ultra Speeds.” There is a mysterious beginning to Autumn Night’s tale, depicted through flashbacks that are peppered throughout each episode. Schreiber and Vialet wanted to make sure these scenes felt different from those inside The Pynk, so they structured a cool palette and utilized a hefty arsenal of eclectic glass, including Spot and Strip diopters as filtration, sometimes paired with a Lensbaby. For the first flashback in Episode 1, in which Autumn is trying to escape a violent man, Schreiber used a broken diopter McVicker had found, which she combined with a #1 White ProMist filter, smoke and slow motion to keep the violence mysterious. During a flashback in Vialet’s Episode 2, where Autumn is sifting through a suitcase in the aftermath of a flood, he had Newcomb use a Strip diopter to create a broken, fractured feel. “With memory, we are often struggling to recall details; other times we are trying desperately to forget,” Vialet adds. “That’s what we were going for with the flashback scenes.” The Paradise Room, a place for high-end clients deep inside The Pynk, was another example of visual free-thinking. Gordon had talked with Hall about the cotton motif and its


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“ We wanted the dancing shown in all its athleticism and its beauty...the power these women had on stage was shown in exact opposition to the challenging lives they had off.” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY NANCY SCHREIBER

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history for Blacks in the South, so he designed a wallpaper that would tell that story. “I felt it was important, no matter how much the audience clues in,” the designer states. “Something like that can also give the actors visual cues.” The wallpaper featured Mississippi riverboats, cotton blooms, plantation houses, masters on horses, and other slave-era iconography. Initially, Gordon put strippers in the fields as silhouettes instead of slaves, but then ended up transforming them into giant silhouettes of Black strippers on top of the toile wallpaper. “It was this idea of power and control,” he continues. “The toile wallpaper recedes into the background while the silhouettes of the dancers are on top, taking control.” Gordon worked with Ladd to create a storm cloud on the ceiling with Astera tubes that could change the mood depending on the scene, as well as Antebellum-era-style lighting all around. He collaborated with Set Decorator Javed Noorullah to design a sitting area for the patrons that looked like a glowing cloud of cotton, for which they used a translucent chair body covered in fluffy cotton, with Ladd building-in lights that could change color. While Hall desired to keep the room blue, Vialet

was worried about a tip into muddiness and a tendency to look too much like blacklight. As a counter, he put hints of orange glow behind Gordon’s plantation columns in the corners of the room for contrast. Historically, women’s bodies in the media have been hyper-sexualized, all the more so with Black women. The Pynk is, of course, a strip club and sexuality is its stock and trade; but Hall, Schreiber and Vialet wanted to push up against the idea that the imagery of the dancers’ bodies had to be strictly sexual. Pole dancing is extremely rigorous, with dancers bruising, falling, slipping, and enduring skin burns from the metal in a typical workday, and P-Valley does a great job of showing that hard reality. “The story is written from a woman’s experience,” Hall concludes, “so at the center of the narrative there is the journey of a woman who [frames the show through a] female gaze.” That meant Hall did not want the camera to linger on bodies; it could “appreciate and love up on a woman’s body,” as she describes, but there was never a gratuitous frame or a cut-up body. The

camera would see each woman’s form as a whole entity, integrated with the character’s POV, and therefore her experience. “The women in our series are embraced for their strength, dignity and empowerment as they work the floor and poles,” Schreiber says. “These are not the androgynous ultraskinny models in advertising. These are real women with beautifully defined muscles and curves.” Schreiber remembers the first time they filmed Mercedes (Brandee Evans), the OG stripper at The Pynk: “The entire crew held their breath as she climbed the pole, twisting and turning her body to the ceiling, then dramatically dropping to the ground into the splits. An audible gasp could be heard from club-patron extras and crew alike, even over the loud music. I doubt Production was happy about her pushing the limits – we did have body doubles to ensure the safety of our main cast. Brandee, of course, has been a dancer for years and had been rehearsing on the pole for months before production ever began. She was more than capable of handling such athletic maneuvers; and like everyone connected with this ground-breaking show, it was inspiring to see her in action.”

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LOCAL 600 CREW Directors of Photography Nancy Schreiber, ASC Richard Vialet A-Camera Operator / Steadicam Dave Chameides, SOC A-Camera 1st AC Alan Newcomb A-Camera 2nd AC Callie Moore B-Camera Operator Janice Min B-Camera 1st AC Brian DeCroce B-Camera 2nd AC Nubia Rahim DIT Chris Ratledge Loader Erin Strickland Utility Chandra Sudtelgte Still Photographers Jessica Miglio, SMPSP Tina Rowden Erika Doss Eliza Morse Kyle Kaplan

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THE GLOBAL NETWORK OF LOCAL CREW & VENDORS. ProductionHUB is the go-to resource for finding exactly what you need for your production. Anywhere in the world.

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Last year in this space, I wrote about the move away from OLED (organic light-emitting diode) display technology in favor of LCD (liquid crystal display) panels that use duallayer cell technology to improve viewing angles and offer OLED-like blacks. And with HDR moving toward becoming a de facto capture space by (my prediction) late 2021, the continued evolution in dualcell LCD has inspired many display vendors to go all-in on the technology previously thought to be only a stopgap until something else (such as micro-LED) grabbed hold of the market. 2020, of course, has been a year like no other when it comes to gauging where onset display technology is headed, as well as charting the peaks and valleys in the postproduction market, given that sector’s ability to quickly transition into remote workflows. While the major trade conferences where new display products are launched each year – NAB in April, Cine Gear Expo in June – pivoted to virtual platforms (as did lens vendor Zeiss with its Virtual Cine Expo in July), there still was a fair amount of interesting new development.

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Eizo ColorEdge Prominence CG3146

Michael Ridolfi, North America Product Manager for Eizo’s ColorEdge line, says his company has decided to “double down” on dual-cell LCD technology, “as it’s particularly well suited for HDR monitoring.” That’s why Eizo’s newest release, the Prominence CG3146 display, is an iterative update to the company’s CG3145 model that will include 12G, 6G, and 3G SDI as well as what Ridolfi describes as “other EIZO-specific technologies that we are known for in the standard ColorEdge lineup of animation and VFX monitors. “ The most prominent [of those technologies] is the built-in colorimeter for self-calibration,” Ridolfi continues. “[Selfcalibration] will change the way reference monitors are managed, as the monitor can be more easily calibrated, and more often from

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a calibration procedure standpoint. When combined with our ColorNavigator Network [EIZO’s network-based calibration software], users will be able to send profiles and monitor calibration results via a web browser anywhere in the world. With COVID-19 keeping more of the production staff at home, this will allow facilities to remotely manage their entire fleet of artist monitors, and now with the CG3146, their HDR reference monitors as well.” Speaking of reference monitors, Bram Desmet, with Murietta, GA-based Flanders Scientific International (FSI), says his company’s prime announcement this summer was firmware updates to one of its flagship HDR monitors, the XM310K, easily one of the brightest displays on the market with a true 3000-nit output. Chief among those updates

are new backlight driving algorithms that greatly improve display performance on the dual-cell LCD unit. “The algorithms used for the Peak Optimized Modulation Mode have been vastly improved based on extensive user feedback and months of additional research and development,” Desmet shares. “The three available backlight modulation modes are now assignable to function keys for faster switching between Peak, Motion, and Contrast modes.” In an extensive online interview with MixingLight’s Patrick Inhofer, Desmet notes that “when people are shown a 3000-nit grade versus a 1000-nit grade, the value of a 3000-nit display becomes clear, but there are tradeoffs. I always tell people that if we could have made the [1000-nit] XM311K or the XM310K and settled on one, that would have made


Flanders Scientific XM310K

our lives much easier,” he laughs. “There are serious performance benefits going with 1000 nits, but for those needing to go into the higher nit range you need to utilize a zone backlight system, and that’s why we tried to build the best display possible with over 2000 zones. A brand new XM310 out of the box can crack 3200 nits; while it’s still considered a niche market, we wanted to help grow the industry in every way possible.” Light-modulating cell layer, aka duallayer LCD, which FSI uses in its other flagship display, XM311K, makes use of technology that allows for an always-on backlight putting out the display’s full nit level. There is a standard LCD panel up front with red, green, and blue filters for color; another monochromatic LCD layer behind that one

acts as a second panel to block out light. The physics of the technology, specifically the ability of the panel to control light, allows for contrast ratios in the 1,000,000-to-one range. “One challenge with this technology,” Desmet continued in the MixingLight interview, “is that it generates a ton of heat. But there are no loading behaviors on [the dual-layer XM311K], so you can do 1000 nits full screen or 1000 nits over a small area. Most other HDR technologies, like the RGB top-emission OLED monitors the industry was using for a while, were not capable of doing 1000 nits full screen. They could do 1000 nits beautifully in a small area, but more like 320 nits full screen, which can be aggravating in a color grade. With light-modulating cell layers, you don’t have those challenges.”

Desmet says the power draw from the duallayer XM311K is much higher than the zone backlight system employed on the XM310K. “I think what we’ll see sometime down the road is a combination of these technologies,” Desmet proffers. “I’ll have a static setup with a lightmodulating cell layer, with its 1,000,000-toone contrast ratio and 1000-nit peak; then someone says, ‘I also need a 2000-nit grade for this project,’ and we’re able to switch over to a zone-backlight, ultrahigh nit function in the display – not full screen but for selected areas. I would anticipate that technology would be pretty expensive, but we are already hearing rumblings of it on both the consumer and pro sides. It’s a definite path for the industry to chart until something like micro-LED can be scaled down, for size and costs.”

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SmallHD 22-inch 4K Display

Sony Corp. has been a market leader in the display sector for so long, that when the company recently moved away from OLED technology in favor of dual-cell LCD, the rest of the industry moved with it. Sony’s latest line of displays designed for DIT’s to monitor HDR on set include the 24-inch PVM-X2400 and the 18.4-inch PVM-X1800 4K displays. As Andy Munitz, Product Manager, PVM Monitors, Sony Electronics’ Imaging Products and Solutions Americas, notes: “These LCD monitors provide reliable color-matching, high-brightness, and a high contrast ratio, and they work seamlessly alongside Sony’s industr y-standard BVM-HX310 Master Monitor, which allows for accurate and uniform colors throughout the lifecycle of a production, no matter where your other team members are located. “As more projects are completed remotely, Sony provides a production workflow that is built upon consistency and quality and leverages our strengths in imagery, as well as our unique capability to touch every aspect of the video delivery chain from capture through display.” The consumer-electronics giant has

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also pioneered proprietary technology for a modular Crystal LED system that carries enormous potential for all areas of the industry – production, VFX, postproduction and even distribution. Company3’s Mike Chiado says his postproduction firm just finished a longterm trial of a full 4K Sony Crystal LED (CLED) wall and was impressed with the technology. “Every client who saw their material displayed on the CLED expressed interest for future work,” Chiado states. “We’re considering using CLED technology for future rooms and theaters as the one device to satisfy all viewing needs in both SDR and HDR.” At the Februar y 2020 Hollywood Professional Association conference, in Palm Desert, CA (pre-COVID-19), Company3 talked about mastering with a Sony Crystal LED screen (measuring 17 ft. 4 in. × 9 ft. at 4160 × 2160 pixels) in a “medium-sized theater.” The test was set up for theatrical and home video mastering with P3DCI, P3D65, and ST2084 P3D65 color spaces (1000-nit peak levels). The main takeaways presented at the HPA presentation were extremely deep blacks (greater than 20,000-to-one contrast ratio in P3); contrast ratios that persisted

even with a full ambient light source (house lights) on; superb color uniformity and uniform sharpness and luminosity across the entire screen (no lens or screen aberrations); excellent viewing angles; and quick switching between SDR and HDR with the possibility of simultaneous display. Perhaps most appealing to Local 600 camera teams is Crystal LED’s potential as a virtual production tool and as a substitute for green screen. Sony Innovation Studios, a division of Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE), offered a preview of that potential at the January 2020 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas (pre-COVID-19), coupling Sony’s Atom View technology, which combines volumetric data sets captured from different angles to produce a single output for use in virtual film productions, video games, and interactive experiences, with backgrounds playing on large Crystal LED displays. Not every vendor has jumped on the light modulating bandwagon as evidenced by SmallHD, a company most known for small camera-top and wireless monitors that has embraced OLED technology in its new reference monitor. The 22-inch 4K display


Sony 24-inch PVM-X2400

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Postium America OBM-H210

offers a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio, true 10bit color depth, and 100 percent of DCI-P3 color space. As Local 600 DIT Jason Johnson describes: “SmallHD’s new 4K OLED displays are in line to become my standard on-set reference monitor. They combine the reliable viewing angle, contrast ratio, accurate color, true black, battery life, and more that we have become accustomed to with OLED, while providing a robust, lightweight build and a professional-forward update in OS4. The new color pipeline features and updated scopes, meshed with the hardware, will make this appealing to everyone from set to post.” No doubt HDR has impacted the Display sector more than any other innovation. And as remote workflows continue to predominate in a COVID-19 landscape, new technology has risen to accommodate off-site/off-studio work. Southern California–based Lilliput Electronics USA recently debuted its portable and lightweight broadcast monitor, BM1204KS, which can provide 97 percent of NTSC

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color space, 90 percent of DC1-P3, and 137 percent of Rec.709. The 12.5-inch, 8-bit LCD panel has a native resolution of 3840 by 2160 and supports quad views display from a variety of input signals, including 3G-SDI, VGA, and HDMI, the latter of which will support full 4K at 60p, as well as a wireless transmitter sending 1080p SDI/4K HDMI. One of the monitor’s key features is its support for adjustable HDR color spaces that allow users to view HDR content in the field, as well as built-in presets, or to load custom 3D LUT’s via its USB port. The unit accepts a wide range of voltages – from 10 to 24 VDC. The included power supply plugs the BM120-4KS into AC power in the studio; in the field, power can be supplied via the built-in V-mount plate. Lilliput USA’s John Liu describes the BM120-4KS as a “medium-sized monitor” whose footprint “doesn’t require close-up view, but it’s also not so large that it becomes troublesome in the field.” Liu says the unit is targeted toward broadcast productions, with the durability of the military-grade case “preventing any interruptions from damaged equipment and costly repairs.”

Postium America, an industry leader for reference monitors for broadcast and motion picture production, has also pushed HDR innovation through its line, including the new OBM-H210, an affordable option for camera crews on location. The 21.73inch, 18.73-pound LCD monitor has a native resolution of 1920 × 1080, and is designed for daylight monitoring in HD/SD broadcast and motion-picture applications. The display can accept up to 1080 60p signals scaled to native resolution and is equipped with standard 3G/ HD-SDI input interfaces as well as an HDMI 1.3a input and analog component/composite I/O. Wes Donahue, Postium’s vice president sales and marketing, describes the OBM-H210 as a “versatile HD-HDR display for production monitoring. With a max luminance of 1500 cd/ m², it supports standard and high luminance HD as well as HDR gammas [PQ-SMPTE ST 2084, HLG and S-Log3], calibrates with and imports custom 3D LUTs, and offers a robust image analysis with features such as HDR Waveform and Vector Scope, Color Space/ Dynamic Range Comparison, Camera Log to


Lilliput Electronics USA BM120-4KS

Linear conversion LUTs, Focus Assist, False Color, Gamut Error Detection [three modes] and more.” Canon USA is another longtime display vendor whose support of HDR, specifically Dolby Vision, continues to grow. The company’s DP-V3120 is a 31-inch 4K Reference Display that promises peak 2000-nit edge-to-edge luminance, and 0.001-nit full-screen black level, both of which exceed requirements for Dolby Vision certified facilities. The LCD panel is capable of resolutions up to 4096 by 2160 pixels in 10-bit color, and, according to Canon product managers, provides “excellent accuracy and color fidelity with edge-to-edge consistency and minimal color shifting.” Canon calls the panel’s dual-layer LCD approach “more stable and reliable” than other technologies, describing the DP-V3120 as “a reliable piece of equipment users can depend on day after day.” The display, which can be controlled remotely over Wi-Fi or LAN, comes with Canon’s award-winning HDR Toolkit – waveform monitor, vectorscope, histogram,

false color, frame luminance monitor, pixel value checker, out-of-gamut display, overrange detection, and side-by-side comparison view. Canon product reps say such onboard tools “allow users to evaluate subject luminance and color visually on the screen using numerical values and graphs that show whether or not images are being recorded according to their intentions. Users can now confidently make creative decisions based on accurate information using a single display.” Canon’s HDR Toolkit was recognized two years ago by the HPA with an Engineering Excellence Award. Of special interest to Local 600 directors of photography, the DP-V3120 supports the next-generation ACES standard, ACES2065-1, developed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). ACESproxy can be directly inputted into the display for plug-andplay ACES monitoring. As HDR creeps into all areas of production, the technology remains beyond the budgets of many shows. That’s why FSI recently announced the introduction of an HDR mastering monitor rental program

that Desmet describes as “a very low-cost program aimed at making HDR mastering more accessible to smaller productions that may only have an occasional need for HDR monitoring/mastering.” Desmet, whose company focuses exclusively on display technology, adds that while the sector is always dynamic, outside forces often dictate what products ultimately show up on sets and in color-grading suites. “The reality is that when it comes to semiconductor manufacturers,” Desmet concluded in the MixingLight interview, “they’re just not making products directly for our industry.” That means according to Desmet, favorable technologies were jettisoned before their time. “CRT’s, plasma, and RGB OLED’s all went away before many of us wanted them to, and that’s due to the commodity nature of this industry. However, as the power centers of the semiconductor industry have shifted from Japan to Korea to now Taiwan and China, we’re starting to see a little bit of what everyone wants — high-quality panels without the massive costs.”

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The world of production may have come to a grinding halt with the advent of a global pandemic, but you wouldn’t necessarily know that by the large number of new product announcements in the Lighting category. Both NAB and Cine Gear exhibitor lists were flush with a lot of “we’ve got something new.” So much so, that it was hard for us to whittle-down the list of what may best serve Local 600 members for 2020 and beyond. That is until we asked vendors about pricing and availability (not to mention a new photograph of the product), and items reviewed for this Product Guide moved to the “pending” box for future ICG Magazine monthly Gear Guide sections. (Case in point would be Cush Light’s new fabric light, the science isn’t quite there.) What we can announce are new small tube elements from companies like BB&S, Nanlite, and Light & Motion; new color science from NILA, Quasar Science, and Cineo; a large panel from Fluotec; and even a water-resistant daylight LED from IKan. It is perhaps not the huge “splash” of light we expected, but it is certainly enough to spark the creativity of many filmmakers.

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BB&S BiColor Compact Beamlight With

its

lightweight

BiColor

beamlight,

BB&S

answers the need for a hard shadow beam that’s easy to use, versatile, blendable and powerful. With a 5.5-inch footprint, single beams offer up to 2700 lumens and 2×2 beams up to 11,000 lumens. Featuring a 10-degree beam angle, the lights are dimmable from 100 to 50 percent at the edges and cut blinding glare so that mixing and overlapping other lights is smooth and easy. Operation is from an optional BB&S 4-way controller to dual channel. Drive/dimmer is included, and the product offers an optional PSU or battery. Pricing: $495 per unit www.bbslighting.com

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Cinelight 480 Superquad by Fluotec This new unit is one of the most powerful and versatile pure-white-light

large-aperture

4-by-4-foot

LED

panels on the market. DMX controlled with two-color, pure white LED luminaires, it offers interchangeable Quick

Release

diffusions

and

adjustable

color

temperature ranges between 2700K and 6700K. The light has a High-Speed mode for shooting at speeds up to 5000 fps, is self-contained, and eliminates the need for ballasts or external power sources. The 480 Superquad can be operated easily and intuitively from the ground. Price $12,698 www.fluotec.net

ETC Fos/4 Panel Ergonomically friendly, the Fos/4 panel light includes a Griprail bracket that acts as a mounting location. Each panel – small, medium, and large – delivers brightness in two array options. The Lustr X8 adds deep red LED to its mix for enhanced skin tones and new depth to blues, greens, and ambers. The Daylight HDR is a tunable white light array that delivers a natural warmth for skin tones and

is

optimized

for

cooler

output

temperatures. The full-spectrum color picker within the user interface lets you choose how to mix each color. The Tune function helps you choose brightness, best spectral, or a hybrid of the two. These panels include wireless control from a mobile device or console, and even add effects such as police siren, beacon, camera flash and party. Pricing: small $4,700, medium $6,850, large $9,800 www.studio.etcconnect.com

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Light & Motion CLx10 Changing

the

way

you

work

on

location,

the

CLx10 drives 25 percent more light into a small, lightweight package. Drop it in a backpack or use it handheld, as it weighs just about the same as a full-frame mirrorless camera with an 85-mm lens. “It’s great for action and daylight work,” explains L&M CEO Daniel Emerson. “10,000 lumens for 55 minutes down to 500 lumens for 15 hours. Full power when plugged into AC. Stepped or continuous dimming. High-output COB LED eliminates multishadows typical of some panel lights.” Output is flicker free to 1000 frames/sec. A 3200K tungsten head accessory is also available. Pricing: CLx10 $1,299; kits available from $1,699 to $1,999 www.lightandmotion.com

PavoTube II 6C RGBWW 10-inch LED Nanlite’s entry into portability with the PavoTube should find plenty of takers, given its powerful output

and

very

modest

price.

With

adjustable

color temperature from 7500-2700K, green to magenta adjustment, a CRI of 98 and TLCI of 95, these new tubes pack studio-quality lighting for just about every placement. The built-in battery runs for 65 minutes at full brightness and can be charged by any USB-C source, including power banks for added running time. Touch a button and 15 pre-programmed lighting effects are at your fingertips. Pricing $99 www.nanliteus.com

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Nila Varsa Bi-Color Offering more lumens than its daylight-balanced counterpart, the new Bi-Color Varsa has a native beam angle of 20 degrees due to the color-blending optics, providing a softer beam for modern cinematography and ENG. Instead of discrete optics for each color, the new Bi-Color blends colors within each individual optic, resulting in less color fringing and better overall color reproduction. The Red Boost circuit allows users to warm up the color if needed. Dial-in between 2600K and 6400K, and the light will remember your choices. DMX control allows users to dial the full range of color options, even when the lights are rigged out of reach. Pricing: Deluxe Kit $2,499; fixture only $2,199 www.nila.tv

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Quasar Science RR100 and RR50 According to industry LED leader Quasar Science, “versatile” is the keyword for the company’s new RR linear LED lights. They double the width of Quasar’s legacy lights while retaining a lowprofile form factor. The 120-cm-long RR100 and 60-cm RR50 feature interchangeable optics, highoutput RGBX spectral control, seamless dimming, and

exceptional

low-end

intensity

for

LED

technology. Dubbed “Double Rainbow,” they both contain two rows of pixelation with 48 and 20 pixels, respectively, expanding animation and FX capabilities. Data control occurs via DMX, sACN, and Artnet as well as wireless connection over DRMX, WiFi, and Bluetooth. Pricing: RR100 $1,500; RR50 $1,000 www.quasarscience.com

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IKan Stryder 100-W Water? Dust? Not a problem with IKan’s first IP54rated light. Rainy conditions are also easily solvable with the new Stryder, which can be powered with an adapter or a V-mount battery adapter, which clamps onto the light stand without getting in the way. A single knob allows for brightness adjustment from 0 to 100 percent. The 4-way barn doors adjust the light direction. This 5-inch Fresnel offers a spot 28 degrees to flood 53 degrees. The daylight 5600K unit also offers a fanless passive cooling design.

Pricing: $1,599 www.ikancorp.com

Cineo ReFlex R15 Cineo’s ReFlex R15 would seem to create a whole new category of hybrid media production lighting. With ReFlex the company has applied patented, groundbreaking technologies to create a high-output, focusable-beam, fully dimmable hard light that exceeds the capabilities of traditional lighting tools. ReFlex also redefines versatility by delivering both high-output hard lighting combined with soft lighting capabilities. It delivers 125,000 lumens of flicker-free, color-stable digital lighting on a less than 1500-watt AC power draw. By providing constantly variable CCT, it can replace a 10K tungsten, a 6K HMI, and everything in between. Beam angle adjustment from 15 to 75 degrees is accomplished without mechanical movement, making it remotely adjustable; and the Advanced Beam Control feature opens a whole new realm of possibilities. Cineo has completely redesigned its control strategy, making it as easy to use as your smartphone. A full complement of remote-control protocols is supported, including DMX/ RDM, CRMX wireless, sACN/ArtNet, and Bluetooth soon available. Pricing: $24,995 www.cineolighting.com

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MESSERSCHMIDT ON THE SET OF NETFLIX’S MINDHUNTER / PHOTO BY MERRICK MORTON, SMPSP

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Erik Messerschmidt, ASC, began his career as a chief lighting technician on television series and features such as Everybody Hates Chris, Bones, Gone Girl, and The Fantastic Four. He transitioned from chief lighting technician to full-time director of photography on the David Fincher–produced Netflix hit series Mindhunter. Messerschmidt also recently completed principal photography on Fincher’s first feature in six years, Mank, and the television series Raised by Wolves from Ridley Scott. He regularly speaks on the topics of technology, workflow, color science, and lighting. He has made presentations at IBC, NAB, Cine Gear, and the ASC. Does your background as a gaffer influence your choice of lighting, perhaps differently from a DP who comes from a camera background? I’m not sure. Everyone has his or her own path, and for me, it was through lighting. I think a lot of my lighting choices and techniques are influenced by the people I worked for as a gaffer, so I’m fortunate to pull from those experiences. I do think my time as a gaffer helped to build a strong foundation in terms of prep and the application of lighting resources. As a gaffer, you spend a lot of time in prep with the DP, director, and producers, and you learn a lot about filmmaking, so that time was helpful. What were some of the important lighting tools you chose for Mindhunter? We tried to keep the lighting very simple. Most of the interiors are motivated by practicals, either overhead fluorescents, incandescent lamps, or streetlights. Where we needed to add our own fixtures out of frame we used a lot of LiteGear Litemats and LiteTiles for our interiors and larger lamps for night exteriors. We also used a ton of Kino FreeStyles, which have become one of my personal favorites. New lighting tools seemed to dominate announcements of what would have been shown at NAB and Cine Gear. Anything that may have been of interest to you? There are so many new fixtures hitting or about to hit the market. I think ARRI Orbiter is the most most exciting of those. We have been asking for a better LED hard light, and I think ARRI delivered. Its updated light engine and color mixing is a great step forward for ARRI. Litegear and ETC also have some great new soft fixtures in the Spectrum and fos/4 products. Everyone is making great progress in terms of color and dimming performance. What do you think lighting manufacturers need to address in the short term? We need to continue to work on color standards for lighting. I’m excited about the color gamut management tools Litegear is exploring with its Spectrum series, and I hope the industry comes together to write some gamut standards. Out-of-gamut saturated colors continue to be an issue we never dealt with when we were using incandescent. I think the lighting industry also needs to collaborate more closely with camera manufacturers. Color workflow and sensor technology

have a lot to do with how lighting renders on camera, particularly when we’re dealing with discontinuous spectrum sources, so more work has to be done there. Frieder [Hochheim] at Kino has been particularly active in this work, and I think the proof is in the high quality of color rendition in Kino’s Feestyle fixtures. LED lighting now dominates the market, but does it still have a long way to go? The ARRI SkyPanel changed the lighting world, as it was the first LED fixture on the market to be widely accepted by cinematographers. It is now a universal standard we see on almost every set. As fixtures like the SkyPanel are more and more accepted, we’re recognizing where there is room for improvement, which the manufacturers are addressing every year. Color science is the name of the game, for sure. We should continue to push manufacturers to improve their product’s color spectrum, dimming characteristics, and weight. Video walls are becoming very popular in lieu of green screen. How does that impact lighting tools? Video walls are the most exciting thing happening in lighting right now. The flexibility they offer and the interactive effects they create are incredibly powerful. We used video walls extensively on Mindhunter for our car process work with great success. I think we’re going to see video walls homogenize with the traditional soft LED panel in the near future. What is your “wish list” for a new light? I want a bright “big gun” LED fixture! Something that could compete with a 20K Fresnel or 18K HMI. I’ve always been frustrated with the inconsistent color quality of HMI’s, and I think, if we can figure out the heat issues, LED or plasma might offer an interesting solution to that problem. As production comes back, where do you think lighting will be? In the short term, it will be a continuation of what we’re already doing – automation and remote-controlled. Wireless will continue to be important and in some cases essential. Remote color and intensity control, which we are already accustomed to using in theatrical moving lights and LED soft lights, will need to migrate into all our lighting tools. We’re seeing this with products like the ARRI Orbiter and Digital Sputnik’s fixtures.

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Michael Bauman is one of the industry’s top chief lighting technicians. He is known for his innovative lighting on such complex features as Ford v. Ferrari (ICG Magazine, November 2019, The Way Forward), Vice (ICG Magazine, December 2019, The Darkest Knight), Phantom Thread, Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn, Iron Man 2, and Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen among many others. Bauman is the cofounder of LiteGear and Lux Lighting, and also keeps busy teaching IATSE Local 728 classes on everything from “Lighting Ironman” to “Fixtures: From Prep to Shoot.”

What do you find most interesting in LED technology? It’s being able to transform light sources that were traditionally incandescent. Something as simple as a paper lantern, when the traditional incandescent light bulb that used to power it for decades is now replaced with a multicolor LED source. That opens up new uses for such a light, which has a quality we’re all familiar with. It’s the same with that little fill light, which has been a workhorse for decades – a beautiful soft controlled light. Now, with an LED light engine inside, you can create colors that we never would have been able to touch before. Where do you see lighting headed? We’re in a transformative time for creative lighting, accelerated by the COVID -19 situation. The lighting business was already transforming in new ways due to image capture driven by sensor technology. That combined with LED technology replacing incandescent and HMI sources made it an especially disruptive time.

How has lighting changed over the last decade? Only a few years ago incandescent and HMI were major players in my normal lighting package. But, in the last three years, LED has replaced almost all of my incandescents except for a few items. Automated moving fixtures, which typically were only used for a concert or club scene, are now a regular tool on a film set. The high-end SolaFrame Theatre has no fans, making it a great friend to the sound department. Lighting applications have changed as well, right? Lighting has transitioned from something that used to be outside the set pointing in to now being a key element of set design. The ability to build lighting into the sets with flexible LED sources provides a consistently lit background to shoot into. Unique LED key lights, like the Hudson Spider or Cream Source SpaceX, are becoming more of the norm. There are also very interesting things happening with video panels and projection mapping. All of these new tools allow different ways of lighting a space and providing interactive light. What is the biggest mistake you see happening when it comes to lighting? Many times – and I’m guilty of this myself – [it is the absence of ] proper education in how these new tools work effectively. As budgets and workflows are under constant scrutiny, along with what COVID-compliant working procedures may bring, it’s important to stay current on this flood – no pun intended – of lighting products and control methods.

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What do you think the new landscape is going to bring? A lot of the advancements in control systems are happening. There are a lot of inexpensive yet powerful tools, such as the iOS-based Blackout app or the ARRI Stellar app. For those needing something more tactile, there are interesting options such as Control One and Gaffers Control. A lot of the advancements in networking on set, be it wired or wireless, provide granular control of lighting systems. What would you like to see for the future of your craft? I’m very excited about where LED technology is heading as color-mixing quality gets much better. But I’m also looking forward to how lights communicate with each other, i.e., color temperature, intensity, tilt, and pan info, and how that data is encoded in camera metadata for reference.


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PHOTO OF MIKE BAUMAN BY CLAUDETTE BARIUS, SMPSP


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The research for ICG’s annual Product Guide issue begins the moment NAB unveils its website, which, this year, came online before COVID-19 took hold. One of the first places we landed was ARRI, with an obvious question: would the company’s game-changing ALEXA system continue to evolve, as it has in recent years with products like the ALEXA MINI LF? More to the point, would any other manufacturers be debuting anything as similarly ground-breaking in camera systems as ALEXA was 10 years ago? Since its debut, ALEXA has become the benchmark by which all other cameras are measured. Both questions were effectively answered (or put on hold) when COVID-19 arrived, and designand-build camera pipelines came to a halt. Luckily, there were some cameras – and lenses – all set to launch before quarantine. Those included not one but two new offerings from Canon, a new system from Panasonic for studio and field, and a new drone from industry leader DJI where a helicopter isn’t needed and handheld won’t do the trick. As for lenses – we fared a little better. Check Fujinon, Tokina, P+S Technik, ZEISS, Sigma, and a new stills lens from Hasselblad. Below are the best of the best in the capture category for 2020 and beyond, all things (COVID) considered.

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Canon EOS C300 Mark III Equipped with a newly designed 4K Dual Gain Output (DGO) sensor and DIGIC DV 7 image processor, Canon’s EOS C300 Mark III is highlighted by internal Cinema RAW light recording. This next-generation system employs a modular design and an interchangeable lens mount (as an optional accessory) that allows users to customize the camera according to the needs of each project. With Canon’s newly developed 4K Super 35-mm DGO imaging system, high dynamic range and low noise levels can be controlled by reading out each photodiode via separate gains – one prioritizes saturation in highlight areas while the other suppresses noise in the shadows. The result is an image with up to 16-plus stops of dynamic range, clean rich shadows and vibrant highlights in resolutions up to 4K and 60p. The DIGIC (Digital Imaging Integrated Circuit) DV7 achieves more fluid and efficient recording of 4K and HDR and can process high-speed video recording, including 4K at up to 120p. The C300 uses Cinema RAW Light, a powerful tool for helping to cut the data size of a file to about one-third to onefifth of a similar Cinema RAW file, without losing grading flexibility. The camera is also able to record 4K and 2K RAW data internally, without using an external recorder, and supports XF-AVC (with a choice of Intra or Long GOP encoding). Pricing: $10,999 www.canon.usa.com

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DJI Mavic Air 2 Filmmakers will welcome this compact folding drone that features a ½-inch sensor and captures 4K video at 60 fps, 12-megapixel photographs, or 48-megapixel images in a new High Resolution mode. A suite of creative and flight modes is preprogrammed

in

the

Mavic

Air

2,

including

Active Track to automatically track a subject, APAS

3.0

to

automatically

maneuver

around

obstacles, and Hyperlapse, which can record in a maximum resolution of 8K. A high-grade 3-axis gimbal

ensures

stable

video

in

challenging

shooting scenarios. New motors and aerodynamic design provide a max flight time of 34 minutes. OcuSync 2.0 has been added to provide a stable and long-range transmission signal. Designed not only to be easy to fly but also safe, Mavic Air 2 includes geofencing to keep drones out of sensitive areas and obstacle sensors on the front, bottom, and rear along with AirSense, which receives transmission signals from manned aircraft nearby to warn the drone pilot of them. Pricing: $799 www.dji.com

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Panasonic AK-HC3900 This cost-effective studio/field camera features

everything

needed

for

full

simultaneous HDR/SDR feature sets. An upgrade to pass the full 4K image will be released late in 2020. The large image sensor allows for high resolution, high sensitivity and low noise. It features full simultaneous HDR/SDR features and HDR/ITU-R BT.2020 wide color space. AKHC3900

also

aberration

features

lens

compensation

skew-reduction

as

function

chromaticwell

and

as

a

Dynamic

Range Stretcher. The 3D HD trunk sends an additional 3G HD signal from camera to CCU, and the 3G HD prompt sends an additional 3G HD signal from CCU to the camera. Pricing has yet to be set but will fall between

that

of

the

HC3800

HC50000. www.business.panasonic.com

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and

AK-


Canon CINE-SERVO 25-250-mm T2.95-3.95 ENG/EFP and documentary-style capture fans will love this new Canon CINE-SERVO lens. The lightweight element has been designed for use with 4K cameras and is available in both ER and PL mount. The lens is a good fit for cameras with Super 35-mm sensors. While the 10× zoom covers a focal range of 25-250 mm, the built-in extender stretches that range to 375 mm, with an added benefit of allowing for full-frame sensor coverage with only a stop of difference in light loss. The servo drive unit included can be easily removed to allow for manual operation, and the gear pitch is compatible with standard cinema controls of zoom and focus. “As the lines between broadcast, cinematic and commercial productions continue to blur, it becomes more important to have a seamless product line that can provide solutions across a broad scope of applications,” describes Tatsuro “Tony” Kano, executive vice president of Canon U.S.A. Imaging Technologies and Communications. “The new 25-250-millimeter lens adds a great deal of versatility to the CINE-SERVO lineup.” Pricing: $29,999 www.canonusa.com

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Fujinon Premista 28-100 T2.9 Industry

leader

Fujinon

has

launched a new series – Premista –

featuring

two

lenses

that

cover 28-100 mm and 80-250 mm (T2.9). Directors of photography frequently refer to Fujinon zooms as “variable primes” because they optically perform on par with primes (with a slightly slower stop), and quickly changing focal lengths

saves

the

production

both time and money, minimizing lens changes and allowing it to shoot an increased page count. Pricing: 28-100 T.29 $38,888; 80-250 T2.9-3.5 $39,800. www.fujinon.com

Tokina Cinema Vista One 135-mm T1.5 With this new 135-mm T1.5, Tokina’s (limited-release) Cinema Vista Primes become a complete set. The single coating of the front element allows for a reduction in contrast and increase in lens flare when offaxis lighting is used. When the lens is on-axis to the light source, the lens retains contrast and normal lens flare. Tokina’s Vista One presents an advantage over uncoated lenses that may provide too much reduction in contrast and less image control. Pricing: $11,999 www.tokinacinemausa.com

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ZEISS Supreme Prime Radiance Users have been waiting anxiously for ZEISS’s new Supreme Prime Radiance lenses, which are now coming to market. Based on the high-speed ZEISS Supreme lenses, they benefit from the new T* blue coating, which offers a distinctive look and controlled flares without any compromises. Seven focal lengths – between 21 and 100 millimeters, all with a maximum aperture of T1.5 – allow for the capture of subtle nuances, even in low light. Featuring an image circle diameter of 46.3 millimeters, the lenses cover the current larger-format sensors and are compatible with the latest camera models, as well as with Super35 cameras. They are equipped with the ZEISS eXtended Data metadata technology, providing frameby-frame data on lens shading and distortion in addition to the standard metadata provided using the Cooke /i technology protocol. Pricing: Seven-lens bundle $170,280 www.zeiss.com

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Hasselblad XCD 4/45P Hasselblad still cameras and lenses have created a unique look for decades, and the company is always redefining its product to reflect the times. The case in point is the XCD 4/45P – the most compact XCD lens to date. Weighing only 0.7 pounds and measuring 1.85 inches in depth, it’s the lightest digital

medium-format

autofocus

lens

on

the

market. The design incorporates two aspherical elements for optical performance. Reduced audible noise lets users get in close and personal with their subjects. With a minimum focus distance of 13.8 inches and a maximum image scale of 1:5.2, it captures a range of images from food to still life and more. Pricing: $1,099 www.hasselblad.com

Sigma FF Cine Classic Art Prime Set For the ultimate vintage look, this brand-new 10set PL-mount lens series provides users with low contrast and aesthetically appealing flare/ghost. With unified T values (14 mm and 13 mm at T3.2 and the rest at T2.5), they support /i Technology. The lenses are water-resistant and available with imperial/feet or metric gradations on the focus ring. Pricing: $43,999 www.sigma.com

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P+S Technik Technovision 1.5X Built

upon

Technovision

the

storied

lenses

from

history the

of

1970s,

P+S Technik has transformed its iconic glass into a full-frame version series. A front anamorphic look with a factor of 1.5Ă—, the new lens is full frame with an aperture from T2.2. It features a

consistent

front

diameter

(136-mm)

position of the scales on primes. Pricing based on current exchange rates; visit www.pstechnik.de/en and www.hotrodcameras.com

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RICHARDSON ON THE SET OF ONCE UPON A TIME...IN HOLLYWOOD / PHOTO BY ANDREW COOPER, SMPSP

Robert Richardson, ASC (Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood, Live by Night, The Aviator, Kill Bill, Casino, JFK, A Private War, To Sleep With Anger), has been nominated for an unprecedented 120 awards and won 20, including Academy Awards for Hugo, The Aviator, and JFK. Before becoming a regular collaborator with visionary directors like Oliver Stone and Quentin Tarantino, he served his apprenticeship doing reshoots on Repo Man. His documentary, shot in El Salvador, caught Oliver Stone’s attention, and they later employed their unique cinema vérité style on Stone’s Salvador and Platoon. The ASC awarded Richardson its 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award, lauding him as “a master operator who’s equally adept at expressive lighting,” noting that he “doesn’t do a shot just to knock it off the list…Every shot is 100 percent, even if it’s just 36 frames.” Richardson is also known for employing a wide range of cameras on any given project, each carefully chosen to enhance the story.

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Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood, which was set in 1969, was shot on film. Was it because of the period? Perhaps, in part. But in reality, Quentin Tarantino has zero desire to shoot on digital, so we shot 35mm, with Panavision cameras and E-, C-, and T-series anamorphic lenses. Were there limitations? The main limitation of film, in my mind, is the speed of stocks. 500 ASA, even if pushed to 1000 or 800, is not as fast as many digital cameras, so the result is an increase in lighting, especially for night sequences and interiors. But, and this is a large “but,” the look of film is softer at this time with respect to skin tones. In my mind that will not be the case very soon. In fact, due to screening facilities, meaning theater versus monitors or mobile devices, the actual quality is lost on smaller systems such as computers and some monitors, phones or tablets. What do you think is the state of cameras today? With respect to digital, it is superb. I can rate the ARRI 65 at 1600 and often shoot at 2000. Venom: Let There Be Carnage, Breathe and Live by Night were all shot on this camera, and I am extremely pleased with the results. Recently, I spent time with the folks at RED and they are quite inventive. The newer cameras are astounding. Again, you can push them to 1600 without question. They are also small and getting smaller, which has obvious advantages. Full-frame capture has become quite popular – any limitations in your eyes? The biggest issue with largeformat shooting is the lenses. 4K is less of an issue, but when you move above that, zooms and many primes with older glass do not cover the entire chip. But I can see this shifting now, and I hope to a larger extent in the future.

“ The biggest issue with large-format shooting is the lenses. 4K is less of an issue, but when you move above that, zooms and many primes with older glass do not cover the entire chip.”

What do you like most about digital capture? I like how digital shifts lighting patterns within my brain. I light less and carry less. A Private War was an 8-milliondollar film, or near that, with a very short schedule and we – director Matt Heineman and I – decided upon a documentary feel with little to no lighting. Often the lighting came from computers or simply what existed on location or household bulbs, or maybe flat LED handheld panels. Minimal and fast, which we needed. What do you think makes a “successful” camera? That’s an interesting question. Size is important, for camera assistants – how their focus systems work with whatever camera. I prefer through an eyepiece, but many do not. The Sigma is an excellent camera and accepts so many superb lenses that one cannot normally use. But overall, what makes a “successful” camera is the chip and how it records the face and setting – with the greatest latitude in terms of stops. Looking forward – what would you like to see as the next innovation in cameras? Lenses for me are vital to any improvement. Companies such as Panavision, ARRI, and Tribe 7 are pushing the boundaries. Glass. Glass. Glass. And the chips need to improve. We cannot stop here. I would love to see Kodak develop a higher speed film that holds the same grain as they currently have. The reversal stocks should also be available in all formats from Super 8 to 16 to 35 – both Kodachrome and Ektachrome as well as black and white stocks. What else needs to improve? We need more cooperation in digital intermediate facilities to create from dailies to finish without great cost. I have tried to use a grader on set rather than shipping off to a facility so that I can oversee what is being done in the moment. One of the central issues I experienced when shooting Venom/Carnage was a need to see the dailies immediately. Sony Chairman Tom Rothman was extremely supportive of allowing a grader from Harbor (DI facility) to set up a lab on site, as were Hutch Parker and Barry Waldman. We had it in an office when we were shooting in London and a hotel room when we were in San Francisco. This allowed me to bring the look into shape each day for the studio, which was extremely important to them. Director Andy Serkis would put in his thoughts on the work as would Sony and also [VFX Supervisor] Sheena Duggal. I felt it was one of the finest relationships I have had with all involved, and I would like to see this become a more dominant trend in filmmaking.

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MORGENTHAU ON THE SET OF THE UPCOMING MGM/UA FEATURE RESPECT / PHOTO BY QUANTRELL COLBERT

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Kramer Morgenthau, ASC (ICG Magazine, August 2018, Fight The Power), is a six-time Emmy nominated director of photography known for his work across a variety of film and television genres. His wide range of projects includes Creed II, American Son, Game of Thrones, Thor: The Dark World, and Terminator: Genisys. He just completed shooting the MGM/ UA feature about Aretha Franklin, Respect, and The Many Saints of Newark, a prequel to The Sopranos. Has moving into digital changed the creative aesthetic? For many years I shot only film. For the past several years I’ve worked primarily in digital, and it’s become a happy home. One of the things I like about digital is how malleable it is. As a director of photography, it’s super important to master that malleability and harness the color science expressively. Has prep changed with the move to digital? During any prep, I typically do deep research into the newest camera technologies, as that area is moving very fast. Currently, most of the main pro cameras are all exceptional technically. It’s a matter of finding one that fits your groove. There are different factors that I take into account – ergonomics, size, weight, adaptability to different forms – particularly Steadicam, remote, gimbal, and, of course, handheld. Most importantly, though, I look at the sensor and the signal processing. I do my best as an artist to deep-dive into color science. What are your choices based on? Well, since the move to digital, I have almost always used an ALEXA sensor. I have gotten so comfortable with the camera; I forget about it as I did with film, and can concentrate on light, story, movement, et cetera. For Thor: The Dark World (2013), I went with ALEXA and Panavision anamorphic C-series lenses. It was one of the early blockbuster films to go with digital anamorphic. On my last two pictures, I’m still ALEXA, but now the LF with Panavision T-series lenses as the mechanics are more stable. I would love to explore shooting something spherical at some point, just to keep things fresh.

whatever “lab” we are using to come up with looks. This involves a lot of testing and tweaking of parameters – i.e., color cubes. Sometimes I try to emulate a film stock for a particular time period as I did with Many Saints of Newark, which is set in the 1960s and 1970s. Kodachrome and Ektachrome were my inspirations for that show. I collaborated with DIT Matt Selkirk, who did amazing work developing LUTS and the color science team at Technicolor. The film stock emulation LUTS tend to be heavy and eat up a lot of light but look beautiful. I feel my 800 ASA became 40 ASA with the strong LUT. And once the camera is chosen, the optics take precedent? This is the other area where I like to go granular. I spend time riffing with Dan Sasaki at Panavision and provide general ideas about what I’m looking for, like a period 1960s impressionist look that I wanted for Respect. Fine-tuning optics with Dan is a little bit of science and a little bit of alchemy. I tend to favor anamorphic lenses, which bring a little magic to the digital world. What is capturing your attention in cameras these days? Large-format cameras. I used the ALEXA LF on my last two pictures. I also used the Panavision DXL with the 8K RED Monstro Sensor with Panavision’s H-series spherical primes on American Son. That worked especially well for all the handheld work. It was a play adapted to the screen, so we had three cameras shooting 25-minute continuous handhled takes, with varioous H-series primes and PV lightweight zooms. What’s your wish list for a camera that hasn’t been invented? It’s a digital camera that allows you not only to apply color cube LUT’s but also textural and even optical emulation LUT’s. I think it would be cool if you could have a programmable ND gradient filter with which you could selectively darken aspects of the frame on the fly – i.e., the hot sky, et cetera. Also, it would be nice to see cameras that have all the onboard accessories integrated, like what the DXL and RED Ranger are moving toward – remote focus and wireless video/focus assist. Lastly, I would love to see a camera with all of the above that is as ergonomically balanced as the old Aaton [16mm] cameras that sat on your shoulder like a cat. Oh, and a camera with an espresso machine attached would also be nice [laughs.]

Coming up with looks isn’t always a solo affair, correct? I work very closely with the DIT, and with

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WALKER ON THE SET OF DISNEY’S UPCOMING MULAN / PHOTO BY JASON BOLAND, SMPSP

Cinematographer Mandy Walker, ASC, ACS, born and raised in Melbourne, Australia, shot her first feature, Return Home, at the age of 25. Known for her eclectic style, Walker balances her work between high-end commercials for major directors such as Baz Luhrmann (Chanel No. 5) and Steve Rogers (Old Spice, Dodge, Nike) and major features (Mulan, Hidden Figures, Truth, Jane Got a Gun). She’s been nominated for 12 awards and won 11, including the ACS Award for Tracks, Lantana, and Parklands; the Australian Film Institute Award for Parklands, the Satellite Award for Australia; and Kodak’s Cinematography Mentor of the Year Award from the Emerging Cinematographers Awards. For Walker, a big part of her creativity is the careful selection of lenses to fit each project.

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How do you choose your lenses? I will visit Dan Sasaki at Panavision, and Dan will interpret our conversations into technical aspects of the possible glass and lens builds. He will go away and make examples of different lenses for me to test, and we confer on whether we are on the right track or should tweak them to have more subtle or obvious effects. On Mulan, we ended up with a combination of Sphero 65 lenses tweaked for more painterly landscape shots. For the character of Mulan, the director, Niki Caro, and I always wanted a special portrait lens for her that centered the frame on her face. This way, the audience would be focused on her even in the melee of the big battle sequences. We decided on an adapted Petzval lens, which is a vintage portrait lens that Dan modified


to seamlessly complement the Sphero lenses. We also had an adapted version of a Gauss lens for moments of Mulan’s chi or special moments where we see her power as a warrior, and martial arts stunts. We had been looking at trying to portray these emotional moments in camera rather than as a VFX. Were lens choices different ten years ago when you shot Australia? I think when I shot on film, I approached the options for different looks to include film stocks and photochemical processes, with only minor tweaks to lenses. For instance, on Hidden Figures (ICG Magazine, January 2017, The Space Race), Dan flattened-out the lenses to decrease the distortion of the anamorphic T and E series for when we shot 35mm, as we were shooting with wider lenses in symmetrical and architectural environments, and I didn’t want them to be too bendy on the outside of the image. We also shot spherical Panavision Ultra Speed MKII for the Super 16mm footage to give a softer, grainy-gritty look for the flashback sequences. But none of these lenses was adapted to the extent that I would do now on a digital image. I find that in conjunction with LUTS and the DI, such lens tweaks can give you an even greater range of creating an individual look for your movie. What are you seeing in current lens technology development? I am always watching, as I feel that’s such an

important part of the cinematographer’s palette – and through camera choice, film or digital, lenses, DI color, and LUT’s, we can make images that are story-specific. We used to do this with the added availability of different filmstock manufacturers and the options of negative and reversal stocks, but that is now much more limited. Lens options have become an essential tool for creating original looks. Dan is always introducing me to new versions of glass he has developed and ways he can manipulate an image – from extreme to very subtle. What is your “wish list” for the development of new lenses? I think new lenses have the opportunity to be even more flexible in creating an image. Also, the option of doing some of your own tweaks on set may be interesting in regard to distortion and close focus options. Multi-levels of image manipulation seem to be in demand these days. Does this include the role of lens optics? I feel that I still want to control the way a film looks in camera as much as I can. In my experience, for the projects I have been involved in, the director feels more comfortable having the look of the movie on set and in the editing room. I also think it looks more organic and natural to do this in camera, and some effects never look the same done in post, such as depth of field, close-focus capabilities, or bokeh and flare characteristics of a lens.

“I think new lenses have the opportunity to be even more flexible in creating an image. Also, the option of doing some of your own tweaks on set may be interesting.”

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Rob Legato grew up in Asbury Park, NJ; graduated from Ocean Township High School; and studied film in Santa Barbara, CA. The magic of filmmaking captured his heart early, and Legato parlayed that passion into early success. He began his film career as VFX Supervisor for Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. The Star Trek franchise earned him three Emmy nominations and two awards. Legato has been nominated for five VFX Academy Awards and won three (for Titanic, Hugo, and The Jungle Book). Apollo 13 garnered Oscar and BAFTA nominations. (He won the BAFTA.) For our annual Product Guide, Legato shared his thoughts about lensing. Where do you see the future of glass design headed? Merging computer-designed lenses with computerassisted digital imaging. One could build, as with Panavision’s lens designer Dan Sasaki, a super-lens that can achieve 75 percent physically, while the other 20 percent could be built into a computer algorithm that completes the lens character.

was also adjusted in real-time at the moment the virtual scene was shot, influencing the composition, depth of field, sun flares, and focus. With the addition of a computer lens mimicking the artifacts of a real one, the illusion would be complete and indistinguishable from live photography.

Can current lenses be adapted to this concept? Not all lenses are designed for optimum sharpness as they tend to lack character, depth, or the warmth of traditional lensing and their specific artifacts. Someone of Dan’s tremendous knowledge and understanding of the value and balance of these characteristics can create a lens with literally no limitations.

What new tools have influenced these new formats? The advent of LED video walls on sets and real-life environments will be shot in camera with a hybrid of foreground live-action and gameengine synthetically created or photographically created enhanced backgrounds. The seamless blend of the real lens and the virtual lens behaving as one becomes imperative to transport the audience into believing what they are seeing as the real thing.

How about a computer-designed lens constructed for fully synthetically created projects? Films like The Lion King (ICG Magazine, August 2019, Pride Rock 2.0) can benefit. If a DP likes the particular character of a traditional lens package, that design can be used to render the computer-generated imagery and virtual camera to have the same warmth of a real glass ground lens. The specific and individual character of real-life lens artifacts is often quite beautiful and only enhances the believability of the artificially created scene. The hybrid film becomes more homogenized creatively as well, as the DP can shoot both live and virtual scenes with the same sensibility using mirrored equipment. How would The Lion King have benefited from this process? Caleb Deschanel [ASC] virtually shot the film with traditional tools such as a dolly, remote head, fluid head, handheld, cranes, and Steadicam. The lighting

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“ [For virtual projects like The Lion King] the character of real-life lens artifacting is often quite beautiful and enhances the believability of the artificially created scene.”


PHOTO COURTESY OF ROB LEGATO

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It’s not an understatement to assess this year’s Support category as “not especially sparkling,” even before the pandemic halted many new announcements. We’re not exactly sure why, and the grips and electrics we canvassed couldn’t put their fingers on the lack of innovation, either. Of course, with camera technology in transition, it’s become challenging for any support vendor to maintain a reliable crystal ball. New COVID-19 workflows have made that equation even more unpredictable, so incremental improvements take the day. That all being said, we did find interesting new offerings, like a 52-foot telescoping crane from Chapman-Leonard, and new heads from ARRI and the Scorpio V Mini that should see plenty of use as productions restart. Aerial work, done safely, will also factor into new protocols, and that’s where Shotover’s ultra-compact gyrostabilized system will shine. On set, light will be guided with new offerings like K5600’s Kurve set, while moving camera work will benefit from products like ACT Zacuto shoulder rig, Manfrotto’s fast tripod, and Matthews’ new Docking System. Check out the accompanying sidebar on “new normal” support systems that are available, no matter where or how Local 600 members are sheltering.

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Matthews Docking System In

response

to

the

increased

use of gimbals on a multitude of shoots, Matthews has created the new Docking System to keep these essential tools safely out of the way between shots, yet still ready for action. The system combines the Slider Stand and Dutti Dock to create a handy platform for making 3-ft.

rig

adjustments.

footprint,

a

Its

fraction

of

the size of a traditional cart, makes it much easier to position close to set. Built for travel, the system collapses to just 25 inches. The docking sled offers a multitude of mounting options, including two long cheese-plate slots

for

an

adjustable

plate

balance position, 18 holes, and four removable accessory hangers to support a fully loaded gimbal rig or camera setup. Pricing: $593 www.msegrip.com

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Chapman/Leonard 52-Foot Hydrascope Featuring the all-new ECS Electric Powered Base, M7 EVO 4-Axis Stabilized Remote Head and Mav 52 Mobile Crane Arm Base; this bigger, better, heavyduty crane can be used on land or in water. When mounted on the Mav 52, it reaches heights of 55 ft. 3 in., with the remote head underslung and heights of 48 ft. 11 in. when mounted on the ECS Base with the remote head underslung. Maximum reach on both is 51 ft. 5 in. capable of 40 ft. 4 in. of horizontal arm travel. It’s powered by either thumb (pickle) or removable hand-control valve. Paired with your choice of stabilized heads, the reach allows for many shots within confined areas or continuous or nodal shots. The unit can be transported through doorways as small as 60 in., allowing production the ability to get a larger arm into areas that require a base with a smaller footprint or need to be used on track. The arm comes with either a 30-volt DC Chapman or lithium battery as well as an AC/DC converter for use in remote locations. Pricing is between $4,800 and $6,800 per day, on a four-day-week price including head and base. Two technicians are not included in this price, and neither is travel, mileage, per diem, or housing expenses if used outside the 30-mile city zone where a Chapman facility is located. www.chapman-leonard.com

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Scorpio V Mini The new Scorpio V Mini Stabilized Head brings all of the latest software and engineering from Service Vision that has been refined in its larger model, the Scorpio V. Engineered to be efficient on any location, it allows for up to 200-mm focal range, with a maximum axis rotation speed of 360°/2 sec. The optional back pan compensation is independent, with no impact on stability. The new Scorpio V Mini is sealed through all covers and ports to allow for use in rain and humidity without the need for a rain cover. A higher range of frequency detection allows for both a greater level of stabilization and the user to set a feel of motion for the shot that is then stabilized. The Scorpio V Mini is compatible with all preferred operating options as well as the new 900-mHz Scorpio Wireless control for greater distance apart for the operator. At a weight of only 39 pounds with a payload capacity of 45 pounds, the Scorpio V Mini brings a new level of ease and confidence to any shoot. Pricing: $1,200 per day rental www.thecranecoinfo.com

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ARRI SRH-360 The

SRH-360

is

a

three-axis,

entirely

stabilized remote head that allows fullsized cameras weighing up to 30 kg/66 pounds to go where no other head can go. On set, in a studio, or at an event, the intelligent and adaptive SRH-3, together with digital controllers

such

as

the

DEH

and

Master

Grips digital controllers, coupled with the ERM radio modules, allows you to control the remote head, camera, and lens while maintaining effective social distancing. The system has the full force of ARRI technology behind it. “Unleashing the pan axis by adding a slip ring and a more powerful pan motor gives the cinematographer and camera operator the freedom to create moves and frames that they could not get before,” shares Curt Schaller, Product Manager for Camera Stabilizer Systems at ARRI. LBUS-based control of the head, camera and lens makes the ARRI stabilized remote head easy to use in both cine and broadcast applications. The modular head is compatible with ARRI accessories as well as Canon and Fujinon broadcast lenses through ARRI’s LCUBE. Pricing: $80,000 www.arri.com

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Shotover B1 At less than 40 pounds, including payload, the B1 is the most compact aerial-camera-system industry leader Shotover has ever developed. Its lightweight design allows it to be used on a wide range of aircraft, including Robinson helicopters and Cessna airplanes. The system can also be used on watercraft and groundbased platforms, such as motorcycles, jet skis, tracks and rails. The open platform design of the B1 allows cinematographers the flexibility and creative freedom to choose the right camera and lens to fit their needs. Like all Shotover systems, it features 6-axis stabilization technology that provides unmatched viewing capability/functionality and in-air safety. Additional features include an angled front window for brilliant imagery without reflections, and exceptional low-light and daylight performance. The B1 now bridges the cost gap between drones and much larger aerial camera systems. Pricing starts at $185,000 www.shotover.com

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Manfrotto 645 Tripod Speed, flexibility, ease of use – the new 645 Fast Twin leg carbon tripod features double tubing and FAST Lever Lock technology. The unique Twist locking mechanism allows for tripod setup in one fast and easy move. It is stable on even or uneven terrain – and Fast Lock operates with one easy twisting motion. The extra M-lock guarantees leg stiffness and perfect operation even in rainy or sandy environments. It supports up to 55 pounds and has a maximum working height of 61.8 in. and a minimum height of 10.6 in. The tripod legs are selectable between free movement or three locking leg positions – without a spreader. Pricing is $949.99 www.manfrotto.com

Zacuto ACT Recoil Ready to shoot out of the box with a balanced, cage-based shoulder rig and electronic viewfinder, this new system from Zacuto includes “key components to ensure balance,” explains Steve Weiss, Zacuto Product Designer. “It has a comfortable shoulder pad and adjustable EVF mount, and we added special features like the twist-on Tactical Handle and ‘saucy’ rosette joint much

on

the

EVF,

which

adjustability,”

he

adds

so

continues.

“And, we added the EVF so shooters can get a complete rig and get out there

to

start

creating.”

The

ACT

offers camera-specific cage options, a

universal

cage,

and

a

cageless

rig. It’s compatible with all DSLR/ mirrorless cameras on the market. Pricing is $850 to $1,450 www.zacuto.com

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K5600 Kurve Series 2 Keeping up with the changes in lighting, K5600 has created a line of parabolic umbrellas and accessories ranging from two to seven feet in diameter. Although the Kurve 7 was initially designed to work with the Joker, this new series will fit most fixtures. A larger umbrella, seven feet in diameter, allows coverage on even the largest set, and even broader highlight/shadow control. Focusable and adaptable, the Kurve Series comes in kit form, including easy-open cam system, focus tubes, diffusion, and a multipoint yoke mount. Pricing starts at $7,490 www.K5600.com

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Support in a COVID-19 World by Pauline Rogers

As production starts to return, there’s little doubt the “new normal” will be challenging for all concerned. With safety protocols for returning to work still in flux (the subject of ongoing discussions between industry unions and producers as of this writing), many companies are trying to be proactive by finding ways to support creativity and still stay safe. We did a little research and thought a sampling of what’s in the pipeline might be of interest. There’s everything from Luminys’ approach to cleaning a set to remote control of image and lighting from HIVE, Sony and ARRI. One takeaway is how many new solutions support vendors are testing out to imagine what a new production workspace may look like. Luminys Luminys Corp. recently received IES and CIE reports on ultraviolet (UV) disinfection and the UV-C photometrics of their 50K and 100K SoftSun, with related kill times for COVID-19. They are working on more of these for all xenon light fixtures. The idea is that with most stages being tall enough to leverage upper room GUV, they can be disinfected with light. The addition of ambient light can be flagged or simply turned off during a take if DP’s, chief lighting technicians and key grips want to try to incorporate this in sound stages. Large arenas with lighting directors can use the same process. Also in the works is the concept of Lightning Strikes as a pulsed-xenon UV-C disinfection device. They are a portable way of disinfecting unoccupied interior locations before shooting, stages between setups, and crew changes. The power of the Lightning Strikes offers a megadose of UV-C that can disinfect an industrial-sized area in just minutes and make it immediately safe to re-enter.

ARRI’s Remote Production Control Getting crews back on set safely will no doubt be facilitated by ARRI’s ready-to-deploy remote production solution. The turnkey cinematic ecosystem, preconfigured by ARRI, allows you to use ARRI cameras, lights and accessories to produce premium, unequaled quality in any environment. Simply choose the appropriate ALEXA camera or cameras, SkyPanels, and accessories, and you are ready to go. Crews can position the gear as needed depending on location. Once in place, users can hit record and start streaming or capturing footage. Creative control will stay in the

hands of the creatives via easy-to-use web browser interfaces from any room, another building or any geographic location.

HIVE Remote Remote lighting control was already a fast-growing area before the pandemic. HIVE has taken it a step further with its Antenna Wireless Remote Control system. The idea is to maximize the value of the portable LED’s via Wi-Fi and Bluetooth while keeping a distance from on-set lights. HIVE even has a remote access control that allows users to control the device and their lights from anywhere in the world via Wi-Fi access. Remote access turns the Antenna into a control hub and extends the wireless control range of the lights to be virtually limitless. The HIVE Antenna can be accessed via a second Antenna Remote or third party Wi-Fi-enabled computer, tablet or smartphone.

Sony Media Cloud The new Sony Ci media cloud platform is a mediacentric cloud environment with innovative applications that leverage the scalability and availability of the cloud to streamline production, editorial and delivery workflows. Ci’s browser-based workspace application connects people, content and devices from any location in the world. They continue to grow their portfolio of REST API’s to enable seamless integration with existing workflows to cost-effectively leverage the scalability and resiliency of the cloud.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MARTIN TORNER

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Originally from Mexico City, Local 80 grip Martin Torner grew up in San Diego, CA in a family-run theater company. At age 12, he was operating a follow spot and soon fell in love with the behind-the-scenes crafts, whether it was in a theater or on film. A year in the Directing Program at New York Film Academy in Los Angeles and then a BA in Communications from Menlo College gave Torner direction toward camera. Although he loved lighting, his interest in still photography led him into the grip department. When not working on such large franchise features as Marvel’s Thor, Iron Man 2, The Amazing Spider-Man, or Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., or on such small-screen series as Curb Your Enthusiasm, Ballers, Homeland, and most recently CBS All-Access’s Star Trek: Picard, Torner is also a product development consultant for industry support gear leader Matthews Studio Equipment. What trends have you been seeing in camera support? The emergence of compact and relatively affordable gimbals, remote heads, and stabilized arms have made an enormous impact on camera support. In the past, these items were specialty rentals that had to be planned in advance and rented for the day. Now they’re tools that can be carried through the entire show or project, allowing for more solutions in camera support from day to day. Were there any new support products you were excited about seeing this year at NAB and Cine Gear, if not for the shows being canceled by COVID-19? It’s a head-scratcher when it comes to grip gear I was looking forward to seeing at trade shows this year. In lighting, camera, and sound, we see yearly leaps forward. But when it comes to support, it’s a bit slower going. We see new telescoping arms, different lengths, different bases, units designed to be mounted on vehicles. But these normally fall in the hands of the specialty technicians who service and operate the gear. The new systems, such as remote camera sliders used for car rigs, are such specialty items designed for their capabilities that I don’t see their all-around usefulness. I’m a big fan of old-school rigging and support. The tools I get excited about are extremely versatile and can be worked into a variety of solutions. What are some of the go-to support tools that you have used recently? One tool I’m a big fan of is a compact jib arm that can travel anywhere. Paired

with a small remote head, which is now more readily available, you can offer up some very creative options on set or location. While trying to figure out whether dolly track will be laid or if dance floor will do the trick, a small jib arm can simplify the setup and add a fun and unique solution. When the jib is first offered up, it might seem to many a pain in the butt, but when it plays and works its magic, the results justify the efforts, and the fussing turns into a pat on the back. How is the relationship between support personnel changing? The relationship between dolly grip/crane operator and camera operators/ camera assistants is going to be redefined. With new [COVID-19] safety protocols, we will see the distancing of as many crew members as possible. Camera operators and focus pullers will most likely be working remotely, leaving the hands-on camera work to second AC’s and dolly grips. Are there tools that will become more important in the “new normal”? With the likely shift to remotely operating as much equipment as possible, it will be interesting to see how remotely operated dollies will enter the set. There are certainly options available, such as the systems used in news broadcasting. These systems require intensive setup and are not adjustable in the format we traditionally shoot in. It’s also possible that blocking and workflow will have to be adjusted and designed around dolly and jib arm setups to promote distancing and efficiency. This will be a big shift from the past, during which every dolly move was tailored to serve the blocking of each scene. Where do you see lighting headed? That area, too, will likely gravitate toward remotely operated units. Lights will have to be placed very thoughtfully on set, knowing that the majority of adjustments will have to occur remotely. This transition will be much more difficult for the grip department – shaping the light is reactionary, and difficult to plan. So, instead of tailoring the lighting setup to the scene, I believe much of the work will go into creating an enveloping lighting setup, as is done in multi-cam live-audience sitcoms. This will aid in distancing as well as efficiency.

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At the end of February, as COVID19 began to ravage New York City, Goldcrest Post Managing Director Domenic Rom decided to transition to remote workflows for picture and sound postproduction tasks. One month later, after brainstorming different solutions, Goldcrest Post’s colorists, conform editors and other staff began working from home or other remote spots, connected to the facility’s central storage and technical resources via remote collaboration software, while clients monitored their work through secure, fast and reliable desktop connections. “Before coronavirus, we had a few remote workflows, mainly for reviews,” Rom offers. “The coronavirus has presented challenges unlike any we’ve previously encountered.” Goldcrest built a temporary colorgrading facility off site, which includes a color-grading control panel, two color-calibrated monitors and a high-speed connection to the New York City facility. It also installed desktop workstations and monitors in the home of remote workers. Among the enabling technology are Sony X300 monitors, Blackmagic Design Resolve for conform and color, and Sohonet’s ClearView Flex, with a cloud system based on Amazon Web Services (AWS). COVID-19 has accelerated the process of postproduction’s moving to the cloud. As facilities throughout the country were forced to shut down, many moved to cloud-based or hybrid cloud/onpremises workflows to push work through the pipeline while keeping staff and clients safe. Here are some of the new products enabling the industry to make that shift.

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Hardware - Workstations In a remote workflow, the creative uses a “virtual desktop” or “virtualized workstation” that refers to the fact that the power of the computer isn’t in a box on the desk but rather in the cloud. In other words, all the computing that would ordinarily be done by the onprem computer is done in the cloud. At the ASC’s Motion Imaging Technology Council, Workflow Committee chair Greg Ciaccio explained that one of the advantages of a cloud workflow is that “the computer doesn’t need to be that powerful. You’re just sending instructions to the server in the cloud,” he notes. “You can do it with a Macbook – any simple computer with a large enough dual-monitor setup.” Ciaccio says that virtual workstations are part of a trend of the industry moving from CAPEX (capital expenses) to OPEX (operational expenses). Rather than a budget line for new workstations, the facility has monthly costs via software subscriptions that run on so-called “dumb” terminals. Most facilities, for that reason, don’t need to buy new computers for their remote staff; but if they do, the industry is full of good choices for zeroclient or thin-client computers, from such providers as Dell and HP. Dell, for example, offers its line of Wyse thin and zero clients, including all-in-one desktop versions and mobile ones. HP offers its HP ZCentral Remote Boost, which enables users to access graphicsintensive applications at home. Similar solutions come from other companies, including StratusCore. A key behind-the-scenes tool is a protocol that enables high-quality, encrypted transmission of pixels to the cloud, which allows virtual desktops to be an alternative to more powerful, local computers. One of the most commonly used is Teradici’s PCoIP (PC over IP see CAS diagram above), whose virtual workspace architecture is highly secure and compresses, encrypts and transmits only pixels to these endpoints. Teradici’s cards are OEMed by many manufacturers of zero/thin clients. VMware Blast, Nvidia Grid vPC, Nutanix AOS, and Red Hat Virtualization are similar solutions. Teradici worked with Nvidia to validate use of its PCoIP protocol with Omniverse; with Adobe to provide guidance for using PCoIP with Adobe Creative Cloud on the three main public clouds; and with Avid, which integrated its PCoIP protocol into Avid|Edit on Demand.

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Creative Tasks Editing is one of the crucial operations required in a remote workflow, and nonlinear editing providers Adobe and Avid each have their solutions. There’s also newcomer Evercast (see opposite page), created by an editor, Roger Barton, ACE, which is described as “the first remote collaboration platform built for creatives by creatives.” Adobe extended the availability of its Team Projects video collaboration capabilities to Premiere Pro and After Effects users with a Creative Cloud for individual licenses, at no additional cost through August 17, 2020. Team Projects, a cloud-hosted collaboration service, lets editors and motiongraphics artists collaborate on projects by syncing changes through the cloud. Projects are then stored and saved in Creative Cloud, so project files can be synced across multiple workstations. Adobe also unveiled its Productions feature for Premiere Pro, which provides a flexible, highly scalable framework for organizing projects and sharing assets between editors. Adobe works with a wide range of partners to support collaboration for teams working remotely, which can be accessed here: https://theblog.adobe. com/adobe-video-partners-support-collaborationfor-teams-working-remotely/ Avid has a plug-and-play remote workflow solution via its collaboration with Microsoft Azure.


THE EVERCAST PLATFORM (USED ABOVE) COMBINES HD LIVE STREAMING WITH SUPER-LOW-LATENCY VIDEO CONFERENCING... “TO EMPOWER IDEATION TO FLOW UNCONSTRAINED BY TIME OR BORDERS,” ACCORDING TO FOUNDER ROGER BARTON, ACE.

Most recently, Avid inked a new five-year strategic alliance agreement with Microsoft Azure. Avid offers a scalable and secure Avid | Edit On-Demand virtualized production environment that includes its Avid Media Composer editing software and Avid NEXIS storage. Avid Chief Executive/President Jeff Rosica says, “Building on the lessons learned during this pandemic, the companies are well prepared for what we believe will be an accelerated pace of cloud adoption.” Evercast is a remote collaboration platform that combines HD live streaming with super-low-latency video conferencing and other special features “to empower ideation to flow unconstrained by time or borders.” In other words, it’s designed for creatives by a creative. Barton says his company is “constantly looking at how to improve the technology and evolve the offering, as use cases are rapidly expanding across the production cycle.” Recent updates include a hotkey that, similar to a push-totalk microphone, allows for quick muting/ unmuting of the microphone when streaming so it doesn’t pick up any audio coming from the speakers. Also new is the ability to hide

video-conferencing thumbnails when viewing stream content, which “dramatically reduces CPU stress when working on less powerful machines.” Evercast will also get a new user interface in the fall.

Cloud/Streaming Solutions There are a lot of solutions for facilities that want to move their operations to the cloud. Some of them provide plug-and-play ecosystems customized to a client’s specific needs; others are building blocks in a cloud ecosystem. Here are some – but not all – of those cloud providers, in alphabetical order. Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage offers affordable cloud storage with data protection, archiving, and content storage with instant availability, at $5 per terabyte per month. Recently, Aiden Korotkin transitioned from freelancing to his own video production company, AK Productions. His data was in a public cloud, but he wanted a simpler system that was still secure. Backblaze helped Korotkin migrate 12 TB, out of a total of 40 TB, in less than a day. (The rest was backed up in

real time.) He notes that Backblaze’s simple interface has reduced the time he had spent managing data backup. He also relied on cloud migration company Flexify.IO to move his data to Technicolor’s TechStream (see below). Flexify.IO is a storage virtualization and data migration solution that offers multicloud (i.e. cloud agnostic) storage, S3-to-Azure API translation, and data migration between cloud services. BeBop Technology provides software that utilizes public data centers to create a seamless, secure ecosystem for remote collaboration and includes virtualized remote workstations. “The zero client is the bridge that displays what’s in the cloud,” explains director of business development Michael Kammes. BeBop Technology’s software also provides industry-standard tools, including Adobe Creative Cloud applications; Foundry products, including Nuke; Autodesk software, including Maya; and other VFX, titling, design, 3D-modeling, and animation tools. BeBop Rocket provides seamless automated file movement to-and-from on-premises, for onboarding existing workflows and projects into the cloud. BeBop will also work with a

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CLOUD STORAGE CENTERS LIKE BACKBLAZE (ABOVE) OFFER DATA PROTECTION, ARCHIVING, AND CONTENT STORAGE AT AN AFFORDABLE $5 PER TERABYTE PER MONTH.

TECHNICOLOR’S TECHSTREAM MOBILE APP (ABOVE) PROVIDES A SECURE REAL-TIME WINDOW FOR AVFX REVIEW OR COLOR-GRADING SESSION.

SIMPLECLOUD, WHICH BUILDS AND MANAGES VIRTUAL STUDIOS, HELPED LUCKY POST KEEP ITS CREATIVES WORKING AFTER COVID-19 SHUTTERED THE COMPANY’S AUSTIN AND DALLAS FACILITIES.

client’s existing accounts with major cloud service providers or will provide access to a cloud account managed by BeBop. Its ecosystem is TPN-compliant, with two-factor authentication to meet the motion picture industry’s security requirements. It also provides cost and use reports and analysis. Cloudian HyperStore is an object-based platform that brings the simplicity and flexibility of public cloud storage into onprem data centers. The company specializes in completely native S3 API storage systems; HyperFile extends object storage capabilities to file storage. In the media and entertainment community, Cloudian’s products have several use cases. Most recently, Vox Media chose HyperStore for its next-generation archive system, in part because HyperStore is certified interoperable with Vox’s existing

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Quantum StorNext storage and Evolphin media asset management (MAM) system. Vox Media Director of Postproduction/Technical Operations Sarah Semlear said that “with Cloudian HyperStore, we have sped-up our data archiving workflow by 10 times, saving cost and increasing productivity.” Quantum introduced enhancements to its StorNext file system and data-management software. StorNext 6.4 incorporates technology (self-describing objects) that facilitates hybrid-cloud and multi-cloud workflows and makes cloud content more easily accessible. It also offers greater flexibility for media and entertainment use cases, among other verticals. StorNext 6.4 software can copy files to the public or private cloud with the option of including additional object metadata, while non-StorNext software clients and cloud-

based processes can access objects directly via newly extended metadata. Other new StorNext 6.4 features include StorNext Dynamic Library Pooling, which improves resiliency for large tape archives, and support for AWS’s Glacier Deep Archive. “At this time, when customers are forced to work remotely, the flexibility to move content between locations, both on-premise and in cloud data centers, is critical,” describes Quantum Vice President/General Manager Ed Fiore. “StorNext 6.4 adds new ways to archive content and access it in the cloud, and is a new step toward providing a seamless bridge between on-premise and the cloud.” SimpleCloud, based in Madrid, Spain but with offices in Los Angeles, is a cloud-based platform that builds and manages virtual studios. SimpleCloud recently worked with its


integration partner, CineSys-Oceana, to help two clients closed due to COVID-19 reopen as remote facilities. ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena, California closed its campus, and the entertainment design program needed to transition to a remote workflow to keep students on track. Full-service postproduction studio Lucky Post, with locations in Dallas and Austin, similarly looked for a way to keep its creatives working. SimpleCloud Head of North America Scott Johnson explains, “We put the platform in your hand, and you manage it in the cloud. With each subscription, we factor in the egress charges,” he says, adding that SimpleCloud’s default streaming protocol is VMware Blast, but it also supports PCoIP. SimpleCloud’s app is supported on Linux, Windows and Mac, as well as a Chrome browser. Johnson says it currently supports all software products from Adobe, Autodesk, and The Foundry, and is testing Blackmagic Design’s DaVinci Resolve. Sohonet unveiled ClearView Pivot, for real-time remote editing, color grading, live screening, and finishing reviews. It offers 4K HDR with 12-bit color depth and 4:4:4 chroma sampling for full-color quality video streaming and runs over the company’s uncontended private media network, which avoids the extreme compression and latency of public internet connections. Currently in use by major Hollywood studios, ClearView Pivot is aimed at providing connectivity and collaboration services for productions around the world. ClearView Pivot also offers a high level of security, having been approved by ISE (Independent Security Evaluators). The stream is encrypted between each endpoint and provides an auditable usage trail. Its SMN connection offers a latency measured in milliseconds and, as a point-to-multipoint solution, enables the user to “pivot” easily from one endpoint to the next to collaborate with multiple people or even stream to different destinations at the same time. ClearView Pivot was tested with productions on studio lots and locations, with trials across multiple departments. ClearView Pivot is part of the ClearView product suite, which includes ClearView Flex and ClearView HD products. Streambox, founded in 1999, considers itself a pioneer in delivering IP-based video streaming over low-bandwidth connections. Its proprietary Advanced Compression Technology codecs can process highmotion, complex video at lower data rates via an advanced motion search feature. The company’s chroma solutions support 10-bit and 12-bit 4:2:2 and 4:4:4 RGB/XYZ, even 4K. Streambox is also now in post facilities that do review, VFX editing, and color grading. In the review process, reviewers don’t need a Cloud account or to connect directly with Streambox Cloud. Streambox recently added support of Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos for its Chroma streaming products. According to

SOHONET’S CLEARVIEW PIVOT (IN USE ABOVE) OFFERS REAL-TIME REMOTE EDITING, COLOR GRADING, LIVE SCREENING, AND FINISHING REVIEWS OVER THE COMPANY’S (LATENCY AND COMPRESSION-FREE) PRIVATE MEDIA NETWORK.

Dolby Laboratories senior director content solution Robert Carroll, this integration will allow users to “remotely monitor their video or audio workflows anywhere in the world.” Technicolor’s TechStream is a mobile app that provides creatives a secure real-time window in a VFX review or color-grading session. It doesn’t require Wi-Fi but rather works on mobile LTE networks. TechStream can accommodate up to six users per session and streams the content’s stereo audio. Because it’s an app, TechStream is very userfriendly and easy to set up. Most recently, TechStream was used on The Stranger, Quibi’s first episodic show. Writer-director Veena Sud and Local 600 Director of Photography Paul Yee worked with colorist Tim Vincent. “By utilizing TechStream, I was able to bring in the director and the DP during pre-

production and show them how different the grading experience was going to be on this project,” Vincent shares. “TechStream was used to demonstrate how we would be making different choices in the grade than we might for a standard feature or episodic project.” Wasabi calls itself the “hot cloud storage company,” with its lower costs (“one-fifth the price of Amazon S3”) and no fees for egress or API requests. The company provides high system availability and support for immutable storage buckets, is compatible with the AWS S3 API and supports “over 150 compatible applications.” Wasabi also partnered with iconik, a smart media-management platform designed for the hybrid cloud. It allows users to store and share files from anywhere, using their existing on-prem and cloud storage, AI licenses, and iconik API.

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PRODUCTION CREDITS COMPILED BY TERESA MUĂ‘OZ The input of Local 600 members is of the utmost importance, and we rely on our membership as the prime (and often the only) source of information in compiling this section. In order for us to continue to provide this service, we ask that Guild members submitting information take note of the following requests: Please provide up-to-date and complete crew information (including that the deadline for the Production Credits is on the first of the preceding cover month (excluding weekends & holidays).

Submit your jobs online by visiting: www.icg600.com/MY600/Report-Your-Job Any questions regarding the Production Credits should be addressed to Teresa MuĂąoz at teresa@icgmagazine.com 134

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First Man / Photo by Daniel McFadden

Still Photographers, Publicists, Additional Units, etc.). Please note


20TH CENTURY FOX

A24/QUEENS LLC

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOAQUÍN SEDILLO, ASC OPERATORS: PHIL MILLER, SOC, DUANE MIELIWOCKI, SOC, JAMIE ALAC ASSISTANTS: KEN LITTLE, CLAUDIO BANKS, ERIC GUERIN, DAVID STELLHORN, MAX MACAT, JIHANE MRAD STEADICAM OPERATOR: PHIL MILLER, SOC STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KEN LITTLE CAMERA UTILITY: PAULINA GOMEZ DIGITAL UTILITY: JOSHUA SMITH

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN TANZER OPERATORS: DAVID HIRSCHMANN, GRETCHEN WARTHEN ASSISTANTS: YEN NGUYEN, RACHEL DUSA, KELSEY CASTELLITTO, MINMIN TSAI LOADER: FRANCESCO SAUTA

“911” SEASON 3

“FRESH OFF THE BOAT” SEASON 6 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GREG MATTHEWS OPERATORS: JOEY MORENA, ADAM KOLKMAN ASSISTANTS: RAY DIER, TOMOKA IZUMI, CHRISTIAN COBB, AJIRI AKPOLO STEADICAM OPERATOR: JOEY MORENA CAMERA UTILITY: LESLIE KOLTER

“LAST MAN STANDING” SEASON 8

“I’M SORRY” SEASON 3

ABC STUDIOS

“AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB KITZMANN OPERATORS: RICH DAVIS, TIM WALKER, LISA STACILAUSKAS ASSISTANTS: MAX NEAL, ROBERT GILPIN, JOE TORRES, ELIZABETH ALGIERI, KARL OWENS, JASWINDER BEDI STEADICAM OPERATOR: RICH DAVIS STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MAX NEAL DIGITAL LOADER: LESLIE PUCKETT DIGITAL UTILITY: STEVE ROMMEVAUX

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DONALD A. MORGAN, ASC OPERATORS: GARY ALLEN, RANDY BAER, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, JOHN BOYD ASSISTANTS: MISSY TOY-OZEAS, SEAN ASKINS, AL MYERS CAMERA UTILITIES: JOHN WEISS, STEVE MASIAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: VON THOMAS

“BLACK-ISH” SEASON 6

“MODERN FAMILY” SEASON 11

“GREY’S ANATOMY” SEASON 16

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES BAGDONAS, ASC OPERATORS: TREY CLINESMITH, TOBY TUCKER ASSISTANTS: JOHN STRADLING, MICHAEL BAGDONAS, NOAH BAGDONAS, REBECCA MARTZ SPENSER CAMERA UTILITY: GAVIN WYNN DIGITAL UTILITY: SEAN KEHOE

“NEXT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRETT PAWLAK OPERATORS: SEBASTIEN AUDINELLE, CHRISTOPHER ARATA ASSISTANTS: MATT ROZEK, NITO SERNA, MATT FEASLEY, ALAN DEMBEK STEADICAM OPERATOR: SEBASTIEN AUDINELLE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: MATT ROZEK LOADER: DEREK ASHBAUGH DIGITAL UTILITY: EMILY LAZLO

“THE ORVILLE” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF MYGATT OPERATORS: BILL BRUMMOND, GARY TACHELL, MIKE SHARP ASSISTANTS: DENNIS SEAWRIGHT, DALE WHITE, STEVE MAGRATH, DUSTIN KELLER, BUTCH PIERSON, KRISTEN LAUBE STEADICAM OPERATOR: BILL BRUMMOND LOADER: BROOKE MAGRATH UTILITY: FERNANDO ZACARIAS

“THIS IS US” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: YASU TANIDA OPERATORS: JAMES TAKATA, COY AUNE ASSISTANTS: SEAN O’SHEA, RICH FLOYD, BRIAN WELLS, JEFF STEWART STEADICAM OPERATOR: JAMES TAKATA STEADICAM ASSISTANT: SEAN O’SHEA LOADER: MIKE GENTILE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON BATZDORFF

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROB SWEENEY OPERATORS: JENS PIOTROWSKI, GARRETT BENSON ASSISTANTS: ART MARTIN, NEAL MORELL, TIFFANI STEPHENSON, PABLO JARA DIGITAL LOADER: JAI CORRIA DIGITAL UTILITY: RAUL PEREZ

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HERB DAVIS, ALICIA ROBBINS OPERATORS: FRED IANNONE, STEVE ULLMAN, LESLIE MORRIS ASSISTANTS: NICK MCLEAN, FORREST THURMAN, KIRK BLOOM, LISA BONACCORSO STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEVE ULLMAN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: FORREST THURMAN CAMERA UTILITY: MARTE POST STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LISA ROSE

“JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!” SEASON 18 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: CHRISTIAN HIBBARD OPERATORS: GREG GROUWINKEL, PARKER BARTLETT, GARRETT HURT, MARK GONZALES STEADICAM OPERATOR: KRIS WILSON JIB OPERATORS: MARC HUNTER, RANDY GOMEZ, JR., NICK GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITIES: CHARLES FERNANDEZ, SCOTT SPIEGEL, TRAVIS WILSON, DAVID FERNANDEZ, ADAM BARKER VIDEO CONTROLLER: GUY JONES STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: KAREN NEAL, MICHAEL DESMOND 2ND UNIT DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BERND REINBARDT, STEVE GARRETT

“STATION 19” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARYN OKADA, ASC, NANCY SCHREIBER, ASC OPERATORS: RON SCHLAEGER, MARIANA ANTUNANO, BILL BOATMAN ASSISTANTS: TONY SCHULTZ, HANNAH LEVIN, MICHAEL ALVAREZ, SUMMER MARSH, ADAM COWAN, DUSTIN FRUGE STEADICAM OPERATOR: RON SCHLAEGER STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TONY SCHULTZ

DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDREW LEMON UTILITY: GEORGE MONTEJANO, III TECHNOCRANE OPERATOR: NAZARIY HATAK TECHNOCRANE TECH: BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

“STUMPTOWN” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CLARK MATHIS, MAGNI AGUSTSSON OPERATORS: BUD KREMP, PHIL MASTRELLA ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN WATSON, SHANE CARLSON, GAYLE HILARY, JESSYCA MARILYN CARACCI LOADER: DYLAN NEAL CAMERA UTILITY: CHRIS SHADLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

ADOBE PICTURES, INC.

“PROJECT ICE CREAM AKA MATRIX 4” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN TOLL, ASC AERIAL DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DYLAN GOSS OPERATORS: DANIELE MASSACCESI, MICK FROEHLICH, GEORGE BILLINGER ASSISTANTS: CHAD RIVETTI, MATT GAUMER, PATRICK MCARDLE, HENRY NGUYEN, TIM GUFFIN, SHANNON BRINGHAM, SYDNEY COX DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ETHAN PHILLIPS LOADER: NATHAN MIELKE DIGITAL UTILITIES: AUSTIN PEDRONI, ROBBIE JULIAN PURSUIT HEAD TECH: PETER TOMMASI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MURRAY CLOSE PUBLICIST: FRANCES FIORE

AFN PRODUCTIONS-TELEPICTURES “THE REAL” SEASON 6

LIGHTING DIRECTOR: EARL WOODY, LD OPERATORS: KEVIN MICHEL, NATE PAYTON, STEVE RUSSELL, CHRIS WILLIAMS STEADICAM OPERATOR: WILL DEMERITT CAMERA UTILITIES: HENRY VEREEN, SALVATORE BELLISSIMO, ANDRES VELASQUEZ, JR. JIB ARM OPERATOR: JIM CIRRITO VIDEO CONTROLLER: JEFF MESSENGER

AMERICAN HIGH

“THE ULTIMATE PLAYLIST OF NOISE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VINCET PATIN ASSISTANT: JUSTIN MARZELLA, DAVID MASLYN LOADER: JOSIAH WEINHOLD

A VERY GOOD PRODUCTION, INC. & WAD PRODUCTIONS

“THE ELLEN DEGENERES SHOW” SEASON 17 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: TOM BECK PED OPERATORS: DAVID WEEKS, PAUL WILEMAN, TIM O’NEILL HANDHELD OPERATOR: CHIP FRASER JIB OPERATOR: DAVID RHEA STEADICAM OPERATOR: DONOVAN GILBUENA VIDEO CONTROLLER: JAMES MORAN HEAD UTILITY: CRAIG “ZZO” MARAZZO UTILITIES: ARLO GILBUENA, WALLY LANCASTER, DIEGO AVALOS

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

135


BEACHWOOD SERVICES

“DAYS OF OUR LIVES” SEASON 54 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VINCE STEIB OPERATORS: MARK WARSHAW, VICKIE WALKER, MICHAEL J. DENTON, STEVE CLARK CAMERA UTILITIES: STEVE BAGDADI, GARY CYPHER VIDEO CONTROLLER: ALEXIS DELLAR HANSON

“THE GOLDBERGS” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON BLOUNT OPERATORS: SCOTT BROWNER, NATE HAVENS ASSISTANTS: TRACY DAVEY, GARY WEBSTER, JENNIFER BELL PRICE, MICHELLE BAKER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN MILLS LOADER: DILSHAN HERATH STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LISA ROSE

BIG INDIE BELLEVILLE, INC. “MASTER”

OPERATOR: DEVON CATUCCI ASSISTANTS: BENYOMIN SPANER, BRIANNA MORRISON LOADER: KATHERINE RIVERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: EMILY ARAGONES, JOJO WHILDEN

BOARDWALK PICTURES

“LAST CHANCE U-BASKETBALL” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TERRY ZUMALT OPERATORS: DEVON HOFF-WEEKES, DAVID NEWTON ASSISTANTS: DEVIN KEEBLER, ETHAN SERLING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOSH GREYTAK

CBS

“BULL” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DERICK UNDERSCHULTZ OPERATORS: BARNABY SHAPIRO, MALCOLM PURNELL ASSISTANTS: ROMAN LUKIW, SOREN NASH, MICHAEL LOBB, TREVOR WOLFSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: THOMAS WONG LOADERS: QUINN MURPHY, NIALANEY RODRIGUEZ

ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES, PETER CARONIA, JACQUELINE NIVENS STEADICAM OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS STEADICAM ASSISTANTS: KEITH BANKS, RICHIE HUGHES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN MILLS DIGITAL UTILITY: CAROLINE MILLS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE PUBLICIST: KATHLEEN TANJI

“SEAL TEAM” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: J. MICHAEL MURO, ALAN JACOBY OPERATORS: DOMINIC BARTOLONE, MATT VALENTINE ASSISTANTS: TODD AVERY, ANDREW DEGNAN, ARTURO ROJAS, RYAN JACKSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: DOMINIC BARTOLONE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: TODD AVERY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RAUL RIVEROS LOADER: NOAH MURO STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: CAROL KAELSON, RON JAFFE

“THE GOOD FIGHT” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRED MURPHY, ASC, PETR HLINOMAZ, TIM GUINNESS OPERATORS: ALEC JARNAGIN, PETER NOLAN ASSISTANTS: RENE CROUT, DANIEL FIORITO, ELIZABETH HEDGES, JULIA LEACH, EMILY DEBLASI STEADICAM OPERATOR: ALEC JARNAGIN LOADERS: SANCHEEV RAVICHANDRAN, BRIAN CARDENAS

“THE TALK” SEASON 10 LIGHTING DIRECTOR: MARISA DAVIS PED OPERATORS: ART TAYLOR, MARK GONZALES, ED STAEBLER HANDHELD OPERATORS: RON BARNES, KEVIN MICHEL, JEFF JOHNSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ HEAD UTILITY: CHARLES FERNANDEZ UTILITIES: MIKE BUSHNER, DOUG BAIN, DEAN FRIZZEL, BILL GREINER, JON ZUCCARO VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICHARD STROCK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RON JAFFE

“ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT” SEASON 39

LIGHTING DESIGNER: DARREN LANGER DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KURT BRAUN OPERATORS: JAMES B. PATRICK, ALLEN VOSS, ED SARTORI, HENRY ZINMAN, BOB CAMPI, RODNEY MCMAHON, ANTHONY SALERNO JIB OPERATOR: JAIMIE CANTRELL CAMERA UTILITY: TERRY AHERN VIDEO CONTROLLERS: MIKE DOYLE, PETER STENDAL

“NCIS” SEASON 17 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WILLIAM WEBB, ASC OPERATORS: GREGORY PAUL COLLIER, CHAD ERICKSON, DOUG FROEBE (VIDEO) ASSISTANTS: JAMES TROOST, HELEN TADESSE, NATHAN LOPEZ, YUSEF EDMONDS LOADER: ANNA FERRARIE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MIKE KUBEISY

“NCIS: LOS ANGELES” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTOR HAMMER OPERATORS: TERENCE NIGHTINGALL, TIM BEAVERS

136

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CETERI, LLC

“UNTITLED KINBERG WEIL SERIES AKA RAY JAMES” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY IVES OPERATORS: MARK SCHMIDT, WYLDA BAYRON ASSISTANTS: ADRIANA BRUNETTO-LIPMAN, ROSSANA RIZZO, AMBER ROSALES, MIKE SWEARINGEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: J. ERIC CAMP LOADER: BRITTANY JELINSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MACALL POLAY

CINE CONDADO ENTERTAINMENT, LLC “EL PROFESOR AKA SIMONE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SONNEL VELAZQUEZ OPERATOR: EDUARDO MARIOTA ASSISTANTS: CARLOS GARCIA, LIZZ DIAZ, ERNESTO GOMEZ LOADER: NESTOR CESTERO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: LAURA MAGRUDER

CMS PRODUCTIONS, INC. “WEREWOLVES WITHIN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHEW WISE OPERATOR: JASON THOMPSON ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN WHITACRE, JOSHUA WATERMAN STEADICAM OPERATOR: PETE KEELING DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BRANDON KELLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SABRINA LANTOS

CRANETOWN MEDIA, LLC “LEGENDARY” SEASON 1

OPERATORS: CHRISTOPHER PIAZZA, MARC BLOOMGARDEN, MICHAEL CIMINO, CLINTON CHILDERS, MARTIN HOFFMAN, MATTHEW MURO, NATHAN LYNCH, JASON MASON, ROBERT DAVIDSON, ROBERT AUMER ASSISTANTS: ZACH SOLOMON, EDWIN SHIMKO, MARK WESTON, ERIC LICHTENSTEIN, OMAR GUINIER, JOHN HENEGHAN CAMERA UTILITIES: JAMES GOLDSMITH, KEVIN WHITE, JONATHAN SCHAMANN, EDWARD LAVIN, RYAN GOLDSMITH, SEAN BOWLES, SR., PETER GEOGHEGAN

DISNEY/FOX 21

“QUEEN OF THE SOUTH” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ABE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: DOMINIC BARTOLONE, MATT VALENTINE ASSISTANTS: JASON GARCIA, DAN MCKEE, RIGNEY SACKLEY, ZANDER WHITE STEADICAM OPERATOR: DOMINIC BARTOLONE STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JASON GARCIA DIGITAL LOADER: ADAM LIPSCOMB

EYE PRODUCTIONS, INC.

“BLUE BLOODS” SEASON 10 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GENE ENGELS OPERATORS: STEPHEN CONSENTINO, GEOFFREY FROST ASSISTANTS: GRAHAM BURT, JACOB STAHLMAN, MARTIN PETERSON, KENNETH MARTELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: RYAN HEIDE, STEVE CALALANG LOADERS: MICHAEL FULLER, JOHN KEELER STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: CRAIG BLANKENHORN, PATRICK HARBRON

“DYNASTY” SEASON 3 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STAR BARRY, ROGER CHINGIRIAN OPERATORS: BRETT MAYFIELD, BROWN COOPER ASSISTANTS: COLIN DURAN, RYAN ABRAMS, ALEXA ROMERO STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRETT MAYFIELD STEADICAM ASSISTANT: COLIN DURAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ERIC HENSON DIGITAL UTILITY: JIMARI JONES

“MACGYVER” SEASON 4 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL MARTINEZ, CHRISTOPHER DUDDY OPERATORS: IAN FORSYTH, PAUL KRUMPER, GREG BALDI ASSISTANTS: AL COHEN, TREVOR RIOS, MICHAEL TORINO, STEFAN VINO-FIGUEROA,


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EASTON HARPER, TYLER BASTIANSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: IAN FORSYTH STEADICAM ASSISTANT: AL COHEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GREG VANZYCK DIGITAL UTILITY: BRIAN FREDERICK STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MARK HILL

“SWAGGER” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RODNEY TAYLOR, ASC CLIFFORD CHARLES OPERATORS: KERWIN DEVONISH, GARY HATFIELD ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER GLEATON, NICHOLAS HAHN, ZAKIYA LUCAS-MURRAY, DERRICK DAWKINS LOADERS: BRITTANY WILSON, XAVIER VENOSTA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: PATRICK HARBRON, FRANK MCPARTLAND, ANTONY PLATT

FILM 8, LLC “PLAN B”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SANDRA VALDE OPERATORS: NEAL TEN EYCK, NICH MUSCO ASSISTANTS: CHERYN PARK, JUSTIN MARZELLA, JADE BRENNAN, DAVID MASLYN LOADER: JOSIAH WEINHOLD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: BRETT ROEDEL

FOX21

“THE CHI” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSE M. FELDMAN OPERATORS: DAVE SAMMONS, JORDAN KESLOW ASSISTANTS: KATHRYN MOSS, RACHEL DONOFRIE, BRIAN KILBORN, J’MME IHMAD LOVE STEADICAM OPERATOR: JORDAN KESLOW LOADER: JJ LITTLEFELD DIGITAL UTILITIES: RODERICK REED, RICHIE COLMAN STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ELIZABETH MORRIS, PARRISH LEWIS

FUQUA FILMS

“THE RESIDENT” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BART TAU OPERATORS: MATT DOLL, ANDY FISHER, CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS ASSISTANTS: JUSTIN DEGUIRE, TAYLOR CASE, APRIL RUANE CROWLEY, MIKE FISHER, JENNIFER RANKINE, GRACE PRELLER CHAMBERS STEADICAM OPERATOR: MATT DOLL STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JUSTIN DEGUIRE LOADER: TREY VOLPE DIGITAL UTILITY: RYAN ST CLAIR STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GUY DE’ALEMA 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY FISHER OPERATORS: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS,

MICHAEL GFELNER, COOPER DUNN ASSISTANTS: JACKSON MCDONALD, CLAIRE PAPEVIES, TAYLOR CASE, MATT EVANS, STERLING WIGGINS, TRISHA SOLYN STEADICAM OPERATOR: CHRISTIAN SATRAZEMIS DIGITAL UTILITY: TREY VOLPE UTILITY: ERIC GAVLINSKI

GHOST PRODUCTIONS, INC. “GHOST” SEASON 1

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRIS LA VASSEUR, AARON MEDICK OPERATORS: JON BEATTIE, NICOLA BENIZZI ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL GAROFALO, CHARLIE FOERSCHNER, YALE GROPMAN, ALIVIA BORAB LOADERS: SCOTT GAROFALO, ANDREW DAILEY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ROB MUIA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MYLES ARONOWITZ PUBLICIST: SABRINA LAUFER

GIMME DAT MONEY, LLC

“DESUS & MERO” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN CONNOLLY OPERATORS: DANIEL CARP, MANNY GUTIERREZ, SR., MARK SPARROUGH, ERIK LUNDELL ASSISTANT: MATT ALBANO CAMERA UTILITIES: JONATHAN SCHAMANN, CHARLES KEMPF STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: GREG ENDRIES

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

137


GLITTER PRODUCTIONS, LLC “G.L.O.W.” SEASON 4

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF WALDRON OPERATORS: ROSS COSCIA, SARAH LEVY ASSISTANTS: MELISSA FISHER, SARA INGRAM, JOHN RONEY, LAURA DIFIGLIO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PETER BRUNET DIGITAL UTILITY: BROOKE ZBYTNIEWSKI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ALI GOLDSTEIN

GRACE AND FRANKIE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “GRACE AND FRANKIE” SEASON 7

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GALE TATTERSALL OPERATORS: CRAIG COCKERILL, TONY GUTIERREZ ASSISTANTS: DAN SCHROER, NAOMI VILLANUEVA, DAN URBAIN, RENEE TREYBALL STEADICAM OPERATOR: CRAIG COCKERILL STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DAN SCHROER LOADER: NICOLA CARUSO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SAEED ADYANI

GWAVE PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“SULPHUR SPRINGS” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEFAN VON BJORN OPERATORS: GREG MORRIS, ROBERT FOSTER ASSISTANTS: BROUKE FRANKLIN, RY KAWANAKA, ERIC VAN DER VYNCKT, MATT GUIDRY DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: PAUL RAHFIELD

HORIZON SCRIPTED TELEVISION, INC. “ANIMAL KINGDOM” SEASON 5

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LOREN YACONELLI OPERATORS: SCOTT DROPKIN, BROOKS ROBINSON ASSISTANTS: DAVE EGERSTROM, PATRICK BENSIMMON, ERIC GUTHRIE, CRISTY ARBOLEDA STEADICAM OPERATOR: SCOTT DROPKIN STEADICAM ASSISTANT: DAVE EGERSTROM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFERSON FUGITT DIGITAL UTILITY: GOBE HIRATA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: EDDY CHEN

“THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN BURGOYNE OPERATORS: ARI ISSLER, ROD CALARCO ASSISTANTS: JEROME WILLIAMS, ALEXANDER WORSTER, CAMERON SIZEMORE, ALEX DUBOIS LOADERS: AMANDA URIBE, JAKOB FRIEMAN

KANAN PRODUCTIONS, INC. “RAISING KANAN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID FRANCO OPERATORS: FRANCIS SPIELDENNER, KATE LAROSE ASSISTANTS: TONY COAN, MARK FERGUSON, BRENDAN RUSSELL, GREGORY PACE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BJORN JACKSON LOADERS: KEITH ANDERSON, JESSICA CELE-NAZARIO STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: NICOLE RIVELLI

KENWOOD TV PRODUCTIONS, INC. “JUST ROLL WITH IT” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSEPH W. CALLOWAY

138

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

OPERATORS: KEN HERFT, BRIAN GUNTER, GARY ALLEN, JACK CHISHOLM DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ARMEN ALLEN CAMERA UTILITY: LISA ANDERSON, TERRY GUNTER, RYAN ECKELBERRY, ROGER COHEN JIB ARM OPERATOR: JOSH GOFORTH JIB ARM TECH: JEFF KIMUCK VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEITH ANDERSON BEHIND THE SCENES: DAVID LIZ, STEVEN PAUL

MAGIC WAND PRODUCTIONS, INC. “GODMOTHERED AKA FRILLS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHER NORR OPERATORS: ALAN PIERCE, GERARD SAVA ASSISTANTS: ETHAN BORSUK, JAMES SCHLITTENHART, JASON BRIGNOLA, M.D. EGAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NICK PASQUARIELLO LOADER: AUDRY STEVENS DIGITAL UTILITY: ANNE ABBRUZZESE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: KC BAILEY

MESQUITE PRODUCTIONS

LOADER: MARION TUCKER DIGITAL UTILITIES: CHRIS POLMANSKI, STEVE CLAY

“F.B.I.” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TARI SEGAL OPERATORS: AFTON GRANT, CHARLES ANDERSON ASSISTANTS: LEE VICKERY, NIKNAZ TAVAKOLIAN, GEORGE LOOKSHIRE, YURI INOUE STEADICAM OPERATOR: AFTON GRANT LOADERS: CONNOR LYNCH, NKEM UMENYI STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: MICHAEL PARMELEE, ELIZABETH FISHER, MARK SCHAFER

“GOOD GIRLS” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JASON OLDAK OPERATORS: GARY CAMP, BRIAN OUTLAND, NICOLE LOBELL ASSISTANTS: JOHN RUIZ, JASON KNOLL, PATRICK BLANCHET, ROBYN BUCHANAN, EM GONZALES, CARTER SMITH STEADICAM OPERATOR: GARY CAMP STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JOHN RUIZ LOADER: MATT SCHOUTEN DIGITAL UTILITY: JONNIE MENTZER

“FOR ALL MANKIND” SEASON 2

“NEW AMSTERDAM” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHEN MCNUTT, ROSS BERRYMAN OPERATORS: TIM SPENCER, MIKE MCEVEETY ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN PAZANTI, JORGE PALLARES, DARIN KRASK, ARTHUR ZAJAC STEADICAM OPERATOR: TIM SPENCER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: MIKE DEGRAZZIO DIGITAL UTILITY: ROBERT RUELAS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JONNY COURNOYER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW VOEGELI OPERATORS: JULIAN DELACRUZ, SCOTT TINSLEY ASSISTANTS: PEDRO CORCEGA, JAMES MADRID, MATTHEW MONTALTO, ROBERT WRASE LOADERS: JEFFREY MAKARAUSKAS, ANABEL CAICEDO

NBC

“BROOKLYN NINE-NINE” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: RICK PAGE OPERATORS: PHIL MASTRELLA, LAUREN GADD, JOEL TALLBUT ASSISTANTS: JAY LEVY, BILL GERARDO, DUSTIN MILLER, WILLIAM SCHMIDT, CHRIS CARLSON LOADER: NICK GILBERT DIGITAL UTILITY: KURT LEVY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN P. FLEENOR

“CHICAGO MED” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: LEX DUPONT, ASC OPERATORS: FAIRES ANDERSON SEKIYA, JOE TOLITANO, BENJAMIN SPEK ASSISTANTS: GEORGE OLSON, KEITH HUEFFMEIER, SAM KNAPP, LAURA DIFIGLIO, PATRICK DOOLEY, JOEY RICHARDSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: FAIRES ANDERSON SEKIYA LOADER: MATTHEW BROWN UTILITY: EMMANUEL BANSA STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH SISSON

“CHICAGO PD” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES ZUCAL OPERATORS: VICTOR MACIAS, DARRYL MILLER, SETH THOMAS ASSISTANTS: JOHN YOUNG, JAMISON ACKER, DON CARLSON, KYLE BELOUSEK, DAVID WIGHTMAN, NICK WILSON STEADICAM OPERATOR: VICTOR MACIAS

“SUPERSTORE” SEASON 5 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JAY HUNTER OPERATORS: ADAM TASH, DANNY NICHOLS, MIGUEL PASK ASSISTANTS: JASON ZAKRZEWSKI, BRANDON MARGULIES, ERIC JENKINSON, RYAN SULLIVAN, ESTA GARCIA, RIKKI ALARIAN JONES LOADER: GRACE THOMAS

“UNTITLED TRACY OLIVER PROJECT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MATT EDWARDS OPERATORS: MATT FLEISCHMANN, CAITLIN MACHAK ASSISTANTS: BLAKE ALCANTARA, VANESSA MORRISON, JORGE DEL TORO, DERRICK DAWKINS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GUILLERMO TUNON LOADERS: CHRISTINASE CARMODY, DAVID DIAZ STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: SARAH SHATZ

NETFLIX PRODUCTIONS, LLC “THE BABYSITTER 2”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT HENRICKSEN OPERATOR: CHRIS MOSELEY ASSISTANTS: DENNIS LYNCH, JAY HARDIE DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LANCE HASHIDA LOADER: CHRIS HOSEY 2ND UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN PINGRY ASSISTANTS: SCOTT KASSENOFF, MIKE GRATZMILLER UNDERWATER UNIT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID WILLIAM MCDONALD ASSISTANT: COREY BRINGAS


“BECOMING HALSTON” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WILL REXER, II OPERATORS: OLIVER CARY, GREGOR TAVENNER ASSISTANTS: JOHN OLIVERI, CORY STAMBLER, MARC LOFORTE, ALEC NICKEL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANTHONY HECHANOVA LOADERS: AMBER MATHES, NAIMA NOGUERA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOJO WHILDEN, EMILY ARAGONES

“THE CREW” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BILL BERNER OPERATORS: ALAIN ONESTO, MARK RENAUDIN, MIGUEL ARMSTRONG, JIMMY O’DONNELL ASSISTANTS: JASON KNOBLOCH, KYLE GORJANC DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DAVE SATIN LOADER: SHAUN JOYE CAMERA UTILITIES: JAMES ABAMONT, ANTHONY BENEDETTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ERIC LIEBOWITZ

“COUNTRY COMFORT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GEORGE MOORADIAN, ASC OPERATORS: RON HIRSHMAN, RANDY BAER, DAVE DECHANT, ELI FRANKS, MICHELLE CRENSHAW, HELENA JACKSON JIB OPERATOR: MICHAEL JAROCKI ASSISTANT: CONNOR HECK DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ELENA GOMEZ CAMERA UTILITY: KATE STEINHEBEL

DIGITAL UTILITY: ERINN BELL TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS VIDEO CONTROLLER: RICK DUNGAN

“SOCIAL DISTANCE” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK SCHWARTZBARD, PEDRO LUQUE ASSISTANTS: JESSICA RAMOS, CHRIS GEUKENS, TIM BAUER, GENNA PALERMO

NKZ PRODUCTIONS, INC.

OUR HOUSE PRODUCTIONS

“BIG BROTHER” SEASON 22 OPERATORS: JONATHAN HALE, CHARLES NUNGESSER, KARIN PELLONI, CALVIN BECK, LAURENCE AVENET-BRADLEY, EMMA PANTALL, JANETTE STAUB, ADAM MARSCHALL, AYMAE SULICK, ADAM SENATE, GEOFF HALE, CHRISTOPHER LOCKETT, DWAYNE SMITH, CASE NORTON, JEREMY BROWN, DALE PILUS, REBECCA ROBERTS, STEVE DARMIS, MELISSA HOLT, KATE STEINHEBEL, BRANDON FRYMAN, JOHN IKENOUYE

“THE BACHELOR” SEASON 24 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS WEILER, CHAD GRIEPENTROG, ANDRE MARTINEZ OPERATORS: DOUG HENNING, MARK JUNGJOHANN, IVAN DURAN, MARTIN MOURINO, TIM STAHL, ANDREW RAKOW, EZRA EPWELL, NICK TULLY, ERICA SHUSHA, JEREMY GUY, SUZIE WEIS ASSISTANTS: YOGI NEELY, TYLER DETARSIO, DAVE OSTERBERG, THOR FRIDLEIFSSON, NICK MILLER, JAY STRAMM, JEN CHMIELEWSKI, TAYLOR GILMARTIN CAMERA UTILITIES: APPLE SCHLOSSER, MICHAEL WILLIAMSON JIB OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, JR. VIDEO CONTROLLERS: RICHARD STROCK, MARC SURETTE

OUTLAW JB, LLC

“THE OUTLAW JOHNNY BLACK” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KEITH L. SMITH OPERATORS: CHRIS WALLING, SAM LAW ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN BRANAGAN, ISAAC DOWELL, JONATHAN MEDINA STEADICAM OPERATOR: SAM LAW

OLIVE AVENUE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “DOOM PATROL” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT WINING, SCOTT PECK OPERATORS: TIM FABRIZIO, RYAN WEISEN ASSISTANTS: JOSH HANCHER, CRISTIAN TROVA, KYLER DENNIS, MIKE FISHER

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

139


STEADICAM OPERATOR: TIM FABRIZIO STEADICAM ASSISTANT: JOSH HANCHER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE ELROM LOADER: NICK YOUNG DIGITAL UTILITY: ALESSANDRA MACI

PACIFIC 2.1 ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, INC. “POSE” SEASON 3

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREI BOWDEN SCHWARTZ OPERATORS: AIKEN WEISS, AILEEN TAYLOR ASSISTANTS: DAMON LEMAY, BAYLEY SWEITZER, KRISTINA LALLY, RACHEL FEDORKOVA LOADERS: RAUL MARTINEZ, STARLENE SOLER

“THE POLITICIAN” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY NORMAN OPERATORS: MATTHEW PEBLER, JENNIE JEDDRY ASSISTANTS: MICHAEL BURKE, ANDREW JUHL, VINCENT TUTHS, ADAM DEREZENDES DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: LUKE TAYLOR LOADERS: MICHAEL POMORSKI, SYDNEY BALLESTEROS STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOHN LOPEZ, GIOVANNI RUFINO, NICOLE RIVELLI, DAVID LEE

PARAMOUNT

“BOOMERANG” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID MORRISON OPERATORS: BRANDON THOMPSON, SIDARTH KANTAMNENI ASSISTANTS: AUSTIN LEWIS, ALEX HOOPER, OREN MALIK STEADICAM OPERATOR: BRANDON THOMPSON STEADICAM ASSISTANT: AUSTIN LEWIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAZZ PIERCE DIGITAL UTILITY: TRENT WALKER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CURTIS BAKER

“MADE FOR LOVE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: NATE GOODMAN OPERATORS: PETER MERCURIO, RON BALDWIN ASSISTANTS: MATTHEW KING, JOJO SUTERA, HEATHER LEA-LEROY, NINA PORTILLO DIGITAL IMGAGING TECH: MICHAEL BORENSTEIN STILL PHOTOGRAPER: JOHN JOHNSON

“STATION ELEVEN” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTIAN SPRENGER OPERATORS: BRIAN FREESH, BLAINE BAKER ASSISTANTS: LIAM SINNOTT, RON RUANPHAE, JASON BONNER, ELAISA VARGAS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS HOYLE DIGITAL UTILITY: LITONG ZHEN STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: PARRISH LEWIS

PROJECT NEXT

SCREEN GEMS PRODUCTIONS, INC.

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GRANT SMITH OPERATORS: RYAN HOGUE, AUSTIN TAYLOR ASSISTANTS: RYAN GUZDZIAL, KEVIN ANDERSON, JESS FAIRLESS, ANDREA GILL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BEN CRUMP DIGITAL UTILITY: JESSICA PINNS

OPERATOR: SCOTT LEBEDA ASSISTANTS: DANIEL MASON, NOLAN RUDMAN-BALL, BRIANNA MORRISON, THOMAS BELLOTTI LOADER: JOSHUA WEILBRENNER STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: DANA STARBARD

“TACOMA FD” SEASON 2

RANDOM PRODUCTIONS, LLC “MARE OF EASTTOWN”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BEN RICHARDSON OPERATORS: STEVEN FINESTONE, KYLE WULLSCHLEGER ASSISTANTS: KALI RILEY, ZACH RUBIN, ANDY HENSLER, ELVER HERNANDEZ LOADER: MATTHEW EWING STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHELE K. SHORT

REDHAWK PRODUCTIONS, IV, LLC “FARGO” SEASON 4

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DANA GONZALES, ASC OPERATORS: MITCH DUBIN, SOC, JOHN CONNOR ASSISTANTS: CHRIS WITTENBORN, HUNTER WHALEN, ERIC ARNDT, SHANNON DEWOLFE, ERIC HINGST DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: RYAN MCGREGOR LOADER: CHRIS SUMMERS DIGITAL UTILITY: EVA JUNE STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH MORRIS

ROCART, INC.

“ALL THAT” SEASON 11 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: VANCE BRANDON, JIM ORR, ROBERT MCCALL TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS ASSISTANT: MONICA SCHAD DIGIAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ UTILITIES: JOSE GOMEZ, TAYLOR FICKLE TECHNOJIB TECH: COREY GIBBONS VIDEO CONTROLLERS: KEITH ANDERSON, BARRY LONG

“SIDE HUSTLE” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL FRANKS OPERATORS: KRIS CONDE, JOHN DECHENE, GEORGE LA FOUNTAINE, CHRIS WILCOX TECHNOJIB OPERATOR: ELI FRANKS TECHNOJIB TECH: COREY GIBBONS ASSISTANT: MEGGINS MOORE UTILITIES: JOSE GOMEZ, ERINN BELL DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DEREK LANTZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: BARRY LONG

SAN VICENTE PRODUCTIONS, INC. POPCOM, LLC/MTV STUDIOS “THREE MONTHS”

OPERATOR: BRUCE CHEUNG ASSISTANTS: JESSICA HERSHATTER, IAN CAMPBELL, KEVIN WILSON, ZAK NORTON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JONNY REVOLT STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RICHARD BAKER PUBLICIST: DEBORAH SIMMRIN

140

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

“THE BLACKLIST” SEASON 7

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL CARACCIOLO, SAADE MUSTAFA OPERATORS: DEREK WALKER, DEVIN LADD, PETER RAMOS ASSISTANTS: DANIEL CASEY, GARETH MANWARING, MIKE GUASPARI, JAMES GOURLEY, EDWIN HERRERA, EDGAR VELEZ LOADERS: JAMES PARSONS, CHARLES GRUNDER JR., ALYSSA LONGCHAMP STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: JOJO WHILDEN, WILL HART, DAVID GIESBRECHT

“SHRINE”

SHOWTIME PICTURES

“BILLIONS” SEASON 5 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: GIORGIO SCALI, ASC, J.B. SMITH OPERATORS: JONATHAN BECK, ERIN HENNING ASSISTANTS: CAI HALL, LEONARDO GOMEZ, II, PATRICK BRACEY, SEAN MCNAMARA LOADERS: DONALD GAMBLE, ARIEL WATSON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JEFF NEUMAN

“CITY ON A HILL” SEASON 2 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSEPH COLLINS, MAURICIO RUBINSTEIN OPERATORS: EDGAR COLON, LAURA HUDOCK ASSISTANTS: ERIC ROBINSON, JOHN REEVES, MARC CHARBONNEAU, SARAH SCRIVENER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JEFFREY HAGERMAN LOADERS: BRITTANY JELINSKI, MAX COLLINS STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FRANCISCO ROMAN SANCHEZ

SONY

“JEOPARDY!” SEASON 36 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, MIKE TRIBBLE, JEFF SCHUSTER, L. DAVID IRETE JIB ARM OPERATOR: MARC HUNTER HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON

“ONE DAY AT A TIME” SEASON 4 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: WAYNE KENNAN OPERATORS: RON HIRSHMAN, DAVID DOUGHERTY, ED FINE, DAVID DECHANT ASSISTANTS: JEFF JOHNSON, VERONICA DAVIDSON CAMERA UTILITIES: DOUG MINGES, BRAD TRAVER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CHRIS RUBIN VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEITH ANDERSON

“WHEEL OF FORTUNE” SEASON 37 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF ENGEL OPERATORS: DIANE L. FARRELL, SOC, JEFF SCHUSTER, RAY GONZALES, STEVE SIMMONS, L. DAVID IRETE, MIKE CORWIN CAMERA UTILITY: RAY THOMPSON HEAD UTILITY: TINO MARQUEZ VIDEO CONTROLLER: GARY TAILLON JIB ARM OPERATOR: RANDY GOMEZ, SR. STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: CAROL KAELSON


STALWART FILMS

“FEAR THE WALKING DEAD” SEASON 6 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM SUSCHITZKY, BSC, JALALUDIN TRAUTMANN, BVK OPERATORS: JUAN RAMOS, KRIS HARDY ASSISTANTS: MARK BOYLE, THEDA CUNNINGHAM, SAM PEARCY, DON HOWE STEADICAM OPERATOR: JUAN RAMOS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JAMIE METZGER LOADER: BRENDA SZWEJBKA DIGITAL UTILITIES: LOUIS WATT, JASON HEAD STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: RYAN GREEN PUBLICIST: SHARA STORCH

THIMBLE PEA PICTURES, LLC

“UNTITLED ANNA DELVEY ART PROJECT” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MARYSE ALBERTI OPERATORS: GEORGE BIANCHINI, JOHN PIROZZI ASSISTANTS: JAMIESON FITZPATRICK, KEITT, CORNELIA KLAPPER, EVE STRICKMAN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DOUGLAS HORTON LOADER: JONATHAN PERALTA STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: NICOLE RIVELLI, LIZ FISHER, CHRIS SAUNDERS

TOT PRODUCTIONS, LLC

“THE OTHER TWO” SEASON 2 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ZACK SCHAMBERG OPERATORS: SEBASTIAN SLAYTER, PATRICK MORGAN ASSISTANTS: STEPHEN KOZLOWSKI, CASEY JOHNSON, SOMER MOJICA, SARA BOARDMAN, TONI SHEPPARD STEADICAM OPERATOR: PATRICK MORGAN LOADER: MADDIE KING

TRISTAR PRODUCTIONS, INC. “HAPPIEST SEASON”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN GULESERIAN OPERATORS: MICHAEL CRAVEN, RICK SCHUTTE ASSISTANTS: DEB PETERSON, AMANDA ROTZLER, BRIAN BRESNEHAN, DANIEL SOTAK, JR. DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CURTIS ABBOTT LOADER: GABRIEL MARCHETTI STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ELIZABETH TERRELL PUBLICIST: RACHAEL ROTH

UNCLE GEORGE PRODUCTIONS, LLC “SERVANT” SEASON 2

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ISAAC BAUMAN, MARSHALL ADAMS OPERATOR: NATHAN LEVINE-HEANEY ASSISTANTS: NICHOLAS HUYNH, ANTON MIASNIKOV, JAMES MCCANN, LEON SANGINITI, JR. LOADER: SEAN GALCZYK DIGITAL UTILITY: WALKER MARKEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: JESSICA KOURKOUNIS

UNIVERSAL

“LAW & ORDER: SVU” SEASON 21 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL GREEN OPERATORS: JONATHAN HERRON, MICHAEL LATINO ASSISTANTS: CHRISTOPHER DEL SORDO, MATTHEW BALZARINI, JUSTIN ZVERIN, EMILY DUMBRILL

LOADERS: JASON RASWANT, JASON GAINES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL PARMELEE

WOODBRIDGE PRODUCTIONS “S.W.A.T.” SEASON 3

WARNER BROS

“ALL RISE” SEASON 1 DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HARP, CYBEL MARTIN OPERATORS: TIM ROARKE, STEPHEN CLANCY, SHANELE ALVAREZ ASSISTANTS: MATT GUIZA, KRISTI ARNDS, RANDY SHANOFSKY, ADAM TSANG, ANTHONY HART, BENNY BAILEY STEADICAM OPERATOR: STEPHEN CLANCY STEADICAM ASSISTANT: KRISTI ARNDS DIGITAL UTILITY: MORGAN JENKINS LOADER: JOHANNA SALO TECHNOCRANE OPERATORS: NAZARIY HATAK, BRIAN LOVE REMOTE HEAD TECH/OPERATOR: JAY SHEVECK

“BOB HEARTS ABISHOLA” SEASON 1 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PATTI LEE, ASC OPERATORS: MARK DAVISON, CHRIS HINOJOSA, JON PURDY, MICHELLE CRENSHAW ASSISTANTS: JEFF JOHNSON, VITO DE PALMA, MARIANNE FRANCO, ADAN TORRES, LISA ANDERSON, ALICIA BRAUNS, LANCE MITCHELL, JORDAN HRISTOV VIDEO CONTROLLER: JOHN O’BRIEN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: T. BRETT FEENEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: MICHAEL YARISH PUBLICISTS: KATHLEEN TANJI, MARC KLEIN

“MOM” SEASON 7 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVEN V. SILVER, ASC OPERATORS: CARY MCCRYSTAL, JAMIE HITCHCOCK, SOC, DAMIAN DELLA SANTINA, CANDY EDWARDS ASSISTANTS: MEGGINS MOORE, NIGEL STEWART, SEAN ASKINS, MARK JOHNSON, WHITNEY JONES CAMERA UTILITIES: ALICIA BRAUNS, COLIN BROWN, JEANNETTE HJORTH VIDEO CONTROLLER: KEVIN FAUST DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: BENJAMIN STEEPLES STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: ROBERT VOETS PUBLICIST: MARC KLEIN

“THE LOST BOYS” PILOT DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HILLARY SPERA OPERATOR: BO WEBB ASSISTANTS: PATRICK BOROWIAK, DEREK SMITH, ROY KNAUF, DARWIN BRANDIS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: ANDY BADER DIGITAL UTILITY: JILL AUTRY STILL PHOTOGRAPHER: FRED NORRIS

“YOUNG SHELDON” SEASON 3 DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: BUZZ FEITSHANS, IV OPERATORS: NEIL TOUSSAINT, SOC, AARON SCHUH ASSISTANTS: MATTHEW DEL RUTH, GRANT YELLEN, BRAD GILSON, JR., JAMES COBB STEADICAM OPERATOR: AARON SCHUH STEADICAM ASSISTANT: GRANT YELLEN DIGITAL LOADER: BAILEY SOFTNESS DIGITAL UTILITY: IAN DOOLEY STILL PHOTOGRAPHERS: ROBERT VOETS, MICHAEL DESMOND, DARREN MICHAELS, NICOLE WILDER

DIRECTORS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: FRANCIS KENNY, ASC, CRAIG FIKSE OPERATORS: TIM DOLAN, BRIAN PITTS, MICHAEL OTIS ROPERT ASSISTANTS: RYAN PARKS, LOGAN TURNER, THANE CHARACKY, RILEY PADELFORD, JUSTNI QUACH, MIKE FAUNTLEROY CAMERA UTILITY: CARL LAMMI LOADER: TREVOR BEELER

COMMERCIALS ARTS & SCIENCES “GATORADE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MIHAI MALAIMRE, JR. OPERATOR: ALEX SALAHI ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: TAMAS HARANGI, ELI BERG, JAMIE METZGER, DAN SKINNER

BISCUIT

“LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: TOBIN IRWIN OPERATOR: VINCENT FOEILLET ASSISTANTS: CHRIS STRAUSER, NIRANJAN MARTIN DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DANIEL APPLEGATE

CAVIAR

“PREGO” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DARREN LEW ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOE BELACK

CMS

“HEAD & SHOULDERS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: MAX GOLDMAN ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, SHAWN WRIGHT DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JESSE TYLER

HUNGRY MAN, INC.

“AMAZON WEB SERVICES” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOPHE LANZENBERG ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: KEVIN ZANIT

“AT&T” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SHAWN KIM ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, KIRA HERNANDEZ, CARRIE LAZAR DIGITAL IMAGING TECHS: NINA CHADHA, ZACH MADDEN

“SAP CONCUR” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COREY WALTER ASSISTANTS: LAURA GOLDBERG, ERIC MATOS HEAD TECH: REID MURPHY

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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SMUGGLER

“WEINERSCHNITZEL”

“NATIONWIDE”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT OPERATORS: DJ HARDER, JOHN PINGRY, ALAN CAUDILLO ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, LAURA GOLDBERG, ETHAN MCDONALD, NOAH GLAZER, ERIC MATOS, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

PARK PICTURES “PARSONS”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIEL VIGNAL OPERATOR: HTAT HTUT ASSISTANTS: EVAN WALSH, MICHAEL WILLIAMS

STATION FILMS

“SPECTRUM HOSUEMATES”

PRETTYBIRD

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: KIP BOGDAHN OPERATOR: JOHN HOKANSON ASSISTANTS: JOHN CLEMENS, NINA CHIEN, SCOTT MILLER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: GEORGE ROBERT MORSE

“MOUNTAIN DEW” BTS OPERATOR: ANNE MARIE FOX

RADICAL MEDIA, LLC

“BOSTON SCIENTIFIC, WATCHMAN” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COLIN WATKINSON AERIAL DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COLIN BURGESS ASSISTANTS: NIRANJAN MARTIN, BRADLEY ROCHLITZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DANIELE COLOMBERA CRANE OPERATOR: BOGDAN IOFCIULESCU CRANE TECH: DUSTIN EVANS MATRIX TECH: SHAWN FOSSEN

STINK, LLC

“KOSE/DECORTE” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS RICHARDSON ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DYLAN JOHNSON

SUPPLY & DEMAND

“PROCTOR AND GAMBLE, ALWAYS” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS RICHARDSON ASSISTANTS: ETHAN MCDONALD, MARCUS DEL NEGRO DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: DANIEL APPLEGATE

“DEVOUR” DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC SCHMIDT OPERATOR: ALAN CAUDILLO ASSISTANTS: LILA BYALL, NOAH GLAZER DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: JOHN SPELLMAN

THE CORNER SHOP

“LITTLE CAESARS”

RAUCOUS CONTENT “OTEZLA”

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC ZIMMERMAN ASSISTANT: STEVE MATTSON DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: CASEY SHERIER

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: COREY WALTER ASSISTANTS: NICOLE MARTINEZ, RICHARD DABBS DIGITAL IMAGING TECH: NINA CHADHA

Advertisers Index COMPANY

PAGE

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DOCPITCH PRESENTED BY

DOCLANDS DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL

DOCPITCH RETURNS! $100,000+ to be awarded in prizes this year in support of the documentary filmmaking community The 2020 DocPitch fundraising forum launches on August 13 with voting open through August 19, as eight independent filmmakers vie for the Audience Choice Award of $25,000 and additional funding of up to $100,000 for their feature-length documentary projects. Find out how to participate and cast your vote at DOCLANDS.COM/DOCPITCH

2017 DocPitch winner Theo Rigby, Sanctuary

2018 DocPitch winners Jim LeBrecht and Nicole Newnham, Crip Camp

DOCPITCH SPONSOR

THANK YOU TO OUR DOCPITCH SUPPORTERS NANCY P. AND RICHARD K. ROBBINS FAMILY FOUNDATION

2019 DocPitch winners Chris Temple and Alejandro Valdez-Rochin, Five Years North Photos © Tommy Lau Photography

AUGUST 2020 PRODUCTION CREDITS

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Across 1 Camera support with great stiffness and rigidity, 2 words 8 Stored energy, abbr. 9 Reduces 11 Emerging flat panel display technology 13 Flightboard abbreviation 14 ____ mesh networking 19 Small part 20 ___ equipment: used in many Transformers films 21 A very long time 22 Atmosphere 23 65 __ : wide high-resolution film gauge 24 Frank Ford Coppola's Rumble ___ 26 Save from danger 28 Mariah Carey's "___ Be There" 29 Roman 60 30 Exposure value, abbr. 32 History making pitcher, Young 33 Hawaii 5-0 wreath 34 ____'s Alexa Mini LF 36 Neg. responses 37 Semiconductor device that serves as an electronic eye 39 ___ 8: the latest ethernet iteration 41 Gray-spotted horse 42 Apple's ____: popular codec in professional post-production 46 ____ 1.3, combining video and audio interfaces into one connection 48 Agree silently 50 @ 51 Noah's boat 52 First Blood character filmed by Andrew Laszlo 53 Very bright light 54 Shakespeare's over there 55 Law & Order criminal's operating basis. abbr. 56 Cancel

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Down 1 Adjustment, in cinematography 2 Fully uncompressed capture format 3 Row boat equipment 4 ___ workflows: vital in the COVID 19 world 5 Select 6 Starsky & Hutch, for example 7 Top of the line all-in-one camera system, 2 words 8 "As ___ instructions" 10 Day before a big day 12 Time between the instant a frame is captured and the instant that frame is dsiplayed 15 Spreads out the red carpet, say 16 Trademark, abbr. 17 Measures of resistance 18 Owned 19 Computer memory unit 23 Combine different elements 24 ____ free, video displays with no 25 The lady's 27 Goes with fi 31 Virtual reality, for short 34 Excellent 35 Nucleus ___ camera 38 ____ 70 lenses from Panavision 39 Makers of the C300 Mark III 40 Technique to reproduce a greater range of luminosity, abbr. 42 Camera sweep 43 GPS instruction, abbr. 44 Managed 45 ___panels, decorative light diffusers 47 Process and software to manage high-volume video and multimedia files 49 ____ control


THE PROD U C T GUIDE

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ICG Magazine - August 2020 - The Product Guide  

Featuring Tenet, P-Valley, and the 2020 Product Guide. ICG Magazine has been the world’s premier cinematography publication since 1929. Publ...

ICG Magazine - August 2020 - The Product Guide  

Featuring Tenet, P-Valley, and the 2020 Product Guide. ICG Magazine has been the world’s premier cinematography publication since 1929. Publ...

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