2022 Ibis Yearbook

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OUR FAVORITE BIRD Central to all campus spirit is Sebastian the Ibis, the university’s mascot. Folklore maintains that the Ibis is the last sign of wildlife to take shelter before a hurricane and the first to reappear after the storm. The local marsh bird was considered UM’s first unofficial mascot when the school yearbook adopted the name “Ibis” in 1926. Today, Sebastian can be found at all football games smoking out the student section Photo by Jared Lennon

006 LIFESTYLES 114 ACADEMICS 166 SPORTS 218 GREEKS 250 ORGANIZATIONS 306 PEOPLE 390 CONCLUSIONS

WELCOME IN Sebastian the Ibis is the face of the university. As the mascot, Sebastian plays a big role in the encouragement of Hurricane spirit. He is the university’s biggest athletics fan, as he can be found at almost every athletic game that UM students compete in. Photo by Jared Lennon

IBIS VOLUME 96 2022 University of Miami 1330 Miller Drive SC Suite 202 Coral Gables, FL 33146 www.ibisyearbook.com Enrollment Undergraduates: 12,089 Graduates: 7,007
002 OPENING
WE WELCOME ‘U’ Former Miami head football coach, Manny Diaz, welcomes freshmen and transfer students at the ‘Canes Take Flight orientation. He throws up the ‘U’ and faces the Frost Band of the Hour. Photo by Jared Lennon

BEGINNING the

Hurricane pride is at the heart of the University of Miami. Tailgates, spirit week, Sebastian the Ibis, football games and fight songs are some of the many ways ‘Canes show their love for the university. Tradition is a big part of the ‘Cane culture. For this reason, every student that enters the university attends orientation before the start of classes. Here, they meet lifelong friends and learn what it truly means to be a Miami Hurricane.

003

CHAPTER new

Being a ‘Cane means belonging to something bigger than just a university. The word ‘Hurricane’ means pride, accomplishment and family. Since opening its doors in 1925, UM has served as an outlet for every student that steps foot on its campus, harnessing their individual talents and desires. Being a part of such a strong community of individuals means that the future is bright for both past, present and future students.

004 OPENING
005
READY FOR ORIENTATION Rows of incoming transfer students and freshmen prepare for President Julio Frenk to address them during 'Canes Take Flight in the Watsco Center. Photo by Jared Lennon

GET THE CROWD ON THEIR FEET

On the last Friday before classes ended, student Opener Chad Nelson performs at the Hurricane Productions ‘Canes Carnival on the Foote Green before celebrity singer Marc E. Bassy. Photo by Jared Lennon

006 LIFESTYLES

LIFESTYLES

Student life is a big part of ‘Cane spirit on campus. During the spring and fall semesters, students will experience a handful of different events that will make their time at UM memorable. Changing trends, summer jobs, Homecoming, Miami life, winter break, ‘Canes Carnival and COVID-19 campus changes are all things that students will experience that will make each academic year unique for ‘Canes across Miami.

007

JUNE 17

JUNETEENTH President Joe Biden talks to Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) after signing the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law in the East Room of the White House on June 17, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Juneteenth is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the emancipation of enslaved African Americans.

JUNE

JUNE 15

PULITZER PRIZE WINNER Cubanborn composer, Tania León’s love and dedication to music carried throughout her life—leading her to most recently winning the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for music for her orchestral composition, “Stride.” León is the 2021 Distinguished Composer-in-Residence for the Frost School of Music.

JULY

BILL COSBY RELEASED Bill Cosby makes his first public appearance at his home in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, after being released from prison on June 30, 2021. Cosby was sentenced to 3 to fourteen years in 2018. His bail was revoked and he was ordered to pay a fine of $25,000 plus the costs of prosecution as part of the sentence. In addition, the judge ruled that Cosby would be classified as a sexually violent predator.

SUMMER OLYMPICS U.S. gymnast

Simone Biles reacts after competing on the uneven bars in the women’s team qualifying at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. During a performance for an Olympic medal, Biles attempted a vault of two and a half twists and ended up getting lost in the air, unable to land the vault. Biles later withdrew from the team final, acknowledging that she would be unable to compete and give it her all.

COVID-19 VACCINES The FDA approves the first COVID-19 vaccine Comirnaty (Pfizer-BioNTech) for individuals 16 and older. The EUA remains in effect for individuals 12 years of age and older and for third dose for immunocompromised individuals 12 years of age and older.

AWARDS Two

JULY 16

HURRICANE OLYMPICS Nadia Eke’s Olympic dream became areality. The University of Miami staff member represented her home country of Ghana in the triple jump at the 2020 Olympic Games in Japan. She was also the flagbearer for Team Ghana at the opening ceremonies.

CUBAN GOVERNMENT PROTESTS

Historic protests ignited with Cuban American students closely watching and using their voices, with a shared common message of solidarity, to call for an end to Cuba’s 62-year communist regime.

30
23
25 AUG
JUNE 21
JULY 19
US FULBRIGHT recent University of Miami alumni, Julia Lynch and Ezra Remer, have been granted U.S. Fulbright awards that will respectively take one to Bulgaria, the other to Dominica.
008 LIFESTYLES
SUMMER EVENTS

SURFSIDE CONDO COLLAPSE In the early hours of June 24th, 2021, the Champlain Towers, a living complex in Miami Beach, unexpectedly collapsed. The collapse of the condo took 98 lives, a devastating loss to the community. Both rescuers and volunteers tried to save as many people as they could, but too many people were buried in the rubble. After the collapse, an investigation was launched to determine what caused the collapse of this enormous concrete building. It was uncovered that there were structural issues within the building dating back all the way to 1990. Some of these issues were not addressed in a timely manner, and were not addressed during inspection, which could have contributed to the collapse.

summer EVENTS

Photos courtesy of the Tribune News Service and News@TheU

009
While students worked jobs, applied for internships and got ahead in summer classes, newsworthy events took place all over the world. Public health innovation, tragic deaths, calls for change and political news kept headlines rolling this summer

A BUSYsummer break

Students spend their lengthy summer traveling, finding jobs and acquiring internships for academic experience

After spending so much time at home over the course of this past year, students did not hesitate to jump at opportunities to travel and reconnect with friends this past summer. Many looked forward to being able to safely explore travel destinations and have the full tourist experience.

Sophomore Jake Newiger, majoring in Music Business, was able to travel with friends for the first time since the start of the pandemic. “I stayed in my uncle’s apartment in Manhattan with my friends and we visited a bunch of tourist attractions. We went to Central Park, Rockefeller Center and a Jimmy Fallon live taping. It was a very fun trip,” he said. Similarly, other students decided that it was the best time to see some friends and have new experiences as traveling became more common.

Vivianne Martell, a junior majoring in Journalism, flew to California to visit her roommate and see what her life away from Miami was like. “We hiked to the Hollywood sign together and I got to meet all her friends from home. It was definitely the best part of my summer,” Martell said.

010 LIFESTYLES
JOBS AND INTERNSHIPS
SUMMER TRAVEL,
Story by Molly Mackenzie Design by Carolina Camus A WIZARD FOR A DAY Kelsey Walker, junior, spends a summer weekend at the Universal Studios amusement park in Orlando, making her wizarding dreams come true. Photo by Jennifer Vega REAL WORLD EXPERIENCE For the summer, Caprina Smith was a creative marketing intern operating under the marketing creative concept team for Bath and Body Works. She worked on creative deliverables for in-store marketing and supported senior designers and visual specialists. Courtesy of Addison Becker
011
CONCRETE JUNGLE During his summer vacation, junior Jake Newiger, visits Time Square in New York City. He has visited the city multiple times on trips with his family during the summer. Photo by Jennifer Vega INTERN IN HIGH PLACES Hannah Rosa uses her summer to complete a highly saught after internship in Capitol Hill as part of the legislative team under the office of U.S. Senator Marco Rubio. Courtesy of Hannah Rosa WOLF TRAP Addison Becker works nights at the National Park Service’s Wolf Trap concert venue outside of Washington D.C. Pictured on the right, Addison is smiling with coworkers. She worked as a chef, preparing meals for many guests. Courtesy of Addison Becker

THE SUN fun in

University of Miami students take full advantage of spending time in the beautiful Florida sun

Miami is a multi-faceted destination, from the Downtown Brickell area, to Wynwood, and its numerous beaches, there were activities that pleased both tourists and locals alike. The area was known for its Art Deco charm, high-end shopping and wild nightlife, but the city’s number one draw was its beaches. Whether your beach goal was to relax and catch a tan, play a game of catch with friends, take nice pictures or go for water sports, there was a perfect spot for you.

South Beach is popularly known for its fl shy cars, eccentric artists, skateboarders, and colossal cocktails. The white sand beaches are understandably the busiest and most touristy.

Crandon Park served as a beautiful escape for tired students to recharge, and was the perfect time to spend with friends or family. Junior Carly Payne is used to waking up early to catch the sunrise at the beach, “The best time of the day to go to the beach is definitely sunrise, specifically at Key Biscayne. The water is crystal clear in the mornings for snorkeling,” she said. While there were many places to spend your free time on and off campus, most students found that nothing could beat a relaxing beach day. Whether it was a full-day event or a quick trip to get a tan, students will always have the memories of enjoying one of the many beautiful Miami beaches.

012 LIFESTYLES BEACH DAYS
WEEKEND FUN Matthew Jachemczyk, junior, and JD Karanik, junior, spend their weekends off at the beach enjoying time with friends while they swim and play games. Photo courtesy of Matthew Jachemczyk MORNING GLORY During late afternoons, the sky over South Point park beach turns into a canvas of yellows, pinks, oranges, and purples. Photo by John Yayi Bondje Story by Maud Joannet Design by Carolina Camus

LOVE ON THE WATER

Helen Menendez and Danilo Navarro, both juniors, enjoy each others company and spend a romantic day at the beach together where they embrace and engage in a kiss.

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GROUP FUN Hanna Bissler and volleyball teammate Alanys Viera, both freshmen, show their love for the clear waters and sunny skies with big smiles and hands high. Photo courtesy of Kiara Wright SHADES ON Freshmen Hanna Bissler and Edgardo Villegas, two UM athletes, face the Miami sun at the beach in style as they wear matching sunglasses while enjoying time in the ocean. Photo courtesy of Hanna Bissler LEAP FOR JOY Juan Fletchas, class of ‘23, enjoys the late afternoon at South Point beach with his friends where he jumps in the sand as the sun is setting behind him. Photo by John Yayi Bondje Photo courtesy of Helen Menendez

WELCOME hurricanes

And they’re back! After many students spent last year online, the University’s campus is largely full again as the vast majority returned to or began taking in-person classes in the fall semester. With COVID-19 precautions in place, students and their families spent move-in week schlepping suitcases, stocking up on supplies and hugging good-bye to begin the school year apart from each other.

Once again, the rattle of luggage carts and ding of elevator doors served as the soundtrack to many students’ first days on campus. For over two thousand incoming students, this move-in marked the beginning of their college experience. After checking in at the Watsco Center, freshmen students along with friends and family found their way to dorms like Hecht, Stanford, Mahoney and Pearson to unpack.

Here, students would meet their new roommates, floormates and residential assistants and staff. Residential areas like Eaton Residental College, Lakeside Village and the University Village welcomed thousands of returning students as well.

To some, this move-in felt extra special.“It was a surreal experience,” said senior Ishaan Shah. Like many students, Shah returned to campus this semester after being remote for the majority of the previous year. Returning to campus, Shah said, “felt like coming back to a second home, seeing all of my friends that I hadn’t seen in almost two years.”

014 LIFESTYLES MOVE IN
As a new academic year starts, freshmen and transfer students move in to their new on-campus housing
NEW HOME Jack Bettex and roommate Peter Commisso move into their dorm room in Stanford Residential College with the help of their families. Photo by Jared Lennon LOVE TO HELP Sophomore Caleb Lambert moves into Eaton Residential College with help from his mom. Photo by Allie Salvucci PHOTO FUN Incoming freshman and transfer students wait in line to have their Cane ID photos taken in the Watsco Center during ‘Cane Kickoff. Photo by Jared Lennon
015
FULL CART Senior Katherine Krishna loads all of her personal belongings into a cart to take up to her dorm after arriving at Stanford Circle on August 16th. Photo by Allie Salvucci NEW FRIEND Patrick Mainente and Matt Seibre throw up the ‘U’ together after moving into their shared dorm. Photo by Jared Lennon HELPING HANDS Sophomore Ashley Tyler Michelin gets help from her friend as she moves in to her new dorm on campus. Photo by Allie Salvucci HEAVY LOAD Sophomore Winn Morley utilizes a Housing and Residential Life cart to unpack from the car and move all of his belongings into his new dorm on campus. Photo by Allie Salvucci FAMILY MATTERS With help from her family, sophomore Virgina Gomez moves into Pearson Residential College on move in day. Photo by Allie Salvucci

A WARMmiami welcome

As COVID-19 protocols were eased, orientation events were held for students in full swing for the first time since the fall of 2020

There were many freshmen joining campus that had a completely unique experience than the class before them. Considering all the precautions that they had to take for the orientation the year prior, everyone was ready to be back and better than ever, but that didn’t mean they could go back to how it was before.

The orientation staff guided incoming students through ‘Cane Kickoff and welcomed them to different departments, colleges, student organizations and each other. There were many students that helped with orientation, and having one that involved more in-person was very exciting for them. “This was actually my first year as an orientation fellow, which was exciting,” says senior Austin Lent. “I know last year everything was fully remote, so it was great that we could have mostly in-person events,” Lent said. They hosted a record-breaking 2,800 accepted students.

on

016 LIFESTYLES ORIENTATION
BAG FOR SWAG Students receive bags their way in to ‘Canefest. The bags are used to carry branded merchandise that clubs and organizations hand out. Photo by Jared Lennon WELCOME HOME Gabby Aguiar, a 2021 Orientation Program Coordinator, welcomes the class of 2025 during the ‘Canes Take Flight program in the Watsco Center. Photo by Jared Lennon FUN ORGS Freshmen Eric Krasinets, Gabe Tejada, Holden Hargrave, Patrick Harris, and Drew Lazenby learn how to play traditional drums at the Indian Students Association table run by senior Kunal Hanchate. Photo by Allie Salvucci LEARNING ABOUT NEW ORGS Students walk through rows of booths showcasing a portion of the 300+ student organizations and departments at ‘Canefest. Photo by Jared Lennon UNIQUE TRADITIONS Iron Arrow Honor Society Officers, Grace Tenke, Josh White, and Jenny Hudak introduce the University of Miami’s alma matter to the Class of 2025 during the Canes Take Flight program. Photo by Jared Lennon NEW ‘CANES Freshmen of the Class of 2025 await the start of the President’s Welcome and Canes Take Flight programs in the Watsco Center. Photo by Jared Lennon WAIT MY TURN Freshmen and transfer students eagerly line up and wait to enter Watsco Center for ‘Canefest, an event to learn about all 300+ on-campus organizations. Photo by Jared Lennon

new housing coming

The Stanford Residential College and

Ruth Hecht Residential College buildings will soon be torn down.

It is rumored that the widely disliked freshman dorms will be replaced by a $260 million dollar housing village, similar to UM’s new Lakeside Village that was opened to students and the community in 2020.

This new living complex will include 25 interconnected buildings, as well as a large auditorium that can hold 200 people. The last time that these residential colleges were heavily renovated was in the 1980s.

The residential colleges are long due for a

FUTURE toward the

A handful of construction projects could be seen rising across campus this year, set to open their doors soon. One is the Frost Institute for Chemistry and Molecular Science building across from Dooly Memorial.

“As a premed student, it seems like this building will give me opportunities to collaborate with other students and get involved in interdisciplinary research with the faculty,” freshmen Erika Del Valle said. According to The Miami Hurricane, the $60 million project is the first of “multiple planned interdisciplinary research centers under the Frost Institutes for Science and Engineering,” funded by Phillip and Patricia Frost, namesakes of UM’s Frost School of Music.

Foundation work for the Knight Recital Hall, which is part of this school, began this school year as well. The space will include new performance spaces, a green room, ancillary spaces, storage rooms, rehearsal rooms, a state-of-the-art sound recording control booth and an ensemble hall.

Both buildings, according to the university’s and architect’s website, will be designed to achieve LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver standards.

018 LIFESTYLES CAMPUS CONSTRUCTION
With advances in technology and thinking, new ground is broken to house continued student learning
A NEW MODERN MUSICAL SPACE Planned to open in the fall of 2022, foundational construction begins for the Frost School of Music’s new Knight Recital Hall located on the edge of Osceola Lake and built to hold a 200-seat ensemble hall, a black box theater, offices, classrooms and more. Photo by Allie Salvucci Story by Maud Joannet Design by Giselle Spicer Florence modern upgrade. By Carolina Camus IN FULL BLOOM In anticipation for the demolition of the Hecht and Stanford towers, the community garden will move to the arboretum on campus. Photo by Allie Salvucci FRESH CUT ON CAMPUS Freshmen Luke Goldenberg awaits for his hair appointment at Golden Touch Salon within Lakeside Village. With the addition of Golden Touch Salon, students can indulge in luxury services at the palm of their hands. Photo by Allie Salvucci
019
FOOD FOR ALL Sophomore Aniko Walsh enjoys a salad from Daybreak. Daybreak, located in Lakeside Village, offers healthy grab-and-go items as well as breakfast items all day long. Photo by Allie Salvucci STEM EXPANSION Bringing new technologies to campus, the Frost Institute of Chemistry and Molecular Science is almost complete and scheduled to open in the summer 2022 in time for the next school year. As of July 2022, it has not been finished. Photo by Allie Salvucci MAKING NEW PATHS Construction begins next to the Herbert Wellness Center blocking off the side entrance into the gym, and students are redirected to walk other ways to class. Photo by Allie Salvucci

a beautiful place to live

Lakeside Village adds a new modern twist on traditional housing. With several layout options and multiple lobbies that create a tight-knit community, Lakeside Village is the ideal transition into adult living.

The newest additions to Lakeside include multiple restaurants, a salon, and large study spaces for Lakeside residents. Without leaving the building, residents can enjoy the comfort of home while indulging in good food and self-care.

At night, lights fill the Lakeside windows, reflect off the lake, and create a beautiful picture, admired by all passing by. By Elyse

CENTER OF IT ALL Lakeside Village is a center for campus life including an auditorium and pavilion. It also includes classrooms and restaurants.

020 LIFESTYLES

LAKESIDE VILLAGE STUDYING HARD First year law student, Corinne Milnamow, sits on a glider, which line the outside of Lakeside Village. Photo by Sofia Ramirez TREAT YOURSELF Freshmen Alli Haber and Liv Hanna pick out their nail colors at Golden Touch Salon located in Lakeside Village. They pick colors and prepare for a relaxing day getting manicures and pedicures on opening week for the Golden Touch. Photo by Allie Salvucci Roscoe Photo by Genesis Del Toro IN THE SHADE Senior Crispin Blamphin chooses a shaded area in Lakeside to work on his assignments. Photo by Sofia Ramirez TAKING A STROLL Students stroll through Lakeside Village and are able to use the sand volleyball courts to study and play. Photo by Sofia Ramirez

a new place

TO CALL HOME

Situated steps away from Lake Osceola, this grand village is comprised of 25 buildings for luxury living

The newest addition to campus living has taken the campus by storm during its second year in action. Admired by many, Lakeside Village won the prestigious International Architectural awards and continues to impress those students and spectators alike.

With so many amenities, everyone on campus utilizes Lakeside. A campus hot-spot, students can enjoy Lakeside’s food options overlooking Lake Osceola in between their classes. Among those is Daybreak, which offers students delicious breakfast foods regardless of the time. Freshman Madison Coll raves about Daybreak, saying, “They have great gluten-free options and a very positive atmosphere. I always get their mango avocado toast!!” Always bustling with activity, people visit Lakeside to visit the UPS store orthe many outdoor courtyards, which are perfect for studying. At night, students use the sand volleyball courts, participating in pickup games.

While Lakeside has so many amenities, the real highlight is the suites. With just over 334 units and 1100 beds, Lakeside is the single most popular option on everyone’s housing applications. Sophomore Abby Gendell says, “The apartments are so spacious, and there is a ton of storage for all of your belongings. I also love the terraces on the second level, and I’m always sitting out there with my friends.”

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AMENITIES The Lakeside Village includes an expo center as well as a salon, barber and rock climbing. Photo by Genesis Del Toro HAPPY OUTSIDE First year law student Kelsey McCarty sits under an umbrella to avoid the Miami sun. Photo by Sofia Ramirez VIEWS Lakeside Village adds a new architectural spectacle to our beautiful campus, especially at night with the lights that line the bridge. Photo by Farha Reshamwala

EATON RESIDENTIAL

COLLEGE In 1986,

Eaton was the third hall converted to a residential college. It is the oldest residence hall on campus and originally opened as an all-women building. This residential college was named after Julian S. Eaton, a Law School alumni. Photo by UM Housing

At the center of the University of Miami lies Lake Osceola, a man-made lake. The lake is home to many freshwater species of fish, plants and reptiles

LAKESIDEVILLAGE

AT THE center of it all LAKE

STORM SURGE FOOD COURT AND LAKESIDE PATIO

The food court at the university houses over 10 restaurants for students to choose from for three meals a day. The restaurants include Pollo Tropical, Cafe Vicky, Tossed, The Market, Sushi Maki, Subway, Panda Express, The Corner Deli, Miami Chicken Co. and the Faculty Club.

FOOD COURT WHITTENUC

SHALALA STUDENT CENTER

The SC is an important addition to student life on the University of Miami Campus. The Center includes a 24-hour study space, student organization offices and lounge spaces, a Grand Ballroom, a Senate Room, multiuse meeting and activities rooms, and a media suite. Photo by

022 LIFESTYLES
LAKE OSCEOLA
Photo by Allie Salvucci Farha Reshamwala Design by Jennifer Vega and Carolina Camus

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE At present, U-SoA has more than 504 students, including 374 undergraduate students and 130 graduate students. There are about 60 full and part-time faculty, plus a professional staff of 20, educating and supporting students.

OSCEOLA

Stanford Residential College is composed of two co-ed 12 story towers, Rosborough Tower and Walsh Tower, and floors are assigned to one gender. The towers are connected by a common area on the first floor where the front desk, residential faculty apartments, a classroom, study room, vending machines, and laundry facilities are located.

FROST REHEARSAL CENTER

School of Music is the music school at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, United States. From 1926 to 2003, it was known as the University of Miami School of Music.

023
LAKE OSCEOLA Lake Osceola is a man-made, freshwater lake located at the center of the University of Miami campus in Coral Gables, Florida. Construction of Lake Osceola began in the late 1940s. Photo by Charisma Jones Photo by Sophia Alexander FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC Frost Photo by Kaylee Mendoza STANFORD RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE Photo by Vicente Nunez
RING THEATRE

ARE OPEN the gates

Fans are finally able to enjoy the full experience of football season by being able to tailgate

Orange and green clothes. Screaming crowds. Sebastian the Ibis. With the first football season to operate at full capacity in two years, there was a surplus of students and fans tailgating.

Students would gather with groups of friends or student organizations outside the Hard Rock Stadium hours before football games to spend time together and to get their energy up before each game.

Senior Danielle Tenberg shared that whether students were dancing to their favorite songs or participating in chants to support the team, water was essential to

be safe. “My number one rule: hydrate so you don’t dehydrate,” she said.

One of the most obvious, yet most necessary essentials was wearing orange, green and different school spirit clothing items to represent the football team. Whether that was a jersey, crop top, face stickers, beaded necklaces or other accessories, sophomore Ellen Otterbach discussed how important UM spirit and clothing was. “Wearing spirit wear is essential and one of the best places to get UM apparel for tailgating is the bookstore on campus or UThrift,” Otterbach said.

024 LIFESTYLES TAILGATING

HOLDING DOWN THE FORT Several ‘Canes fans show their pride for the university with their coordinated clothes, merchandise, and paraphernalia outside of the Hard Rock Stadium before the home football game against the Appalachain State Mountaineers on September 11. Photo by Jared Lennon TOSS THE BALL While waiting for the afternoon game against the Virginia Cavaliers to begin, fans were playing catch with their own football outside the Hard Rock Stadium. Photo by Jared Lennon WAITING GAMES Alumni and future generations of ‘Cane fans spend their time on game day playing dominoes and other board games. Photo by Jared Lennon PASS THE RIBS A ‘Canes fan prepares ribs and other food before the start of Miami’s game versus the University of Virginia at Hard Rock Stadium on Sept. 30. Photo by Jared Lennon

IN STYLE At the home game against Michigan State University, sophomores Andres Miranda and Sebastain Calonge along with juniors Andrea Arrizabalaga and Carolina Miranda were dressed in fashionable UM gear. Photo by Carolina Miranda 025

this is THE 305

Dive into the streets of Miami and take in sky scrapers, vibrant culture, warm oceans, and colorful sunsets

026 LIFESTYLES THIS IS MIAMI
Design by Daniel Fernandez

OUR HOME

The city of Miami, which has the third most recognizable skyline in America, is home to hundreds of hotels, cultural landmarks and historic sites. The city is home to millions of tourist every year and provides UM students with lots to explore through out the year.

027
Photo by Travel Scape

BRIGHT LIGHTS Brickell City Centre

is Miami's new hot spot. The night life is unmatched with its vibrant lights, diverse culture and dining options amidst high end shops.

this is

BRICKELL

This mega financial district has become an iconic part of the Miami skyline with its impressive architecture and bustling streets

028 LIFESTYLES BRICKELL

Design by Daniel Fernandez Photo by Rachel Pankow

CONCRETE JUNGLE

TOP BRICKELL ATTRACTIONS

HISTORY SAYS WHAT?!

Brickell is one of Miami’s oldest neighborhood and yet still remains one of the fastest growing areas in all of Florida.

Source: Timeout.com

TOP PLACES TO CATCH A BITE TO EAT: LETS

NAME 1. CANTINA LA VEINTE

Brickell was originally founded in the 19th century and was first known as “Millionaires Row” due to its deep ties with fianancial corporations.

Source: Eater Miami

The number of residents living within Brickell has soared nearly 40% over the last 8 years.

Sources: Apartment Guide

029
SIMPSON
4.
CINEMAS
SOCCER ROOF
COST $$$$ $$$$ FREE $$$$ $$$$
NAME 1. BRICKELL CITY CENTRE 2. MARY BRICKELL VILLAGE 3.
PARK
CMX
5.
TOP
HERES WHERE THE FUN IS AT:
2. THE RIVER OYSTER BAR 3. MARABU BRICKELL 4. KOMODO 5. MOXIES
EAT!
PICTUERE PERFECT Senior Genesis Del Toro celebrates the holidays by going on a quick shopping spree through City Centre Brickell. Photo courtesy of Genesis Del Toro DINING OUT Mckenzie Stout takes an opportunity to visit Brickell with a group of friends during a fun tradition of Wine Wednesday after a long week of studying. Photo by Jackie Abreu TAKING IN THE VIEWS Junior Sophie Oustatcher admires the brickell skyline while on a boat. Photo courtesy of Sophie Oustatcher BRICKELL SKYLINE Photo by Rachel Sullivan SEXY FISH Photo by Sophie Oustatcher BRICKELL SUNSET Photo by Lauren Nam

ART FESTIVAL

STROLLING DOWN Coconut Grove sees dozens of cyclists trying to take in the neighborhood every day as biking might be the cheapest and most eco-firendly form of trasportation. Photo courtest of Natalie Santos

ARTISTIC RENAISSANCE Every year, the Coconut Grove art festival is hosted right here in Miami for three days which includes performances and family friendly activities. Photo courtesy of Coconut Grove Art Festival

BEST PLACES TO GO SHOPPING

TOP BEACHES RANKED IN

HISTORY SAYS WHAT?!

Coconut Grove is a Miami neighborhood that isn’t hard to find, especially with peacocks roaming freely around the village.

attends an art museum to interpret some local art and get a feel for what artists in Miami are producing.

Source: Miamiandbeach.com

BUCKET LIST

WHATS THERE TO DO AROUND

COCONUT GROVE?

ATTRACTIONS

1. DAVID T KENNEDY PARK

2. COCONUT GROVE SATURDAY ORGANIC MARKET

3. VIZCAYA MUSEUM AND GARDENS

4. THE KAMPONG

Source: TimeOut.com

The area is often referred to as “The Grove” and many locals take pride that Coconut Grove is one of the greenest areas of Miami

For one weekend every February, the Coconut Grove Arts Festival takes over the neighborhood, showcasing work by local and international artists

Sources: AllinMiami.com

LIFESTYLES COCONUT GROVE STORE
MOORISH AMBIANCE
EDITE MODE
GAS BIJOUX
THE BAZAAR PROJECT
GUADALUPE DESIGN ADRESS 3092 Fuller St 3015 Grand Ave 3015 Grand Ave 2990 McFarlane Road 3162 Commodore Plaza
030
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
MIAMI
TAKING IN SOME ART Natalie Santos Photo courtesy of Natalie Santos. LING CHOW Photo by Zihui Xie COCO WALK Photo by Zihui Xie COCO WALK Photo by Zihui Xie

this is

COCONUT GROVE

Coconut Grove has lush parks, enormous retail outlets and friendly streets filled with art

031
Design by Daniel Fernandez GRAB A BITE Coco Walk is filled with bustling restaurants where patrons can enjoying many amenties like a movie theater and outlet shops. Photo by Zihui Xie

this is

CORAL GABLES

The home of our beautiful campus and many historical landmarks. Architecture and booming businesses that make up the surrounding community, as well as many residential areas

032 LIFESTYLES CORAL GABLES Design by Daniel Fernandez SUNSET IN THE GABLES The city of Coral Gables, with thousands of residents and tall architecture, shines bright under a bright powerful sunset. Photo by Jess Morgan

BRIGHT BLUE WATER Venetian pool stands as an iconic landmark of Coral Gables with its giant natural pool and picture opportunities everywhere you go.

HEAVEN ON EARTH

A SEA OF GREEN Sophomores Bridget Craig and Natalie Lewis go to downtown Coral Gables with friends to indulge in shopping.

TOP FOOD SPOTS

TOP RESTAURANTS RANKED IN GABLES

HISTORY SAYS

WHAT?!

Among the landmarks in Coral Gables are the Venetian Pool, Douglas Entrance, the Miami Biltmore hotel, and many fine residences.

SWEET TOOTH Zhizi Li, a student at the University of Miami, enjoys an ice cream on campus from the ice cream parlor

Source:

BUCKET LIST

WHATS THERE TO DO AROUND CORAL GABLES?

ATTRACTIONS

1.

4.

5.

Source:

Coral Gables is home to the University of Miami, whose main campus spans 239 acres (0.97 km2) in the city

The city was developed by George Merrick during the Florida land boom of the 1920s.

Sources: Grayline Miami Blog

033 BEACH NAME 1. CAJA CALIENTE 2. MKT KITCHEN 3. BACHOUR 4. THREEFOLD CAFE 5. ZITZ SUM AREA 808 Ponce de Leon Blvd 1831 Ponce de Leon Blvd 2020 Salzedo St 141 Giralda Ave 396 Alhambra Cir
EaterMiami.com
FAIRCHILD
VENETIAN
CORAL GABLES MUSEUM
TROPICAL GARDEN 2.
POOL 3.
LOWE ART MUSEUM
DEERING
ESTATE
CultureTrip.com
Tayaki NYC. Photo by Zhizi Li Photo by Julie Spicer Photo by Jackie Abreu RIGHT AT HOME Corinne Milnamow, a first year law student, sits on a glider to focus on her studies on the Coral Gables Campus. Photo by Sophia Ramirez EAT AWAY Miracle Mile offers some of the finest restaurants to choose from. Brooke Weiser, Danielle Tenberg and Emily McCabe enjoy the day eating at these restaurants. Photo by Julie Spicer

HIGHEST RANKED RESTAURANTS

WHERE IS FINE CUSINE BEING SERVED?

RESTAURANT NAME

1. CVI.CHE 105

2. LA VENTANA REST.

3. JOE’S STONE CRABS

4. PAO BY PAUL QUI

5. STUBBORN SEED

Source: Restaurantclicks.com

TOP HOTSPOTS

HISTORY SAYS WHAT?!

ADDRESS

1245 Lincoln Rd

710 Washington Ave

11 Washington Ave

3201 Collins Ave 101 Washington Ave

WHAT IS THERE TO DO AROUND MIAMI BEACH?

ATTRACTIONS

1. SOAK UP THE SUN AT SOUTH BEACH

2. TAKE A FREE TOUR THROUGH ART DISTRICT

3. WANDER THROUGH OCEAN DRIVE

4. WALK THE PIER AT SOUTH POINTE PARK

5. VISIT THE MUSEUM OF ART AND DESIGN

Source: CultureTrip.com

Miami Beach was once a popular spot for pirates as famous figures like Blackbeard would often visit our shorelines in search of treasure and trade.

Over 50% of the city’s population is Hispanic/Latino as Miami Beach has seen waves of Cuban immigrants arriving in Miami.

Forbes awarded Miami Beach as the cleanest city in America in 2008 despite it’s large metropolitan size.

Sources: 33 Travel Tips

BY THE WATER

STYLING SHADES

Freshmen Nataly Rabelo arives to the beach early in the morning to decompress before a long day ahead.

034 LIFESTYLES MIAMI BEACH

FLOATING BY Junior Margaret Christovich buys a floatie to enhance her beach experience and take in the Atlantic ocean. Photo courtesy of Margaret Christovich ALL ABOARD Junior Victoria Kline finds herself crusing around Miami with some friends. Photo courtesy of Victoria Kline Photo by Daniel Fernandez MUNCHIN’ ON SNACKS Sitting by his picnic, junior Christopher Perez has a meal while taking in some waves. Photo courtesy of Chris Perez MIAMI BEACH Photo by Yuze Tian CARBONE Photo by Yuze Tian Photo by Sydney Cheane HARBOR

this is

MIAMI BEACH

As one of the most diverse across the nation, this city offers residents and visitors a change of pace with an unbeatable night life, pristine restaurants and giant skyscrapers

THE MIAMI SKYLINE

With over 23 million tourist visitors every year and all year round warm weather, there is something for everyone as you explore Miami Beach.

035
Design by Daniel Fernandez Photo by Yuze Tian

this is

WYNWOOD

The Wynwood neighborhood has become a center for creativity and free expression, which has attracted artists from around the world to Miami

a

036
LIFESTYLES WYNWOOD Design by Daniel Fernandez THE WYNWOOD WALLS Wynwood has becoming distinct art district within Miami revolving around creativity. Photo by Haoyu Gong

POP UPS

PINK PARADISE

TOP EATS

TASTIEST PLACES TO CATCH A BITE

BEACH NAME

1. THE SYLVESTER

2. SPANGLISH CRAFT BAR

3. HIYAKAWA MIAMI

4. BEAKER AND GRAY

5. ZAK THE BAKER

Source: EaterMiami.com

BUCKET LIST

WHATS THERE TO DO AROUND WYNWOOD?

ATTRACTIONS

1. TAKE A TOUR OF THE WYNWOOD WALLS

2. WALK THE STREETS TO EXPERIENCE STREET ART

3. DRINK A CRAFT BEER AT WYNWOOD BREWERY

4. VISIT THE WYNWOOD ART DISTRICT GARAGE

5. BUILD A TACO PLATTER AT COYO TACO

Source: CultureTrip.com

HISTORY SAYS

WHAT?!

The Wynwood area was originally sub-divided and sold by a couple of early Miamians: Josiah Chaille and Hugh Anderson.

Wynwood has long been referred to as Little San Juan, because many Puerto Ricans immigrated to this Miami neighborhood from the island in the 1950s.

For some years, the neighborhood has been gentrified with large invesment and a rising cost of living has pushed many locals out.

Sources: Wynwood Wikipedia

037
ADDRESS 3456 N
2808 N
2700 N
2637 N
Miami Ave
Miami Ave
Miami Ave
Miami Ave 295 NW 26th St
IN A SEA OF PINK Junior Margaret Christovich spends a day in Wynwood exploring art with her friends Eva, Ethan and Curtis and stops to take a group photo. Photo courtesy of Margaret Christovich LOUIS APPROVED Freshmen Michaela Torres attends a pop up exhibit in Wynwood courtesy of the Louis Vouitton Exhibit. Photo by Michaela Torres Wynwood is characterized by giant walls of art that bring life to the city. In recent years, pop-up exhibits have emerged to temporarily showcase new art and artistic brands. WYNWOOD WALLS Photo by Liting Bu WYNWOOD WALLS Photo by Liting Bu WYNWOOD WALLS Photo by Liting Bu

DINE OUT Calle Ocho is filled with authentic Cubana and Latin American cusine designed to satisfy all your taste buds.

HISTORY SAYS WHAT?!

Festivals in Little Havana include Calle Ocho Festival, Viernes Culturales/Cultural Fridays, the Three Kings Parade and others

TOP RESTAURANTS

AUTHENTIC LATINO CUSINE

RESTAURANT NAME

1. AZUCAR ICE CREAM

2. SANGUICH DE MIAMI

3. EL REY DE LAS FRITAS

4. VERSAILLES

5. TERRAS

Source: TimeOut.com

In 2015, Little Havana was included in the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s annual list of 11 Most Endangered Places

The name “Little Havana” emerged in the 1960s as the concentration of Cubans in the area grew sharply.

Sources: KidsKiddle.co

038 LIFESTYLES LITTLE HAVANA

BUCKET LIST

EAST LITTLE HAVANA EAST LITTLE HAVANA

IN THE HEART OF LITTLE HAVANA Junior Zoe Fundora and Freshmen

Isabella Rodriguez go to a Dolce Provisions in Little Havana for a light brunch.

by Sydney Stropes

ROOSTERS EVERYWHERE

The iconic Rooster has become synonymous with Little Havana as it is a symbol of strenght and power within the Cuban culture. Photo by Jackie Abreu

A TASTE OF LITTLE HAVANA Wenxi Xu grabs an Azucar ice cream creation with her friend Rita at the heart of Little Havana. Photo by Wenxi Xu

WHATS THERE TO DO AROUND LITTLE HAVANA?

ATTRACTIONS

1. EXPLORE CALLE OCHO

2. SAMPLE CUBAN CUISINE

3. PLAY DOMINOES AT MAXIMO GOMEZ PARK

4. CHECK OUT HOW CIGARS ARE MADE AT EL TITAN

5. WATCH LIVE PERFORMANCES AT CUBAOCHO

Source: TimeOut.com

AREA
Photo by Emily Sendin Photo

this is

LITTLE HAVANA

This vibrant Cuban neighborhood can be found in the heart of Miami, surrounded by extravagant art galleries, authentic Cuban food and music from local musicians

TOOTH The Azucar Ice Cream company which rapidly gained popularity for tropical flavored gourmet ice cream has become a key part of Miami.

039
Design by Daniel Fernandez SWEET Photo by Wenxi Deng

this is

THE KEYS

The Florida Keys are a string of tropical islands stretching about 120 miles off the southern tip of the U.S. state of Florida

040 LIFESTYLES THE FLORIDA KEYS Design by Daniel Fernandez BRIGHT BLUE SEA Alligator Reef Lighthouse is located 4 nautical miles east of Indian Key, near the Matecumbe Keys of Florida. Photo by Sydney Burnett

HIGHWAY TO HEAVEN

BEST BEACHES

TOP BEACHES RANKED AT THE KEYS

BEACH NAME

AREA BIG PINE KEY KEY LARGO LOGGERHEAD KEY

Source:

AUTHENTIC SEAFOOD

WHATS THE BEST SEAFOOD AT THE KEYS

ATTRACTIONS

LAYING BACK Freshmen

Jose Haro visIts the Keys for the first time and takes a moment to sit on the iconic beach chairs at Robbies .

Photo courtesy of Jose Haro

ONTO

THE BOAT Freshmen

Daniel Fernandez goes on a 2 hour snorkeing tour at John Pennecamp State Park and visits many of the untouched coral reef systems.

HISTORY SAYS

WHAT?!

The Florida Keys consists of 800+ keys, stretching for over 180 miles. However, only 43 of the keys are actually inhabited.

The longest inhabited key is Key Largo which measures 30 miles long and 0.5 miles wide.

Source:

There are 42 bridges connecting all the Florida key islands with the longest bridge, the Seven Mile Bridge, being over 30,000 feet long.

Sources: Grayline Miami Blog

041
1. BAHIA HONDA STATE BEACH 2. JOHN PENNEKAMP BEACH 3. DRY TORTUGAS BEACH 4. SMATHERS BEACH 5. SOMBRERO BEACH WEST MARATHON Planetware.com 1. FLORIDA KEYS STEAK AND LOBSTER HOUSE 2. DJ’S CLAM SHACK 3. THE LOBSTER SHACK 4. TWISTED SHRIMP 5. THE SQAURE GROUPER BAR AND GRILL Trip Advisor FUNKY HAT FRIDAY Freshmen Michaela Torres takes a mini road trip straight down Key Largo’s one straight road with Madeline Cohen on a Friday before the weekend. Photo by Daniel Fernandez Photo courtesy of Daniel Fernandez JOHN PENNECAMP CAFE MOKA ALABAMA JACKS Photo by Kylea Hensler Photo courtesy of Daniel Fernandez Photo by Sydney Burnett

MIAMI BREAKDOWN

spoken languages

SPANISH: 67%

ENGLISH: 25% OTHER: 8%

urban population

5.5 MILLION PEOPLE

average lowaverage high

61-74 ºF79-89 ºF

836

wynwood little havana brickell

Little Havana is a large cultural hub and home to many Cuban exiles and immigrants from South America. Source: Wikipedia

The Wynwood Walls stand tall as an outdoor museum that brings artsits from around the world right here to the streets of Miami.

Source: Wikipedia

fisher island

Coral Gables was created by George Merrick who envisioned an upscale Miami suburb with Spanish architecture Source: CityTownInfo

coral gables

Brickell is known for its highrise residential neighborhoods and luxury shops.

Source: Wikipedia

coconut grove

The Grove is one of the oldest inhabited neighborhoods in Miami with rich history

Source: Kids Kiddle

key biscayne

042
LIFESTYLES MAP OF MIAMI
I-95 I-95

north beach

a glance at

OUR HOME

A few key places that make Miami the place we’ve come to know and love

Design by Daniel Fernandez

BEST BEACHES

TOP BEACHES RANKED IN MIAMI

HISTORY SAYS WHAT?!

North Beach is a residential area with wide stretches of sand and pristine sky scrapers. Source: Wikipedia

ATLANTIC OCEAN

miami beach

BEACH NAME

1. SUNNY ISLE BEACH

2. CRANDON BEACH

3. MATHESON HAMMOCK

4. BAL HARBOUR BEACH

5. VIRGINIA KEY BEACH PARK

Source: CultureTrip.com

BUCKET LIST

WHATS THERE TO DO AROUND MIAMI?

ATTRACTIONS

1. GO FOR A SWIM AT THE HISTORIC VENTIAN POOL

2. EXPLORE THE EVERGLADES

3. WANDER THROUGH VIZCAYA MUSEUM

4. WALK DOWN CALLE OCHO IN LITTLE HAVANA

5. EXPERIENCE THE NIGHTLIFE IN SOUTH BEACH

Source: CultureTrip.com

Until 1912 the site was a mangrove swamp, where growers tried unsuccessfully to establish coconut plantations but had better luck with avocado groves

Source: Britannica

Fisher island has the highest per capita income of any place in the United States Source: Wikipedia

Because of its low elevation, Key Biscayne is usually among the first Miami areas to be evacuated before an oncoming hurricane.

Source: Wikipedia

Key West is Florida’s southernmost point, lying roughly 90 miles north

key west

Miami is home to the world’s largest collection of art deco architecture. The art deco nightclub district on Miami’s South Beach is ranked one of the best in the world.

Miami is the only US city that was founded by a woman when local businesswoman, Julia Tuttle, encouraged the development of modern day Miami.

Miami was once a mangrove swamp and the land we now know was mostly man made As a result, some of our beaches need to be replenished with sand.

Sources: Grayline Miami Blog

the keys

The Florida Keys were originally inhabited by Calusa and Tequesta Indians, and were later charted by Juan Ponce de León in 1513.

Source: IndianHeritage.org

043
AREA MIAMI KEY BISCAYNE CORAL GABLES BAL HARBOUR MIAMI
island

food that hits

THE SPOT

In addition to dining halls, UM offers students more than 25 unique restaurants and cafes to purchase food from

044 LIFESTYLES CAMPUS FOOD
Photos by UM Dining Design by Carolina Camus
3 1 5 FITBERRY Acai Bowl FRESH FUSION Falafel Bowl FRESH FUSION “Eggless” Sandwich MIAMI CHICKEN CO. Chicken Waffle Cone MIAMICHICKENCO. ChickenBaconWrap DINING HALLS Donuts DAYBREAK Avocado Toast DAYBREAK Omelet Waffle

whats on the menu?

1. ACAI BOWL

Frozen acai puree, banana, pineapple, frozen mixed berries, low fat greek yogurt, almond milk, honey, fresh fruit, granola

2. FALAFEL BOWL

Spinach, brown rice or cauliflower rice, purple cabbage, baked falafel, hummus, tzatziki, crumbled feta, pickled onions, pita

3. “EGGLESS” SANDWICH

Spinach, lettucce, tomato, onions, pickles, mayonaise, tofu, wheat bread

4. CHICKEN WAFFEL CONE

Boneless or skinless chicken thighs, buttermilk or soured whole milk, kosher salt, garlic powder, honey, chili powder

5. CHICKEN BACON WRAP

Flour tortilla, romaine lettuce, thick-cut bacon, tomato, chicken breast, ranch dressing, mayonaise

6.

DONUTS

All purpose flour, white sugar, baking powder, ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg, salt, buttermilk, eggs

7. CHICKEN TENTER COMBO

Chicken breast, waffel sliced potato, macaroni, cheese, cracked pepper, buttermilk, salt, garlic powder

8.

AVOCADO TOAST

Multigrain toast, smashed avocado, crombled applewood bacon, “everything but the bagel” seasoning

9.

OMELET WAFFLE

Sweet ham, egg, salt, cracked peper, shredded cheddar

10.

NITRO COLD BREW

Brewed coffee, vanilla sweet cream, milk, vanilla syrup, nitrogen

045
10
STARBUCKS Nitro Cold Brew
MIAMI CHICKEN CO. Chicken Tender Combo

THE RAT is back

A trip to the Rathskeller and its events is an essential part of the full UM student experience

The Rat was a campus landmark and completely studentowned and operated restaurant that served students for many years. As a popular hang-out spot on-campus that was known for its food, beverages and various events, it announced that it would reopen its doors after closing for nearly two years due to strict COVID-19 regulations.

To bring back the social environment at the Rat, the employees planned an array of events to celebrate the reopening. For the first day open again, they offered an all-day event called “Stuff a Plush” where students and staff stuffed plush animals as a creation of Build-A-Bear. Additional events included DJ Thursdays, where students could come to enjoy music from fellow students, Hurricane sports watch parties, live bands, trivia and more.

Older students noted the differences on-campus during the period it was closed down compared to when it was open. Senior Paulina Stein discussed these differences and how the Rat affected her and her peer’s experiences as college students. “It finally feels like the school is back to its old self, The Rat is an important place for students to gather and celebrate their successes together. As a 22-year-old, I can now have a drink with my friends after class and gather in a joyful setting,” she said.

Despite having to shut down for over a year and opening back up with COVID-19 precautions still in place, both the staff members and students brought back the festivities that came with The Rat.

046 LIFESTYLES THE RAT
FULL HOUSE There’s usually no empty gliders at The Rathskeller with Andre Rodz, Bennett Richer, and Steve Kruszenski getting a hold of one during the musical student performances on DJ Thursday. Photo by Charisma Jones CRAFT AWAY In collaboration with Hurricane Productions, the “Don’t Worry Bead Happy” event helped students alleviate their stress, like first-years Ann Augustine and Francesca Lama and junior Mikayla Bell. Photo by Charisma Jones LUCKY CHARM At Hurricane Production’s “Don’t Worry, Bead Happy” event held at The Rathskeller, Alexa Moutafis, sophomore, polishes her customized bracelet brimming with school spirit. Photo by Charisma Jones EAGER VIEWER The Rat is packed with students watching the Elite Eight game from the televisions with clothing colored with the university’s traditional colors. UMiami was up by six points going into half-time. Photo by Allie Salvucci

THE TEAM BEHIND the scenes

Despite the two year closing due to the pandemic, the Rathskeller was able to reopen during the fall

BACKSTAGE HANDS The Rathskeller’s events organized by Hurricane Productions run smoothly thanks to the help of the organization’s E-Board members like senior Dija Thomas, first-year Salvatore Puma, sophomore Gianna Terranova, and junior Mikayla Bell. Photo by Charisma Jones

047
DROP THE BEAT During the late afternoon rush, the Ratskeller’s DJ Thursdays host senior Steve Matousek as he plays from his DJ table. Photo by Charisma Jones COW TRIVIA In honor of National Coming Out Week, Amanda Hillegass and Blake Maune, 2018 graduates, host Trivia Tuesday with a LGBTQ+ decorated set-up in collaboration with SpectrUM. Photo by Charisma Jones GRACIOUS HOST Junior Sarah Hutchison, Hurricane Productions E-Board member, gladly greeted and welcomed particpants of their “Don’t Worry, Bead Happy” event within The Rathskeller. Photo by Charisma Jones

FOR CAMPUS essentials

Some materials and equipment are a must-have for college students in order to successfully take classes, walk around campus and study
Story by Jonathan Doe Design by Maria Gomez
CLIPS
PAPER

whats in the bag?

In Miami, rain is likely to randomly occur. Carrying an umbrella will ensure that students stay dry on their walk to class

Can be used to ensure organization. Grouping papers together with paperclips can help students separate class work

As frequent laptop users, college students should always carry a charger. As the day goes on, battery life is sure to deminish

These small cards come in handy when taking notes on specific subjects or words, and are essential to exam prep

During hot weather, using a hair clip to put long hair up ensures students are keeping

Can be used to cover up gramatical errors, miscalculations, and any mistake written

For those who opt for technology free notes, these can be used to write content for notes, papers and assignments

Can be used to make important subjects or keywords stand out, which allows for a

An essential in order to carry paper and assignments. Colored tabs can be used to organize content by class

10. SANITIZING WIPES

To ensure hands always remain clean. Can also be used to clean desks before and after every class

049

OF THE GRIND the return

Keeping one’s body and mind health under any circumstance is an important tenet for a productive and engaging student life

With the bustling lives of college students and the year-long summer weather in South Florida, many people on campus took advantage of the Herbert Wellness Center to nurture their physical and emotional well-being.

At the Herbert Wellness Center, students could enjoy a workout class from their favorite instructor with a group of friends at any time during the day. From aquatic exercises, guts and butts workouts, vinyasa flow yoga or HIIT classes, there were many options for even the busiest students. Freshman Carina Steininger was a student that went to the Wellness Center often. “I appreciate how it offers different workout classes like yoga and spinning. Overall it’s very modern and they have good equipment. It helps me to de-stress and regain focus and I have noticed that I

sleep better after working out,” she said.

In addition to fitness classes, students had access to a variety of mental health resources. From group therapy sessions to individual appointments and even couples counseling, counselors were available to discuss any personal or academic problems face-to-face with students. For those who didn’t feel comfortable with in-person therapy, there was online help to navigate through the self-help therapy app WellTrack. WellTrack featured a wellness assessment and tools to manage anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses. To help students prioritize their physical and mental well-being, the Herbert Wellness Center, and the university in general, offered many resources for students to either work individually or with professionals.

STUDENT WORKERS Junior Isabella Jurika and sophomore CJ Burnette discuss responsibilities for the safety of gym users. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil GAIN DAY During a busy Tuesday afternoon, Safia Gecaj, a junior studying exercise physiology, does upper body workouts. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil A SMASHING HIT To help alleviate the stress of classes, Hurricane Productions hosts a Canes Night Live event dubbed “Sit, Paint, and Smash!” where students, like first-year Uyen Dang and sophomores Diep Vu and Jess Li, smash self-decorated plates at a mobile rage room. Photo by Allie Salvucci HOLDING ON Bench pressing is a common exercise for fifth year Jake Wiater. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil 050 LIFESTYLES WELLNESS CENTER AND MENTAL WELLNESS

BALL IS LIFE On a warm night, junior Shadae Nicholas practices her shooting skills at the outdoor basketball courts of the Wellness

GREEN THUMBS Courtesy of HP’s Canes Night Live, sophomores Paris James, Liam Green, and Samuel Carter plant terrariums as a way to relax after a week of classes. Photo by Allie Salvucci STUDY BREAK In between classes, Max Dimarzo and Derec Rodriguez, both sophmores, spend their time at the Wellness Center’s gym to de-stress and burn callories. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil
051
BAKING BONANZA During a general body meeting of CommUnity Garden, president Carolina Tran and Angel Carrasquillo use freshly grown bananas to make banana bread. Photo by Sharron Lou Center. Photo by Charisma Jones

fulfilling cravings

While going to the market is seen as an opportunity to enjoy your favorite foods, that is not the only thing that people love about it. For those that want to expand their pallets and try new types of food, the market is the perfect place for them to go. As the stands with food from many different cuisines are lined next to each other, students are presented with all of the food they hoped to try that represented the diverse culture on campus.

Browsing through the food is something that members of campus look forward to each week, and it never failed. Whether customers wanted to fulfill a craving or try something new, everyone knew they would leave feeling satisfied from the Wednesday market.

SO POPULAR LA Toast workers are seen taking a breath after finally clearing their line on a Farmers’ Market Wednesday.

by Charisma Jones

052 LIFESTYLES MARKET WEDNESDAYS
Photo FRESH BITES At Miller Circle on Wednesdays, students can choose from a variety of healthy fruits to enjoy for lunch. Photo by Charisma Jones

meet at

THE MARKET

Market Wednesdays are back in full swing, and students are enjoying it

From fresh fruit and smoothies made directly in front of you, Greek delicacies, and poke bowls, many students were overwhelmed with excitement to share their favorite parts of market Wednesdays.

With a wide variety of food options available, many students and staff members felt that the best part of market Wednesdays was that they had something for everyone and every food craving. Samuel Nuñez, a freshman, shared what he looked forward to each week. “I really appreciate that they have a diverse group of options of food and drinks, so whether I want Korean food or a poke bowl, they almost always have it,” he said.

053
REFRESH YOURSELF One of the vendors present on Market Wednesdays advertises fresh made fruit drinks at Miller Circle. Photo by Charisma Jones GOOD EATS Freshmen Ryan Tornow, Quinn Davidson and Isabela Richardo enjoy freshly prepared food from the market. Photo by Charisma Jones GRAB & GO Sophomore Owen Leonard grabs a bite at Korean Kitchen at the Wednesday Farmers market. Photo by Charisma Jones STOPPING BY Junior Alexandra Berman orders from Poke Smash, a Thai vendor that is a crowd favorite. Photo by Charisma Jones MANY CUISINES Market Wednesdays take place at Miller Circle, where one of many vendors market “indianised multi cuisine.” Photo by Charisma Jones REGULAR VENDORS At Miller Circle on Wednesdays, a regular Farmers Market vendor prepares fresh fruits, vegetables, and smoothies to all who come. Photo by Charisma Jones

MUSICin the air

Lakeside Patio is the place to be to enjoy musical performances featuring student artists

With many students that were either a part of the Frost School of Music, a musical student organization or were passionate about music themselves, Patio Jams provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through this music and to entertain the bustling campus throughout the day.

Student musicians were able to perform covers of songs and, for some, even their unreleased original songs. These performances helped new musicians make their name and music known on-campus and amongst the student body. Freshman Jasmine Ortiz had the opportunity to play at one of the first Patio Jam sessions of the fall semester. “My performance was the highlight of my month. I loved playing some of my original music for a crowd of excited people. It made me more excited to finally release it,” she said.

For students and faculty that came to campus each week, Patio Jams was a notable part of their experience. With every performance held at the center of campus, freshman Deitrick Knatt discussed what listening to Patio Jams meant to him. “The sessions are a really good way for aspiring students who have passion for music. It’s a very pleasant thing to walk down the breezeway and hear good music. They make it lively during market days or just bring energy to campus all the time.”

Whether you were a spectator or performer, Patio Jams were one of the pronounced experiences that happened every week by and for students to lift their spirits.

An off campus band called REMYZ visits the UC Patio on March 23 to perform their original music live to students after their evening classes.

ON THE ROAD

TURN UP THE STEREO With a mix of instrumental players and vocalists from different school years, Jake Rosen, Gabriel Abram, Kyle Norris, Ally Moore, Jeyhan Turker, and Tea Wyse perform together as a band in front of student while they enjoy their lunches during a sunny afternoon. Photo by Martin Hidalgo MUSICAL DUO Isadora Figuera and Nanseera Wolfe, both juniors, bring a latin flare to the jam session as they rift off each other’s singing and musical skill. Photo by Danielle Tenberg BASS PRO Junior Patrick Goeghan showcases his expertise with the bass guitar while performing with the other members of his musical routine. Photo by Danielle Tenberg Photo by Mia Madrigal 054 LIFESTYLES PATIO JAMS

SHREDDING SOME STRINGS

While performing with his

band, junior Trent Jones steals the spotlight with his instrumental skills. Photo by Danielle Tenberg SHINING STARS During an evening performance, junior Jasmine Ortiz sings unreleased originals and covers with the help of her band members Aidan Arbona, Chandler Swirl, Justin Giacchetto and Marco Kellgy. Photo by Genesis Del Toro SIGN UP AND LINE UP Hurricane Productions hosts the Patio Jams event on April 28th where students login to Engage and gain access to exclusive merchandise like t-shirts and bracelets. Photo by Mia Madrigal
055
GETTING THE BAND BACK TOGETHER On April 28th, Sunny Side Up composed of Aron Stornaiuolo, Zach Levine, Nolan Slate and Jake Sonderman play at the last Patio Jams for the academic school year. Photo by Mia Madrigal

THE ROCK thats hot

Central campus marker and classic photo op became venue to community building events

One of UM’s trademark spots, The Rock, hosted a variety of events for students to meet new people and get more involved. These events were hosted by student organizations catering to the university’s diverse student population all while giving out free gifts to students.

Some of the most popular events at The Rock were hosted by groups in Greek life. Freshman Camila Escobar especially enjoyed the events through Phi Delta Epsilon, the university’s pre-medical, co-ed fraternity. Escobar commented on their “Stand for the Kids” event in support of Nicklaus Children’s Hospital, “I loved all the different activities they had to offer, like pie a phi, the raffles and giveaways of essential oils.”

The Rock also held events during Hispanic Heritage Month when clubs like The Federación de Estudiantes Cubanos (FEC) and PorColombia scouted students of all backgrounds, gave away food, and showcased their country’s music and traditions. Freshman Angelisa Fernandez recalled ,“It was nice to see my country being represented by other students and to meet people from different countries and states that were interested in the club too.”

The Rock provided an opportunity for students to integrate themselves further into the campus community through the hard work of organizations that otherwise they may not interact with, not limited to Greek life, cultural and ethnic groups, community outreach organizations, and religious groups.

056 LIFESTYLES EVENTS AT THE ROCK

THE ELEMENT At the Rock, Hurricane Productions members Mikayla Bell and Randy Cockrell, both juniors, set up a table and give out canvases and watercolors to students. Photo by Sergio Ganchala UNA FAMILIA The Federacion de Estudiantes Cubanos end ‘Week of Cuban Culture’ with a carnival where attendees play games while enjoying cafecitos and pastelitos served by organization leaders and volunteers. Students get the opportunity to showcase their heritage. Photo by Sydney Stropes ICY FUN First-year Asha Sneed and sophomore Cameron Brown serve snowcones to students participating in Phi Delta Epsilon Medical Fraternity’s ‘Stand For The Kids’ event. Photo by John Yayi Bondje PERFECT ACCESSORY At the Rock, Hurricane Productions member Mario Gordon, junior, gives kites to senior Andrea Rivera, with instructions on how to put them together. Photo by Sergio Ganchala

STANDING TOGETHER

The university community, including Student Government president Landon Coles, gather at The Rock to peacefully protest the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill that limits LGBTQ+ discussions in school settings.

057
Photo by Sharron Lou

ASTROWORLD On November 5, Travis Scott performed at his Houston Astroworld Festival where a crowd crush resulted in 10 deaths. Eight people died on the night of the concert, and two more died in the hospital over the following days including a 14-year-old boy. 25 people were treated at the hospital and over 300 were treated for injuries at the on site field hospital. Originally planned as a two-day festival celebrating Travis Scott’s third studio album of the same title, the festival was canceled after the tragedy on night one.

fall

EVENTS

The changing of the seasons brought a monumental change to the university football program. Around the world, people were protesting, setting trends and preparing for the holiday season

Photos courtesy of the Tribune News Service and News@TheU

058 LIFESTYLES FALL EVENTS

HOLLYWOOD SHOOTING A live round was discharged from a revolver used as a prop by actor Alec Baldwin accidentally killing cinematographer

Halyna Hutchins and injuring director

Joel Souza. The weapon had not been thoroughly checked for safety.

SQUID GAME The South Korean survival drama television show, Squid Game, premieres becoming a worldwide phenomenon. The limited series reached 142 million member households in it’s first month and is the most-watched show on Netflix topping viewership in 94 countries.

FREE BRITNEY After 13 years, Britney Spears’ conservatorship has ended as fans celebrate the success of the #FreeBritney movement outside the courthouse. Jami Spears will no longer control his daughter’s finances, personal life or medical decisions.

GABBY PETITO After going on a trip with her boyfrined in July, Gabby Petito’s case is finally solved. After an avid search for Petito, her remains were found on September 19 in Wyoming. Petito’s boyfriend, Brian Laundrie, having been missing was found having committed suicide and admitted to killing Petito by manual strangulation in a notebook.

CUBAN HERITAGE COLLECTION

The University of Miami Libraries

Cuban Heritage Collection hosted the fourth New Directions in Cuban Studies Conference held virtually drawing more than 50 presenters in partnership with Harvard University’s Cuba Studies Program.

GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS Nelson Dellis, a double alumnus and lecturer in the Department of Computer Science, broke the world record for the fastest time to arrange a deck of playing cards memorized underwater at the University Center Pool

UNIVERSITY GUIDE TO ART WEEK 2021

The Lowe Art Museum hosts artist Samuel Levi Jones in conversation with alumnus Dennis Scholl at the Lakeside Expo Hall. The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, the Frost School of Music, and the Lowe Art Museum co-present “Pictures at an Exhibition,” featuring the Frost Symphony Orchestra conducted by world-renowned maestro Gerard Schwarz. The Department of Art and Art History present “New Works,” featuring artwork of fine arts master’s students on display at the University of Miami Gallery in Wynwood.

MARIO CRISTOBAL At an introductory press conference, Miami’s new head football coach Mario Cristobal said the Miami Hurricanes football team will be known for its resiliency, toughness, and physicality. Cristobal comes to the University after four years as head coach at the University of Oregon, and a UM alumni.

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8

PUTTING on a show

The university community comes together to enjoy live performances by students in the theatre department

One of the many delights on campus is the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre, a fully functioning theater operated by the Theatre Arts Department. Named after the musical theatre composer and UM alumni, Jerry Herman, the Ring Theatre employed an entire technical staff that introduced students into industry quality production.

Throughout the fall semester, “The Frogs”, “Godspell” and “Into the Woods” were held in the theatre, which was a thrill for many people on campus. Whether you were a spectator, performer or crew member, everyone was able to participate in the joy that they found came with the production of each and every show. For Caleb Polsky, a senior and member of the Theatre Arts Department, he couldn’t help but gleam about watching the performance of “Into the Woods”. “This cast did a marvelous job, providing a campy and joyous show,” he said.

Many students also found that the joy-filled atmosphere went beyond attending performances, but being a performer at the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre provided some of the best memories and most beneficial experiences. Polsky, who played George Bernard Shaw in their fall performance of “The Frogs”, commented on this. “I was lucky enough to play Shaw and I could not have been prouder to work alongside the tenacious students, staff and faculty,” he said.

Whether you were a person that was only able to enjoy the Ring Theatre for one performance, or you were a theatre student that spent countless hours there, many people felt that the experience was unforgettable.

060 LIFESTYLES FALL THEATRE
TUGGING FOR THE CAPE Allegra Rosa, ‘22, and Leonardo Espinosa, ‘23, fight over the red hooded cape as Little Red and Baker in the production of Into The Woods performed at the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre. Photo by Allie Salvucci LET DOWN YOUR HAIR Junior Scarlett Diaz, who plays Rapunzel, sings from a raised platform and holds a hairbrush for her hair that extends down to the main stage. Photo by Allie Salvucci FITTING TIME Senior Christopher Milano gets his Greek inspired costume fitted for his role and performance in the fall theatre production of The Frogs. Photo by Allie Salvucci

HITTING HIGH NOTES

Junior Aden

Siegel

ON STAGE NOW

061
sings as he plays Jack in the dress rehearsal of Into The Woods at the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre. Photo by Allie Salvucci PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT The cast of The Frogs hosts a dress rehearsal for their performance. They practice to an empty auditorium in hopes to perfect their lines, movements and skills before they perform for an audience. Photo courtesy of Ring Theatre Juniors Tobi Baisburd, Emily Song, Jenna Robinson, Julia DeSimone, and seniors Penelope Hinds, Chloe Friedman, Luciana Ragolia, and Brooke Hall perform a rendition of Godspell in the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre . Photo by Jennifer Vega LETS SING TOGETHER Tobi Baisburd, Jenna Robinson, Emily Song, Brooke Hall, Julia DeSimone, Penelope Hinds, Emilia Torello, Luciana Ragolia, and Greta Hicks gather in a circle and sing a song from the musical Godspell. Photo by Jennifer Vega

rise of the

LIVING DEAD

With the safety guideline in mind, students were spend their Halloween partaking in various event both on and off campus

As COVID-19 cases started slowing down, the traditional celebrations during Halloween made its way back to the area. With so many different ways to enjoy the holiday, students took advantage of the opportunities to celebrate in the way that sounded the best for them.

There was an array of activities both on and off campus, so students found what piqued their interest the most. In downtown Miami, events such as Club Space’s three-day Hocus Pocus Halloween weekend, the Wicked Wharf and Bodega in Euphoria took place throughout Halloween weekend. On campus, student organizations kept the Halloween spirit alive with events like Canes Night Live’s Halloween town, UBS, Halloween Thump and the Rocky Horror Picture Show events.

While there were many events to

partake in in the area, there were some that students felt were worth traveling for. In Key West, there were many festivities on Duval Street, which were known for being iconic. As more people traveled to Fantasy Fest compared to before, some of the largest celebrations were canceled. The festival was still met with large crowds, so much so that it changed the way they operated. Key West City Manager Patti McLaughlin shared, “We’ve closed the street earlier than we have in the past.”

Halloween weekend was about spending time with friends and having a good time for the holiday, which is exactly what everyone did. Whether students traveled far, went downtown or even stayed on campus to celebrate, they found that the festivities were never a disappointment.

HALLOWEEN PICNIC

Members from both the Video Games Club and SpectrUM huddled together at the IM Fields for their collaborative picnic where they played board games, painted pumpkins, and made edible mud cups.

MUSIC AND FRIGHTS

While dressed as Buzz Lightyear and a mermaid respectfully, juniors Marissa Hones and Natalie Blahnik

062
LIFESTYLES HALLOWEEN
LOVIN’ THESE FITS All dressed as the famous god of love Cupid, first-years Alyssa Longo, Ashley Irvine, and Lauren Ohmacht pose for photos in Hecht McDonald. Photo by Alyssa Longo BUMP IN THE NIGHT At the Halloween picnic collaboration with Video Games Club and SpectrUM, sophomores Mia Rivas and Sam Hindshelped set up the planned events while in their costumes. Photo by Spencer Bailen Photo by Spencer Bailen celebrated their Halloween night in vibrant Wynwood at a local block party. Photo by Natalie Blahnik BUMP IN THE NIGHT Sophomores Charisma Jones and Maggie Coughlin leave Hurricane Production’s showing of Rocky Horror Picture Show dressed as two of the characters. Photo by Addison Becker

SPOOKYdecorations

In theme with the Halloween spirit, several locations on campus were furnished with inseason knickknacks

GAINS AND SCARES

The entrance at the Herbert Wellness Center gym was decked out with themed trinkets like hanging cobwebs, jack-o-lantern pails, and orange streamers.

TAKE IF YOU DARE

At the Mahoney Pearson dining hall near the doors, students were greeted with Halloween signs that guarded a bowl at the center full of

candy

treats. Photo by John

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Photo by John Yayi- Bondje tasty and Yayi-Bondje LA CATRINA For Dia De Los Muertos, senior Valeria Feliciano was dressed to impress while helping a local SFX student makeup artists with a sugar skull makeup photo shoot. Photo by Valeria Feliciano PUPPIES TO THE RESCUE UPup trainers, seniors Brook Boyd and Sofia Gonzalez, are accompanied by their dogs, Sargeant and Farley. They were set up outside the Shalala Student Center to greet students in their cute costumes at their “Smooch A Pooch” stand for Halloween day celebrations. Photo by Sergio Pizarro

BRINGING THE

we’re beat back

Honored and anticipated Hurricane Homecoming traditions were back after previous elebrations were canceled because of the pandemic regulations

064 LIFESTYLES HOMECOMING Design by Carolina Camus LIGHT UP THE SKY After the traditional boat burning ceremony, a 20 minute firework display takes place over Lake Osceola. The fireworks include green, orange, white and gold colors. Photo by Sergio Ganchala
065

THE WEEK UPopening

Homecoming made its return after a year of no celebrations due to the COVID-19 pandemic

With dance performances, celebrations, and snacks, the Monday morning homecoming opening ceremony undeniably brought the beat back. Not only did the energy during the ceremony get everyone excited for what was yet to come, but it also set the trend for the whole week of festivities.

The Hurricane Homecoming Committee (HEC) started homecoming week off with a bang. They began on-site preparations early and were proud to watch as students partook in the activities. UCheer and Sunsations dance teams performed at the Lakeside stage. Students also enjoyed an appearance from Sebastian, a balloon artist, video games, bracelet making, and an array of food options. As campus transformed and spirit was undeniably ever present, students had their first opportunity to show off their love for the university and the communities they built.

Members of the committee knew that they had to make it the best they possibly could, as it was the first year without any precautions in a long time. Ishaan Shah, HEC member, described the experience, “After two years of being at home, we were pressured to bring Homecoming back. It was stressful getting everything setup, but the payoff was unreal. I saw everyone get swept up, along with us, in the excitement. ”While most Mondays tended to drag on a little too long, planners of homecoming week knew that the first day had to truly make moves. From the various events, entertainment and food, there was something for every person on campus and it truly kicked off the week.

066 LIFESTYLES HOMECOMING
GET HYPE The brass section of the Frost Band of the Hour perform their own rendition of the Alma Mater for students during the Homecoming theme reveal. Photo by Jared Lennon RAISE YOUR FLAGS Guard and Frost Band of the Hour perform together during the Homecoming theme reveal and celebration at the Lakeside Patio. Photo by Jared Lennon A SPECIAL CELEBRATION SONG Student Jenna Earhart sings an orginal song at the Homecoming opening ceremony Photo by Genesis Del Toro

As the upcoming weeks events were being announced, the UCheer team performed small routines to get the crowd on their feet and excited for what was to come.

HOMECOMING 2021

timeline

THEME: BRING THE BEAT BACK

opening ceremonies

NOV. 1

The Homecoming Executive Committe, ODK, and other orgs kicked off Homecoming by hosting various performances, giving out free food, and playing live music.

spirit day

NOV. 1

All UM students were invited to show off their best ‘Canes gear as they celebrated the begining of Homecoming week with various acitivties to partake in.

NOV.1 board competition

Teams composed of different organizations created album covers that represented their organizations and experiences at UM. They will later be put on the Spirit Tree.

067
Photo by Genesis Del Toro The Homecoming committee set up a tent of free food for students to enjoy. They had a long line of students waiting for donuts and fried Oreos. Photo by Genesis Del Toro Sebastian the Ibis throws up the 'U' during the Homecoming theme reveal and celebration at the Lakeside Patio on Sept. 10, alongside the UCheer team. Photo by Jared Lennon SINGING MY SONG During opening ceremony for Homecoming week, student Jordi Polycarpe sang one of her new songs titled ‘Mwen Vle Ou.' Photo by Genesis Del Toro

ROYALTY has arrived

The Homecoming court compete for one of the four royalty crowns that are up for grabs

During the first evening of homecoming week, students went to-to-toe competing for the coveted positions of campus royalty. As they walked the runway, they were bolstered by the pride from the organizations they represented, as well as support from the other students and staff that attended.

For many students, even those that weren’t up for court, the crowning of king and queen was their favorite part of the weeklong festivities. The ceremony began with performances from each candidate, and ended with the royalty being anounced. Participant Senior Bao Duong discussed why this was his favorite event. “My favorite homecoming event is the King and Queen Pageant. I love how everyone put themselves out there to compete and it was great seeing organizations cheer on their representatives and org members.”

While all the students enjoyed that evening, it was especially special for the crowned king and queen. Senior Ari Mubanda, the Homecoming Queen, shared how the experience touched her. “Sharing that moment with everyone around me, especially my mom, dad and grandma, was so special. I created beautiful memories alongside my royal court and the Homecoming Executive Committee. We laughed, cried, danced, and bonded with fellow canes,” she said.

While the Homecoming King and Queen Pageant was only the first night of homecoming week, it was the perfect event to kick off homecoming and participants were proud to cheer on their fellow students their organizations on stage.

068 LIFESTYLES HOMECOMING
THE WHOLE CREW IS HERE The entire winning Homecoming court celebrate with their friends and peers after being announced winners and given their regalia. Photo by Allie Salvucci FRIENDS SUPPORT ROYAL FRIENDS Junior Hugo Mijares-Bracho and other students shows off hand-made poster in support of their friends who are competing. Photo by Allie Salvucci THE ROYAL COURT Ari Mubanda, senior, is crowned Homecoming Queen and is gifted flowers by Sebastian the Ibis. Photo by Allie Salvucci PERFORMING TO WIN THE CROWN Seniors Sonia Singh and Drew Goheen do a skit together as their individual talent pieces that they must complete in order to be considered for the crown. Photo by Allie Salvucci

king & queen pageant

NOV. 1

The Homecoming Court finalists were judged on their spirit and talent. A Homecoming King, Queen, Prince, and Princess were then officially elected.

spirit tree

NOV. 2

The Spirit Tree is the only orange tree on campus. Different organizations presented ornaments to hang on the tree as all students are invited to watch and cheer.

help the hometown

NOV. 2

The Homecoming Committe, partnering with many other organizations, collects and builds care-packages as a way to support Miami-based veterans.

organized cheer

NOV. 3

Different organizations are invited to re-create skits based off of some of the most iconic moments in University of Miami history. They are then awarded points.

069
COMPETITIVE GROUP The final eight candidates for King, Queen, Prince, and Princess line up and prepare for the begining of the poise round of the competition. Photo by John Yayi Bondje BOW DOWN Seniors Corey Jones and Ari Mubanda look out to the crowd of students as they are crowned Homecoming King and Queen. Photo by Allie Salvucci

LIFESTYLES HOMECOMING

070
GOT MOVES During O-Cheer the United Black Students, channeling the early 2000s, performed on Lakeside Patio and won Second Place. Photo by Charisma Jones FOODIE To purchase food at a food truck, sophomore Fernanda Salas uses a $10 food voucher that she received during Homecoming week by attending other events. Photo by Allie Salvucci GROOVY KAOS Co-Ed Hip Hop Dance Team performed at O-Cheer on Lakeside Patio on day four of Homecoming week. Photo by Charisma Jones SPIRIT TREE Association of Commuter Students representatives hang their org ornament on the Spirit Tree. Photo courtesy of UM Homecoming ALL SMILES Immediately after O-Cheer concluded, Federación de Estudiantes Cubanos was declared third place winners and President Syndey Stropes, class of 2023, celebrates with Sebastian the Ibis. Photo by Charisma Jones

FOR A WEEK fun events

From food trucks to fireworks, Homecoming week is full of very different events for current and past ‘Canes to enjoy on campus

Homecoming featured a week full of events that allowed students to show their pride for their university through a myriad of ways. The Homecoming Executive Committee coordinated these efforts through creativity and hard work, and it was the best time of the semester for most students and alumni.

While the large events were beloved by many, there were a lot of students that loved to participate in the smaller events during their free time. Some highlights included Pancakes with Pat, Donuts with Duerk, Spirit Tree competition, Trivia Tuesday at the Rat and an organized cheer competition on the Lakeside patio.

The Butler Center for Service and Leadership also led a service-based event, Hurricanes Help the Hometown, where students supported different Community Partners. Providing service to the community was an essential part of celebrating Homecoming. Meera Patel, a senior on the Homecoming Executive Committee, helped plan the event. “I was one of the committee chairs for Hurricanes Help the Hometown and I love seeing that people are able to experience homecoming and embrace the ‘Cane spirit.” Patel’s favorite part of homecoming came from expressing her love for her university through singing a familiar tune. “My favorite activity is singing the alma mater loud and proud next to my closest friends.”

Every day, there was a new activity to partake in, food to try or fellow students to meet at the Homecoming Committee’s carefully planned events. Homecoming week was surely a vibrant, energetic week for all who participated.

alma mater

NOV. 4

Some of the best student volcalists on campus take the stage and compete by singing their own rendition of the Alma Mater. They are awarded points.

NOV. 5 block party

Past and present ‘Canes and their families are invited to enjoy various live performances, games and art displays before Hurricane Howl commences.

NOV. 5 food trucks

All members of the University of Miami community are invited to enjoy various food trucks on the Foote Green. Most trucks are from local Miami businesses.

5 award ceremony

NOV.

A ceremony is held before the Boat Burning that announces the winners of all Homecoming competitions. President Frenk and Dr. Whitely speak to all students.

071
TRICKY GAME Matthew McConnell ‘24, Sydney Cloutier ‘24 and Inge Brijker ‘25 discuss methods to guess the number of jelly beans in the jar at the Association of Commuter Students’ table at the Homecoming org festival held on the Foote Green . Photo by Allie Salvucci SWEET REUNION Alumni Party Desai ‘19, Michael Warrell ‘20, Anoop Desai ‘19, and Kyle Mastoloni ‘19 pose with one of the UM mascots at the Alumni event. Photo by Allie Salvucci

we’ve got some

HURRICANE PRIDE

Hurricane Howl is the most cherished Homecoming tradition at the university. It is a night where current and past ‘Canes gather around Lake Osceola to enjoy traditions that make the ‘U’ unique

HOMECOMING

072 LIFESTYLES
Design BURNING BRIGHT UM orange and green fireworks lit up the sky on the Friday of Homecoming week over Lake Osceola during and after the Boat Burning ceremony. Photo by Sergio Ganchala

TIME WITHloved ones

Students

FAMILY TIME Senior Christina Davison sits with her family to watch the Burning Boat Ceremony and the fireworks. Photo by Allie Salvucci

LAST HOCO Seniors

Azul Alvarado-Dadin and Bella Bramell find a spot at the bottom of the steps by Lake Osceola to sit and enjoy their last Homecoming at the university.

Photo by Allie Salvucci

boat burning

NOV. 5

The Boat Burning is the most popular tradition at UM. Thousands of past and present ‘Canes gather around Lake Osceola. During this time, a boat is intentionally sunk, and tradition states that if the mast falls before the boat sinks, UM will win the Homecoming football game. The ‘Canes went on to beat Georgia Tech 33-30.

NOV. 5 fireworks

After the Boat Burning, a firework display takes place. Fireworks are placed in the center of Lake Osceloa, and on top of all residential college buildings. The firework display lasts approximately 15 minutes, and is the final celebration before Homecoming week ends.

miami vs. georgia tech

NOV.

6

As tradition rang true, the Hurricanes football team beat Georgia Tech at Hard Rock Stadium 33-30. Even as rain poured down on the field, nothing could stop the ‘Canes football team from defending their home turf.

073
spent time with their friends and families as they enjoyed the firework show on the lake
SWEET TREAT FreshmAn Alexis Owens gets ice cream from the Cold Stone food truck before the Hurricane Howl fireworks. Photo by Allie Salvucci NIGHT TIME FUN Freshmen Tiffany Ortner, Caity MacWilliams, Abby Pinkerton, and Sam Miller are all smiles as they wait for the the Boat Burning ceremony and fireworks to start. Photo by Allie Salvucci VINTAGE ‘CANE MERCH On Homecoming Friday, Lakeside Village hosted an exposition of different jerseys, football tickets, signed photos, and memorabilia from past years of ‘Canes football for students and alumni to admire and learn about. Photo by Sergio Ganchala

it's

to be

074 LIFESTYLES HOMECOMING
MIAMI
great
A hurricane AN EXPENSIVE DISPLAY Because Homecoming is so important to UM tradition, the university spends a large amount of money on the impressive firework display over Lake Osceola. On average, the cost of a small scale firework display can cost $10,000 to $25,000. Photo by Sergio Ganchala
The
week of Homecoming served as a reminder to ‘Canes old and new that the University of Miami will always be their second home
075

a moment to say

THANK YOU

As the fall semester comes to a close, students travel near and far to return home to family and friends

With the semester ending and finals just around the corner, Thanksgiving break was a time for students to relax with family and friends, and recharge before returning to campus. However, Thanksgiving was much different than the previous year, as many students were able to reunite and spend time with loved ones.

With a large number of out-ofstate and international students, many people traveled to spend the holiday away from campus.

Sophomore Katerina Lomis traveled to visit family. “My family visited my brother in South Carolina because he couldn’t make it back home due to work circumstances,” she said.

Similarly, Sophomore Carla Puliti, saw her brother in Washington, D.C. as he flew back from London. “It was the best part of my break and I used most of my time to hang out with him,” said Puliti. While many students left, some local students stayed in Miami to be with family, and others made it their newfound home by celebrating Thanksgiving nearby with friends. Junior Gemellaro, who worked for the football team, spent the holiday with other people a part of the team that also couldn’t make it home.

“We had to fl y out that Friday to play Duke so I couldn’t go home this year, but I got to relax and watch football with friends,” he said.

University of Miami students take advantage of every chance to experience the world around them. On week long breaks, many students find themselves traveling to different states, and even some to other countries to experience the different cultures the world has to offer. By doing so, we strive to be more culturally aware ‘Canes.

076 LIFESTYLES
THANKSGIVING BREAK
international travel
ADVENTURES Inside the Centro las Plazas mall in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, sophomore Mia Rivas stands next to a sign with the state’s name while visiting family for the break. Photo by Mia Rivas BROADWAY LIGHTS Ainsley Vetter, a sophpmore, walks the busy streets of New York City after attending the theater and watching the award winning musical, Hamilton, which was released in 2015 and written by Lin Manuel Miranda. Photo by Shea Halpenny AUTUMN LEAVES Lauren Ledon, sophmore, poses for pictures amid the changing colors of the fall season. Photo by Shea Halpenny
077
‘CANE FOR LIFE Sophomore Carissa Niccoli brings the ‘U’ to Tallahassee as she visits friends at Florida State University. Photo courtesy of Carissa Niccoli PICTURE PERFECT Senior Amrutha Chethikattil enjoys a picnic at the park in her hometown of Arizona. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil OUTDOOR EXPLORING Senior Amrutha Chethikattil enjoys hiking with her friends and family during Thanksgiving break. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil COUNTRY BEACH CONCERT Junior Ellen Otterbach enjoys the country music festival, Tortuga, on the beaches of Fort Lauderdale over the Thanksgiving break. Photo by Shea Halpenny SEEING SNOW ON BREAK Christopher Perez, junior, spends his Thanksgiving break in Utah where he experiences heavy amounts of snow throughout the week. Photo by Christopher Perez

BETTY WHITE DIES Just weeks before her 100th birthday, Betty White passed away leaving a legacy unlike any other not only with her roles including Golden Girls, Hot in Cleveland and countless more but also being one of the first female producers in Hollywood.

JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE The James Webb Space Telescope, a collaboration among NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Canadian Space Agency, successfully enters orbit at its target destination, about 930,000 miles from Earth.

SUPREME COURT NOMINATION

President Biden nominates Ketanji Brown Jackson citing her as having historical perspective, wisdom and character. This comes after Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement on January 27.

DON’T SAY GAY BILL The Forida Senate passed the bill that bans public school districts from teaching about sexual orientation or gender identity in kindergarten through the third grade, causing debate within the state. The bill passed the Republicancontrolled Senate 22-17, and passed the Republican-controlled state House two weeks earlier 69-47.

OMICRON SURGE A town hall held virtually allowed the University community to get more information about the necessity of modifications to the start of the spring semester, which begins remotely on Jan. 18 resuming in-person instruction on Jan. 31 after two weeks.

TABITHA BROWN Student Government’s “What Matters to U” agency hosted Tabitha Brown, the social media personality, bestselling author, actress, entrepreneur, and vegan discussing self-acceptance, wellness, representation, and how feeding the soul is key.

CENTER FOR GLOBAL BLACKS STUDIES

President Frenk opens the Center for Global Black Studies with codirectors Donette Francis and Jafari Allen. The center serves as a unifying platform to assist in the coordination of initiatives that address structural racism and inequalities throughout society.

NEW RECITAL HALL A ceremonial signing of a steel beam marked a major milestone in the construction of a new 25,000 square foot state-ofthe-art performance and technology center at the University of Miami Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music. The Knight Center for Music Innovation, currently under construction along Lake Osceola, will transform music education through musical performance and experimentation.

078 LIFESTYLES WINTER EVENTS JAN 24
MAR
DEC
FEB 25
7
31
FEB 8
JAN
FEB 28 MAR 3
11

UKRAINE INVASION After building up troops at the Russia-Ukraine border for weeks, at dawn on the morning of February 24, Russia’s president Vladimir Putin launches full scale invasion of Ukraine by land, air and sea in a major escalation of the Russo-Ukrainian War that was started in 2014 by Russia. This war caused the largest refugee crisis since World War II causing eight million people to flee and a third of the population to be displaced from their homes in Ukraine.

winter EVENTS

As winter arrived, students prepared for their travels back home after the fall semester concluded. The new season brought tragedy, entertainment and new COVID-19 spikes across the world. Students overcame all challenges and united as one Photos courtesy of the Tribune News Service and News@TheU

079

WINTER BREAK

080
LIFESTYLES
GETTING ICY Senior Caitlin Herondale skates in at Millennium Park in Chicago, a winter tradition for the Windy City. Photo courtesy of Caitlin Herondale WORK AND PLAY Senior Danielle Tenberg works at the Duke’s Mayo Bowl as field media in North Carolina. Photo courtesy of Danielle Tenberg NORTHERN ANGEL Senior Lily Waxman spread her snow angel wings in Big Sky, Montana. Photo courtesy of Lily Waxman SWINGING THROUGH THE ART Junior Sophia Emanuel visits Design Miami on a night out during Art Basel. Photo courtesy of Sophia Emanuel SNOW SPORTING Sophomore Ainsley Vetter hits the slopes this winter break skiing in Colorado. Photo courtesy of Ainsley Vetter HITTING THE SLOPES Junior Christopher Perez visits Park City Utah with his family, and spends his vacation time skiing blue level slopes on the mountain. Photo by Christopher Perez

THE WAYS WE

winter break

Students chose to spend their winter and holiday break doing what they thought was the best use of their time

Everyone has a unique definition as to what a productive break looked like with some taking classes, participating in internships or working. However, after a long semester of diligent work, other students found that a productive break was one that focused on doing things that sparked joy. Taking personal time with loved ones was important for many ‘Canes. Sophomore Simone Lantier enjoyed the break in her hometown, “I spent time with my family and hung out with friends at each other’s homes. I also celebrated the holidays with my family, which I always love.” Senior Nicolas Alvarez spent his time similarly as he flew to Guatemala City, “My family and I went to our beach house and the mountains, we ate good food, and enjoyed each other’s company.”

Some students did a little of both, taking advantage of the extra free time between family events to get ahead academically. Alvarez comments on this dynamic, “Online classes were difficult because I was home with a three hour time difference from Miami so the hours were hard, but my friends at home were also taking classes so it was like a shared online college experience.”

The student body had diverse interests and needs creating equally diverse winter break experiences.

081
A VERY COLLEGE DAY Junior Mark Robrowski takes a photo with Bar Stool President Dave Portnoy before the FSU vs Miami basketball game. Photo by Mark Robrowski HOME GAME Sophomore Kyra Earley sits centerfield for a New York Giants game at MetLife Stadium. Photo courtesy of Kyra Earley A BEACHY WINTER Freshmen Makayda Brown and Asha Sneed enjoy the Florida winter on South Beach as they become tourists for the day. Photo by Asha Sneed

CULTURE embracing

Black, Asian, and Hispanic cultures are highlighted through events and celebrations during the year

Several opportunities for students to become more involved with the school and the community were provided. In particular, were cultural organizations, where students could join, make friends and learn about the different cultures present in their own life and on campus.

United Black Students (UBS), an organization dedicated to exposing all members of the community to the facets of African American culture, was very active by hosting discussions about racial injustice in America, challenging food insecurity in black communities and implementing many initiatives during Black History Month.

The Asian American Students Association (AASA), an organization promoting the awareness of Asian culture and the Asian American identity, welcomed many new members. Junior Mintra Putlek, a new member, was extremely grateful for her involvement in AASA. “It has changed my entire experience on campus,” said Putlek. She further explained, “It helped me gain perspective about my own identity as an Asian-American and validated experiences that I previously felt were isolating.”

Some Hispanic students expressed feelings of gratitude and inclusion as a result of joining organizations like the Alliance of Latin American Students (ALAS) and the Federaci n de Estudiantes Cubanos (FEC). Freshman Maui Candela stated, “Being in FEC has rekindled the connection between myself and the Cuban culture I’m a part of. Until FEC, I didn’t really have a true appreciation for my roots.”

Whether you identified with one of these cultures, or some combination of them, there were student organizations with the intention to provide a safe space to learn about each culture.

082
LIFESTYLES CAMPUS CULTURE TRADITIONAL TREATS At the end of the first Asian American Students Association general body meeting, sophomore Nicholas Tong hands out taro flavored boba. Photo by Charisma Jones LOVELY LANTERNS Sophomore Charisma Jones releases her lantern into the water at the Lantern Festival. Photo by Allie Salvucci STEP BY STEP Sophomore Lia Mussie and Junior Geethika Kataru pose at the 360 video experience at the Students of Color Symposium. Photo by Sharron Lou INSPIRING WORDS Guest speaker Raymond Santana discusses empowerment and social justice with senior moderators Victor Rios and Caleb Taylor. Photo by Sharron Lou
083
QUIZ QUESTIONS At the start of Hispanic Heritage Month, Eaton Residential Assistant Demaris Zamudio-Galvan holds an event in the lobby celebrating Hispanic culture. Photo by Charisma Jones FOLLOWING ALONG The Federacion de Estudiantes Cubanos hosts a bachata dance workshop for students to attend at the Wellness Center. At the workshop, students learn basic Hispanic dances. Photo by Farha Reshamwala WITH THE DRUMS At the 10th annual Lunar New Year event, a lion dance performance by an off-campus group takes place on Lakeside Patio for students to watch. Photo by Sharron Lou
084 LIFESTYLES INTERNATIONAL WEEK
BEAUTIFUL BOUQUETS At European Night hosted by the Council of International Students and Organizations, student Adrianna Marrero is taught how to make flower crowns representing Greece as one of the many activations that night. Photo by Sharron Lou CHECK-IN Junior Mona Abuzahra runs the check-in stand with a friend for Latin-American Night where students can learn about Latin American countries. Photo by Sharron Lou FESTIVE Traditional Mexican decorations are hung at the Lakeside Patio for Latin-American Night. Photo by Sharron Lou

TREASURE international

COISO presents International Week with nights for different parts of the world including Latin America and Europe

085
Design by Giselle Spicer SPIN TO WIN! Senior Lizeth Camacho Lopez and graduate student Michel Pinard introduce Latin American flags with an interactive game to teach students about different countries. Photo by Sharron Lou WORLD TASTES Experiencing new foods, senior Dina Sarwani enjoys Montenegran staples. Photo by Sharron Lou GETTING CRAFTY Students attending COISO’s International week create make hand-crafted, original masks made of jewels on Latin-American Night. Photo by Sharron Lou SPORTS FAN Junior Arnaldo Ferrebus explains soccer to participating students. Photo by Sharron Lou LEARN Senior Kunal Hanchate teaches students about European flags as they travel through European activities. Photo by Sharron Lou GEOGRAPHY Freshman Inge Brijker runs game stand for Latin-American Night, a part of COISO’s International Week. Photo by Sharron Lou

GROUP SHOT Once DragOut ended and the audience members were exiting, all the performers, both students and professionals, along with the volunteers gather at the back of the stage to commemorate the work they put into the event with most of the people preparing for the event since the early morning with set up, sound check, dress reharsal and more.

BEHIND

curtains

IN BETWEEN Tiffany Fantasia also works as the MC with the help of a script made by SpectrUM’s president Nathaly Gonzalez, although that didn’t stop Tiffany from putting her own twist on things.

ASK AWAY SpectrUM hosts a panel with a professional drag king, Spikey Van Dykie, and two drag queens, Tiffany Fantasia and CC Glitzer, with sophomore Veronica Geoghegan moderating. Photo by Ryan Hires

to the song Tequila by The

as

a subtle, yet fun

TEN OUT OF TEN Dr. Andrew Porter, Dr. John Clochesy, Dr. Barbara Hoffman and Dr. Claire Oueslati-Porter spend their night judging student performers and deciding the winners of DragOut 2022.

Photo by Emma Gladden STEPPING UP TO THE CHALLENGE Stracey Aurelien, Yoland Victor, Cidnee Lassiter, Kyana Brown, Andaiye Gibson and Natalia Gonzalez practice their Hurricane Steppers dance routine before the show outside the green room. Photo by Allie Salvucci SPOTLIGHT TIME Feminist Flight Club composed of Lauren Colaco, Kat Cocson, Tram Huynh, Bradon Zhang and Kate Ortner finish with a dance to a K-pop song, MONEY by Lisa. Photo by Allie Salvucci
From backstage help to event planning, SpectrUM members were busy preparing for a night of glitter, heels and excitement
Photo by Emma Gladden STRIDING DOWN THE CATWALK While dancing Champs, Adrianna Marrero Jack Hauff gives musical number. Photo by Emma Gladden IN THE ACT During her time on stage, student drag queen Inita Man brings the audience to the stage by dancing with faculty member Vannessa Kania. Photo by Emma Gladden MUSICAL AIR As the drag queen Mary Poppers, sophomore David Caldarella plays a violin rendition of Material Girl by Madonna. Photo by Allie Salvucci
LIFESTYLES
Photo by Emma Gladden
086
DRAGOUT

RISING from the ashes

The annual event hosted by SpectrUM raises money for the LGBTQ+ community amid glitter, elaborate costumes, dancing and song

The DragOut event, hosted by student organization SpectrUM, brought the art of drag to campus, allowing members of the LGBTQ communities and allies to express themselves. Famous drag queens, kings and students put on drag and performed in typical drag fashion: with lip-syncing to songs and overthe-top dancing. The stage was set up in the Shalala ballroom for performances and fundraising for both SpectcrUM and SAGE, a non-profit organization that supported elderly people in the LGBTQ community.

Participants and organizers of the event spoke about the intent of holding DragOut. Sam Hinds, a sophomore and the Secretary for SpectrUM, said DragOut “helps educate students, but also let’s queer students know that they’re not alone and helps them find a sense of community.” Hinds, along with the rest of SpectrUM, provided students with the opportunity to explore their sexuality and identity, helping them build bonds with other queer students.

The DragOut event was intended to create a safe space for queer and non-queer students to express themselves with colorful outfits, artful makeup and styled wigs. Sophomore David Caldarella, drag name Mary Poppers, also spoke about his experience as a performer at the event. “DragOut is a showcase of talent, a spot for all sorts of performers to share their skills in front of a supportive audience,” he said. DragOut was known as an event full of self-expression for performers, a facet of entertainment for peers and an opportunity to raise money for charities.

COLORFULLY COMING OUT

After entering the stage with a black dress, CC Glitzer reveals her proud-to-bepride outfit with applause from the audience.

PACKED

TO THE MAX A wide variety of students fill the seats in the Shalala Grand Ballroom to witness the first live performance of DragOut after two years since the start of the pandemic. Photo by Emma Gladden
087
Photo by Allie Salvucci

THE YEARtrends of

The top takeaways from social media, fashion, movie and music trends that were all

CROSSBODY BAG

Almost like a fanny pack with a longer strap, men have been wearing crossbody bags to house their belongings as opposed to pockets.

for the office, blazers are now brunch attire paired with a crop top and either a matching pant, jeans, or shortsblazers are a versitile jacket for an occasion that needs a little dressing up.

AIR FORCE 1S The classics are back with the all-white Air Force 1’s by Nike - a staple for anyone’s wardrobe taking over from the previously trendy Adidas Superstars.

CUFFED JEANS & TALL SOCKS No one ever gets to see socks, so we are showing them off cuffing jeans and wearing tall socks usually paired with high top shoes.

CORSETS Worn under dresses a century ago, structured corset tops are now another version of a crop top either paired over another shirt, dress, or worn under a nice jacket.

TENNIS SKIRT Pleated tennis skirts are popular in white and pastel colors for a casual day out or a nice lunch with the ability to be dressed up or down.

088 LIFESTYLES TRENDS
the hype

WORDLE People across the globe tune into wordle.com where every day there is a new fiveletter word to find within six guesses.

OLIVIA RODRIGO The newest pop sensation, Olivia Rodrigo, completed her SOUR album tour and brings the style of the early 2000’s back.

VIRAL ON TIKTOK

ABOUT DAMN TIME Lizzo promoted a trending dance to a portion of her hit single ‘About Damn Time’ in preparation of her sophomore album Special.

Photo courtesy of TikTok

the multiverse

Hollywood takes a dive into the multiverse exploring parallel lives

SPIDERMAN: NO WAY HOME Tobey

McGuire and Andrew Garfield reprise their roles as Spiderman, joining Tom Holland and blending the Spiderverses.

EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE Michelle

Yeoh and Stephanie Hsu are mother and daughter connected to every universe in this stoy of existentialism.

DR. STRANGE: INTO THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS

Dr. Strange meets a girl who can travel across universes in an attempt to save the multiverse from destruction.

JIGGLE JIGGLE Louis

Theroux’s comedic rap ‘My Money Don’t Jiggle Jiggle’ goes viral after Jess Qualter and Brooke Blewitt create a TikTok dance to the lyrics.

TikTok

SALMON BOWL Emily Mariko goes viral with her salmon bowl made of leftover salmon, rice, sriracha, soy sauce, kewpie mayo, kimchi, and seaweed to scoop. Photo courtesy of TikTok

BAD REDESIGN Emily

Zugay creates a series of redesigning brand logos satirically leading to several brands using her designs as profile pictures. Photo courtesy of TikTok

NOODLES THE PUG Like the weather, people check on 14-year-old pug Noodles every morning to see if he sits up determining, if we have a Bones Day or No Bones Day.

Photo courtesy of TikTok

089
Photo courtesy of
@LIZZO @JESSQUALTER @EMILYMARIKO @EMILYZUGAY @JONGRAZ

UVALDE SHOOTING On May 24, 2022 an 18-year-old walked into Robb Elementary with an AR-15 style rifle in Uvalde, Texas killing 17 children and two teachers. This is the third deadliest shooting in US history and the largest in Texas. The closure of the school and a call for gun control resulted from the event. The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act was signed in the wake of the event implementing several changes to the mental health system, school safety programs, and gun safety laws.

EVENTS

With the arrival of spring came an influx of news, trends and headlines. Students kicked off the spring semester and seniors prepared to graduate while news was breaking all over the world

Photos courtesy of the Tribune News Service and News@TheU

090 LIFESTYLES SPRING EVENTS
spring

MAY 2

ROE V WADE In the wake of the leaked draft of a Supreme Court opinion that would overturn the right to an abortion established in the landmark Roe v. Wade decision of 1973, protesters on both sides of the issue squared off in front of the nation’s highest court.

MAR 29

PITBULL ON CAMPUS As part of the Student Government’s What Matters

To U speaker series, Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, and record producer Pitbull encouraged students to work hard, take risks, and “live for the moment.”

MAY 8

FORMULA 1 MIAMI The inagural Miami Grand Prix was held at the Hard Rock Stadium, stamping Miami as a permanent location in global Formula 1 racing and gathering celebrities from all over the world to South Florida with Dutch racer Max Verstappen winning the weekend.

JUNE 1

DEPP-HEARD CASE The defamation

Johnny Depp brought against his ex-wife Amber Heard concludes after two months of public trial. The verdict deemed Depp the winner of the case being awarded $15 million. Depp was also found guilty of one of three counterclaims from Heard in which he is to pay $2 million in compensation.

APR 1

JUNE 11

GAS PRICES For the first time in United States history, the average gas prices nationwide topped $5 a gallon due to increasing inflation rates.

APR 1

EARTH MONTH To kick off the University’s Earth Month celebration, the Student Government Environment and Conservation Organization (ECO) turned to three members of South Florida’s Indigenous communities, inviting them to the Coral Gables Campus to discuss how their culture informs their environmental advocacy. Serving on the panel at Indigenous Voices in Climate Action were Betty Osceola, a member of the Panther Clan of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida Rev. Houston Cypress, a member of the Otter Clan of the Miccosukee Tribe Dante Blais-Billie, a member of the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

MAY 18

CANCER

CENTER FUND Florida

UKRAINIAN AID Ukrainian doctoral

flutist Dmytro Gnativ and the Frost School of Music present musical selections featuring faculty members along with students, alumni, and special guest artistic director Marina Radiushina—to raise money for humanitarian aid for Ukraine, Gnativ’s home country, amid war against Russia where his family still resides.

Governor Ron DeSantis announced the passage of a record $100 million in funding for research and care at the state’s top three cancer centers, including Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center—which received a NCI designation from the National Cancer Institute three years ago.

091

092 LIFESTYLES SPRING BREAK

SEEING RED Diego Huerta, Daniel Fernandez, Christopher Perez and Jose Haro spend spring break in Miami and visit some of the most popular restaurants in the heart of the city. Photo courtesy of Christopher Perez BEACH BUDDIES Abby Gendell and Catherine Pasquella take in a colorful sunset at the beach. Photo courtesy of Shea Halpenny A HIGHER ALTITUDE Asha Sharma travels to South America hiking through the mountains of Peru. Photo courtesy of Asha Sharma ABROAD FOR BREAK Sergio Ganchala spends his spring break abroad and visits the Lego store during his time at Cardiff University. Photo by Sergio Ganchala COLD BREAK Julia Rauton heads to colder climates for break to participate in winter sports. Photo courtesy of Julia Rauton OCEAN ADVENTURES Isabella Turco finds a shark while diving in the ocean with a friend during her break. Photo courtesy of Isabella Turco

SPORTS

AWAY FOR the week

Traveling,

school during their spring break

Following the first half of the semester and midterms, most students start to look forward to some time off school. Spring break gave students a full week off from classes and work to do whatever they want. Ailis Clifford, a sophomore at UM, looked forward to spring break weeks in advance. “It felt like forever that I was working on homework and studying for exams,” Clifford said. “I booked an Airbnb weeks in advance looking forward to the time off school. The beginning of the semester always seems to drag.” Due to the time off school, Clifford was even able to have her boyfriend come to Miami to visit. “It was great to have the week to see my boyfriend and spend some time with him without the pressure of school.”

Some students even decided to take a break outside of Miami. While some students used the time off school to visit family back in their home cities, others choose to vacation abroad. Taylor Overy is a freshman at UM that traveled overseas to Greece during the break. “I love traveling and exploring new places, and spring break is a great time to do that,” Overy said. “I get to discover something new and take a break from all the stress.”

093
relaxing, and beach days are just a few of the things students do with their week off
WATER Morgan Scola and Emily Stens take on a jetskiing during spring break. Photo courtesy of Shea Halpenny WINDY CITY Genesis Del Toro stands in a makeshift metro train while visitsing SkyDeck Chicago during her break. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

diving into a

SEA OF KNOWLEDGE

The OAW Club hosts a successful ocean awareness week this year by spreading awareness, holding daily events, and raising money in order to help save the ocean and the wildlife living in it

With many students passionate about the safety and health of the oceans, different students and student organizations came together to host Ocean Awareness Week each year. At the end of March, Ocean Awareness week officially commenced and it was packed with various events and activities to better inform the student body of these issues.

The celebrations started with a showing of ‘Shark Tales’ held at the UC pool, followed by a night at the Rathskeller with an ocean-animal plushies giveaway. A marine, environmental conservation and atmospheric career fair was also hosted virtually with EcoSwell, NOAA, RSMAS and others to help students network themselves with future employers. They also held an OAW fair at the Foote Greene with carnival games and food trucks. The final event was the beach cleanup held at

Crandon Park hosted by OAW in coordination with Debris Free Oceans. A combination of these events raised over $2,400 for the Ocean Conservancy nonprofit organization.

Other clubs and organizations also worked in conjunction with Ocean Awareness week, as well as participated in the events themselves, such as the Marine Mammal Rescue Team (MMRT). Marlee Barbour, a member of MMRT, spoke about her experience. “As a new member, I was so excited to participate in Ocean Awareness Week. I was promoting it to my friends to make them go out and show support at events!”

Many members and participants contested that Ocean Awareness week was full of engaging activities, which resulted in thousands of dollars in donations that worked to make a difference in ocean conversation.

094 LIFESTYLES OCEAN AWARENESS WEEK
A STINGING TATTOO With the help of some artistic skill from sophomore Izzy Nelson, sophomore Sophia Garas gets a purple jellyfish painted on her arm. Photo by Allie Salvucci WAVING FAREWELL Sophomore Ellen Otterbach says goodbye to OAW President and senior Dani Tenberg after a successful week filled with engaging events. Photo by Danielle Tenberg PRESERVING THE OCEAN Olivia Hennon, Ellen Otterbach, Justin Jenkins, Robert Sims and Max Gravier take a beach cleanup pause at Crandon Park. Photo by Danielle Tenberg

RECYCLE AND UPCYCLE In collaboration with UThrift, OAW has a pop-up thrift shop where first-year Samantha Morales peruses through the clothing.

NO WASTE To combat the use of plastic, OAW fair gives away mason jars, which sophomore Lindsay Facher paints.

SELLING SEASHELLS Outside of the Shalala Student Center, Saige Zervos, Izzy Nelson, Hunter Wickland, Ryan McMullen,and Max Gravier table with t-shirts, stickers, and other goodies to help raise money. Photo by Danielle Tenberg HIDDEN TREASURES During the beach cleanup, sophomore Justin Jenkins shows off a piece of sea glass exemplifying why Ocean Awareness week is a necessary event for preserving our environment. Photo by Danielle Tenberg Photo by Allie Salvucci Photo by Allie Salvucci
095
FULLY SUBMERGED Junior Danielle Tenberg is dunked as one of the E-Board members of Ocean Awareness Week, in order to raise money. Photo by Allie Salvucci

what went on

AT THE ‘U’

Students attending events appreciate hard work put in by fellow ‘Canes

With a variety of events offered across campus, a lull in student life was few and far between this year. The commotion of small events drew students in bidding ‘Canes to come together to enjoy and to participate in.

While enjoying the perks of attending on-campus events, students were very aware of the effort it took to get these events running. Senior Nadia Deskins shared her experience in hosting a small event on campus, “So many students and friends could come by to participate in our activities allowing us to get to know each other and our organization,” she said, referencing an outdoor painting event hosted by SWE x Yellow Rose Society.

Students who attended the small campus events felt the most important thing was that they brought ‘Canes together. Senior Jiucheng Ding reflected, “small events are essential in strengthening affections between students and the school”, they bring moments of joy and give students a break from possible academic monotony. Many of the events held on campus were interactive, facilitating chances for students to meet not only fellow classmates but faculty as well.

Small campus events went beyond showing support for the smaller organization on campus but in giving opportunities to bond with each other under the flag of meaningful campus contribution and involvement; they facilitated relationships built on civic engagement.

096 LIFESTYLES SMALL EVENTS
A FAMILIAR FACE Professor MJ Barnes and sophomore Niles Boyd host and converse with guest speaker Josh Peck at What Matters to ‘U’ event, where he speaks to students and discusses how they can motivate themselves in their future careers. Photo by Evan Garcia FOOD FOR FASHION Senior Tikiyah Ivey and junior Michelle Wanyana handout pizza at the Elevate Fashion event. Photo by John Yayi Bondje HOT CHOCOLATE Sophomore Sara Howard provides hot chocolate to students at the White Hot Chocolate Bar in celebration of winter holidays. Photo by Genesis Del Toro FOR THE KIDS Members of medical fraternity Phi Delta Epsilon host Stand Up For Kids event at the Rock, supporting Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. Photo by John Yayi Bondje
097
CATCHING PIE Junior Matt Natale pies senior Alexandra Wallery in the face in order to raise money for a fundraising event for Relay for Life hosted on the Foote Green. Photo by John Yayi Bondje ALL IN THE FAMILY Posing with Sebastian, junior Nicole Garcia-Tunon attends family weekend events with her parents, where she gets to introduce them to mascot Sebastian the Ibis. Photo by John Yayi Bondje TUESDAYS AT THE RAT Freshmen Julia Barrist, Ashley Painter, Josh Beck, Holden Seward, Logan Sandefur, Sabrina Nubel and Kayla Humphrey compete in Trivia Tuesday as a team at the Rat’s weekly event where students work together to answer trivia questions and win. Photo by John Yayi Bondje
098 LIFESTYLES SMALL EVENTS
MR. 305 ARRIVES Pitbull enters the Watsco Center stage greeting the ‘Canes at What Matters to ‘U’ hosted by Professor Serona Elton and senior Matthew Calle. Photo by Jared Lennon CLUBBING Student organizations table at the Foote Green for the Spring Involvement Fair, highlighting several on campus clubs trying to recruit students. Photo by Sharron Lou SOCIAL JUSTICE Senior Shivani Sundaresan manages the Butler Center table for Social Justice Week. The campaign #IAMCOMMITTED represents participants’ commitment to addressing social issues. Photo by Allie Salvucci BALD BEAUTIES Students wear bald caps, sharpied goatees, sunglasses, and matching outfits to imitate Pitbull’s look earning a shout out from him during the event. Photo by Jared Lennon

BELLLYDANCING The Whitely Women’s Leadership Symposium Committee hosts Belly Motion’s Workshop in the Shalala Student

what went on

AT THE ‘U’

Events

hosted by various organizations keep students busy and engaged during long and rigorous semesters

RIGHTS AND RAINBOWS Students rally in protest of Florida’s ”Don’t Say Gay” bill with an event at the Rock complete with several speakers and organized by oSTEM, a chapter that supports LGBTQ individulas in STEM fields. Photo by Sharron Lou

099
THROW WHAT YOU KNOW Tabitha Brown, a What Matters to U guest speaker, throws up the ‘U’ as she speaks to students and discusses how to become motivated in the future with hosts Kennedy Robinson and Tiyah Snel. Photo by Jennifer Vega Center ballrooms. Photo by Amrutha Chethikattil Design by Giselle Spicer

SO BRIGHT talent

Bringing words to life on a stage is no easy task, but the actors that are part of the Ring Theatre excel at it

The cast and crew of Cabaret and The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time brought the stories to life inside the J erry Herman Ring Theatre in the spring semester. Students, along with a few fellow adult actors to play older characters, wrapped up the school year with passionate performances.

Emilia Torello, a senior majoring in Musical Theater, shared what her experience was like when she was cast in The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time. Torello was ecstatic to play a part in the first performance after returning from winter inter session. “I loved every moment of this play. It was such an interesting play to be able to present for students and it was such a big hit. I’ve always loved Simon Stephens so to be able to bring his work to life was an amazing opportunity,” she said.

As the final production of the year, students put on the musical Cabaret. Cabaret was a well-known classic musical, and Samuel Evan explained the differences between performing straight plays in comparison to musicals. As a senior majoring in Musical Theater, as well as a cast member of The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time and a spectator of Cabaret, he noticed a difference in reactions from the student body. “The plays are entertaining and even heartfelt, but the musicals are always fun for the students,” Evan said.

100 LIFESTYLES SPRING THEATRE
CURIOUS INCIDENT During opening night in March, students perform a rendition of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the Ring Theatre. Photo courtesy of the Ring Theatre ALMOST SHOWTIME Freshmen Oliver Whitehouse, Will Sobel and Nate Bergman wait outside of the ticket booth to attend the dress rehearsal at the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre. RING A BELL Junior Leonardo Espinosa rings a bell as Theseus in a rendition of A Midsummer Night’s Dream performed on the Foote Green by UM students. Photo by Allie Salvucci FAIRY KING Junior Christopher Cline portrays Oberon, the King of the Fairies. Photo by Allie Salvucci
101
OUTDOOR PLAY Senior Eliza Knode plays Helena in A Midsummer Night’s Dream for her final performance with the Ring Theatre, as she prepares to graduate in the spring. Photo by Allie Salvucci ONLY BUCKETS Freshmen Daniel Farber and Jordan Sotomayor compete with at the basketball hoops for a prize of a giant glowstick. Photo by Allie Salvucci SWEET SMILES Despite the long line, freshmen Lizbeth Rosario, Kate Anarfi and Emoni Davis enjoy their freshly made cotton candy from the snack booth while perusing the carnival. Photo by Allie Salvucci 102 LIFESTYLES ‘CANES CARNIVAL CROWD SURGE Rapper Swae Lee, of Rae Sremmurd, performs at the Spring 2022 Hurricane Productions Concert in the Watsco Center Photo by Jared Lennon

CELEBRATE at the carnival

For the first time in two years, students got to have fun before finals with rides, games, food, and a concert on the Foote Green

Since the beginning of the pandemic, UM has had to follow social distance protocols that have made holding large events difficult. With the easing of restrictions of this semester, including the removal of the mask policy, HP Productions was once again able to hold ‘Canes Carnival on campus.

Usually an annual event, ‘Canes Carnival has always been a way for students to relax and have some fun before final exams begin. To celebrate ‘Canes Carnival coming back, HP went big, having a variety of things for students to do: food trucks with fair food, games to win prizes, giveaways, rides, and a concert to end the night.

Many students, both freshman and sophomore, have never experienced UM’s own personal carnival. Zanaiah Billups is a freshman, so this was her first experience at ‘Canes Carnival. “I had an insane amount of fun getting on rides in our own backyard,” Billups said. “I felt very welcomed in the UM community and will remember the night.”

With over 2,000 students in attendance, the Foote Green saw more foot traffic than usual. Many students came to the event to see the highlight of the carnival: a performance by famous singer and musician Marc E. Bassy. “His performance was captivating,” said Cassandra Michel, a junior at UM. “He’s a great live singer. You could tell he was connected to his audience.” With all the events and fun, the concert seemed to be a perfect ending to the carnival.

FOOD TRUCK FRENZY Students line up with meal vouchers provided by Hurricane Productions at Needa Pita and other food trucks parked in Stanford Circle at the start of ‘Canes Carnival. Photo by Jared Lennon FEAR AND FUN Racing down the fun slide, students sit on sacks to see who will be the first to make it to the bottom. Photo by Jared Lennon SWINGING Sophomores Nate Smith and Akshay Advaney strap in and ride the swings in circles around the Foote Green. Photo by Jared Lennon SKEE-ING FOR A PRIZE Six students play skeeball including juniors Zach Ng, Jacob Edward Leader and Katherine Ei and if they score high enough they could win glowsticks or small plushies. Photo by Allie Salvucci
103
BASSY BEATS Marc E. Bassy takes the stage on the Foote Green as the Canes Carnival headliner gets personal with the crowd. Photo by Jared Lennon

hecht’s last

HURRAH

Students and the surrounding community honor the Hecht Residential College before demolition

As the plans began for Centennial Village, a new part of campus that will consist of five new residential colleges, the current first-year residential colleges were going to be torn down. Hecht Residential College was the first to take part in the demolition, and many members of the campus came together to celebrate the building one last time at Hecht’s Last Hurrah.

Hecht’s Last Hurrah provided an opportunity to say goodbye to the building where participants signed a commemorative poster with the event’s name on it, took pictures with Sebastian the Ibis, chanted “oh yeah, Hecht yeah” and were offered refreshments and food. Freshman and resident, Caleigh Russo, discussed the event. “Everyone I knew was at Hecht’s Last Hurrah. There was such a good turnout because it was almost as if we were leaving our ‘legacy’ as the last group to live there before being torn down,” she said.

With the special event, many current and previous residents reflected on everything that made living there what it was. Hecht Residential College consisted of two towers, Pentland and McDonald, that were co-ed with one assigned gender on each floor and communal bathrooms.“I loved living there because of all of the social aspects like making friends on each floor and spending time in the lobby study room. It truly maximized the freshman experience because of all the opportunities to meet new people,” Russo said.

Hecht’s Last Hurrah was the final send-off to Hecht Residential College and marked the beginning of a new era as construction for Centennial Village began.

104 LIFESTYLES FAREWELL TO HECHT
CAPTURE THE MOMENT Students take a selfie with Sebastian on the Hecht Bridge as the school says goodbye to the dormitory. Photo by Sharron Lou MAKING HISTORY AND MEMORIES Hecht Resident Assistants listen to the speakers on stage as the last group of RA’s in the building. Photo by Sharron Lou AN ELECTRIC GOODBYE EQ Collective DJ club students provide music for the Hecht Residential College celebration. Photo by Sharron Lou REMINISCING Senior Resident Assistants Carrie Furman and Julie Ornelas take turns to talk about their experience working in the Hecht Residential College before it is demolished. Photo by Sharron Lou
105
GENERATIONAL The Hecht family receives one of the first monumental decorations in Hecht Residential College from Pat Whitely. Photo by Sharron Lou LOOKING BACK Patricia Whitely speaks on the historical significance of the Hecht Residential College and introduces the Hecht family to attending students. Photo by Sharron Lou THROW WHAT YOU KNOW A commemorative Hecht jersey and a portrait of Florence Hecht are displayed at the last hurrah for Hecht Residential College. Photo by Sharron Lou

CHANGED things

Lifted COVID-19 restrictions on campus positively affect campus spirits and community

Campus changes from last academic year were noticed as soon as students stepped on campus as they attended in-person classes, and saw nearly the entire student body in-person and without masks. For the first time in a long time, students and staff alike returned to pre-pandemic habits.

One of the more palpable changes throughout was the dining hall operations. When the pandemic first began, the dining halls switched to plastic utensils and paper plates and cups. Students were also not allowed to eat inside the dining halls and were directed to use a takeout system. As campus returned to normal, glass plates and metal silverware made their return and students were able to eat indoors without a limited seat capacity per table.

Restoring classes with lifted restrictions was equally beneficial in determining the morale on campus. Most classes were conducted entirely in person, with class sizes ranging from a few to over a hundred students. In the fall, masks were still required in class but students no longer had to sit with spaces between seats. Sophomore Carissa Niccoli appreciated this change. “Meeting people was challenging the first year, but having in-person classes this year made college feel more real to me,” she said. Spring changes allowed classes to look even more similar to pre-pandemic campus life.

106 LIFESTYLES COVID-19 CHANGES
OCTOBER 1 - CLASSROOMS Theatre students gather around the piano in-person as they continue to sing despite mask mandates. Photo by Mike Montero OCTOBER 5 - MIDTERMS A university librarian hands out treats to students studying for pandemic-ridden midterms. Photo by Mike Montero NOVEMBER 15 - PRIZES Student Josie Shindler receives $5,000 as part of the university’s vaccination incentive program. Photo by Mike Montero AUGUST 25 - BACK IN ACTION A new school year in-person starts after two years of hybrid and online learning. Photo by Mike Montero JANUARY 10 - NEW SEMESTER SAME RULES Orientation leaders Victoria Gomez, Meera Patel, Katarina Jenkins, and Tatiana Alvarado film the alma mater for spring admission students at the start of the semester. Photo by Mike Montero

IT HAPPY Despite still being masked in class, students

in

two years of unconventional graduation

107
AUGUST 18 - WELCOME President Frenk welcomes new students to the ‘U’ in Pavia Garage, the university COVID-19 testing site. Photo by Mike Montero MAY 4 - BACK TO NORMAL Students study in the Richter Library maskless with snacks and beverages for energy during finals season. Photo by Mike Montero MAY 13 - CLASSIC GRADUATION After ceremonies, the class of 2022 has a classic graduation ceremony in the Watsco Center. Photo by Mike Montero FEBRUARY 1 - KEEPING keep smiling and enjoying school as the pandemic eases. Photo by Evan Garcia MARCH 1 - MAJOR MASK MOVES Mask restrictions classrooms are lifted across campuses by President Frenk and COVID signage is removed from campus. Photo by Mike Montero

in the beginning

· Masks mandatory for all indoor and outdoor settings regardless of vaccination status

· Residents required to have a negative test within 24 hours of returning to campus and/or move-in

· Vaccination status must be uploaded to the UHealth portal

· Vaccinations are offered and strongly encouraged on the Coral Gables campus for those unvaccinated and wish to receive their COVID-19 shots

· Activities and meetings will remain in a hybrid format to ensure physical distancing measures

· Students who have not been vaccinated or have not submitted their vaccination status will be required to be tested twice a week

in the end

· Masks no longer required in indoor spaces or classrooms

· Those who wish to remain masked are encouraged to do so on the Coral Gables and Marine campuses

· Medical campus will continue to follow guidelines from UHealth

· Students who have not been vaccinated or have not submitted their vaccination status will be required to be tested twice a week

· Anyone on campus who is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 should get tested and communicate with UHealth

· Graduation celebrated maskless and in the Watsco Center for the first time in two years

CONFUSION As of the spring semester, masks are required in classrooms and not large public spaces, but apprehension is still apparent as students decide how comfortable they are maskless in class Masks will not become fully optional until spring break.

UNITED AS ONE As campus gets back to normal after most Covid mandates are taken away, students gather for the annual Hug the Lake event on Earth Day.

108 LIFESTYLES COVID-19 IMPACT
Photo by Amanda Perez Photo by Diego Meza-Valdes

IMPACTS covid-19

Campus life was uneasy when COVID-19 first came to the United States in 2020, but the university eventually adjusted. Students and the world were wearing masks everywhere, avoiding unnecessary interactions with friends and family, and spending more time at home. After what seemed like a lifetime, a vaccine was released to the public, and students rushed to receive their dose in hopes of life returning to normal.

Sophomore Ailis Clifford commented on difficulties of the pandemic era campus life that left many aching for a return to normal, “Online classes prevented me from getting to know anyone, I felt really isolated during my first year on campus.” Then things began to look up, “I’m glad the vaccines allowed campus to return to in-person classes, even if it means wearing masks,” Clifford concluded.

While the vaccine was not an end to the pandemic, it was a step in the right direction. ‘Canes finally saw their friends and returned to in-person classes without fearing the worst. New and returning students adjusted again to campus life feeling grateful for all new opportunities and the renewed sense of vibrancy and school spirit that tore through campus.

109
As the spread of COVID-19 slows, students are happy that campus begins to return to normal
HERE TO STAY? Pavia Garage continues to be utilized as a COVID-19 testing site two years into the pandemic. The testing stations are removed at the start of the spring semester. Photo by TJ Lievonen MAKING IT WORK Students continue to wear masks outdoors, even though masks were deemed optional for wearing outside. They were still required in all indoor spaces and classrooms. Photo by TJ Lievonen

covid

VACCINES

University COVID-19 vaccine rates are at a steady increase for both students and staff

STARTING ON THE RIGHT

89.9%

SPRING

75%

OVERALL STUDENT BODY VACCINATION

VACCINE OUTREACH

Student

university vaccine regulations

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, there were many ever-changing adjustments on campus. The most notable development was that vaccines started being offered in April of the 2022 academic year, which led to more changes and provided more opportunities for students.

To attempt to make it easier and more convenient, students only had to make an appointment through their health portal to secure their spot to get vaccinated. Junior Kendall Onley got vaccinated as soon as she could. “Having the school offer the vaccine right here on campus was so easy, especially for those who didn’t know where to go, or who weren’t able to get it at home,” she said.

Despite the majority of the population on campus being vaccinated, the vaccinations offered on campus and the incentive program that came with it made it easier and gave more reason for people on campus to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. By Molly Mackenzie

110 LIFESTYLES COVID-19 VACCINES
Art by Muhammad Ajis Design by Giselle Spicer & Carolina Camus LET’S GET VAXXED Zachary Ripic receives a COVID-19 vaccine at the Herbert Wellness Center as incentive programs are put in place. Photo by Mike Montero Claire Connelly receives a flu shot at a pop-up event organized by the Student Health Service outside Lakeside Village. Photo by Mike Montero FOOT Dr. Roy E. Weiss, Chief medical officer for COVID-19, greets students to promote free vaccine clinic at the beginning of the year.
FALL
Photo by TJ Lievonen

FACULTY AND STAFF UNVACCINATED AUGUST 2021

STUDENT ATHLETES UNVACCINATED AUGUST 2021

MEDICAL CAMPUS UNVACCINATED AUGUST 2021

98% 90% 94%

FACULTY AND STAFF VACCINATED AUGUST 2021

STUDENT ATHLETES VACCINATED AUGUST 2021

MEDICAL CAMPUS VACCINATED AUGUST 2021

FACULTY AND STAFF UNVACCINATED MAY 2022

STUDENT ATHLETES UNVACCINATED MAY 2022

MEDICAL CAMPUS UNVACCINATED MAY 2022

99.4% 90% 94.5%

FACULTY AND STAFF VACCINATED MAY 2022

STUDENT ATHLETES VACCINATED MAY 2022

MEDICAL CAMPUS VACCINATED MAY 2022

111
5.5% 10% .6% 6%
10% 2%

TESTING STATISTICS

Testing was administered to unvaccinated university members and those with COVID-19 symptoms. The University’s UScreen surveillance testing program for students and employees was discontinued Friday, April 1, 2022. On-campus testing for individuals who experience COVID-19 symptoms continues to be available.

DAILY POSITIVE RESULTS

Testing was administered to unvaccinated university members and those with COVID-19 symptoms. Testing was provided in multiple areas on campus, the majority in Pavia Garage. Most cases returned positive throughout January after winter break.

TESTING TESTING The Pavia Garage COVID-19 testing site remained open in the fall as testing was still required for the un-vaccinated. Photo by Lauren Nam

112 LIFESTYLES COVID-19 CASE STATS Fall 2021 Tests Negative 54,910 52,258 Positive 2,652 Spring 2022 Tests Negative 36,894 34,823 Positive 2,071 94.4%
5.6%
4.8%
Negative 95.2% Negative
Positive
Positive
200 150 100 50 August 2021September 2021October 2021November 2021December 2021January 2022

POSITIVE TEST RESULTS

Out of 91,800 tests administered throughout the school year, 4,800 were positive.

Fall 2021

SPRING CLEANING

campus covid cases

A decrease of cases lent itself to an unrestricted spring semester as students saw life return to normal at UM

The return of students in the spring brought a spike in positive COVID-19 tests in both vaccinated and un-vaccinated ‘Canes on campus, but the spike soon resulted in a sharp a downward trajectory that quickly resulted in changes on campus.

There were about 4,700 positive tests out of around 91,800 total tests by the end of the school year, spanning 17,000 students and 16,000 employees across all three campuses. Only 0.2 percent of the campus tested positive daily in comparison to 25 percent at the beginning of the semester. Mask protocols, consistent testing for un-vaccinated students and high vaccination percentages contributed to keeping cases low.

During the same time, 94 percent of employees were vaccinated. Overall, 86 percent of the student body was vaccinated. The student vaccination percentage for non-residential students was 85 percent and 91 percent for residential students.

High vaccination numbers and a downward trend of cases prompted UM administration to remove the mask mandate in indoor spaces on March 1. “I think they took enough time to affirm that it was the right decision to lift the mask mandate,” noted freshman Maria Rojas. Throughout the pandemic, UM has changed its policies to reflect campus safety but this spring the university has lifted restrictions as they restored campus life to how it was prior to the pandemic.

113
Students Residential Students Non-Residential Employees Total Spring 2022 Students Residential Students Non-Residential Employees Total Cumulative Total 480 791 1,381 2,652 383 531 1,157 2,071 4,723
Januaury 2022Februrary 2022March 2022April 2022 May 2022
FOR ENTRY The Rathskeller requires students to wear a mask and reserve the right to deny service. Photo by Julie Spicer PREFERENCES Some students stay committed to masks despite requirement lift. Photo by Sydney Cheney
114 ACADEMICS
A HAPPY GRAD At spring graduation held in the Watsco Center, senior Hadieh Zolfaghari celebrates her new UM alumni status with her peers after the ceremony ends. Photo by Mike Montero

ACADEMICS

Miami life can be thrilling, but when the time comes to get serious, ‘Canes know how to hit the books. Academics are at the heart of UM. Comprised of 12 different academic schools, the university ranks high among many other prestigious universities all over the country. With a competitive acceptance rate, students at the university have fought hard to maintain an excellent academic status in order to study at UM.

115

where do

WE RANK

Facts and figures of our elite university

12,037

NEW STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE FALL

28%

ACCEPTANCE RATE

99%

FULL TIME REGULAR FACULTY WITH DOCTORATE OR TERMINAL DEGREE

13%

PERCENTAGE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

54%

42,245

APPLICATIONS RECEIVED

GENDER RATIO

46% FEMALE MALE

116 ACADEMICS UNIVERSITY RANKINGS
Source: UM Fact Book

board of trustees

Chair

Laurie S. Silvers

Vice Chairs

Manny Kadre

Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.

AVERAGE UNDERGRADUATE TUITION COST

$53,112 13:1

STUDENT-TO-FACULTY RATIO

Trustees

Leonard Abess

Betty G. Amos

Hilarie Bass

Jon Batchelor

Fred Berens

Tracey P. Berkowitz

Marc A. Buoniconti

Alfred R. Camner

Adam E. Carlin

Wayne E. Chaplin

Christopher Chen

Adriana Cisneros

Charles E. Cobb

Landon Coles

Edward A. Dauer

Paul J. DiMare

David L. Epstein

Richard D. Fain

Miguel B. Fernandez

Phillip Frost

Phillip T. George

Rose Ellen Greene

Barbara Hecht Havenick

Allan M. Herbert

Marilyn J. Holifield

Manuel Kadre

Carolyn B. Lamm

MAJORS & PROGRAMS

Jayne Sylvester Malfitano

Jose R. Mas

Patricia Menendez-Cambo

Stuart A. Miller

William L. Morrison

Judi Prokop Newman

Aaron S. Podhurst

Lois Pope

Alex E. Rodríguez

Steven J. Saiontz

Robert E. Sanchez

Marvin R. Shanken

Laurie S. Silvers

H. T. Smith

IN THE NATION US NEWS RANKING

Jacquelyn R. Soffer

E. Roe Stamps, IV

Ronald G. Stone

Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.

Ana VeigaMilton

Alice S. Vilma

Jonathan Vilma

David R. Weaver

Geisha J. Williams

G. Ed Williamson II

Ex-Officio Members

Devang Desai

Ana VeigaMilton

Maribel C. Wadsworth

Julio Frenk

Carlos Guzman

Kourtney Gibson

Roberta L. Jacoby

Emeriti Members

Michael I. Abrams

Adrienne Arsht

Jose P. Bared

M. Anthony Burns

Paul L. Cejas

Laura G. Coulter-Jones

Carlos M. de la Cruz, Sr.

Edward W. Easton

Gloria M. Estefan

Enrique C. Falla, Sr.

Alfonso Fanjul

George Feldenkreis

David I. Fuente

Thelma V.A. Gibson

Bernard J. Kosar, Jr.

Jorge M. Pérez

Fredric G. Reynolds

Eduardo M. Sardiña

Frank P. Scruggs

Steven Sonberg

Patricia W. Toppel

Gonzalo F. Valdes-Fauli

Marta S. Weeks-Wulf

Frances L. Wolfson

Secretary of the Board of Trustees

Frances Marine Davis

117
180+ #55

THE ‘U’ who is at

As the student body continues to grow, so does the diversity amongst the attendees of the university

Source: UM Fact Book

RACIAL AND ETHNIC DISTRIBUTION OF UNDERGRADUATES

INTERNATIONAL 11%

2 OR MORE RACES 4%

ASIAN/ PACIFIC ISLANDER 9%

WHITE 48% BLACK 10%

HISPANIC OR LATINO 28%

118 ACADEMICS UNIVERSITY DEMOGRAPHICS

GEOGRAPHIC ORIGINS OF UNDERGRADUATES

MIAMIDADE 21% OTHER U.S. TERRITORIES

52%

MEN

BROWARD 5% OTHER FL 11%

headcount by school

ARCHITECTURE

Undergraduate: 417

Graduate: 133

Total: 550

ARTS & SCIENCES

Undergraduate: 3,906

Graduate: 635

Total: 4,541

MIAMI HERBERT BUSINESS

Undergraduate: 2,915

Graduate: 1,126

Total: 4,041

COMMUNICATION

Undergraduate: 1,080

Graduate: 150

Total: 1,230

EDUCATION & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Undergraduate: 543

Graduate: 516

Total: 1,059

ENGINEERING

Undergraduate: 896

Graduate: 223

Total: 1,129

FR0ST MUSIC

Undergraduate: 521

Graduate: 364

Total: 885

LAW

Graduate: 1,389

46% WOMEN 54%

5,6176,472

GENDER DISTRIBUTION OF UNDERGRADUATES

MILLER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Graduate: 1,618

NURSING & HEALTH STUDIES

Undergraduate: 1,021

Graduate: 322

Total: 1,343

ROSENTIEL SCHOOL

Undergraduate: 482

Graduate: 507

Total: 989

OTHER

Undergraduate: 308

Graduate: 14

Total: 322

TOTAL 19,096

119

fun, fun

FUNDING

While the university embarks on it’s largest fundraising event to date, Ever Brighter, several research grants also contribute to the $300 million total donation amount

Source: UM Fact Book

$3.8 MILLION

Institute of Education Sciences grant awarded to Mary Beth Calhoon to study the effects of an intensive reading program for middle school students with or at-risk for reading disabilities. The study will collaborate with select Sports Leadership.

$6.9 MILLION

Scientists Anthony Griswold, Ph.D.,Jeffery M. Vance, M.D., Ph.D., and Derek Dykxhoorn, Ph.D in the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics have been awarded a five-year, $6.9 million grant from the National Institute on Aging to map how African and Amerindian DNA regulates its genes in human brain cells.

$3

MILLION

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded Guillermo “Willy” Prado—vice provost for faculty affairs; dean of the Graduate School; and professor of nursing and health studies, public health sciences, and psychology at the University of Miami—and his research team a four-year, $3.05 million grant for new research, “Scaling a Parenting EBI (Evidence-Based Intervention) for Latinx Youth Mental Health in Primary Care.” The team will use the money to roll out a parenting training program 20 years in the making.

$375,03

120 ACADEMICS GRANT MONEY & RESEARCH
STAND PROUD Mary Beth Calhoon, center, associate professor in the University of Miami School of Human Education and Development, stands with Galit Cohen, left, a Ph.D., and Michela Galante, a Ph.D. Photo by Jenny Hudak

$31.7

MILLION

The John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics (HIHG) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, will serve as principal investigators for a major five-year initiative with Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of Southern California, to pool and standardize research data gathered from individuals in multiple studies of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD). HIHG principal investigator, Michael Cuccaro, Ph.D., associate director of the HIHG’s Center for Genomic Education & Outreach, will lead the universities portion of the groundbreaking project.

$2.5 MILLION

Donated to the School of Law by Laurie Silvers, chair of the University of Miami Board of Trustees, and her husband, Mitchell Rubenstein, the gift provides a substantial boost to the University’s Ever Brighter: The Campaign for Our Next Century. A double alumna herself, the donation is an example of Silvers and Rubenstein’s largesse to the University over the years. Their generosity created an endowed distinguished professorship and created student scholarships, including one for students committed to public service. The Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Hall, which houses the school’s awardwinning clinics, is named in their honor.

5,037,551

121
FISH FRIENDS UM Scientist Awarded awarded part of $9.3 million NOAA has slated to help spur the development and growth of of aquaculture. Photo by News@TheU FOR THE EDUCATION Three professors in the Department of Teaching and Learning in the School of Education and Human Development have received a $6.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to support teachers and help them engage high-needs students in middle and high school classes They are Luciana de Oliveira, Wendy Cavendish and Mary Avalos. Photo by News@TheU WORTH RESEARCH Professor of Law and Dean's Distinguished Scholar Charlton Copeland was awarded a Mellon CREATES grant through the collaboration with the UM libraries and the Lowe Art Museum. Photo by News@TheU

EXECUTIVES

122 ACADEMICS DEANS AND ADMINISTRATION
DAN RADAKOVICH VP & Director of Athletics BRAD ROHRER VP, Information Technology FRANCES MARINE DAVIS Secretary of the Board of Trustees CHARMEL MAYNARD Chief Investment Officer & Treasurer JESSICA ELIZABETH BRUMLEY VP Facilities Operations & Planning BRANDON ERIC GILLILAND VP & Chief Financial Officer JOHN G HALLER VP, Enrollment Management JACQUELINE R. MENENDEZ VP, Communications AILEEN M. UGALDE Senior VP & General Counsel PATRICIA A. WHITELY Senior VP, Student Affairs JEFFREY DUERK VP for Academic Affairs & Provost JACQUELINE A. TRAVISANO VP for Business and Finance & COO RUDY FERNANDEZ VP for External Affairs & Chief of Staff JOSH FRIEDMAN Senior VP for Development & Alumni JULIO FRENK President JOSEPH JAMES ECHEVARRIA Chief Executive Officer

leading the

CHARGE

The deans and administration keep the university at the top of its game, enforcing it’s prestigious reputation

123
Design by Giselle Spicer HENRI FORD Miller School of Medicine REBECCA M FOX Continuing & International Education LAURA KOHN WOOD Education & Human Development CINDY MUNRO Nursing and Health Studies DAVID YELLEN Academic GUILLERMO J PRADO, PH.D. Graduate School JOHN A. QUELCH Miami Herbert Business School KARIN WILKINS School of Communication SHELTON G. BERG Frost School of Music PRATIM BISWAS College of Engineering CHARLES ECKMAN Libraries RODOLPHE EL-KHOURY School of Architecture RONI AVISSAR Rosentiel School of Marine Science
DEANS
LEONIDAS G BACHAS College of Arts and Sciences

A HEAVY workload

Aspiring scholars must have an impressive resume when applying to the prestigious school

The School of Architecture has an accredited 6-year program for a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering along with a Master of Architecture (B.S.A.E/M. Arch). It’s known for its heavy course load and extensive work assignments creating a UM stereotype that an Architecture student sighting is akin to seeing an obscure endangered species.

Freshman Carlos Hernandez spent long hours in the 24/7 hour individual studio living up to this stereotype and making sure everything was up to par for the students’ pin-ups. It was a tradition for first-year students to participate in pin-ups, where students placed their projects on the walls for critique.

“I’m a perfectionist and I want all my work to reflect that, but sometimes it can get overwhelming. Luckily, I get the best guidance and critiques whenever I need it,” recalled Hernandez.

The School of Architecture emphasizes the importance of hard work but with such an extensive curriculum, he dedication of the staff is a hallmark of this program that consistently outputs confident professionals able to succeed in their demanding field. Hernandez further reflects, “I’ve learned so much in two semesters with still so much more to learn. I’m excited to see what the upcoming years have to offer and I know my professors will be there every step of the way.”

124 ACADEMICS SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
BUILD A HOME Under the instruction of Professors Carie Penabad and Adib Cure, Amy Agne ‘23 and Hope Kenny ‘23 designed the “Sister House” and presented it for critiques. Photo courtesy of the School of Architecture HARD AT WORK First year School of Architecture students work on sketches and virtual designs for a class held at the Murphy Design Studio. Photo courtesy of the School of Architecture SHOW YOUR STUFF Student mock-up designs line the outside walls of the Murphy Design Studio on Pin-Up Day. Architecture students receive critiques and notes from their peers and professors. Photo courtesy of School of Architecture

SPECIAL SPEAKER

Steven

SCOUTING At the annual Architecture Career Fair, employers displayed and discussed student work, reviewed portfolios, and held interviews with students. The fair is held for architecture students in order to expose them to the real world. Photo courtesy of the School of Architecture

125
Lewis speaks as a guest lecturer for the Tecnoglass Lecture Series. Tecnoglass is a manufacturer of glass and aluminum products for architectural usage in construction. Photo by Allie Salvucci INSTALLATION Faculty and students discussed installation HB1557, interdisciplinarity, and methods for productive campus conversations. Photo courtesy of School of the Architecture

AND SCIENTISTS ALIKE equipping artists

Proving once again to be a factory for great student thinkers, new courses and extensive opportunities for both freshmen and graduating seniors are offered

Students in the College of Arts & Sciences seized opportunities to advance their studies and skill sets through research and strategic courses whether they fell within the sciences, fine arts, or humanities.

Some fine arts students took classes in freedom of expression like sophomore Ana Sofia Jouvin who found relief in the time she spent capturing photos for her photography class. Jouvin states, “Taking photography allowed me to discover new ways of seeing the world, especially our beautiful campus and other aspects of the city.”

While virtual research was vastly different in comparison to conducting it in-person, many students were still able to be successful. Senior Anjou Sharma, majoring in Neuroscience and Computer Science, shared his experience. “I’m currently conducting two senior honors theses.

The first looks at treatment outcomes for youth with emotional disorders across transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral therapy. For the second project, I’m utilizing a coding algorithm to predict moral decision-making across undergraduates. I’ve been able to learn a lot about both topics and make contributions even through a virtual setting.”

Offices, classrooms and studios in the Rainbow Building, the Studio Arts Building, the Merrick Building, and Dooley Memorial fostered motivating environments for students to craft and enhance their works. Some students in the College of Arts prepared for medical school, and were ready for their future careers after conducting research and partaking in laboratory work. Whether students navigated the humanities or the STEM field, students felt equipped by their courses for careers.

NATURE WATCH Professor Amy Zanne examines local fungi in the Gifford Arboretum, which is a botanical garden located on the Coral Gables campus. It is run and maintained by the biology department. Photo by Evan Garcia HISTORY IN THE MAKING Double-major graduates Eliza Stuart and Erica Goldfinger finish with honors in geography and sustainable development for their work in geospatial mapping within the surrounding area. Photo by Janette Neuwahl Tannen Story by Molly Design by Kaylee Mendoza RESEARCHING Alexis Adornato ‘22, Baylee Brochu ‘22, and Lindsey Faucher ‘24 present their research at the 14th Annual RCIF. This is the first time that the event is held in person since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.
126
OF
& SCIENCES
Photo courtesy of Alexis Adornato
ACADEMICS COLLEGE
ARTS
127
TAKE A FINAL BOW Student actors perform the final scene in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the Ring Theatre on campus. Courtesy of Jerry Herman Ring Theatre UNREAL LEARNING Students enrolled in “Religion and Sacred Spaces in the Era of Virtual Reality and Artificial Intelligence” course learn through virtual reality headsets. Photo by Kim Grinfeder FLYING SCIENCE Benjamin Kling ‘20, Alexander Leiva ‘21, and Whitaker Redgate ‘22 pose with their invenvtion: Precision Ecology’s Wingtra drone. Photo by TJ Lievonen

TO BUSINESSget down

Improvement among academics leads to continuous success among attendees who are pursuing a degree in Business

The Miami Herbert Business School exceeded in performance and claimed a number one placement as Best Undergraduate School in Florida and #30 in the nation, according to Poets & Quants. This ranking is six places higher than the previous year, showing how the school dedicated itself to improving by providing the best opportunities and education.

After the rankings were released, many staff members boasted about how the culture of the school allowed students and faculty to continuously succeed. John Quelch, the dean of Miami Herbert, claimed that the school’s “upward trajectory is a testimony to our faculty and staff’s unyielding commitment to our student’s success.” Members of the administration weren’t the only ones

that spoke positively about the school. Eduardo Tefel, a freshman studying finance,shared his experience with the engaging courses and passionate professors.“I took MKT 201with Dr. Kulkarni and I loved how much I learned about things that I saw everyday, like the logic behind TV advertisements or how companies attract customers to their products,” he said.

One of the many benefits of attending the Miami Herbert Business school was not only the quality education, but it was also the resources offered following graduation. “I believe that the school does an excellent job in helping students start on the right track after graduating by providing assistance in finding a job and I know I’ll have the best resources to jump start my career,” said Tefel.

room to grow

When asked about some of his longterm goals for the Miami Herbert Business School, Vice Dean of Business Programs Hari Natarajan, said, “There is always room for growth. I would like tosee growth in terms of reputation, statute and size. All of these can be achieved through the enhancementof student outcomes. Our focus is to set students up in terms of career success and finding jobs, and if wecontinue to focus on that, we are able to improve upon these aspects of our school.” By Sara

128 ACADEMICS MIAMI HERBERT BUSINESS SCHOOL
SHINE BRIGHT The palm trees reflecting on the windows of the Miami Herbert Business School building bring the lush tropical landscape of Miami to the Coral Gables campus. Photo by Marlen Lebish CHAT Student Sara Holtem interviews Vice Dean Natarajan about the progress and future of Miami Herbert Business School. Photo by Margarita Sinko

RUN THE WORLD Students

leadership

129
Alvina Ackinggal, Amina Daoud, and Martha Wamil promote their club, She Means Business, that aims to empower women in pursuing roles in business. Photo by Margarita Sinko SCHOOLIN’ Dhananjay Nanda, Herbert Vice Dean of Faculty & Research as well as Professor of Accounting, explains budgeting concept to student Alina Sander. Photo by Miami Herbert Business School Fernandez Ferrer, Dr. Tie Su, Dr. John Quelch, Margarita Sinko, Cecilia Sanchez, Matthew Domenick Dirico, and Daniel Ruvins. Photo by Margarita Sinko ALL EARS Students listening to Sumit Singh, as he talks about humility, hard work, intellectual curiosity, and the

LEARNING hands on

Inspired students apply their skills beyond the classroom in extracurricular groups

Due to the large array of hands-on opportunities offered by the School of Communication, many students were able to combine their academic experience with their passions to produce a variety of impactful film, advertising, social media campaigns and entertainment pieces.

Chema Garcia, a junior studying Sports Administration and Advertising, was one of the many students that brought the education provided by the School of Communication into real-life ideas. However, his journey started when he came to tour campus, and was given access to the broadcasting studio of UMTV. “I had recently visited the MBC and Telemundo studios in Doral and this one had the exact same infrastructure, it was very impressive,” he said.

Once Garcia began attending classes, he applied the curriculum by becoming a writer, producer and editor for Uni Miami and Off the Wire. Additionally, he combined this passion with his love for the school for a personal project, Red Cup Canes. “I started Red Cup Canes because there was no social media presence showing what the school was really like. My goal was to create an account to show how students actually were and how going to school here actually was, in all its good and bad.” This account grew to 11.6 thousand Instagram followers and, along with the knowledge provided by professors and faculty, connected him to opportunities. Garcia, similarly to other students, was able to take advantage of the opportunities at the School of Communication and use it to start ventures outside the academic scope.

NETWORK Students

130 ACADEMICS SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION
TEAMWORK Junior Jennifer Vega and senior Ysabella Maldonado discuss client work during Orange Umbrella, the on-campus student run advertising agency. Photo by Allie Salvucci BIG WIN UM’s Dr. Stacks and Dr. Tao receive an award alongside student Ruoyun Sun, with Boston University professors Dr. Arunima Krishna and Dr. Rosalynn Vasquez at a conference for PR scholars. Photo by Yi Grace Ji Anandi BienAime and Catherine Woods attend the recruitment fair in the courtyard to seek job opportunities. Photo by Allie Salvucci

CONNECT

Communication, Media and Entertainment Fair is held at the courtyard where local employers recruit communications majors. Photo by Allie Salvucci

SPIN IT Public Relations students show their school spirit while recruiting for PRSSA, a pre-professional

real pr campaigns

Offered by the School of Communications, STC-436 or the PR Campaigns course, was a culmination of four years of study for public relations students. Professor Jack Miller, who taught the course, described it as an“opportunity for students to demonstrate the multitude of skills they have learned during their college career, then apply, integrate, and showcase them to both the professor and a real-world client so that they can successfully build a Strategic Communication Plan for that client. Working in teams towards a common goal, having deadlines and meeting the needs of a client benefits the students, and at the end of the course, they end with a great sense of accomplishment and pride.” By Sara

CLASSMATES STC346 students enjoy a wide selection of fruit after an event to celebrate their work with a real client.

131
Holtam Photo by Jack Miller & JOSH Niles Boyd, a sophomore and professional public speaker, moderates the What Matters to ‘U’ panel with Josh Peck, who stared in the Nickelodeon series “Drake & Josh.” Photo by Evan Garcia student organization. Photo by Olivia Notman VACCINE AMBASSADORS Seventeen students were selected as vaccine agents and, throughout the summer and fall semesters, they engaged with marginalized groups in the community to address vaccine hesitancy. Photo by Ashley A. Williams TALKING SPORTS Former UM athletes discuss their athletic and academic experiences while at UM and their transitions to professional roles at the School of Education and Human Development’s 13th Annual Sport Industry Conference held April 14. From left to right: Asa Burke, Jon Jay, Hannah Marchbanks, Jessica Hurley, and Rachel Smith. Photo by Maggie Cayón AN HONOR Misteria Brown, recipient of the Outstanding Master’s Student in Education Award, and Dr. Mary Avalos attend the 2022 Awards of Excellence Celebration SHE Awards Ceremony held at Lakeside Village.
132
Photo by Artemio Pomares
ACADEMICS SCHOOL OF EDUCATION & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

A SPOTLIGHTon education

Unique opportunities for learning are presented to students studying for education based career paths

Teachers, professors, and educators all have to start somewhere. Professions handling the education of minds are the most prominent in people’s lives from childhood into adulthood. The School of Education and Human Development wanted to ensure that the school would prepare the current students to be well-rounded future educators amidst the social and political restrictions of the waning pandemic.

Sophomore Kayla Wig majors in Music Education Major with an Education Minor and shared that one of her favorite things about the School of Education was their field experience program. “This semester I was paired with Ponce De Leon Middle School where I’m expected to spend at least five hours doing a classroom observation.” Wig found that this immersive style of learning was very helpful in expanding her educational and social skill set.

On top of learning new skills, Wig shared that she networked through this experience as well, “I was able to get advice from the teacher at Ponce de Leon about the transition from college to a full-time teaching position and how to make that as smooth as possible.” Wig’s goal through receiving off-campus experience was to teach high school songwriting and a modern band class to change student lives.

The School of Education emphasized building educators through a well-rounded curriculum and expanding students’ knowledge through opportunities that provided insight into what teaching in real-life could look like for them after they graduate from UM.

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STAY INFORMED Doctoral student in counseling psychology Lukas Novak and Dr. Joseph Signorile, professor of exercise physiology, discuss their project research findings at the 2022 Research Symposium. Photo by Artemio Pomares Story by Mia Rivas Design by Kaylee Mendoza ROBO FRIEND Graduate research assistant at the sports medicine and motion analysis lab, Zac Ricip, attempts to educate students with Sebastian the robot at the School of Education and Human Development tent during Homecoming’s Foote on the Green. Photo by Jenny Abreu

SHOW ‘N TELL Biomedical Engineering students of class (Introduction to Medical Robotics) watched demonstrations of robot-assisted orthopedic surgery during their visiting to Stryker, one of the world’s leading medical technology companies.

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JUNIOR

“I chose to study environmental engineering because I was good at math and I loved being outside. Combining the two gave me a major that has the capabilities of changing the world & making it a better place for life.”

ACADEMICS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

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Photo by Weizhao Zhao

TOGETHER all back

Engineering students relish in the spring semester’s lifted COVID-19 pandemic restrictions as difficult work loads are easier managed with in-person group learning

The College of Engineering emphasized teamwork and handson learning to gain knowledge and experience, so some students were disappointed when they had to begin exchanging information over Zoom calls due to the pandemic. However, the decline in the spread of COVID-19 soon allowed these students to resume in-person learning and meet with their teams. Junior Miguel Silveira, majoring in Biomedical Engineering and Physics, discussed the importance and convenience of working in person with groups for the curriculum in the College of Engineering, “Labs are intended to be done with a partner or in a group setting, so when we were forced to

work alone, it became more difficult to collect accurate data.”

Following the fall semester, students returned to work in groups for labs and projects. Silveria shared that there were certain benefits when utilizing this method of work. “Working closely with those in your group is not only helpful in the process of learning, butof creating connections with those in your field of study,” he said.

With such an emphasis on group learning and team work, Silveira found the adjustments to the pandemic made the course load more difficult, but spring semester brought back some highly appreciative students as UM shifted back into a much needed normalcy.

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STAND TALL The McArthur Engineering Building hosts a number of classes, labs, and more for students majoring in various engineering fields. Photo by Mariel De Moya SHOW-OFF The Shalala Ballrooms are packed with project tables, senior engineering students, judges, and visitors who can vote on teams to win a cash prize for their unique innovations at the Senior Engineering Expo. Photo by Allie Salvucci IMMERSIVE FUN Biomedical Engineering students visited CyberKnife Center of Miami, one of the University-Industry partners in Miami area. Students were given a sitelecture about robot-assisted radio surgery and a demonstration of quality assurance testing. Photo by Weizhao Zhao

TEACHING MOMENT

Professors conduct Suturing Instructions Class with students to show them the best techniques and safe practices.

THE HEART of learning

Studying in the medical field requires students to adapt to changes in classroom mid COVID-19

The School of Nursing and Health Studies prepared students to lead with cutting edge simulation-based educational techniques, research and a stringent course load. Students in nursing programs worked to complete a set of clinical requirements, where they received hands-on experience and practiced skills they would utilize in a real-world environment before working with patients. However, nursing students had to adjust to the change in clinicals as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The university adopted new guidelines to ensure the safety of students while maintaining a rigorous curriculum, which affected the clinical experience for many students.

Junior Lauren Yates found the changes to be extremely effective. “The School of Nursing has been good about

informing us of everything we need to know for clinicals. I am grateful for everything they are doing to give us the best opportunities possible during this time,” she said.

It was vital for these students to remain focused and keep track of their work and productivity throughout this time of change as different health care facilities were introducing different guidelines. While these changes were quite the adjustment, the online system, Complio, allowed students to keep all their immunizations and requirements organized.

Regardless of the changes they encountered, students still had the chance to learn more skills in the following semesters. The countless hours of clinicals, despite the changes, Yate said helped students learn what it would be like to work in the field.

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Photo by Julian Narchet TRAININ’ Students conduct an O.R. Anesthesia Simulation to prepare for their future career with hands-on experience at the School of Nursing. Photo by TJ Lievonen

PARTNERS Two students work on an O.R. Simulation in class to understand where to place various needles and tubes for the procedure.

PRACTICE makes perfect

Nursing students use simulations to prepare for various situations they may face when working in a hospital

CONCENTRATE A student completes an O.R. intubation simulation on a nursing manikin to learn how to perform an operation.

TOP NOTCH Students complete ACLS: Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support Training.

APPROVED Two students complete their CRNA: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Workshop with a manikin.

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Photo by TJ Lievonen Photo by Julian Narchet Photo by Julian Narchet Photo by Julian Narchet JOIN THE CHORUS Professor Amanda Quist conducts the Frost Chorale students at the annual Winter Wonderful concert. Courtesy of Frost School of Music TRUMPETING IN Professor Etienne Charles plays the trumpet celebrating the legacy of Melton Mustafa. Courtesy of Frost School of Music
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WIND ENSEMBLE Dr. Robert Carnochan conducts the Frost Wind Ensemble presenting Enigma. Courtesy of Frost School of Music
ACADEMICS FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC

MUSIC

to our ears

Those with the gift of music attend university to further their career in hopes of musical success

The Frost School of Music is home to students of many musical and creative interests. Frost consists of a variety of students, many of which worked hard to make it there, and who have dreams of making it big.

The school was dedicated to students with artistic backgrounds, which meant there was a required audition process to select who demonstrated immense talents and passion for what they wished to pursue. Isabelle Olmeda, a freshman majoring in Music Education, recalled, “The audition process was extensive, nerve-wracking, and preparing for them was a journey, but it was all worth it to attend my dream school at the University of Miami.”

As each student became a part of the Frost School of Music, they found their favorite and most beneficial aspects of the school. There were many students with similar interests and aspirations, and it built a “community that pushes me to become a greater musician and allows me to share my talents with those around me,” Olmeda said. In addition to this, it also provided many opportunities. “Performing Mussorgsky Picturesat an Exhibition in the Adrienne Arsht Center was a highlight this semester,” said Olmedawhen speaking about her favorite performance.

The Frost School of Music provides a safe space for students to create, learn and pursue their talents and passions while simultaneously allowing them to share these talents with the people in their community and beyond.

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IN SONG Graduate student Leah Torres and doctoral student Timothy Oliver rehearse Frost Opera Scenes before final performances for an audience. Courtesy of Frost School of Music COLLABORATION Doctoral bassonist Melanie Ferrabone and masters pianist Audrey Puschinsky perform with Ensemble Ibis. Courtesy of Frost School of Music Story by Maria Rojas Design by Kaylee Mendoza GUEST APPEARANCE Vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant and the Frost Jazz Vocal Ensemble celebrate Antonio Carlos Jobim. Courtesy of Frost School of Music ORDER UP Graduate student Cierra Hall performs with the Frost Reperatory Orchestra playing flute. Courtesy of Frost School of Music

UNDER THE SEA deep down

The goal of studying marine related subjects is to help learn how to maintain a healthy planet and protect aquatic ocean life across the world

Students and faculty in the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science were greeted with a new academic year of in-person learning and events to help raise awareness for the ocean and environment. With the surplus of opportunities offered to RSMAS students, they had a lot to discuss about some of the biggest events and extracurricular activities that came along with the school.

Ocean Awareness Week was one of the largest events, which involved different educational opportunities with the purpose of spreading awareness on campus.

Sophomore and Marine Affairs student Ellen Otterbach served as the education chair on the executive board for Rho Rho Rho, the RSMAS honor society, shared her excitement.“We strive to connect with the student body and faculty, staff and the community of Coral Gables to educate them

about the importance of our oceans through a week full of activities and events,” she said.

RSMAS students also found that there were many ways to pursue their studies and passions through different activities on and off campus. Marine Biology and Ecology student Allison Blatter, freshman, joined the Marine Mammal Rescue Team.

Students that are part of the team went through a stranding certification course, and following certification, were trained to respond to calls from local stranding organizations. “The team also goes on rewarding and fun trips to see different marine mammals in the wild and rehabilitation centers,” she said. With the large number of activities and extracurriculars, this past year was packed with spreading awareness and becoming actively involved in saving the atmosphere, oceans and its creatures.

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OUT BOATING Freshman undergraduates Cade Smith, George Gramza, Valentina Gomez and Adam McInerney embark on a first-year student research cruise on a UM RSMAS boat that is frequently used by field professionals. Photo courtesy of Diana Udel TAKE A LOOK With the help of an advanced microscope from an on-campus laboratory, undergraduate student Madison Scott conducts research on an unknown collected specimen from the ocean. Photo courtesy of Diana Udel
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WATERFRONT The Rosenstiel campus sits along Biscayne Bay, providing access to local marine life for student research. Photo courtesy of Diana Udel OBSERVE Undergraduate students Marisa Annunziato and Dylan Stegman examine coral specimens that marine students grew in an on-campus lab. They examine its growth. Photo courtesy of Diana Udel COLLABORATE Professor Chris Langdon, who teaches Marine Biology and Ecology, works with undergraduate student Adrianna Davis on a digital coral model. Photo courtesy of Diana Udel

TIME TO master it

Choosing to what pursue for a higher education is a decision that students do not take lightly

With a highly-competitive work environment, many students opt to continue their education into graduate school to improve their chances of succeeding in the real world and to increase the amount of opportunities available to them.

When deciding whether or not to pursue a graduate degree, Pierson stated, “Once we realized that a five year option was available, my family decided it would be best to just go ahead and continue for one more year instead of trying to come back or going somewhere else for the degree.”

Luckily, some schools offer an encompassing program that includes a bachelor and master degree that students can take advantage of, such as Pierson, while other students are left going the traditional route and applying to graduate programs separate from their undergraduate degrees. Nonetheless,

students are still exposed to an abundance of knowledge and insight. “A Master’s degree will help me further research within the field and help me understand if I want to pursue a career in academia or more corporate,” stated Pierson.

Once in the work field, Pierson recognized how helpful a graduate degree will be by saying, “It will help me stand out by showing employers that I have a deeper understanding of the topic that most other applicants would not, coupled with the in-depth classes and extensive research.”

Although graduate school may not be for everyone, Pierson recommended for students to consider it, saying, “Oftentimes there are 2 paths available: doing research or more classes. This allows you to focus on either career path you want and there are great programs available for degrees.”

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CELEBRATE RSMAS student Olivia Williamson receives praise after her 3 Minute Thesis presentation on coral reef restoration wins first place. Photo by Lee Pritz BIG WIN Associate Dean Patricia Sánchez-Abril stands with Ph.D. student in Biology, Olga Tserej Vazquez; and Ph.D. student in Sociology & Criminology, Oshea D. Johnson at the Annual Awards Ceremony for grad students. Photo by Yuval Pritz GOOD WORK Postdoctoral Associate and judge Madelen Diaz takes a look at the presentation of Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. student Gabi Schwartz at the Research Symposium. Photo by Yuval Pritz JOB WELL DONE Brittney Davis, Ph.D. student in Community Well-Being, shares her Research Symposium project with judge Professor Scotney Evans. Photo by Yuval Pritz

A group of law students pose together before a competition with other classmates against the School of Medicine.

THE LAW perspective

Courses tailored to current world issues, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, are offered to law students

Nestled inside the larger undergraduate campus, the University of Miami School of Law is home to its own collection of course offerings and prestigious faculty and alumni network.

Kelly Malloy, 3L student, spoke on Miami Law’s everexpanding curriculum. “While classes on traditional law school subjects are always available, much of our curriculum is refreshed each semester to cover hot topics like artificial intelligence law and sneaker law and discuss the legal implications of current events such as the pandemic.”

Similarly, due to the meaningful relationships students were able to build with faculty, they even had input on the courses offered. “I requested a course on Patent Prosecution as I was gearing up to take the Patent Bar, and the Vice Dean for

Academic Affairs put one together,” said Malloy.

Malloy also took on leadership opportunities by serving as the President of Miami Law’s Student Bar Association, which allowed her to act as a liaison between students, administration, and the greater community.

“I planned our most successful Barrister’s Ball in over a decade, conceptualized and hosted a panel on diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace, and improved communication regarding the bar application and preparation processes for both in-state and out-of-state bar takers,” she said.

With a smaller community, UM Law showed a willingness to evolve the curriculum and opportunities as they curated their law school experience for faculty and students alike.

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TOGETHER Photo by Stephen Chang FOR THE PLANET 2L student Jordan Maun, Director of Student Life Jack Townsend, and Dean Janet Stearns celebrate Earth Day in front of the Alma Jennings Student Lounge at the School of Law. Photo by Shakira Valle

2L (GRADUATING BY MAY 2023)

“Law School may be overwhelming, but in the long run, you will begin to change, grow and transform to be the best version of yourself. You are braver than you think, more talented than you expect, and more capable than you imagine.”

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COMMUNITY Students study and meet up in the Hilarie Bass Bricks courtyard of the Miami Law School. Photo by Joshua Prezant. PLAYIN’ BALL The girls team from the School of Law poses at the Dean’s Cup competition, an annual athletic competition against the School of Medicine. Photo by Stephen Chang

ITS OFFICIAL Gauri

Agarwal, M.D., associate professor of medicine and associate dean for curriculum at the Miller School, pins first-year student Normila Barthelemy on August 20, 2021, at the John G. Clarkson Freshman White Coat and Pinning Ceremony.

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Photo by Jenny Abreu

SUCCESS journey to

Medical students are given multiple opportunities to become involved in organizations on and off campus

The Miller School of Medicine is known to encourage its students to support one another, as showcased by some of the many student-run organizations on and off-campus.

Biomedical Graduate Student Government (BGSG) was one of these organizations that focused on the needs of the Miller School of Medicine’s student body. BGSG Treasurer, Minh Lam, is a graduate student in the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology department. He emphasized that the “constant stress of setting priorities and self-care” led to a fundamental shift in focus of BGSG. He explained that the purpose of the group was to “approach supporting students differently... having to comply with new rules and mandates, mental health and burnout were main concerns among the graduate students.”

BGSG made great strides in supporting Miller students and took some of the load off their backs. One of the organization’s biggest accomplishments was proposing a stipend increase for Miller students to afford the rising cost of living in Miami. According to Lam, this “reduced the financial stress put on the students.” BGSG also held a major career development fair for students. “We invite top academics, industry personnel and advisors to come to talk to current students,” Lam explained. In addition, BGSG held an International Women’s Day Event, a Black History Month event, beach cleanups and more interactive community events to support students.

BGSG reflected the ways in which Miller assisted its students by offering a support system throughout the students’ journeys to success.

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WHITE COATS ON Miller School Dean and Chief Academic Officer Henri R. Ford makes the “U” with first-year students celebrating at the John G. Clarkson Freshman White Coat and Pinning Ceremony. Photo by Jenny Abreu JUST LAUNCHED Miller School Lauren Hucko and Margaret Koester launched Healthier Together: A Group-Based Approach to Weight Management and Lifestyle Change. It recently graduated its first cohort of participants. Photo courtesy of Robert Benchley SPINE SCIENCE Dr. Kar Men Mah, a post-doctoral fellow at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, is discussing data from a nextgeneration sequencing project concerning nerve regeneration with lab members M.D./Ph.D. student Jeffery Lowell, Ph.D. student Nick O’Neill and Vance Lemmon, Ph.D., professor of neurological surgery. Photo courtesy of Robert Benchley WE MATCHED On Match Day, March 18, 2022, five graduating Miller School students celebrate learning where they have been selected for residencies.. Photo by Jenny Abreu

EXPANDING

our education

Cognates broaden the reach of education by allowing students to personalize their credit requirements

what is a cognate?

Students fulfill the Areas of Knowledge requirement by selecting and completing a cognate in the three areas of the university curriculum:

1. Arts & Humanities (A&H)

2. People & Society (P&S)

3. Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM)

A cognate requires a minimum of at least three courses, for at least nine credit hours. A major, minor, thematic cognate, or an individualized cognate will satisfy the requirement.

Your major will fall into one of the three areas of knowledge, and you will complete two additional cognates of your own choosing.

You will craft an education that draws from UM’s unique range of schools and colleges with any number of combinations that represent your curiosities, passions, and career explorations.

CENTER OF IT ALL The Merrick Building, located at the heart of campus, houses several academic departments. This allows students to use buildings and classrooms for cognates that are outside of those in their academic school of study. Courtesy of University of Miami
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MELTING POT Dooley Memorial does not belong to one school, but classes across campus gathering majors of all kinds in the halls, allowing students to take their cognate courses in this building alongside other majors and minors. Courtesy of University of Miami

RAYAN ZEIN

Freshman

Major: Biology

Cognate: Psychology & Sociology, French

Why this cognate: Freshman Rayan Zein chose French as his Arts & Humanities cognate because his first language is French. He chose psychology and sociology for People & Society because it is related to math and interests him.

SABRINA MENENDEZ

Freshman

Major: Nursing

Cognate: Psychology

Why this cognate: Freshman Sabrina Menendez chose psychology as her People & Society cognate because psychology is a requirement for her major, so she decided to continue with the cognate.

BETTY SROUR

Freshman

Major: Sociology, Political Science

Cognate: Technology

Why this cognate: Not really a science or math person, freshman Betty Srour decided to go down a more technological route with her STEM cognate.

DANIEL HOFFMAN

Freshman

Major: Entrepreneurship

Cognate: National Government

Why this cognate: Freshman Daniel Hoffman hadn’t put much thought into cognates so he simply allowed his advisor to choose a cognate for him.

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AT WORK we’re all

Students can be found working everywhere on campus, from residence halls to The Rathskeller

While attending school, many students found it possible to maintain a job and a social life. Going out got easily expensive for students who wanted to get the full college experience. For that reason, student employment gave students the opportunity to find a job that worked around their class schedule.

Whether to decrease living costs, pay for textbooks or to acquire some extra money, students were able to gain work experience, while earning a wage. From offering campus tours, managing social media accounts, serving at a campus restaurant, leading workout classes or working for a campus organization, every student was able to find a position that fit their interests and skills.

There were many advantages to student employment, the most prominent ones being the abundance of options, the flexibility of managers to work around students’ classes and the easy commute to and from work. Danielle Jordan, a junior, had worked as a student employee in the residence halls’ computer labs for the past two years. “I chose the computer labs because my roommate worked there, the job is very relaxed, and I was able to study while working,” she said.

Regardless of where, when, or how often students worked, many of them left the experience feeling all of the benefits that came with it. From having extra time to study, improving their customer service skills, and putting extra work experience on their resumes, many students felt that being a student employee was one of the best decisions they made.

SHOWING THE ‘U’ President’s 100 ambassador, Zoe Fundora, gives prospective students tours around campus in the signature orange polo. She discusses amenities and popular spots on campus. The ambassadors also answer any question new incoming ‘Cane families. Courtesy of UM Admissions 150 ACADEMICS STUDENT EMPLOYMENT Story by Maud Joanett Design by Giselle Spicer DORM DUTY Jordan, a desk assistant at Lakeside Residential College, rents out a cart to a student moving into their new housing. Photo by Catherine Mairena
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ORDER UP Sophomore Reese Johnson calls an order number over the intercom at the The Rathskeller. Photo by Charisma Jones WHAT CAN I GET YA Senior Lainee Winter works as a cashier at the Rathskeller, where she greets students and takes their lunch orders. Photo by Charisma Jones SHALALA SMILES Samantha Lawson works at the front desk of the Shalala Student Center. Photo by Genesis Del Toro BEHIND THE DESK Meera Patel logs packages in the back room of University Village to get students their online orders as quickly as possible. Photo by Catherine Mainera

OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD

ACADEMICS STUDY ABROAD

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AT THE STUDIO Kris Berg, Carolina Camus, Lily-Rose Sheedy, Rebeccah Blau and Chloe Beach visit and tour the CBS News station in London, England during the Global Communication study abroad program. Here, they get to use CBS cameras and microphones to experience a day in the life of a journalist. Photo by Howard Seelig Charisma Jones moved to South Korea for the fall semester and studied biotechnology and bioengineering at Yonsei Universty. Photo by Charisma Jones ON THE WATER Gabriela Hernandez participates in the USeville program, which is a unique opportunity for UM students to participate in an exchange program in Seville, Spain. Photo courtesy of Gabriela Hernandez

THE WORLD we're all around

Seizing the opportunity to be educated in another country via study abroad programs is a rare opportunity

After a summer of wondering whether their study abroad academic plans would be altered, many students were happy to find that certain fall study abroad programs were greenlit. The study abroad department offered a limited selection of programs to attempt to ensure student safety. With this being the first batch of students who were able to study abroad since the onset of COVID-19, many seized the opportunity.

With a large array of study abroad programs across multiple continents, there were many to choose from. Hailey Ray, a senior studying Biochemistry, chose to spend her semester in Rome, Italy. During the URome program, a collaboration with the American

University of Rome (AUR), Ray said students had the opportunity to make friends from all over the world, develop their cultural knowledge, and learn more about themselves.

While Ray took many classes to expand her academic enrichment, she said she learned her most important lessons outside of the classroom. “The thing that changed the most is my independence. I had my first experience traveling by myself. I had to learn how to navigate a new culture where I didn’t even know the language. This forced me to be confined to myself and my abilities,” said Ray. Study abroad programs paved the way for students to gain cultural fluency, personal development, and expanded academic achievements.

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MY TIME ABROAD UM student Sergio Ganchala, back row second from the right, spends his spring semester studying at Cardiff University in England where he made friends from all across the world. Photo by Sergio Ganchala A ROYAL STUDY Nhadya Lawes visits Buckingham Palace on a weekend during her study abroad time at Queen Mary University of London study abroad program. Photo courtesy of Nhadya Lawes

FACULTY

The faculty of the ‘U’ are at the top of their fields and bring that expertise to the students in Miami

JOEL HOLLANDER Art history professor Dr. Hollander boasts a doctorate degree from the University of Minnesota in art history. He has since delivered numerous papers at museum and university conferences, curated exhibitions and served on panels at international art fairs. He has also assisted in designing educational programs funded by local, state and federal agencies.

LARISSA RAMOS Teaching Management for Success in the Global Environment and Organizational Behavior, Professor Ramos credits two leaders at the ‘U’ (Linda Neider and Gina Maranto) for encouraging her to bring her nonprofit management and leadership experience into the classroom. Her positive student evaluations reinforced she was on the right path and place. She appreciates how students are not only competitive but also cool and kind. She believes UM is a special place and loves the energy from the diverse culture.

KATHLEEN MCAULIFFE The course Professor McAuliffe teaches at the university focuses on a fascinating topic she’s written about extensively—how all the bacteria, viruses and other microbes that normally dwell within the body influence physical and mental wellbeing. She loves making complex science accessible to students—not just conceptually but emotionally. Her goal is to inspire awe at the explanatory power and elegance of evolution, and to convey the excitement and creativity of discovery. She structures her lectures so as to expose students to one piece of a scientific puzzle after another. Her favorite part of teaching is the “Ah-ha” moments in class and her UM students are very good sleuths.

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Interviews and Design by Jennifer Vega
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JOAN MARTINEZ EVORA Not only teaching business law at the Miami Herbert Business School since 2012, but also currently the Academic Director of the Global Executive MBA program, Professor Martinez wants his work as a teacher to open the door to critical reasoning and offer the space where diverse perspectives and disciplines can be brought together. He is a lecturer because the curiosity of wanting to learn has also made him a perpetual student of the law, a commitment he tries to pass on to his students.

MARGARET CARDILLO In the Department of Cinematic Arts, Professor Cardillo teaches Introduction to Screenwriting, Survey of Motion Pictures, and Professional Development in Film. She says being a film professor is one of the best jobs in the world. She gets to teach what she loves, and her job encourages her to practice her craft and do her creative work. She also loves the students who are the most interesting, hardworking, gritty young people out there having laughed, cried, pondered, triumphed, failed, and been creative with. The students inspire her and keep her up to date on all the slang. She appreciates that.

JORGE CUELLAR A math professor at the ‘U’, Dr. Jorge Cuellar obtained an associate’s degree in mathematics from Miami Dade College in 2001, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Florida International University three years later and earned a master’s and doctorate degree in higher education leadership and administration in 2012 and 2017 respectively from Capella University.

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FACULTY

HAN TRAN Dr. Han Tran not only teaches classic courses but her research interests center on the language of iconography, the reception of classical myth in the art of all periods, monsters of all stripes, Roman wall-painting, New Materialism, and Object-oriented Ontology. Receiving a doctorate in classics, Dr. Tran specializes in Reception of Classical Myth in the Arts and has lectured at the University of Miami since 2009.

HUGO FARIA A lecturer in economics at the Miami Herbert Business School, Dr. Faria has been teaching a variety of economics courses at the ‘U’ since 2014 with a doctorate degree in finance from the University of South Carolina after completing his bachelor’s in Venezuela.

MITCHELL SHAPIRO Dr. Shapiro began working in the film industry as an assistant film editor when he decided to go back to graduate school in order to pursue a Ph.D.. Once enrolled in my Ph.D. program, the faculty learned of his film production experience and asked him to teach their film production course. He reluctantly agreed and discovered that it was very fulfilling and that he really enjoyed it. He has now been teaching at thee university level for 46 years – the last 40 at UM with courses including Media Programming, Evolution & Impact of Television Content: The American Sit Com, and Honors Communication Colloquium. Many of his former students stay in regular touch and it is rewarding for him to see how they have grown and become successful in their various professions.

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The faculty of the ‘U’ are at the top of their fields and bring that expertise to the students in Miami Interviews and Design by Jennifer Vega

CLAUDIA HOFFMANN Dr. Hoffmann studied English at the University of Florida with concentrations in African studies and film studies. Following a Mellon postdoctoral fellowship at UCLA, she worked at the University of Toronto Scarborough and Clarkson University before joining the University of Miami as a lecturer in the Writing Program. She has published papers on the Nigerian film industry, as well as on representations of undocumented migration in global cinema.

KEVIN COLLINS Teaching Introductory Biology/Chemistry Laboratory, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Developmental Neuroscience, and Seminar in Biology as well as graduate classes, Professor Collins had some really great experiences in the lab and classroom teaching students about science which motivated him to pursue it as a career. He is really happy about the diversity of perspectives available from students and faculty saying every day is an opportunity to see the world from a new vantage point.

SUSAN LEARY A three-time alum of the University of Miami, Professor Leary teaches first year English as well as Advanced Writing for People and Society, and Advanced Composition. A love for reading and writing in college compelled her to pursue advanced degrees in English literature and creative writing, opportunities which involved much college-level teaching and fifteen years later, she is honored to say she still teaches at the ‘U’. She adores her students and says it is a privilege to meet students at this stage of their intellectual and personal journeys and to learn longside them each semester.

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DISTINGUISHING AWARDS honored with

Thirteen professors are honored with highly regarded awards that focus on the categories of mentorship, transdisciplinary innovations in teaching, experiential teaching and learning

Luis Glaser Mentorship

Award: Amiethab Aiye

Associate professor in the department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. He focuses on the treatment of disorders of the foot and ankle. Recently, he was named a top 10 faculty educator across the medical school.

Luis Glaser Mentorship

Award: Hilit F. Mechaber

Dr. Hilit Mechaber is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Sr. Associate Dean for Student Affairs whose professional interests lie in the areas of medical student career development and work life integration. She creates and oversees programs and resources.

Luis Glaser Mentorship

Award: Jonathan West Professor of Political Science and the director of the Master of Public Administration and the Master of Public Policy programs at the university. His research interests include public policy and administration, human resource management, productivity, local government and ethics.

Luis Glaser Mentorship

Award: Joy Beverly

As a Senior Residential Faculty member living in the Hecht Residential College, she engages with students on a daily basis. Going above and beyond her role as a mathematics lecturer, she hosts an array of formal programming and organizing events such as “Math Mondays.”

Luis Glaser Mentorship

Award: Carol-Anne Phekoo Associate professor of professional practice in the School of Education and Human Development department of Educational and Psychological Studies. She joined the University of Miami faculty in 2000.

Luis Glaser Mentorship

Award: Imelda K. Moise Assistant professor in the College of Arts & Sciences Department of Geography and Regional Studies. Her goal as a teacher and scholar is to integrate research, teaching and mentoring with community outreach by linking students to class content and research.

158 ACADEMICS PROVOST’S TEACHING AWARDS
Photos and quotes by the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs

Innovation in Teaching

Award: Margie Oleksiak Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education and professor in the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science department of Marine Biology and Ecology. Her research focuses on biological variations and how populations adapt.

Innovation in Teaching

Award: Derin Ural Professor of practice in the department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering and associate dean of student affairs in the College of Engineering. Dr. Ural has led efforts to address the need for innovative teaching and learning.

Excellence in Experiential Teaching

Award: Sonia Chao Research Associate Professor in the School of Architecture and director of the Center for Urban & Community Design. She writes and teaches in the area of sustainable architecture and urbanism, resilient design, and historic preservation.

Excellence in Experiential Teaching

Award: Rebecca Sharpless Professor of law and the founding director of the Immigration Clinic at the School of Law. She teaches immigration law and researches and writes in the areas of immigration law, progressive lawyering, and the intersection of immigration.

Innovation in Teaching

Award: Andrew Porter Assistant professor of Clinical at the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. His current research involves looking at how health promotion and harm reduction messages in college classrooms are disseminated through peer groups.

Excellence in Experiential Teaching

Award: Melissa Jane Barnes Lecturer at the University of Miami School of Communication medical school. She is managing director of the University’s first-ever student-run communication consultancy, Orange Umbrella.

Excellence in Experiential Teaching

Award: Valerie Coleman-Page Assistant professor of performance, chamber music, and entrepreneurship at the Frost School of Music. She is an internationally acclaimed, Grammy nominated flutist, composer and entrepreneur.

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ONE LAST TIME

160 ACADEMICS FALL GRADUATION
PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS President Julio Frenk speaks to the fall class of 2022 in his commencement garb. Photo by TJ Lievonen BACK TO TRADITION For the first time since the pandemic, friends and family of graduating students sit in the Watsco center eagerly waiting to hear the graduating names called. Photo by TJ Lievonen Sebastian the Ibis gets graduates ready for a C-A-N-E-S spellout on the graduation stage. Photo by Evan Garcia

CEREMONY december

Seniors walk the stage in the Watsco Center with a real ceremony for the first time since graduation of 2019

Friday, December 16, the fall commencement ceremony was held for undergraduate and graduate candidates at the Watsco Center. The non-traditional graduation time period coupled with rising COVID-19 cases translated into a commencement that was largely scaled-down in comparison to the years prior to the pandemic, but it still had a similar sentimental value to students.

For fall commencement, students were allotted only six guest tickets for the ceremony and there was a live stream for all of the families that couldn’t travel to Miami or weren’t able to receive a ticket to sit in the Watsco Center. While these adjustments did take place, some graduates shared that they were grateful for the opportunity to celebrate an in-person commencement ceremony. “I feel really grateful we even got to have the graduation. At the time, many schools had canceled their ceremonies entirely,” commented senior Megan Page.

In addition to the ceremony itself, Page found that the event caused her to reflect on her experiences as a first-generation college student. “It felt like a full-circle moment for me because I went into the college process alone and had to figure out many things for myself. Now, I am graduating a semester later than most of my peers. However, I graduated with a dual degree, and taking only an extra semester is a really big accomplishment for me and I’m proud of myself for that,” she shared.

Page, along with other students, rejoiced in their successes and reflected upon their college experience during their commencement ceremonies, grateful to enjoy the moment alongside friends and family.

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ON BISCAYNE’S WONDROUS SHORE Doctoral students raise their right fingers to sing the Alma Mater as the ceremony comes to a close. Photo by TJ Lievonen GRADUATE ENTRANCE School of Architecture students, masters and undergraduate, enter the Watsco Center to Pomp and Circumstance. Photo byTJ Lievonen THE BIG WAVE A student waves to her family as she makes her way back to her seat after receiving her diploma, still masked for safety. Photo by TJ Lievonen OPENING ANTHEM Graduate student Thandolwethu Mamba sings the United States National Anthem as his face is projected at the top of the stage, along with the American Flag. Photo by TJ Lievonen

OF 2022 the class

Spring graduates assemble in the Watsco Center as they come to the end of their college careers

The class of 2022 celebrated commencement at the end to an unconventional college career in the traditional Miami way at the Watsco Center on Friday, May 13.

“Graduation day was bittersweet. It was satisfying to cross stage with the same people I was in Watsco with on orientation day and see how much we had grown as a class,” said senior Julie Erhardt who graduated from the Herbert Business School. Even though the day was very

exciting, it was underscored by sadness knowing it was the end of our journeys at Miami and a goodbye to a place that had been home for 4 years.”

As Erhardt got on the graduation stage to sing the alma mater at the end of the ceremony, she was able to reflect. “It always felt like there was someone in my corner. I’m grateful to UM for a lot of things, but most importantly how much the people there care,” said Erhardt.

PRESIDENTIAL GRADUATE Student body President Landon Coles gradautes with his peers after a change-making term. Photo by Mike Montero DOUBLE DEGREE Masters students embrace after graduating in the Wastco Center. Photo by Mike Montero CORE MEMORY Sebastian the Ibis takes a photo with a senior after commencement. Photo by Mike Montero MAKING HISTORY Senior Madison Clinger receives her diploma and takes a photo with President Frenk graduating as the first female Sebastian. Photo by Mike Montero 162 ACADEMICS SPRING GRADUATION

Senior Caleb Polsky and friends exude excitement as commencement closes out and ends their

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BIG REVEAL Senior Nate Dumont throws up the ‘U’ revealing himself as a graduating Sebastian on stage. Photo by Mike Montero

SHALALA SHOUT OUT

To commemorate the Homecoming week of her senior year, a student decorates her cap with a scene of Homecoming fireworks.

THANKS TO YOU A graduate thanks her parents for their support during her college years by dedicating her grad cap to them.

GRAD SWAG

BEAUTY IN NURSING

Decorated in pink and white flowers, a student celebrates the beauty of the field of nursing with her grad cap.

BEATING HEART To celebrate their new BSN, a students decorates their cap with a stork and stethoscope.

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ACADEMICS GRAD CAPS Photo by TJ Lievonen Photo by Evan Garcia Photo by Evan Garcia Photo by Evan Garcia

FOR DAD To recognize all that their father has done for them, a student dedicates their graduation cap to their father.

PRETTY PINK As a new BSN graduate, a student dedicates her grad cap to showcasing the beauty of the nursing field.

BIGGEST SUPPORTERS

A graduate attributes her collegiate successes to her mom and dad by dedicating her cap to thanking them.

HISPANIC At spring graduation, a student dons a cap decorated in red, blue and white; the colors of her Hispanic country of ethnicity.

Graduates looking to stand out from the rest of the crowd create unique designs on their graduation caps that represent their individual majors, areas of study, personalities and more.
165 years to
Photos by Evan Garcia, TJ Lievonen and Mike Montero Photo by Evan Garcia PROUD Photo by TJ Lievonen Photo by TJ Lievonen Photo by Evan Garcia
166 SPORTS
TAKING THE SHOT Sixth-year redshirt senior guard Charlie Moore brings the ball downcourt during the first half of Miami’s game versus Florida State in the Watsco Center. The ‘Canes would eventually lose to FSU in a 61-60 game. Photo by Jared Lennon

SPORTS

Miami has an elite sports program that mirrors the stamina needed for academic courses. Student athletes are pushed to new limits during their athletic careers, and as a result, they break records and bring home championship trophy’s. The new season brought a big change to football leadership by welcoming new coach Mario Cristobal, and men’s baseball and basketball teams secured spots in championship games.

167

TRIUMPHS top hurricane

‘Cane athletes reach new heights throughout the year, posting school records and earning championship titles across all sports

Design by Giselle Spicer

WOMEN’S TENNIS

NCAA SINGLES CHAMPIONSHIPS

Daevenia Achong

Eden Richardson

NCAA DOUBLES CHAMPIONSHIPS

Daevenia Achong

Eden Richardson

NCAA TEAM CHAMPIONSHIPS SWEET 16

ALL- ACC FIRST TEAM

Daevenia Achong

Eden Richardson

ALL- ACC THIRD TEAM

Isabella Pfennig

ITA ALL-AMERICAN

Daevenia Achong

Eden Richardson

ALL-ACC ACADEMICS

Daevenia Achong

Audrey Boch-Collin

Diana Khoda

Isabella Pfennig

Eden Richardson

Maya Tahan

SOCCER

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC TEAM

Selena Fortich

Melissa Dagenais

MEN’S TENNIS

ALL- ACC FIRST TEAM

Dan Martin

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC

Bojan Jankulovski

Dan Martin

Martin Katz

DIVING

NCAA 1-METER DIVING CHAMPION

Mia Vallée

ACC WOMEN’S 3-METER DIVING CHAMPION

Mia Vallée

ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS MEN’S DIVING MVP

Max Flory

ACC 3-METER DIVING CHAMPION

Max Flory

ACC WOMEN’S DIVER OF THE YEAR

Mia Vallée

ACC MEN’S PLATFORM CHAMPION

Zach Cooper

ACC MEN’S AND WOMEN’S DIVING COACH OF THE YEAR

Randy Ableman

ALL-ACC ACADEMICS

Max Flory

Emma Gullstrand

Mia Vallée

ALL-AMERICAN HONORS

Zach Cooper

Max Flory

Mia Vallée

Emma Gullstrand

ROWING

ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS Fifth Place (School Record)

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC

Mackenzie Holmgren

Taylor Kuligowski

Abby Schwenger

Laura Alcorn

Stephanie Ferrali

Maren Stickley

INDOOR TRACK AND FIELD

2022 ARTHUR ASHE JR. SPORTS SCHOLAR

Isaiah Holmes

ACC MEN’S HIGH JUMP CHAMPION

Isaiah Holmes

ACC MEN’S LONG JUMP CHAMPION

Isaiah Holmes

ACC WOMEN’S 60M CHAMPION

Jacious Sears

ACC WOMEN’S 400M CHAMPION

Moriah Oliveira

ACC MEN’S FIELD POTY

Isaiah Holmes

ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS MEN’S FIELD MVP

Isaiah Holmes

ALL-ACC FIRST TEAM

Isaiah Holmes

Ayman Zahafi

Justin Forde

Kevin Arreaga

Jacious Sears

Alfreda Steele

Moriah Oliveira

Debbie Ajagbe

ALL-ACC SECOND TEAM

Khamal Stewart-Baynes

Davonte Fuller

Solomon Strader

Decio Andrade

Blanca Hervas

Moriah Oliveira

Kayla Johnson

Sierra Oliveira

Lauryn Harris

Ashley Moore

Hannah-Sophia Hall

BASEBALL

ALL- AMERICAN BASEBALL

Carson Palmquist

Andrew Walters

ALL-ACC FIRST TEAM

Carson Palmquist

Andrew Walters

ALL-ACC SECOND TEAM

Jacob Burke

CJ Kayfus

Yohandy Morales

NCAA REGIONAL WORLD SERIES

GOLF

NCAA REGIONAL TOURNAMENT Fifth Place (School Record)

168 SPORTS ACC AND NCAA STATS

OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD

ACC WOMEN’S CHAMPIONSHIP Team First Place Champions

ACC WOMEN’S 400M CHAMPION

Moriah Oliveira

ACC WOMEN’S FIELD MVP

Debbie Ajagbe

ACC WOMEN’S DISCUS CHAMPION

Debbie Ajagbe

ACC MEN’S HAMMER THROW CHAMPION

Décio Andrade

ACC MEN’S TRIPLE JUMP CHAMPION

Russell Robinson

ACC 800M CHAMPION

Ayman Zahafi

NCAA PRELIMINARY QUALIFIERS

Décio Andrade (Hammer)

Isaiah Holmes (Long Jump)

Russell Robinson (Long Jump)

Debbie Ajagbe (Shot Put, Hammer)

Kayla Johnson (800m)

Moriah Oliveira (400m)

Jacious Sears (100m)

Alfreda Steele (100m, 200m)

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC TEAM

Ja’Leah Williams

Kelsey Marshall

Destiny Harden

ACC CHAMPIONSHIP

Second Place

2022 STATE FARM COLLEGE 3-POINT CHAMPIONSHIP

Kelsey Marshall

VOLLEYBALL

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC TEAM

Angela Grieve

Priscilla Hernandez

Peyman Yardimci

ALL-ACC FIRST TEAM

Savannah Vach

ALL-ACC SECOND TEAM

Angela Grieve

Priscilla Hernandez

Janice Leao

ALL-ACC FRESHMAN TEAM

Peyman Yardimci

2022 U.S. NATIONAL COLLEGIATE TEAM

Janice Leao

MEN’S BASKETBALL

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC TEAM

Charlie Moore

Sam Waardenburg

NCAA MARCH MADNESS

Elite Eight

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BASKETBALL COACHES (NABC) FIRST TEAM

ALL-DISTRICT 2

Kameron McGusty

ACC ALL-TOURNAMENT FIRST TEAM

Kameron McGusty

ALL-ACC HONORABLE MENTION

Charlie Moore

ACC ALL-DEFENSIVE TEAM

FOOTBALL

ACC ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

Tyler Van Dyke

ALL-ACC SECOND TEAM

Lou Hedley

Charleston Rambo

DJ Scaife, Jr

ALL-ACC HONORABLE MENTION

Jaylan Knighton

Zion Nelson

Tyrique Stevenson

James Williams

Andy Borregales

ALL-ACC ACADEMIC

Lou Hedly

Zion Nelson

Tyler Van Dyke

IN ATLANTAfirst snap

The Hurricanes take a 44-13 hit in the season opening game against Alabama in Atlanta

Kicking off against Alabama’s Crimson Tide at the MercedezBenz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, the Hurricanes put up a fight in their season-opener loss.

“Walking to the arena was an out-of-body experience. I’ve never had the opportunity to experience a team that I love playing in such a large stadium,” said sophomore Erin Spinner, who attended the game.

After a 10-0 lead in the first quarter by Alabama, the ‘Canes finally put points on the board in the second quarter with a field goal by Andres Borregales.

“My hopes for the game was for us to put up a fight. There was no doubt in my mind that Alabama was a powerhouse and a force to be reckoned with, but I had hoped that we would put up a good fight and keep pushing until the very end,” said Spinner about the game.

By the end of the third Miami managed to place another field goal by Borregales and the single touchdown of the game was thrown by quarterback D’Eriq King to Xavier Restrepo, despite also throwing two interceptions.

The game against the number one team ended 44-13.

“At the end of the game, I was definitely disappointed, but I did leave with a feeling of excitement for the rest of the season,” said Spinner.

170 SPORTS FOOTBALL
Story and Design by Giselle Spicer CLOSING IN Freshman wide receiver Xavier Restrepo attempts to evade junior Nick Ross during Miami’s game versus Appalachian State at the 20 yard line. Photo by Jared Lennon TO THE GROUND Mike Harley tackles Alabama redshirt senior Brian Robinson at the hips at Meredes-Benz Stadium in the season Opener. Photo by UM Athletics FIRST DOWN Senior D’Eriq King passes a stunning 388 yards against Michigan State but also obtains a shoulder injury that will take him out for the rest of the season being replaced by freshman Tyler Van Dyke. Photo by Jared Lennon

THE CATCH Freshman wide receiver

Key’Shawn Smith reaches for the ball in an attempt to score during the second quarter but falls short versus Michigan State at Hard Rock Stadium.

FOOTBALL

Finished second in the ACC Coastal

Overall 7-5

OPPONENT

AT ALABAMA

VS. APPALACHIAN STATE

VS. MICHIGAN STATE

VS. CENTRAL CONN. STATE

VS. VIRGINIA*

AT NORTH CAROLINA*

VS. NC STATE*

AT PITTSBURGH*

VS. GEORGIA TECH*

AT FLORIDA STATE*

VS. VIRGINIA TECH*

AT DUKE*

TONY THE TIGER SUN BOWL**

CANCELED DUE TO COVID-19

*denotes conference game

**denotes NCAA tournament

RESULT

L, 44-13

W, 25-23

L, 38-17

W, 69-0

L, 30-28

L, 45-42

W, 31-30

W, 38-34

W, 33-30

L, 31-28

W, 38-26

W, 47-10

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DATE 9/04 9/11 9/18 9/25 9/30 10/16 10/23 10/30 11/06 11/13 11/20 11/27 12/31
Photo by Jared Lennon TRIPPIN’ Junior safety Gurvan Hall, Jr. tackles wide receiver Corey Sutton during the game versus Appalachian State at Hard Rock Stadium. Photo by Jared Lennon

SHINING achievements

The football team reveals the fifth turnover chain and second version of the touchdown rings for

BRING OUT THE CHAIN

Senior safety Amari Carter wears the Turnover Chain 5.0 after the first interception of the season, a tipped pass during Miami’s game versus Appalachian State.

HEAVY METAL Taking over three months to make, the version five helmet turnover chain contains 5,000 sapphire stones and weighs 4.5 kilograms.

ON THE FINGERS Also made of sapphires, version three of the touchdown rings debuts an M-I-A-M-I spellout across both hands when worn.

Photo by Jared Lennon TEAM EFFORT The team huddles around sophomore Jakai Clark and junior Cam’Ron Harris to celebrate their touchdown against Virginia with a snapshot of the moment. Photo by UM Athletics Photo by Austin Sapin Photo by Austin Sapin 172 SPORTS TOUCHDOWN RINGS & TURNOVER CHAIN

JEWLERY gameday

Iconic Hurricane jewelry gets its annual revamp with a ‘U’ helmet turnover chain and MIAMI touchdown rings

A PAIR OF RINGS

Redshirt juniors

Charleston Rambo and Corey Gaynor share touchdown rings after a 14-yard touchdown against Michigan State in the third quarter.

Design by Giselle Spicer ON CLOUD NINE James Williams shows off the new turnover chain with his teammates after he intercepted a throw from Central Connecticut’s quarterback Romelo Williams in the shutout 69-0 game including Marcus Clarke, Jordan Miller, Kamren Kinchens, Tyrique Stevenson, Gilbert Frierson, Bubba Bolden, Al Blades Jr., Chantz Williams, Mike Harley, Zach McCloud and more. Photo by Jared Lennon GOLDEN SUCCESS Freshman running back Donald Chaney, Jr. shows the crowd his touchdown rings after scoring versus Appalachian State in the 25-23 win. Photo by Jared Lennon
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Photo by Jared Lennon
174 SPORTS FOOTBALL
PERFECT KICK Andy Borregales kicks an extra point against Central Connecticut State University making all seven extra points in the game in the 69-0 win. Photo by UM Athletics IN THE AIR Freshman Romello Brinson catches the ball midair for his first career touchdown for 17 yards with the Hurricanes against Central Connecticut. Photo by UM Athletics READY TO PASS Tyler Van Dyke steps back to throw the ball passing 203 total yards against the Virginia Caveliers in a 30-28 loss. Photo by UM Athletics ON THE RUN Losing to Virigina in a close 30-28 game, Freshman Jaylan Knighton runs the ball in a pass from Tyler Van Dyke for a first down. Photo by UM Athletics

HOME IN THE END ZONE

OF FIRSTSbig game

Throughout the successes and losses of this past football season, there was quite a lot to talk about across campus. From the games where the team dominated to the games where they could’ve done better, the experience of attending a football game was always memorable.

Scoring a total of 10 touchdowns against the Central Connecticut Blue Devils, the Hurricanes played an exciting shutout game winning 69-0. For first-year graduate student Emily Chavez, this game marked her first at the Hard Rock Stadium as a ‘Cane. “Being surrounded by students made the experience great, as our excitement towards the game was communal,” Chavez said.

Within the first three minutes of the game, the Hurricanes had moved all the way down the field for Mike Harley to catch a 5-yard pass for the first touchdown. Tyler Van Dyke, a freshman, was called to the field with D’Eriq King out due to a shoulder injury. Van Dyke threw three touchdown passes and gained 270 yards throughout the game. Jake Garcia also threw two touchdowns and had a total of 147 yards. Cam’Ron Harris stole the show scoring three of the 10 touchdowns all in the second quarter gaining the ‘Canes 21 points.

Despite a delay of game at halftime due to lightning in the area, the Hurricanes on and off the team came back strong in the second half.

NEED FOR SPEED

Brashard Smith runs in for his only touchdown against Duke in the 4710 win. Photo UM Athletics Cam’Ron Harris sprints for a 57-yard touchdown, his second against Virginia losing by two. Photo by UM Athletics

THE SWARM defeating

Charleston Rambo breaks records in front of an alumni crowd at the homecoming game winning 38-26

With hundreds of alumni in the stands on November 6 for the homecoming game, the Hurricane defense was able to fend off Georgia Tech’s Yellowjackets in a tight match-up ending in a 33-30 win.

Starting out strong for fans at the Hard Rock Stadium, senior Mike Harley and junior Charleston Rambo each scored a touchdown leading the Yellowjackets 14-7 by the end of the first quarter.

The second, however, added 14 points for Georgia Tech as they began to lead 21-17. By the top of the fourth Georgia Tech surpassed expectation and were winning 28-27 with a small window for the ‘Canes to close.

A heart-stopping run by Georgia Tech 98 yards down the field in the fourth would have shattered the win, but the score was a point after touchdown conversion, which only gave Georgia Tech two points in a 33-28 lead by the ‘Canes. With defensive plays in the rest of the fourth quarter, the Hurricanes won in the name of the fans returning to their alma mater for the weekend.

The star of the game, Charleston Rambo, totaled 210 yards in seven catches throughout the game. He is only the fourth in university history to pass 200 yards and has the most yards second only to Eddie Brown, who had 220 yards against Boston College in 1984.

176 SPORTS FOOTBALL
CROSSING THE LINE Junior tight end Will Mallory dives into the end zone at the Hard Rock Stadium in the third quarter after evading NC State defenders for five yards, scoring a touchdown putting Miami in the lead 21-17. Photo by Jared Lennon CATCH THAT BALL Safety Avantae Williams, freshman, catches the football mid-air in his first career interception against Georgia Tech in the 33-30 win. Photo by Joshua Halper IN THE AIR Redshirt junior punter Lou Hedley punts the ball 46 yards during the first quarter to NC State. Photo by Jared Lennon BRACING FOR IMPACT Freshman running back Jaylan Knighton attempts to evade defenders and protect the football in the first quarter in a short run of one yard. Photo by Jared Lennon

FOR THE SACK

A CASUAL SCORE Redshirt junior wide receiver Charleston Rambo walks through the end zone after scoring a touchdown during fourth quarter winning versus NC State 31-30. PASSING BY Freshman wide receiver Jacolby George speeds past NC State defense, running the ball in the first quarter for seven yards. Freshman defensive lineman Leonard Taylor celebrates after sacking Virgina quarterback Brennan Armstrong in the eventual loss 30-28. Photo by Jared Lennon

20 YEARS celebrating

The 2001 Hurricane football team achieved the ultimate victory by winning the fifth National Championship going undefeated

Design by Giselle Spicer THE TASTE OF VICTORY Wide receiver Andre Johnson lifts the Rose Bowl crystal football alongside his teammates including quarterback Ken Dorsey after catching seven passes for 199 yards and 2 touchdowns in the Hurricanes undefeated season and victory against the Nebraska Huskers 37-14. Photo by JC Ridley COKER COLLECTS Larry Coker goes undefeated in his first year as Miami’s head coach with the 2001 championship team. Photo by JC Ridley 178 SPORTS ANNIVERSARY TRIBUTE

THE 1991 championship

The 1991 Hurricane football team defeated Nebraska 22-0 in the Orange Bowl, winning the National Championship, after an undefeated season. The team was led by head coach Dennis Erickson and quarterback Gino Torretta.

MIAMI #1 Head coach Dennis Erickson addresses Miami fans beside Sebastian the Ibis after their 1991 National Championship win and season. Photo by William Lai CELEBRITY STATUS Junior linebacker Michael Barrow signs his name for a fan after his second National Championship win in three years. Photo by William Lai WINNERS ROUND Players travel through Miami as fans line the streets to see the winning Hurricane team. Photo by William Lai CHEER FOR THE CHAMPS The Band of the Hour and Hurricanettes follow the parade as crowds gather to see the National Champs. Photo by William Lai CONGRATS COKER The city of Miami honors Coker and the winning team with a parade ending at City Hall. Photo by William Lai A LEGACY Safety Ed Reed, now the Athletic Director for the university, caps his senior year with a National Championship parade in Miami. Photo by William Lai DORSEY DEMOLISHES Quarterback and Hesiman Trophy finalist Ken Dorsey finishes the season with over 2,600 passing yards. Photo by William Lai TURNOVER TOUCHDOWN Senior safety James Lewis runs into the endzone at the Rose Bowl after a pick six interception for 42 yards to put Miami in the lead 20-0 against the Nebraska Huskers.
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Photo by JC Ridley

mario cristobal

Mario Cristobal has been named the 26th head coach of the University of Miami. As a former Hurricane himself, Cristobal was a part of the 1989 and 1991 National Championship teams as an offensive lineman. After his time at the ‘U’, he was tight end and offensive line coach at Rutgers for two years and returned to Miami in the same position for two more.

He was then named Florida International University’s second head coach in 2006 where he stayed for five years. After leaving FIU, he was hired by Nick Saban as Alabama’s assistant head coach and offensive line coach spending three seasons there. In 2017 Cristobal moved to the University of Oregon where he was also the offensive line coach under Willie Taggart. Cristobal then became the head coach for Oregon and remained there until being offered the head coach position at Miami.

In his introductory press conference, Cristobal stated his excitement about joining the Hurricane family again. “I can’t wait to get to work. This show of support here is just poured all in. The University of Miami was a game changer in my life. I’ve never been the same. Never. Because of my experience here. I believe I owe it to everyone that wears that ‘U’.”

180 SPORTS COACH CHANGE
SOAKING UP MIAMI SUN Arriving at Hard Rock Stadium for the pregame walk-in, head coach Manny Diaz and his Hurricane football players prepare for a matchup against Appalacian State. Photo by Jared Lennon BACK AT THE ‘U’ Mario Cristobal holds up a custom jersey 20 years after playing for the Hurricanes mentioning that as a defensive lineman, he never thought he would wear a single digit number. Photo by Jared Lennon A WARM WELCOME President Julio Frenk embraces Mark Cristobal after introducing him as the new head coach of the Hurricane football team with a $5.6 million salary. Photo by Jared Lennon SUPPORT SYSTEM Charles Rambo is congratulated by Coach Manny Diaz with pride on his recordbreaking game against Duke on November 27 becoming leader in receptions at Miami with 79 over the previous 72. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics CATCHING UP Coach Manny Diaz converses with a referee at the Virginia Tech matchup where the Canes ultimately won 38-26. Photo by Charisma Jones

OUR COACHfarewell to

UM alumni and head coach of five years, Manny Diaz, is replaced by Mario Cristobal from University of Oregon

After joining the Miami football team in 2016 as defensive coordinator, Manny Diaz coached the ‘Canes for six seasons as both defensive coordinator and head coach.

Hired by head coach Mark Richt, Diaz made his mark on the Miami defense. He invented the Turnover Chain in 2017, which has become a Miami tradition to incentivise interceptions and garnered a No. 4 NCAA defense in 2018 also scoring No. 1 in several categories.

Two years into his position, Diaz was offered a head coach position at Temple, which he accepted. Within weeks, Richt retired and Diaz was offered the head coach position at Miami and rejoined the Hurricanes for another three seasons.

With an overall 21-15 record with the ‘Canes, Diaz had some tough losses, but despite his disappointment leaving the ‘U’ Diaz will continue is coaching career at Penn State as their new defensive coordinator.

END OF THE FOURTH In the rain, Coach Manny Diaz turns to the student section and raises his right finger alongside his team to sing the alma mater after loss to Michigan 38-17.
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Photo by Jared Lennon INVESTED Coach Manny Diaz watches the field intently as Andres Borregalis prepares for his gamewinning field goal to defeat Appalacian State 25-23. Photo by Jared Lennon LOOKING ON Kicker Andres Borregales has a conversation with Coach Manny Diaz during warm-ups before shutting out Central Connecticut 69-0. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics CROSSING THE LINE Freshman Daphnee Lavassas records 18:00.5 in Virginia finishing 14th in the women’s 5k at the Virginia Invitational. Photo by UM Athletics SPEEDING TO HISTORY Freshman Elle Mezzio places 13th in the women’s 5k with 17:58.2 at Virginia’s XC23 Invitational which also marks the fifth best time in program history. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics
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KEEPING THE PACE Freshman Owen Doyle runs 28:01.3 landing 87th in the men’s 8k at the Virginia XC23 Invitational. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics
SPORTS CROSS COUNTRY

THE RUNliving for

Placing 13th, the women’s team records a program best finish at the NCAA South Regional Championship

With the uncertainty surrounding the two previous seasons, members of the Cross Country team took advantage of the time off to get back into their groove and it showed through their scores and their friendships.

Although COVID-19 provided several setbacks, it also allowed for extra time to perfect their skills and spend more time practicing. “We weren’t allowed to race as much last year, so we spent time training and were ready for our races this year,” stated senior Emma Langlois. Sophomore Dillon Fields agreed that the rest period provided “a good opportunity to rest and fall in love with the sport again.”

The team relied on the extra time to fine tune their talents, and it encouraged each person to succeed and push themselves, while still having fun with other team members.

“A few upperclassmen hyped everyone up for our workout using a karaoke machine and a strobe light because it lightened the mood and relieved some of the stress,” recalled freshman Elyse Bartelmey.

Cross Country is not an easy feat, but with the supportive and uplifting dynamic between the team and the students, it made it a lot more enjoyable. For freshman Daphnee Lavassas, the team is like a family. “I care for them a lot and I’m always offering any support or help whenever I can,” she said.

Building these friendships and actively participating in a sport they’re passionate about has led the cross country team to a valuable season filled with hard work and success.

CROSS COUNTRY

*denotes

OPPONENT
FAU VS. FLORIDA STATE VS. LEHIGH VS. VIRGINIA ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS* NCAA SOUTH REGIONAL** DATE 9/01 9/17 10/1 10/15 10/29 11/12 RESULT M,1ST W,1ST M,8TH W,8TH M,24TH W,1ST M,9TH W,5TH M,15TH W,14TH M,N/A W,13TH
VS.
conference game **denotes NCAA tournament
MAXIMUM EFFORT The women’s cross country team prepares together for the NCAA South Regional Championships in Cobb Stadium finishing 13th overall in the 6k run. Photo by Canes Track STEP BY STEP Freshman Austen Cannon finishes the 8000m with a 26:30.2 at the Florida State Cross Country Open at 108th.
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Photo by Athletics Finished men’s 15th and women’s 14th in the ACC

READY, SET, SERVE

Freshman outside hitter Peyman Yardimci serves during the third set of the match versus USF setting the ‘Canes up for a winning point.

Photo by Jared Lennon

Freshman defensive specialist Hanna Bissler bumps the ball against UMBC as the ‘Canes go on to win the

Finished third in the ACC

Overall 25-5

VS. NOVA SOUTHEASTERN

VS. TARLETON STATE AT TEXAS STATE

AT NOTRE DAME*

VS. FLORIDA STATE*

VS. PITTSBURGH*

AT WAKE FOREST AT VIRGINIA TECH*

VS. BOSTON COLLEGE* AT GEORGIA TECH

AT FLORIDA STATE*

VS. WAKE FOREST VS. SOUTH ALABAMA

185
W,
3-0 L, 0-3 W, 3-0 W, 3-2 W, 3-0 W, 3-1 W, 3-0 W, 4-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-2 W, 3-0 W,
3-0
1-3
RESULT W, 4-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-1 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 W, 3-0 L, 2-3
3-0 W,
3-1 W,
L,
W, 3-0 W, 3-1 W, 3-2 W, 3-1 W, 3-1 W, 3-1 L, 0-3

Overall 4-12

DOWN

ON THE MOVE the first half of Miami’s match versus Pittsburgh.

186 SPORTS
DOWN THE PITCH Sophomore defender Delaney Brown winds up to clear the ball during the second half of the’ game versus USF. Photo by Jared Lennon THE PITCH Junior midfielder/forward María Jakobsdóttir dribbles downfield in the match agaisnst Notre Dame ending in a 5-0 loss for the ‘Canes. Photo by Jared Lennon WITH A KICK Sophomore midfielder Annie Blair passes the ball during the second half of the match versus Pittsburgh. Photo by Jared Lennon

FLYING into the net

Despite a tough season, the women’s soccer team creates an incredible bond through the ups and down

In August, the women’s soccer team was ready and anticipating their chance to play again after an unpredictable previous year. The team had been spending a lot of time on the field training, working together and learning from each other to build a successful game plan, but many team members well went far beyond training efforts. The familial bond and comradery between the girls was key to ensure their stellar performance on the pitch. Melissa Degenalis, a junior and team goalie, agreed that this season “was the one that we grew the most as a team, especially culture wise. Our team dynamic is better than it has ever been and I feel like that’s reflecting on the field,” she said.

For many of the players, the relationships between each other was important on and off the field to ensure they performed at their best, and their numerous wins demonstrated this exact team bond and encouragement that existed between the women. Freshman Lauren Meeks greatly appreciated these relationships, and shared her experience as a member of the team.

“We know how to get serious and go after it when we have to but we also have a lot of fun together,” Meeks said.

Playing here, building friendships, and having participated in a sport they were passionate about led the women’s soccer team to a valuable season of working their hardest and never giving up despite the losses.

187
Story by Mariajose Rojas Design by Giselle Spicer Junior midfielder/defender Taylor Shell stops the ball from going out of bounds during the first half of Miami’s match versus Notre Dame at Photo by Jared Lennon STELLAR SAVE Junior goalkeeper Melissa Dagenais catches the ball during the Canes’ match versus USF at Cobb Stadium. Photo by Jared Lennon

SWIMMING AND DIVING

*denotes conference game

**denotes NCAA tournament

DIVING FOR the big win

Mia Vallée wins the NCAA National Championship Title for women’s diving in the 1-meter dive

OFF

INTO THE WATER

OPPONENT AT FIU VS SMU AT FLORIDA (DIVE) VS FGCU AT CINCINATTI VS OHIO STATE (DIVE) AT MIAMI* VS USA DIVING VS NORTHWESTERN AT GEORGIA TECH* VS BOSTON COLLEGE* AT FGCU VS FLORIDA STATE* VS GEORGIA TECH* AT MIAMI* ACC* VS GEORGIA NCAA** DATE 10/2 10/8 10/16 10/22 11/6 11/18 11/18 12/14 12/18 12/18 1/7 1/12 1/21 1/28 2/11 2/15 2/26 3/16 RESULT 1ST 4TH 1ST CANCELED 1ST 9TH 1ST 4TH 2ND 1ST CANCELED 1ST 2ND 2ND 1ST 9TH 12TH 22ND Finished ninth in the ACC
POOL PREPARATION Sophomore Lucy Ho prepares in the pool to compete in the 100 yard backstroke at the Miami First Chance Invite between two FSU swimmers. Photo by Jared Lennon AERODYNAMIC Freshman Emma Gullstrand places second in the 1-meter dive in the against FSU at the Miami Invite. Photo by Jared Lennon At the National Championships, Mia Vallée peforms springboard dive. Photo by Peter H. Bick THE BOARD Sophomore Mia Vallée wins first place in the 1-meter dive versus FSU. Photo by Jared Lennon
188
TAKE A BREATH Senior Grace McGinnis competes in the 200 yard freestyle event timing a lifetime best of 1:51.53 also competing in other freestyles and relays. Photo by Jared Lennon SPORTS SWIM AND DIVE
Overall 4-2
SHIFTING THE WATER Sophomore Savannah Barr swims 100m butterfly against FIU placing fifth. Photo by Jared Lennon

DIVINGinto success

‘Canes top swim and dive teams have another successful record-breaking season in the pool

Succeeding in the sport was about more than training and discipline, but rather who you trained with according to the teams. An encouraging training environment was crucial to take athletes to the next level. This environment included having coaches that cared about the individual athletes.

Max Flory, a sophomore on the dive team, emphasized the honor of having a coach with the “biggest winning streak in NCAA history” who sent athletes every year to the Olympics from 1992 to 2016. Savannah Barr, a sophomore on the swim team, shared her favorite part of being on the team. “Everyone on the team has big goals that the coaches contribute to and support,” she said. The supportive hand given by head diving coach, Randy Ableman, and head swimming coach, Andy Kershaw, paid off as four members of the diving team qualified for the 2022 NCAA Championships and the swimming team placed ninth at the ACC Championships.

On top of coaching, teammates were vital for support. Maria Coburn, a freshman diver, underwent surgery during the season due to an injury when she came to find out her fellow teammate, Brodie Scapens, had undergone the same surgery.

“He told me how to keep a positive outlook on things. He has worked hard to get back into diving and it’s really inspiring to see. I hope to do the same,” she shared.

BACK SPLASH Senior Carmen San Nicolas competes in the 100 yard backstroke at the Miami Invite placing first in several events. Photo by Jared Lennon TWISTING Freshman Emma Gullstrand places first in the 3-meter dive at the Miami Invite on campus. Photo by Jared Lennon
189
UP FOR AIR Freshman Kaitlyn Bitting competes in the 100 yard breaststroke at the Miami Invite earning a season best time of 1:05:97. Photo by Jared Lennon

THE GAME head in

In pursuit of March Madness, the ‘Canes reach number third in the ACC impressing fans and students

The men’s basketball team was the big talk on campus as they continued to move up the ranks this past season, reaching number one in the ACC in mid-January. Students that were fans of the sport and the team were able to discuss the difference in the student section in comparison to other years.

“The atmosphere this semester has been insane. With nearly 2,000 students that were deprived of basketball games all of last season, and with the style of play that our team plays like up-tempo, forcing

turnovers, and draining threes, it’s really easy to get hyped for a game,” said senior Rohin Vaidya.

Miami had a few key players, including third-year sophomore Isiah Wong averaging 25 points per game and sixth-year seniors Kameron McGusty and Sam Waardenburg averaging 18 and 21 points per game respectively. These players, along with others, were often part of student pride.

“The thing I love most about attending games is seeing our entire campus community come together and support our studentathletes,” said Vaidya.

With more in-person support and nerve-wracking close matchups against rival schools, many were determined to keep the first ranking in the ACC and the energy up.

ANYTHING FOR THE BASKET Sophomore Isaiah Wong twists midair to get a shot at the basket through Clemson defenders Chase Hunter and PJ Hall in the tight win. Photo by Charisma Jones 190 SPORTS MEN’S BASKETBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Finished fourth in the ACC

Overall 26-11

OPPONENT

VS. NOVA

VS. CANISIUS

VS. UCF

AT FAU

VS. FLORIDA A&M

VS. DAYTON

VS. NORTH TEXAS

VS. ALABAMA

AT PENN STATE

VS. CLEMSON*

VS. LIPSCOMB

VS. FORDHAM

VS. STETSON

VS. NC STATE*

VS. WAKE FOREST*

VS. SYRACUSE*

AT DUKE*

AT FLROIDA STATE*

VS. NORTH CAROLINA*

VS. FLROIDA STATE*

AT VIRGINIA TECH*

AT GEORGIA TECH*

VS NOTRE DAME

AT VIRGINIA*

VS GEORGIA TECH*

AT WAKE FOREST*

AT LOUISVILLE*

VS VIRGINIA*

AT PITTSBURGH*

VS VIRGINIA*

AT BOSTON COLLEGE*

AT SYRACUSE*

VS. BOSTON COLLEGE*

VS. DUKE*

VS. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA**

VS. AUBURN**

VS. IOWA STATE**

VS. KANSAS**

191
TO THE PAINT Sixth-year redshirt senior guard Kameron McGusty brings the ball to the net versus Florida State defenders after a pass from Sam Waardenburg. Photo by Jared Lennon
DATE 10/20 11/9 11/13 11/16 11/21 11/25 11/26 11/28 12/1 12/4 12/8 12/12 12/20 12/29 1/1 1/5 1/8 1/11 1/18 1/22 1/26 1/29 2/2 2/5 2/9 2/12 2/16 2/19 2/22 2/26 3/2 3/5 3/10 3/11 3/18 3/20 3/25 3/27 RESULT W, 106-95 W, 77-67 L, 89-95 W, 68-66 W, 86-59 L, 60-76 W, 69-63 L, 64-96 W, 63-58 W, 80-75 W, 76-59 W, 72-66 W, 82-72 W, 91-83 W, 92-84 W, 88-87 W, 76-74 L, 64-65 W, 85-57 L, 60-61 W, 78-75 W, 73-62 L, 64--68 L, 58-71 W, 79-70 W, 76-72 W, 70-63 L, 71-74 W, 85-64 L, 70-71 W, 81-70 W, 75-72 W, 71-69 L, 76-80 W, 68-66 W, 79-61 W, 70-56 L, 50, 76
*denotes conference game **denotes NCAA tournament BALL IN HAND Junior Jordan Miller drives through Lipscombe’s Jacob Ognacevic during the 17-point win. Photo by Charisma Jones JUMP SHOT GOLD Sophomore Isaiah Wong clears a Clemson defender while shooting a longrange two in their five-point win at home in the Watsco Center. Photo by Charisma Jones

ELITE EIGHTentering the

For the first time in history, the men’s basketball program competes in the final eight in NCAA March Madness

BASKETBALL

192 SPORTS MEN’S
Story and Design by Giselle Spicer LOCKER ROOM CELEBRATIONS Senior Rodney Miller Jr. and coach Jim Larañaga get drenched after winning against Auburn and continuing the the Sweet 16. FAMOUS SIGNATURE Sixth-year redshirt senior guard Kameron McGusty signs a fan’s shirt after arriving back to the Watsco Center on March 27 after a 50-76 loss to the University of Kansas.
193
Jumping off the bench as Miami leads Kansas at the half, senior guard Charlie Moore Photo courtesy of UM Athletics Senior Sam Waardenburg tips off against USC in the first round of March Senior Kameron McGusty sinks a three against Iowa State’s Izaiah Brockington in Photo courtesy of UM Athletics

the basket PUSH FOR

‘Canes pull through during crunch time advancing to the NCAA March Madness Tournament

With a season full of ups and downs and wins and losses, many members of the women’s basketball team had a lot to show for the time spent training, and supporters of the team had a lot to discuss as to how the season played out.

THROUGH THE PAINT Freshman guard Lashae Dwyer drives to the basket during the first quarter of Miami’s game versus Georgia Tech in the one point win. Photo by Jared Lennon
194
SPORTS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Finished eighth in the ACC

Overall 21-13

OPPONENT

VS. JACKSON STATE

VS. BETHUNE-COOKMAN

VS. STETSON

VS. FAU

VS. WASHINGTON STATE

VS. INDIANA

AT MARYLAND

VS. TULANE

VS. ARKANSAS PINE-BLUFF

VS. ROBERT MORRIS

VS. NORTH FLORIDA

VS. WAKE FOREST*

VS. NC STATE*

AT CLEMSON*

VS. GEORGIA TECH*

VS. DUKE*

AT FLORIDA STATE*

AT BOSTON COLLEGE*

AT WAKE FOREST*

VS. SYRACUSE

AT NORTH CAROLINA*

AT NOTRE DAME

VS. FLORIDA STATE*

AT VIRGINIA*

VS. PITTSBURGH*

AT GEORGIA TECH*

AT VIRGINIA TECH*

VS. CLEMSON*

VS. DUKE*

VS. LOUISVILLE*

VS. NOTRE DAME*

VS. NC STATE*

VS. SOUTH FLORIDA**

VS. SOUTH CAROLINA**

60-50

W, 51-39

L, 63-70

W, 76-40

W, 61-55

W 61-59

W, 57-54

L, 47-60

W, 78-66

L, 33-49

195
DATE 11/9 11/12 11/14 11/18 11/25 11/27 12/2 12/5 12/6 12/12 12/21 1/6 1/9 1/13 1/18 1/20 1/23 1/27 2/1 2/3 2/6 2/10 2/13 2/15 2/17 2/20 2/24 2/27 3/2 3/3 3/4 3/6 3/18 3/20 RESULT W, 72-67 W, 55-43 W, 54-39 W, 56-46 L, 47-62 L, 51-53 L, 74-82 W, 70-63 W, 78-65 W, 86-45 POST L, 46-47 L, 64-76 W, 69-60 W, 46-45 L, 49-58 W, 59-52 L, 66-79 W, 66-59 L, 66-69 W, 71-65 L, 38-85 W, 76-59 W, 71-55 W,
*denotes conference game **denotes NCAA tournament TEAMED UP Freshman guard Ja’Leah Williams attempts to get past multiple defenders against NC State. Photo by Jared Lennon Senior guard Karla Erjavec defends against Stetson’s junior guard Jamiya Turner as the Band of the Hour watches from the stands. Photo by Charisma Jones Graduate student guard Kelsey Marshall shoots against NC State’s graduate student Kai Crutchfield making the two in the eventual loss 64-76. Photo by Jared Lennon Redshirt senior Destiny Harden shoots a three as NC State’s graduate student Photo by Charisma Jones

OFFENSIVE PLAY Maneuvering through Louisville defenders Mykasa Robinson and Kianna Smith, senior guard Karla Erjavec runs to the basket fighting for a semifinals spot in the ACC Tournament. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics

SPORTS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

196
PULLED UP Teammates Karla Erjavec, Destiny Harden and Lola Pendande reach for senior guard Mykea Gray to help her up and move back down the court in the ‘Canes win against Notre Dame 57-54. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics THE FINAL COUNTDOWN Head Coach Katie Meier, who will remain a ‘Cane until 2027, celebrates the eighth seed pick for March Madness. Photo by Jared Lennon OFF THE GROUND Freshman guard Ja’Leah Williams shoots above Louisville’s Chelsie Hall to score contributing to the 61-59 Miami win as the women move onto the semifinals of the ACC Tournament. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics AT THE LINE Shooting a free throw, junior forward Lola Pendande sinks two baskets against USF in the 78-66 win to move onto March Madness round two. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics ON DEFENSE Senior guard Mykea Gray defends Stetson’s junior guard Kiya Turner in the matchup with a 54-39 win. Photo by Charisma Jones

Freshman guard Ja’Leah Williams breaks away for a layup in the winning match 51-39 against Georgia Tech scoring nine in that game and 248 points for the season.

FIERCE

From the ACC Championships to March Madness, the ‘Canes ends the season 21-13

197
Design by Giselle Spicer FOR THE FINISH Freshman guard Lashae Dwyer pushes past University of South Florida defender Elena Tsineke to reach the basket with eight points throughout in the 78-66 first round win of March Madness. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics Senior forward Naomi Mbandu and her teammates go wild after their 57-54 win against Notre Dame taking them to the ACC Championship game against NC State. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics BREAKAWAY Photo by Jared Lennon
winners

INDOORS keepin’ it cool

Indoor track team brings home several different ACC Championship titles after a successful season

Closing out the season at the NCAA indoor track and field championships, the ‘Canes end their winter with a remarkable set of wins in their wake.

Several school records were beaten by the indoor athletes including fifth-year Khamal Stewart-Baynes breaking a 35-year-old record for the 200m by .19 secords at the Carolina Challenge and the women’s distance medley race which includes Natalie Varela, Sierra Oliveira, Kayla Johnson and Daphnee Lavassas, setting a new record 8 seconds faster than the previous one at the Clemson Tiger Paw Invitational.

The season was also filled with ACC champions including Jacious Sears in the 60m, Moriah Oliveira in the 400m and Isaiah Holmes who received two ACC gold medals in high jump and long jump. Holmes was also named the 2022 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholar and the recipient of the Men’s Indoor ACC Performer of the Year award.

With 18 All-ACC honors presented to 10 women and eight men on the team and a season of record-breaking feats being accomplished, the team completes the season just in time for outdoor competition to commence.

MEN’S TRACK & FIELD

198 SPORTS MEN’S TRACK & FIELD HURDLING OVER At the ACC Championships, Andre Turay competes in the men’s 60m hurdles. Photo courtesy of Canes Track STEPPING OUT Senior Davonte Fuller runs the relay in the men’s 4x400m relay at the UAB Blazer Invitational. Photo courtesy of Canes Track UP AND OVER Junior Justin Forde competes in the men’s high jump at the Hurricane Alumni Invitational Meet at Cobb Stadium. Photo by Jared Lennon
OPPONENT ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS DATE 5/12 6/8-11 RESULT 5TH, 61 PTS 50TH, 5 PTS
IN THE SKY Junior Russell Robinson keeps winning with ACC Gold in the Triple Jump and NCAA lead. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics ON THE RISE Competing in shot put, senior Jeffrey Williams places fifth and takes third farthest mark in program history. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics
199
SPRINTS Record-holding fifth year RELAYING Fifth year Khamal Stewart-Baynes sprints with baton in hand placing second with his teammates. Photo by Jared Lennon RUN WITH THE PACK In the men’s 1500m dash, freshman Austen Cannon places second and sophomore Justin Rittenhouse places fifth at the Hurricane Invitational. Photo by Jared Lennon STRENGTH Junior Decio Andrade wins the hammer throw at the Hurricane Collegiate Invitational. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics
200 SPORTS WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD
Sabharwal de Bessenyey lands Freshman Erikka Hill competes in the javelin throw placing second at the Hurricane Invitational. Fifth year Debbie Ajagbe competes in Photo

WOMEN’S TRACK & FIELD

THE TRACK leave it on

Outdoor track and field athletes break school records and the women’s team become ACC Champions

The spring season of UM outdoor track and field brought the team to be the best in the nation. Each individual performance was crucial to the team success which made establishing a supportive team bond a priority. Junior Sincere Rhea immediately felt motivated by his fellow teammates.“Right after transferring at the beginning of the spring semester, the team welcomed me with open arms and we locked eyes towards our goals,” Rhea said. “This team is truly a family and I’m lucky to have become a part of it.”

The ‘Canes carved through the busy season scoring top times both in the men’s and women’s races while setting new school records. The women’s team saw five records broken this spring: the 3,000 Meter and the 5,000 Meter by Freshman Daphnee Lavassas, the 3,000 Meter Steeplechase by Freshman Bianco Banato, and the Javelin by Freshman Erikka Hill. The men’s team saw two records broken this spring: the Triple Jump by Junior Russell Robinson and the Hammer Throw by Graduate Student Decio Andrade.

A proud season for the history books and for Hurricane Athletics for outdoor track and field. Rhea summed up the team’s efforts, “It was important that we pushed each other constantly to get where we wanted to be,” and it showed as the team excelled on a national level.

OPPONENT ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS DATE 5/12 6/8-11 RESULT 1ST, 108 PTS 57TH, 2 PTS
STARTING SHOT Junior Jacious Sears starts for the women’s relay contributing to the first place win. Photo by Jared Lennon READY TO ROLL Senior Selina Dantzler prepares for her shot put event at the ACC Championships. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics CORNERS Sophomore Daphne Lavassas places second in the 3000m at UAB. Photo courtesy of Canes Track LANDING Sophomore Ashley Moore achieves a personal best in long jump at the ACC Championships with 6.00m and 19-8¼.
201
Photo courtesy of Canes Track

beyond the net ABOVE AND

Placing 28th in the NCAA, men’s tennis end the season in round two of the NCAA Tournament

With another season completed, members of the men’s tennis team discussed all of the events and lessons that made up their experiences. Players shared their favorite parts of the season, how the time spent training helped achieve their individual and team goals and the professional routes it led them to.

As the team powered through the season, they gained a title in the NCAA Top 20 Rankings, which allowed different members to create goals for the future. Franco Aubone, a fourth-year junior, shared that at the halfway point of their season, their goals were to “fight for the ACC tournament and to host the first two rounds of NCAA at home.” Similarly, these goals fueled senior Bojan Jankulovski to be better. When asked what his favorite part about being on the team was, Jankulovski said that “sharing one common goal is something that motivates me every day to get up and give my best...we suffer, win, and lose together.”

Beyond playing the game and winning tournaments, players headed on their professional journeys and shared what the season taught them. Freshman Martin Katz shared the skills outside of the game that it instilled in him. He said that through tennis, he “learned autonomy and organization” and had become a “better person by teaching me both discipline and selflessness.”

202 SPORTS MEN’S TENNIS
SERVE IT With a high serve, senior Benjamin Hannestad is unable to finish versus FAU due to cancellation. Photo by Jared Lennon BY TWO Freshman Martin Katz and senior Benjamin Hannestad beat Georgia Tech 7-5 in their doubles match. Photo by Jared Lennon A LIGHT TOUCH At the net, gradute Dan Martin taps the ball over for a point in a doubles win with senior Bojan Jankulovski versus FSU 6-0. Photo by Jared Lennon WIDE LEFT Running to the left of the court, freshman Martin Katz puts a wide ball over the net for a point versus Georgia Tech 6-2, 6-4. Photo by Jared Lennon ANTICIPATE Senior Benjamin Hannestad awaits a serve from FAU opponenets Carles Sarrio and Hunter Robbins in the doubles match. Photo by Jared Lennon

SMASHING IT

MEN’S TENNIS

Finished seventh in the ACC

Overall 17-10

OPPONENT

VS. TROY

VS. BINGHAMTON

VS. FGCU

VS. NORTH FLORIDA

VS. CLEMSON

VS. BAYLOR

VS. GEORGIA STATE

VS. MERCER

VS. FAU

VS. LIBERTY

VS. WAKE FOREST

VS. NC STATE

VS. MEMPHIS

VS. ARMY

VS. NORTH CAROLINA

VS. DUKE

AT LOUISVILLE

AT NOTRE DAME

VS. FLORIDA STATE

AT BOSTON COLLEGE

VS. VIRGINIA TECH

VS. VIRGINIA

AT GEORGIA TECH

AT CLEMSON

VS. GEORGIA TECH*

VS. SOUTH FLORIDA**

VS. FLORIDA**

*denotes conference game

**denotes NCAA tournament

203
RESULT W, 6-1 W, 7-0 W, 6-1 W, 7-0 W, 4-1 L, 0-4 W, 4-1 W, 7-0 W, 4-1 W, 7-0 L, 3-4 W, 4-2 W, 4-3 W, 4-0 L, 0-4 L, 2-4 L, 2-4 L, 3-4 W, 4-0 W, 4-1 L, 3-4 L, 1-6 W, 4-3 W, 4-2 L, 1-4 W, 4-3 L, 0-4
GETTING HEIGHT Senior Bojan Jankulovski lands after hiting a high ball versus FAU during his unfinihsed match. Photo by Jared Lennon Graduate student Dan Martin hits a volley in his singles win against FAU 7-5, 6-3. Photo by Jared Lennon BACKHANDED In a doubles match with senior Benjamin Hannestad against FAU, junior Franco Aubone hits a backhand in the eventual 6-4 loss for the ‘Canes. Photo by Jared Lennon

SPORTS WOMEN’S TENNIS

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Finished no. 4 of 15 in the ACC

Overall 19-6

OPPONENT

VS. USC

VS. KANSAS

VS. OLD DOMINION

VS. UCF

VS. GEORGIA TECH*

VS. CLEMSON*

AT WAKE FOREST*

AT NC STATE*

AT FLORIDA STATE*

AT VIRGINIA TECH*

AT VIRGINIA*

VS. NORTH CAROLINA*

VS. DUKE*

VS. COLUMBIA

AT NOTRE DAME

AT LOUISVILLE*

VS. SYRACUSE

VS. BOSTON COLLEGE*

VS. GEORIGA TECH*

VS. DUKE*

VS. STETSON**

VS. UCF**

VS. PEPPERDINE**

*denotes conference game **denotes NCAA tournament

DATE 1/28 1/29 2/5 2/20 2/25 2/27 3/4 3/6 3/11 3/18 3/20 3/25 3/27 4/1 4/8 4/10 4/15 4/17 4/22 4/23 5/6 5/13 5/23 RESULT L, 3-4 W, 4-1 W, 4-3 W, 5-0 W, 4-3 W, 6-1 W, 4-3 L, 3-4 W, 6-1 W, 6-1 W, 6-1 L, 1-6 W, 4-3 W, 6-1 L, 2-5 W, 7-0 W, 4-0 W, 7-0 W, 4-3 L, 3-4 W, 4-0 W, 4-1 L, 0-4
204
ON HER TOES With a backhand, junior Daevenia Achong defeats Celmson’s Eleni Louka 6-3, 6-0. Photo by Jared Lennon LOW VOLLEY Sophomore Audrey Boch-Collins hits a low ball at the back of the court in her win against Clemson’s Daniella Medvedeva 6-2, 6-3. Photo by Jared Lennon PREPARED TO STRIKE While awaiting her FSU opponent Petra Hule to serve, senior Eden Richardson squats on the court with her racket ready in her loss 6-4, 7-5. Photo by Jared Lennon RAQUETS UP Hitting a volley, junior Daevenia Achong shoots her ball over the net in her defeat of Georgia Tech’s Ava Hrastar 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Photo by Jared Lennon

GO GIRLSgame, set

Ranked fourth in the ACC, Miami’s tennis women win matches all the way to the NCAA Championships

As the women’s tennis team continued to compete throughout the season, many of the players found that there was certain dynamic necessary to compete in a composed and consistent manner, and this was a main contributor to the team’s successes.

As each team member came together to train and compete, many players noted that they were able to build a family that supported and encouraged each other to strive for excellence. “We are going through the best and toughest moments together and that’s what makes this team special. We are more than teammates. We are friends, we are family,” described sophomore Diana Khodan. As the season began, this dynamic helped the team succeed with a 13-4 winning streak.

Tennis players were able to use their relationships to their advantage this season when they were given the opportunity to play a match at Miami Open. This chance to compete allowed the players to exhibit their excitement through the power on the court. Khodan remembered this as a moment to “try those courts and feel how it is to play in that environment. We also were able to help show people what college tennis is all about and show them our level and what we’re capable of.”

As mentioned by Khodan, the women of the team were able to inspire each other, which allowed their chemistry on the court to be unmatched and created a connection that led them to multiple wins and opportunities in the sport.

205
TEAMED UP Senior Eden Richardson and junior Daevenia Achong team up in a doubles match in their eventual loss to UNC’s Fiona Crawley and Elizabeth Scotty 6-3. Photo by Jared Lennon

COMPETITION gliding into

Placing high in the ACC Championships, the rowing team posts best record since the team expansion in 2015

Rowing involved lots of practice and synchronization, and when the main racing season approached in the spring, members of the rowing team shared their confidence in their performance as a team because of the dynamic they were able to build in the fall prep months.

The team organized several team bonding activities that pushed them to trust and respect each other, which some players noted was essential to performance. Veronica Belloso, a sophomore rower on the team, noticed this shared respect and its positive impact on the team. “The team isf ull of very fast and determined girls and our shared drive to win brings us together. I would say the team dynamic is the best it has been in years,” Belloso said.

This extra time spent practicing and bonding was reflected in the very first competition of the season. Four team members traveled to Boston to compete in the Head of the Charles regatta where they placed third out of 54 teams. These results gave players hope that they would be able to continue the streak in the coming tournaments. “We placed sixth at the ACC Championship last year, which was the best result our team had ever seen. We think we will do even better this year,” Belloso said.

OPPONENT AT STETSON SUNSHINE STATE INVITE AT UCF LAKE WHEELER INVITE ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS* DATE 3/25 4/1 4/15 4/22 5/13 RESULT 3V8 2ND 2V4 2ND 1V4 1ST 2V8 1ST 1V8 1ST 1V8 PETITE 2ND 2V8 GRAND 6TH 3V8 GRAND 6TH 1V4 PETITE 2ND 2V4 GRAND 3RD 1V8 2ND 2V8 1ST 1V4 2ND 2V4 3RD 3V8 2ND 3V8 5TH 2V4 3RD 1V4 5TH 2V8 2ND 1V8 3RD 3V8 PETITE 3RD 2V4 GRAND 5TH 1V4 PETITE 2ND 2V8 GERAND 4TH 1V8 GRAND 4TH
ROWING
206
SPORTS ROWING
AT TOP SPEED Sophomore Breanna Roney, junior Isabella Larder, freshman Caroline Hanlon, and junior Brielle Racanelli finish at Lake Wheeler placing third. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics FORWARD AND BACK Graduate student Mackenzie Holmgren rows during practice at Indian Creek. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics
Finished fifth in the ACC
*denotes conference game

CONSISTENCY Junior

207
PADDLES OUT Freshman Aaliah Dawson pushes the water with her paddles at Indian Creek. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics IN TIME While syncing pace with her fellow teammates, junior Brielle Racanelli slides in her seat as the boat glide through the water against Barry University. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics LEADING THE BOAT Coxswain senior Abby Schwenger directs her teammates through the water against Barry University. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics Sara Hansen and sophomore Lily Butler are led by sophomore Tarynn Kaelin as they row against Barry University in the fall winning their race. Photo courtesy of UM Athletics
208 SPORTS GOLF
GET THE DRIVE Junior Anna Backman ties for eighth ending ther round even in the Bahamas. Photo by Ronnie Archer STRAIGHTAWAY DRIVE Following through on a drive, sophomore Daniella Barrett finishes the invitational tied for 17th at plus five. Photo by Ronnie Archer PUTT FOR PAR Sophomore Franziska Sliper putts to sink her ball at the White Sands Invitational in the Bahamas finishing 16th. Photo by Ronnie Archer GOLDEN GIRLS Junior Anna Backman and freshman Sara Byrne celebrate their match in the Bahamas individually placing tied for 8th and tied for 10th. Photo by Ronnie Archer A FAIR SWING Sophomore Morgan Pankow swings on the fairway as the team finishes third at the end of the competition. Photo by Ronnie Archer WORKING THE COURSE Junior Anna Backman swings at the White Sands Invitational tying for eighth in the individual round and placing third with the team. Photo by Ronnie Archer

VS. WHITE SANDS VS. UCF VS. LOUISVILLE VS. FSU

VS. VALSPAR

VS. CLEMSON

VS. ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS*

VS. NCAA REGIONALS**

PARADISE swinging in

History is made as the program finishing fifth at the NCAA South Regional Championship in Tallahassee

With placing ninth out of 17 teams in the first tournament to kick off the season, the golf team was starting at a lower performance than expected. Throughout the season, the team placed somewhat inconsistently, with some of them ranking in the bottom half percent, like the FSU Match-Up where they placed seventh out of 12 teams, and other tournaments where they ranked higher, like the White Sands Invitational where they received third place out of seven teams.

Despite some of the lower-ranking tournaments, some players shared their feeling about the performance as a team. For junior Franziska Sliper, with 1,337 strokes throughout the season and one top-20 finish, she felt that these stats didn’t necessarily reflect the team’s capabilities. “We’re a strong team and I know we haven’t shown our full potential yet,” she said.

The team did compete successfully at other tournaments throughout the season, with one of them being the Jim West Challenge, where they finished in third place out of 15 teams. Throughout this tournament, the team collectively had par-72 and 6,415 yards. Sara Byrne had 209 strokes and Daniella Barrett had 208, which earned them both top 10 rankings individually.“There have been successful tournaments in the fall that have helped us trend in the right direction and I am sure that it will result in a great end to our season,” Sliper said.

While there were ups and downs throughout the season, the golf team was hoping to start an upward trajectory as they reached the spring semester.

OPPONENT
VS. CHARLESTON VS. TENNESSEE VS. TEXAS STATE
DATE 9/13 9/20 10/17 10/22 2/6 2/20 2/25 3/12 3/25 4/14 5/9 RESULT 9TH 2ND 3RD 3RD 8TH 15TH 7TH 7TH 7TH 9TH 5TH GOLF
209
RIDING BY Sophomore Morgan Pankow drives sophomore Franziska Sliper to their next hole finishing 33rd and 16th at White Sands. Photo by Ronnie Archer *denotes conference game
Finished fifth in the ACC
**denotes NCAA tournament

Sophomore Ronaldo Gallo winds to pitch against Boston College in a winning series eventually ending the season with 42 strike outs.

210
FIRST OUT UNC sophomore Mac Horvath is called out after a catch from Miami’s sophomore first baseman CJ Kayfus in the 3-2 win for the ‘Canes. Photo by Jared Lennon FIERCE FOCUS Photo by Jared Lennon HOMER Fresh off a home run, freshman outfielder Edgardo Villegas jogs through the bases in a loss against Boston College 12-11. Photo by Jared Lennon CATCHING AIR Preparing for a pitch, first baseman CJ Kayfus bounces against Florida. Photo by Jared Lennon THROW TO CATCH Left-handed freshman Rafe Schlesinger throws a practice pitch to sophomore catcher Carlos Perez between innings in the 15-5 win against Virginia. Photo by Jared Lennon FOR THE RUN Hitting a single with a .272 average, junior catcher Maxwell Romero Jr. helps CJ Kayfus score in a win against Virginia. Photo by Jared Lennon

BASEBALL

OPPONENT VS. TOWSON VS. TOWSON VS. TOWSON VS. FAU VS. HARVARD VS. HARVARD VS. HARVARD VS. FLORIDA VS. FLORIDA VS. FLORIDA

AT FIU VS. BOSTON COLLEGE* VS. BOSTON COLLEGE* VS. BOSTON COLLEGE*

AT UCF

AT CLEMSON*

AT CLEMSON*

AT CLEMSON*

AT FAU VS. NORTH CAROLINA* VS. NORTH CAROLINA* VS. NORTH CAROLINA*

AT FGCU

AT DUKE*

AT DUKE*

AT DUKE* VS. FGCU VS. FIU VS. VIRGINIA* VS. VIRGINIA* VS. VIRGINIA* VS. FAU AT VIRGINIA TECH*

AT VIRGINIA TECH*

AT VIRGINIA TECH* VS. BETHUNE-COOKMAN VS. PITTSBURGH* VS. PITTSBURGH* VS. PITTSBURGH* VS. STETSON AT GEORGIA TECH*

AT GEORGIA TECH*

AT GEORGIA TECH* VS. NORTH DAKOTA STATE VS. NORTH DAKOTA STATE VS. NORTH DAKOTA STATE

AT FLORIDA STATE*

AT FLORIDA STATE*

AT FLORIDA STATE* VS. FGCU VS. NOTRE DAME VS. NOTRE DAME VS. NOTRE DAME

TO THE TOP home run

With a fresh young team, the Hurricanes fly near the top of the NCAA, ranking number two in the mid-season

As members of the baseball team operated throughout the season, the coaches and many players had to adjust to a roster full of younger students. With 31 players in total and 27 of them being either freshmen or sophomores, there were different obstacles that players had to overcome, as well as different opportunities for them to bond.

Despite the unconventional team, the season ended with few games lost. After competing in 60 games in total, the team lost 20 games with close match-ups against Boston College with an 11-12 score and Harvard with 6-11. Catcher Maxwell Romero Jr., who caught 313 times this past season, spoke about how the younger team affected the way they operated on and off the field.

“One of the biggest differences this year is the chemistry and love for one another. This team is younger, but we have such a tight bond that it makes us even better when we play,” he said.

Jacob Burke, a sophomore that played in an outfield position, discussed further how the younger students contributed to the chemistry that Romero also noticed.

“There is an unfathomable amount of chemistry both in the locker room and on the field. It is great because we are all best friends, meaning that we always have each other’s backs and are always committed to doing the best thing for the team,” Burke commented.

The success is reflected in the season’s statistics as they finished off the season going two round in the ACC Championship and advancing to the NCAA Regionals.

W, 13-2

W, 22-0

W, 16-1

W, 6-4

W, 8-2

L, 6-4

L, 6-4

L, 7-3

W, 6-4

L, 5-0

W, 16-7

DATE 2/18 2/19 2/20 2/23 2/25 2/26 2/27 3/4 3/5 3/6 3/8 3/11 3/12 3/13 3/16 3/18 3/19 3/20 3/23 3/25 3/26 3/27 3/30 4/1 4/2 4/3 4/5 4/6 4/8 4/9 4/10 4/12 4/14 4/15 4/16 4/19 4/22 4/23 4/24 4/26 4/29 4/30 5/1 5/6 5/7 5/8 5/13 5/14 5/15 5/17 5/19 5/20 5/21 RESULT W, 10-8 W, 13-2 W, 11-1 W, 9-1 L, 11-6 W, 2-1 W, 10-0 W, 5-2 L, 8-1 L, 11-3 W, 12-5 L, 12-11 W, 11-3 W, 12-2 L, 10-5 W, 11-4 W, 4-1 L, 20-5 W, 7-1 W, 8-5 W, 7-3 W, 3-2 W, 11-7 W, 4-1 W, 4-3 W, 11-3 W, 5-2 W, 17-1 W, 6-2 W, 5-4 W, 15-5 W, 7-6 L, 13-2 W, 8-5 W, 9-0 W, 2-1 W, 17-2 L, 9-4 L, 12-4 L, 12-4 L, 3-1 L, 7-5
211
Finished second in the ACC Coastal
*denotes conference game post season scoreboard on
page 213
SINGLE WIN After a single from freshman Renzo Gonzalez that resulted in a winning run, Gaby Gutierrez, JP Gates, and Dominic Pitelli celebrate 3-2 versus UNC. Photo by Jared Lennon
Overall 40-20

& SO CLEAN so fresh

Holding their number six national spot, Miami baseball tries to advance to the College World Series but falls short

SPORTS BASEBALL

212
ROUNDING THE CORNER In the 11-3 win against Boston College, infield sophomore CJ Kayfus rounds third base but doesn’t make the run for the ‘Canes. Photo by Jared Lennon OUTFIELD DIVE Freshman outfielder Edgardo Villegas catches taking out a Florida hitter after diving for the baseball, but it is not enough for a win. Photo by Jared Lennon RUNNING HOME Outfielder Jacob Burke runs home and scores after a Dominic Pitelli hit a double versus Boston College winning 12-2. Photo by Jared Lennon ON THE MOUND Freshman pitcher Rafe Schlesinger lobs a pitch against Florida in the 3-11 Sunday loss. Photo by Jared Lennon AND A SLIDE Sliding home, sophomore infielder Dominic Pitelli adds a point to the eventual 15-5 blow out against the University of Virginia. Photo by Jared Lennon
213
ball close to the ground versus

women’s basketball

women’s tennis

214 SPORTS GROUP SHOTS
Alex Santos, Julia Rapicavoli, Audrey Boch-Collins, Eden Richardson, Tatyana Nikolenko, Isabella Pfenning, Maya Tahan, Diana Khodan, Daevenia Achong, Paige Yaroshuk-Tews FRONT ROW: Jasmyne Roberts, Lashae Dwyer, Kenza Salgues, Kelsey Marshall, Ja’Leah Williams, Karla Erjavec, Mykea Gray; BACK ROW: Moulayna Johnson Sidi Baba, Lola Pendande, Maeva Djaldi-Tabdi, Paula Fraile Ruiz, Naomi Mbandu, Chiso Okafor, Destiny Harden

men’s basketball

FRONT ROW: Jakai Robinson, Thomas Oosterbroek, Deng Gak, Sam Waardenburg, Rodney Miller Jr., Anthony Walker, Jordan Miller, Harlond Beverly; BACK

Isaiah Wong, Filippos Gkogkos, Kameron McGusty, Jim Larrañaga, Charlie Moore, Bensley Joseph, Wooga Poplar

FRONT ROW: Nataliya Gustav, Sara Byrne, Morgan Pankow; SECOND ROW: Kristina Frydlova, Franziska Sliper, Anna Backman; BACK ROW: John Koskinen, Daniella Barrett, Patti Rizzo

215
golf
ROW:

swim and dive

FRONT ROW: Giulia Carvalho, Emma Gullstrand, Maria Coburn, Jacey Hinton, Kaitlyn Bitting, Ariana Brattoli, Lucy Miller; SECOND ROW: Randy Ableman, Dario di Fazio, Lucy Ho, Emma Sundstrand, Savannah Barr, Zach Hinsley, Andy Kershaw; THIRD ROW: Mia Vallée, Una Forsythe, Isabel Traba, Brodie Scans, Max Flory, Nicole Sowell, Adrianna Cera, Aino Otava; BACK ROW: Millie Haffety, Grace McGinnis, Zorry Mason, Maddie Lauther, Emily Weissman, Danika Huizinga, Carmen San Nicolas, Sydney Knapp, Zach Cooper

rowing

FRONT ROW: Claire Frenkel, Lindsay Yap, Laura Alcorn, Shelly Sclater, Abby Schwenger, Maren Stickley, Brielle Racanelli, Breanna Roney, Christine Marsell, Stephanie Ferrali, Carline Rodriguez, Alyssa Bacchus SECOND ROW: Kristen Harkins, Anastasia Ray, Lily Butler, Liane Lopez, Sabina Lewis, Samantha Tripp, Veronica Belloso,Mackenzie Holmgren, Laura Johnson, Sara Hansen, Isabella Larder BACK ROW: Dave Sanderson, Colin Regan, Arianna Luther, Ellie Hartman, Kathleen Hanson, Mimmi Balaam, Aaliah Dawson, Casey Morgan, Taylor Kuligowski, Emmalyn Brenner, Caroline Hanlon, Maya Feldman, Elizabeth Arrowsmith, Olympia Binos, Emma Tschetter, Fiona Magee, Lauren Lusardi, Paige Jackett, Constance Stirling, Marilou Chardin

216 SPORTS GROUP SHOTS

men’s tennis

FRONT ROW: Gage Ziehl, Dorian Gonzalez Jr., Edgardo Villegas, Ariel Garcia, Jacob Burke, Dominic Pitelli, Renzo Gonzalez, Henry Wallen, Gaby Gutierrez, Alejandro Rosario; SECOND ROW: Daivd Feeley, H.R. Powell, Jonathan Anderson, J.D. Arteaga, Gino DiMare, Norbert Lopez, Brandon Brewer, Anthony Arguelles, Robert “G.M.” McDaniel, Julian Rivera; THIRD ROW: Jacoby Long, Mike Rosario, Carlos Perez, JP Gates, Maxwell Romero Jr., Zach Levenson, CJ Kayfus, Alejandro Torres, Jordan Dubberly, JD Jones BACK ROW: Karson Ligon, Rafe Schlesinger, David Rossow, Jake Garland, Carson Palmquist, Ronaldo Gallo, Lorenzo Carrier, Alex McFarlane, Andrew Walters, Matt Raudelunas, Yohandy Morales

baseball
FRONT ROW: Benjamin Hannestad, Bojan Jankulovski; BACK ROW: Juan Martin Jalif, Franco Aubone, Dan Martin, Martin Katz, Oren Vasser, Casper Christensen
217

GREEKS

Involvement in Greek life on campus is at an all time high. To ensure everyone at the university can be involved in Greek life, several types of sororities, councils and fraternities are active. Students can join the Multicultural Greek Council, or a traditional sorority and fraternity. With 26 Greek organizations on campus, ‘Canes can participate in something that makes their undergraduate years more memorable and significant.

218 GREEKS

ALL SMILES FOR SERVICE Sisters of Chi Omega, including Danielle Tenberg, Jocelyn Rodenstein, Cailey Cahoon and Claire Connelly raise $15,000 for the Make a Wish foundation and celebrate by singing Disney songs. Photo

219
by Shea Halpenny

welcome home

GREEK MEMBERS

All four councils of greek life welcome dozens of new members at the start of each year

*Names and lists of new members for each sorority and fraternity was provided and approved by the Office of Student Affairs and Dean of Students office

Panhellenic Association

Kayla Schnieder

Kayla Trainor

Lara Montalbano

Lauren Carlson

Abby Stenn

Addison Becker

Adithi Vrushab

Alexandra Dauphin

Allison Topkis

Aly Kirsch

Alyza Capriles

Anabell Alfonso

Angela Maggiore

Angleina Harb

Anna McCarthy

Anna O’Brien

Ashley Cohon

Ashley Fanning

Ashley Schafer

Ashley Yankulin

Ashton Guss

Caroline Smith

Cassia Szaro

Charlie Gardner

Chloe Manke

Courtney Pappas

Danielle Bennett

Danielle DeNittis

Delaney Bertrans

Ella Dimmick

Ella Grbic

Emily Frank

Emmy DeBender

Emnet Naod

Em Pacheco

Erin Hufer

Gabby Whitehorn

Gianna St. Louis

Grace Crutchfield

Helena Restreps

Isabella Turco

Isabella Viscovich

Jenna MacMillan

Jessica Axtman

Kailyn Oganovich

Katharine Prather

Katherine Rose

Kayla Bruise

Lauren DiGemma

Lauren Groccia

Lauren James

Lily Alvarez

Maddie Reagan

Maggie Kid

Maggie Rabitch

Millie D’Angelo

Morgan Burhance

Morgan Pill

Navya Kulhari

Nicole Bateman

Olivia Teufel

Parker Owens

Payton Pettine

Regan Hakes

Reilly Hamill

Ryann Miller

Samantha Andreetti

Samantha Frankel

Sara Aframian

Sara Alessa

Shae Bianchi

Shannon Graham

Shelby Warren

Shreeya Chalikonda

Skylar Koff

Sofia Palacois

Sophia Villani

Sophie Accurso

Stefanie Yaegel

Sydney Acheychek

Valentina Waschbusch

Victoria JewulaAbby O’Reilly

Victoria Zanoni

Abby Pinkerton

Aishley Painter

Alea Voyer

Alex Poliakoff

Allie Rodman

Allison Joy Halpern Reish

Amanda Sale

Amelia Byrd

Anna Valente

Anna Skare

Bianca Martinez Penn

Bobbi Ward

Bryn O’Hara

Cailey Cahoon

Carlotta Porter

Catherine Butler

Cecelia Horrigan

Claire Connelly

Destiny Lyn Da Silva

Elise Roman

Emily Stens

Emma Beers

Emma Perrone

Eva Bowen

Francesca Dostillo

Gabby Biondi

Gabriella Barger

Georgia Elder

Gianna Rettew

Grace Cate

Grace Rivero

Gretchen Nauck

Hope Sears

Isabella Posoli

Isabella Pepdjonovic

Isabella Rodriguez

Jaidyn Patel

Janeen Llaurado

Jessica Wright

Julia Pilavin

Juliette Valle

Juliette Borges

Kaitlyn Reynolds

Katherine Considine

Katherine Schumann

Kathleen Davis

Kaylynn Siedlecki

Laureana Dizon

Lauren Papa

Lily Darwin

Lindsey DelliBovi

Lucy Schwartz

Madeleine Blaufuss

Madeline Hannemann

Madison Morneau

Maggy Ross

Mariajose Rojas

Megan Locke

Micaela Greenfield

Michaela Torres

Morgan Scola

Morgan Lutes

Natalie Rojanets

Nicole Maddox

Olivia Champion

Olivia Hennon

Rachel Davis

Regina Potenza

Remi Steinberg

Samantha Spica

Samantha Armstrong

Sarah Valcq

Simone Werner

Simone Lantier

Simran Arora

Skylar McEvoy

Sofia McMahon

Sophia Friedenberg

Sophia Tripodi

Tabby Garver-Mosher

Talia Gold

Tatum Pilkerton

Tiffany Ortner

Veronica Porges

Vicky Orozco

Yassie Habayeb

Zoey Eisenband

Addison Taylor

Alexandra Tomodan

Alex Bothe

Alexis Skarlin

Aly DeLaet

Alyssa Mirenda

Alyssa Longo

Amanda Kaplan

Amylia Wiesner

Anna Snyders

Ashley rvine

Astrid Lopez

Audrey Sanft

Blake Kimmel

Brayden Hill

Bridget Stoops

Caity MacWilliams

Callie Mulligan

Camille Pastore

Claire Cordonnier

Daisy Blumenthal

Eliza Jelly

Emily Arzola

Gabby Orlando

Gabi Quintana

Gabi Samano

Gianna DiStasio

Grace Bucklin

Haley Holland

Harper Boege

Hunter Holstein

Isabella Sullivan

Izzy Lemus

Jules Bober

Julia Riley

Kasey McPherson

Katie Nelson

Kelly Rennan

Laura Johnston

Lauren Whitner

Lauren Ohmacht

Lauren Bricca

Lauren Iannazzo

Lauryn Joseph

Liana Shtern

220 GREEKS NEW MEMBERS
ALPHA DELTA PI CHI OMEGA DELTA DELTA DELTA Design by Samantha Sweder

Lindsay Smith

Lindsay Arone

Liv Nolt

Mackenzie Heyliger

Maddie Lunson

Maren Valente

Margo Falack

Miranda Brennan

Monica Tan

Morgan Burger

Morgan Leo

Natalie Freeman

Nicolette Brigante

Nina Sideris

Racheal Cheren

Rachel Karlin

Rachel Lipsky

Sacha Levy

Sam Stellijes

Samantha Shepherd

Samara Grannum

Sara Kirkwood

Sasha Silva

Sohi Shah

Sophie Ross

Suhasini Simlote

Sydney Ryder

Vanessa Devin

Zoe Nierman

Abigayle Guyer

Alexis Rodriguez

Alivia Cerisano

Ally Gallagher

Amanda Aldana

Amanda Ayres

Ameera Mazraany

Anna Stahlecker

Anna Pressgrove

Annika Stewart

Ariana Almonte

Avery Seibert

Belen Brizi

Bella Chiaravalle

Belle Dolan

Breckon Hill

Brittany Klaiman

Brooke Horn

Brooke Leonard

Camryn Spector

Carolina Mojena

caroline brannon

Celia Mazzarelli

Chase Finizio

Chloe Ponte

Cirrafina Biele

Eliza Spain

Ella raslavicus

Emily DiCeglio

Fiona Glascott

Gianna Novello

Gianna DeHerrera

Grace Johnsen

Grace Quigley

Haley Stamberger

Hanna Bella Spivak

Heather Arslanian

Isabela Ricardo

Isabel Castro

Isabella Comella

Isabella Paez

Jenna Rothenstein

Jillian DiMonda

Jillian Saloma

Jules Davis

Julia Rauton

Kate Petkov

Katherine Rosen

Katherine Subliskey

Katia Gelbstein Arata

Katie Knarr

Lana Nesheiwat

Lena Henderson

Lexi Covey

Lili Koehler

Lucey Pommer

Luna Melo

Maeve Spicer

Marin Bomgaars

Meghan Warshauer

Meredith Farrington

Mia Curtin

Mia Gates

Michaela Rutigliano

Mollie Sysler

Molly Bergman

Morgan Vickaryous

Nelly Hashemi

Nic Facchinaa

Nicole Camilliere

Rebeca Kamhazi

Riley Russell

Samantha Loew

Sesil Lee

Shayne Dubin

Skyler Mahoney

Sofia Gasparo

Sophia Prescott

Stacy-Love Belizaire

Taya defina

Victoria Sinconegui

Virginia Suardi

Alaina Weir

Alexandra Warren

Alexandra Rosenbloom

Alexa Psomopoulos

Annashea Carlisle

Ashley Edwards

Ashley Veneto

Ava Gjokaj

Ava Jai Weshler

Caitlin Hayes

Camila Romero

Caroline Turgeon

Caroline Frisiras

Charlotte Macht

Christina Randazzo

Claudia Tammaro

Elissa Cimino

Elizabeth Lamerson

Elizabeth Medzhibovsky

Emily Struble

Emma Kessler

Erica Fradkov

Gabriella Andrea

Gabrielle Goldwert

Gabrielle Brudner

Georgia McMayon

Hannah Hassouni

Inge Brijker

Isabel Mondshine

Jaye Lis

Jenna Ostrove

Jolena Cordasco

Julia Low

Juliana Darrigo

Julia Nevins

Karina Wagner

Kate Camphausen

Katherine White

Kathleen Trebing

Kathryn Wyatt

Kaylee Levine

Kourtney Rhoads

Kylie Perkins

Sarah Prior

Lauren Turner

Lex Kondratenko

Lia Simoniello

Lilia Morgan

Lizzie Kristal

Lola Minutillo

Lucia Muscarello

Madison Brand

Madison Nguyen

Maeve Jebb

Margaret Neubauer

Nadia Engenheiro

Nazli Nur Usman

Nina Brunetti

Olivia Fernandez

Olivia Hanna

Olivia Saunders

Oliwia Nawrot

Rachel Yeung

Riley Block

Samantha Abelman

Sarah Moledina

Sarah Batista

Sofia Rey-Garaycoa

Sophia DiMeo

Susa Carlson

Sydney Weiner

Taylor Gill

Taylor Consolazio

Trinity Nguyen

Zoie Tirona

Interfraternity Council

Aaron Baxt

Aaron Kahn

Aashay Badgamia

Adam Maioriano

Adam Wadsworth

Adin Segall

Alec Bleyer

Alexander Tractenberg

Alvin Baranov

Andrew Goldberg

Andrew Shatsky

Ariel Hus

Axel Kovalchick

Benjamin Dias

Billy Milgrim

Brett Freeman

Brett Simons

Brian Evans

Brian Rush

Cameron McKhann

Charlie Cummings

Christan Rojas

Christian Cugno

Clarke Somma

Cooper Beitman

David Joseph

Dimitri Politano

Brittany Pekeles

Casey Mae Fine

Kendall Grogan

McKenzie Stoute

Marielle Koeppen

Marlee Brestle

Maya Ramati

Meg Mooney

Megan Mannix

Melissa Hunyadi

Mia Gerock

Michelle Fleishaker

Drew Halperin

Dylan Kronengold

Eli Buxt

Eli Golden

Ethan Brandwein

Ethan Gropper

Ethan Shinder

Evan Paldrmic

Aamilah Khanu

Abigail Gendell

Miranda Bialek

Mya Goldstein

Gabe Berkowitz

Hayden Jacobs

221
DELTA PHI EPSILON SIGMA DELTA TAU ZETA TAU ALPHA ALPHA EPSILON PI

Heath Ruchman

Hunter Mendell

Jack Moses

Jack Potier

Jacob Mohebban

Jake Darlak

Jake Wild

Jason Federico

Jerry Freedman

John Strifas

Jordan Passman

Josh Buxbaum

Josh Rochlin

Joshua Feinberg

Joshua Gellmn

Joshua Gruber

Julian Karam

Justin Hausman

Justin Russ

Justin Shupack

Kai Hansen

Landon Ferris

Lucas Lerman

Luke Leibman

Matthew Adelman

Matthew Fiebach

Matthew Luckman

Matthew Rothstein

Matthew Storch

Matthew Vinoski

Matt Levine

Max Fernando

Max Horne

Max Zussman

Michael Lehner

Michael Mendelson

Michael Mesbah

Mike Pannullo

Milo Chemla

Myles Perrin

Nicholas Ballman

Nicholas Basham

Nicholas Lobato

Nicholas Mispagel

Nico Hanna

Noah Celler

Ryan Hansburg

Sam Gordon

Samuel Rosenberg

Samuel Tsirulnikov

Sebastian Acuna

Shawn Kim

Stanley Spiegelman

Steven Isaac

Theo Staykoff

Trevor Riess

Trevor Stimpfl

Tyler Sklut

Zachary Esquenazi

Zach Lehner

Zach Stark

Ali Alzayadi

Brandon Nunez

Cam Ezell

Carson Clark

Colten Cicarelli

Derek Nissly

Franco D’Amico

Gabe Simmons

Gabriel Tejada

Grayson Everage

Holden Hargrave

Jack Linn

Jack Oswald

Jake Wallmeier

Michael Domenichelli

Reid Kiernan

Scott Loarie

Sean Berning

Theo Krijnse Locker

Tyler de Boer

Will Lacono

Benjamin Elizondo

Brandon Caraballo

Brent Ebner

Caiden Gagner

Gorav Surana

Jackson Bryant

Jose Enrique Haro

Josh Abel

Joshua Bornstein

Joshua Izen

Justin Barett

Kevin Luis

Matt Ramstrom

Michael Rossi

Nick Fricisia

Ryan Haas

Ryan McMullen

Ryan Novak

Sebastian Spencer

Will Passink

Jarrett Spada

Joe Roddy

Jordy Elster

Justin Franklin

Kyle Root

Luke Brienzi

Matteo Capezzuto

Max Boye

Max Papadatos

Mike Griffin

Mike Mcconell

Noah Shafton

Noah Sharp

Owen Mistele

Peter Masse

PJ Boehm

Adrian Contreras

Alexis Gomez

Benjamin Johnson

Cade Odom

Charles Lihota

Daniel Govin

Duncan Ryan

Dylan Borrowman Smith

Elliot Berry

Evan Hindmarsh

Gabriel Tsukamoto

Jack Wunz

Jack Lyon

Jackson Krieger

Jackson Humphries

Jack Strauss

Jacob Mentkowski

Jake Falbo

Jarrett Weiss

John Castanoli

Kyle Beckemeyer

Kyle Snyder

Logan Nieves

Marcus Molina

Michael Giannetta

Michael Blessing

Robert Balsano

Stone Sparkes

Trevor Lynn

Winn Morley

Aidan Puskas

Carter Rowe

Cole Carson

Cooper Leppard

Druv Murthy

Geroge Stimson

Jack Bettex

Jackson McChesney

Jackson Simon

Jordan Roberts

Keagen Lecomte

Lucas Petersson

Maxim Volynets

Nicholas Graham

Robert Ohebshalom

Robert Northwick

Sean Bennett

Aidan Bailey

Ari Morton

Ben Miller

Braden Sweeney

Charles Lord

Chase Townsend

Cisco Beretta

Colton Weeks

Connor Rundell

Costi Bletsas

Daniel Adili-Khams

Finn Nolen

Frank Biamonte

Frank Bonaddio

Giovani Gomez

Aidan Herman

Andrew Dubinett

Ariki Pesqueira

Griffin Beers

Ian Fry

Jack Cummings

Aidan Levine

Ashton Benavides

Blake Heiligman

Blake William Jacey

Camden Schnoor

Daniel nsogna

Drew Mickelson

Elad Anbar

Henry Fisher

Jet Sendaydiego

John Monteith

John O’ Brien

Joshua Sheykhet

Julian Dallas

Liam Wight

Luke Bell

Luke Provenzano

Matias Henry

Mays Levy

Michael O’Deens

Nathaniel Steinmann

Nicholas Apostolou

Patrick Brandon

Reilly Mahler

Ricky Demario

Ryan Clark

Ryan Newitz

Thomas Hanusik

William Christodoulis

William Hammer

Zach Berg

Aidan Friedson

Alex Hansburg

Brandon Shapiro

Charlie Morris

Dillon Abend

Ethan Shapiro

Gavin Mook

Greg Habib

Jake Buckelew

Joao Pedro Tortolo

222 GREEKS NEW
MEMBERS
ALPHA SIGMA PHI BETA THETA PI LAMBDA CHI ALPHA PHI DELTA THETA PI KAPPA ALPHA PI KAPPA PHI SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON

John Testaiuti

Jordan Jacob

Joseph Fiumefreddo

Justin Brown

Logan Nothann

Matt Cook

Matt Libertoff

Neil Schiff

Paul Guillo

Quinn Metcalfe

Russell Wagman

Trey Richardson

Isaac Bendell

Jack Borowsky

Jackson Harris

Jason Hicks

Jason Vaughn Foster

Jeremy Ruan

Jonathan Lonstein

Jonathan Macchiaroli

Jordan Chesebrough

Joshua Applebaum

Joshua Sher

Julian Pollak

Justin Yassinger

Kevin Yanagi

Kyle Sygall

Liam Holland

Kennedy Farrior

Laura Francois

Briana Hall

Jalyn Hamilton

Nyah Hawkins-Harrison

Kailyn Hayes

Logan Hill

Tikiyah Ivey

Anne Jean Baptiste

SiaunnaJenkins

Shaliya King

Gabriella Mais

Niani Mays

Sasha Menard

Bria Morton

Diondra Moss

Houston Bolton

Joshua Wooten

Khalil Bland

Cortland Montgomery

Alex Fishbone

Austin Brown

Benny Feuer

Bobby Marcus

Brandon Merves

Harry Larson

Jacob Bullock

James Nunnery

Jeffery Page

Jeff Greenstein

Joe Brunetti

Jordan Abraham

Joseph Casali

Joseph Casali

Luke Goldenberg

Matt Metzler

Matt Wendorff

Max Kaul

Michael Fletcher

Ryan Chinai

Saul Birmaher

Tyler Dimartino

Tyler Wyman

Lincoln Warstler

Maximilian Baumann

Maxwell Dimarzo

Maxwell Shafran

Miles Miller

Nate Bergfeld

Noah Andrews

Noah Brody

Noah Dorfsman

Paul Russo

Pierson Chan

Samuel Hopkins

Sanjay Posinasetty

Spencer Henry

William Goldstein

William Fleck

Zachary Berkowitz

Zachary Leb Klein

Multicultural Greek Council

Inaayah Muhammad

Taylor Murdock

Heaven Odom

Kendall Onley

Mya Osibogun

Charis Pitter

Nonii Randall

Tiara Ranson

Erin Rogers

Chelse Salnave

Christina Smiley

Allison St.Clair

Kylea Stamps

Michelle Stjuste

Veronica Tachie-Menson

Ashanti Tate

Jennifer Tsozock

Ajiri Uzere

Kelsey Walker

Jamie Williams-Smith

Treasure Wilson

Johnny Brown

Sherrod Williams II

Martin Methellus

Adedayo Akinwole

Chantel Omene

Marcela Lynch

Alejandro Loureiro

Alexander Carrieri

Alex Costabile

Arik Shalmiyev

Benjamin Gallinson

Blake Goldberg

Carson Wiltshire

Charles Burnette

Christopher Arthur

Christopher Peters

Daniel Phillips

Davin Patel

Dean Zilberman

Dominic Hiltebrand

Emilio Rengifo

Ethan Dominguez

Ethan Pires

Felix Nguyen

Gabriel Abram

Hunter Williams

Ian Stanfield

Ian Silver

Vatsal Lahoti

Dhruv Jain

Prabhat Datre

Julien Bacon

Sufyaan Bhatti

Nandha Ravi

Nayan Bansal

National Pan-Hellenic Council

Julianne Buggs

Kayla Crews

Kennedy Debow

Harper Dillard

Leslie Dominique

KiAnna Dorsey

Samantha Ewiah

223
Ryan Scott Tatiana Jean-Francois Yazmin Castelo Yasith Yapa Kristophe Smith-Walker SIGMA CHI ZETA BETA TAU ALPHA PI ALPHA OMEGA PSI PHI PHI BETA SIGMA SIGMA GAMMA RHO ZETA PHI BETA DELTA EPSILON PSI KAPPA ALPHA PSI ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SISTERS FOR LIFE Claire Connelly, Ainsley Vetter and Sofia McMahon of Chi Omega celebrate their big and little sister reveal by dining out together at Brickell City Center. Photo by Ainsley Vetter

Both new and old sisters of Chi Omega Erin Spinner sophomore; Carissa Niccoli sophomore; Sky McEvoy freshman; and Jamie Moses, sophomore, take a moment to pose admist all the excitement of Bid Day.

WILD WILD WEST Sophomore Eleanor Andresen and junior Abby Rosen are all smiles while dressed in western hats, bandanas and gear for their rockin’ rodeo Bid Day.

ALL SMILES Ellie Perrigo, junior; Savannah Yates, senior; and Laela DeFilipppo, junior, show their Tri Delta spirit by throwing what they know inside of a colorful ball pit. Photo courtesy of Ellie Pelligro

224 GREEKS BID DAY

Photo by Danielle Tenberg PURE HAPPINESS Photo by Danielle Tenberg

living the

GREEK LIFE

Do you want to be in Greek life? Bid Day gives all students the opportunity to find their home

Recruitment is the week when girls looking to join a sorority explore Greek life in its fullest. Bid Day is the day when all those girls find their home with a new sorority.

Bid Day is a day full of celebration and laughter, and old members get to meet their new soon-to-be sisters and new members get their matches with a sorority. Getting a bid is every girl’s dream when they want to join Greek life.

Danielle Tenberg, a senior who is a member of Chi Omega, participated in her third bid-day this year. “I’ve always loved recruitment week, especially bid-day,” Dani said. “Bid Day is such a fun day where we can celebrate finding new girls to expand our family.” Chi Omega had one of the biggest new classes of the year, with over eighty new girls joining this year.

Each sorority featured their own theme for their celebration. Chi Omega choose Classic Rock and Roll while Tri Delt’s was “Madd Happy,” including their very own ball-pit for the fun. With this being the first in-person Bid Day since the COVID-19 pandemic entered our lives, girls were ecstatic to be celebrating with their new members face-to-face.

225
GIRLS WANNA HAVE FUN There is no better way to kick off the best day than with a ball pit. Sophomore Celia Condon and junior Ellie Perrigo are all giggles in this fun filled pit. Photo courtesy of Ellie Pelligro FULL OF BLING Joanna Howson, sophomore and Shoshana Ronen, freshman round up Delta Phi Epsilon’s new pledge class. Photo by Danielle Tenberg ROUND ‘EM UP Haley Kuproski, Bryn Burton, Cynthia Dillon, Isabelle Anderson, Sky Dunmyer and Samantha Yoon rocked the cowgirl look for special Bid Day. After being virtual last year, everyone was ready to lasso in the new class. Photo by Danielle Tenberg LIVING LIKE A ROCKSTAR Chi Omega sisters Sky McEvoy, freshman, and Carissa Niccoli, sophomore, rock out with their new members at their Bid Day celebrations. Photo by Danielle Tenberg

new greeks

ON THE BLOCK

UM welcomed the angels of Pi Beta Phi to campus, largely growing Greek Life’s presence on-campus at the university

226 GREEKS PI BETA PHI
RELAXING RIDE Christina Callas and Malley McGuire take a sunset boat ride through the waters of Miami. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi Design by Giselle Spicer SISTERS FOR LIFE Megan O’Brien and Mandy Becker become a big-little pair after their reveal and celebrate with photos by the fountain. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi FROM HEAVEN Pi Phi angels Marley Cain, Malley McGuire and Tara Robinson welcome new members to the chapter and celebrate with a themed photoshoot. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi THE NEWEST ANGELS New members Rhea Theodore, Rachel Apodaca, Valeria Hunter, Kristen Forristal, Atlantis Hofstetter, and Lauren Meehan celebrate their fall bid day with their new wings. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi VIRTUAL MEET Claudia Berthold and Shea Zerbeam prepare to meet girld during virtual recruitment on campus. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi READY TO RECRUIT Ready for round three, Rhea Theodore and Kristen Forristal take photos before sisterhood chats. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi

FOOTBALL FANS Getting ready for a football game, Ashley Margaritondo, Sophie Wright, Brianna Frank, Jess Jacobs, Chloe Stemerman, Kaylee Reyes wear matching game day shirts. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi

I HEART YOU Tiernan

Trout, Caleigh Russo and Hannah Robinson celebrate bid day with their Falling In Love themed party and attire.

227
WE ARE NOW SISTERS Tara Robinson reveals herself as big to Sayde Beltran-Alvaro and Isabella Patel, and the trio wear matching shirts to make it official. Photo courtesy of Pi Phi Photo courtesy of Pi Phi

the seven

SORORITIES

GREEKS PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION

228
As the largest student org on campus, the Panhellenic Association is home to all seven sororities on campus
Design by Giselle Spicer FOR THE KIDS Tri Delta’s Ally Parr, Kendall Colaluca, Audrey Lopes and Jessie Bulanda raise money for St. Jude, their national philanthropy organization. Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta CHARMS ADPi sisters Lexi Zisselman, Julia Russel celebrate their lucky bid day with Lucky Charms. Photo courtesy of Alpha Delta Pi WELCOME TO THE SISTERHOOD New Pi Beta Phi members hold up their letters after their informal fall semester bid day. Photo courtesy of Pi Beta Phi EXECUTIVES The Panhellenic Association executive board members Rachel Levy, Molly Ferris, Cata Rodriguez, Julia Sackett, Nikki Suchodolski, Jackie Perez and Annie LoPinto show Panhell love and commemorate their positions. Photo courtesy of UMiami Panhellenic
229
DENIM Sigma Delta Tau members Izzy Eisenberg, Maggie Bires and Casey Crawford prepare for bid day with their denim-decked letters. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau FROM HEAVEN Junior Ana Lithgow, senior Kelly Bramson, and sophomores Joelle Solowiejczyk, Eleanor Parks, Eve Cohen, Julia Postell, Cierra Edejer and Vivianne Martell wear matching Zeta recruitment merch. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha COZY Pi Phi angels Marley Cain, Malley McGuire and Tara Robinson welcome new members to the chapter and celebrate with a themed photoshoot. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon LEADERS Senior Julie Erhardt passes the presidency of Chi Omega to junior Eleanor Provosty. Photo courtesy of Chi Omega

DELTA DELTA DELTA

Members held bonding time including boat trips, events on the Foote Green and Disney vacations

Design by Giselle Spicer

AERODYNAMICS Three years of Tri Deltas, sophomore Emma Tishler, junior Brooke Harrison , and senior Grace Braider cheer on Bid day Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta

Emma Tishler, junior Allison Reyes and sophomore Savannah Schiebel hold hands and celebrate sisterhood Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta

WELCOME Like a second home, senior Danni Mackler invites new members into the Tri Delta suite. Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta

OUT AND ABOUT

Friends senior Fallyn Brody and junior Brooke Harrison enjoy a day out in Miami.

MAGICAL MOMENT Sophomore

Amanda Kaplan and junior Emily Arzola throw up their sign in front of Cinderella’s Castle at Disney World.

ON THE WATER

Sophomore Emma Tishler and junior Brooke Harrison have a boat day in Miami, catching some sun while bonding. Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta

DELTA DELTA DELTA & DELTA PHI EPSILON

230
GREEKS
Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta SISTER LOVE Sophomore QUEEN BEES Junior Jessica Bulanda, sophomore Ally Parr, senior Raquel DiMitri, junior Emilia Weiss and sophomore Emma Tishler serve as Tri Delta’s board. Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta ALL SMILES Junior Brooke Harrison imitates art while smiling in front of a smiley face mural in Wynwood. Photo courtesy of Delta Delta Delta

DELTA PHI EPSILON

A semester full of sisterhood and events that brought the sisters of this sorority together

WONDERS IN WHITE

231
Sophomores Shoshana Ronen, Julietta Kijek and Sarah Schachte enjoy a brunch together. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon FLOWER POWER With matching go-go boots, seniors Alexa Franchi, Emily Bergwall, Ana Sakellakis, and Tea Young show off their 70’s themed outfits. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon NEW MERCH Sophomores Isabella Comella, Brooke Leonard, Maeve Spicer, and Rebeca Kamhazi reveal their 2022 merchandise for DPhiE. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon YEE-HAW Sister Eleanor Andresen, sophomore, and junior Abigail Rosen round up for Bid Day. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon SUNNY Freshmen Maddy London and Julia Davis pose together on a balcony with a beach front view. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon Design by Giselle Spicer TIE-DYE DELIGHT Rachel Tomasetti, Samantha Yoon, Morgan Krempsky, and Bella Chiravalle pose together after learning who their sisters were. Photo courtesy of Delta Phi Epsilon

ALPHA DELTA PI

The girls of ADPi had a fun year with their candy themed Bid Day, study abroad and a crush party

232
GREEKS ALPHA DELTA PI & CHI OMEGA MATCH MADE Sophomore Cassandra Szaro and junior Sara Sadowski celebrate being paired as little and big sister. Photo courtesy of ADPi VACATION VIBES Seniors Maddy Joyce and Olivia Zablan spend their winter break abroad together. Photo courtesy of ADPi VIBRANT Senior Taylor Grieb poses at the Wynwood Walls as she explores Miami during her last year in ADPi. Photo courtesy of ADPi THE DANCE Juniors Olivia Lee and Anika Markan dance at their crush party Photo courtesy of ADPi SHINING Sophomores Anna Taber, Sarah Milner and Madeleine Cagnoli prepare to welcome new members on Bid Day. Photo courtesy of ADPi FORMALLY RED Dressed to theme, Sophomore Emily Penner, junior Brooke Jaffe and sophomore Gianna Pasacreta attend formal. Photo courtesy of ADPi by Giselle Spicer

CHI OMEGA

The ChiO girls rocked out this semester by welcoming one of the the biggest pledge classes

Design by Giselle Spicer

ROCKING OUT Sisters of Chi Omega junior Emille LaRose, junior Rachel Levy and senior Danielle Tenberg are already fans of their new memebers.

REVEAL Sophomore Abigail Shultz is revealed to her new littles, freshmen Tiffany Ortner and Emily Stens. Photo courtesy of Chi Omega

WINTER IN MIAMI Dressed to ski, sophomores Jamie Kushnir and Jamie Moses enjoy a hot Miami winter. Photo courtesy of Chi Omega

LOVE As a Valentine’s Day treat, sophomore Emily Morrison and freshman Emma Craig attend their Crush Party. Photo courtesy of Chi Omega

FLY HIGH Sophomore Jenna Zabroski and freshmen Simone Lantier and Lily Darwin have a butterfly-themed sister reveal.

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Photo courtesy of Chi Omega Photo courtesy of Chi Omega PRETTY IN PINK Juniors Emma Dominguez, Simone Weatherspoon, Emilee LaRose, sophomore Lauren Ledon, juniors Jocelyn Rodenstein, Eleanor Provotsy, Olivia Moll, Avery Gawel and senior Danielle Tenberg make up this year’s executive board. Photo courtesy of Chi Omega

SIGMA DELTA TAU

The girls of SDT had a semester of meeting new sisters and bonding with each other

MAKE A SPLASH Sophomore

Allyson Weiss jumps in the Merrick fountain with freshmen Olivia Miller, Carly Sussman,

234 GREEKS SIGMA DELTA TAU & ZE TA TAU ALPHA
BLUE JEANS Sophomore sisters in denim Sydney Jacobsen, Amelia Buch and Jessie Glover match for Bid Day. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau SOAKING UP THE SUN Freshmen Ali Paulett, Katie Riddle, Victoria Lyakerman, and Sophia Sinder enjoyr their first year in SDT. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau PUPPY LOVE Sophomore Gabriella Marinich, sophomore Lillian Post and junior Kristen Feeney snuggle with their pup. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau GOLDEN HOUR Seniors Sabrina Snyder and Casey Goodman take a stroll on the beach during sunset. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau SNOWY DAY Taking a break from the Miami heat, seniors Isabel Tragos and Blake Ottimo take to the slopes. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau and Julie Hersh on Bid Day. Photo courtesy of Sigma Delta Tau

ZETA TAU ALPHA

Life in ZTA was as sweet as can be this year with the girls holding a successful Bid Day

Design by Giselle Spicer

ELEGANT Prepared for a night out, sophomores Katherine Pickens and Emma Peterson get ready at Lakeside.

PINK ROSES Dressed head-to-toe in pink, sophomores Sophia Carter and Isabella Cohen match their rose bouquets.

Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha

a calm boating evening, sophomore Catherine

235
BRIGHT Juniors Giana McGaughey,Lillianna Fedewa, Kylee Pufko, Alex Debure, and Kaylli Medzhibovsky have a colorful semi formal. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha CANDYLAND Sophomores Catherine Bettridge, Eleanor Parks and Eve Cohen celebrate Bid Day with sweets. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha CALM WATERS On Pasquella stays cozy in her Zeta hoodie. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha FAN ZONE Tailgating on campus, junior Kalli Medzhibovsky and senior Alexandra Debure throw up the ‘U’. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha GARDEN TIME Sophomores Medgan Shoffner and Sophia Carter enjoy a day in the Miami Gardens. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha SUN AND SEA Sophomores Alexandra Hass and Sophia Carter take a boat ride in Miami on a sunny day. Photo courtesy of Zeta Tau Alpha

COUNCIL leading

After weeks of recruitment, fraternities welcome their new members

the greek lineup

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON

BETA THETA PI

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA

TAU KAPPA EPSILON

SIGMA CHI

SIGMA PHI EPSILON

PI KAPPA PHI

ALPHA EPSILON PI

ALPHA SIGMA PHI

PHI DELTA THETA

PI KAPPA ALPHA

Story by Shea Halpenny Design by Marcela Lynch EXEC ON POINT The New executive board for SAE is composed of junior Brandon Mills, sophomore Nathan Sfida, sophomore Collin Euvino, sophomore Sam Sachs and junior Leo Saltzman. Photo courtesy of SAE SUITED UP TKE’s newly elected officers Miles Bernstein, senior; Brian Goldberg, sophomore; Aidan Ryder, senior; Ethan Bennett, junior; Matthew Caldwell, junior; Dylan Waks, senior; Riley Walters, junior; and Dror Timen, senior celebrate their election with a photo in the courtyard by the Panhellenic building. Photo courtesy of TKE BITTER SWEET Sigma Phi Epsilon seniors Beltran Morenoand and Michael Federici celebrate a new year of brotherhood with past VP Mario Suarez-Marill. Photo courtesy of Sigma Phi Epsilon
236 GREEKS FRATERNITIES
SO STOCKED Alpha Sigma welcomes their new pledge class to the brotherhood, and celebrate by donning their flag. Photo courtesy of ASig EXPANDIND THE FAM Alpha Epsilon Pi welcomes their new Alpha Beta pledge class and celebrate with a photo by the ‘U’ statue. Photo courtesy of AEPI NEW BROTHERS Pi Kappa Phi welcome their Omega class of 2022 and take a celebratory photo outside of their fraternity house. Photo courtesy of PI Kappa Phi LAMBDA PRIDE Lambda Chi Aplha celebrates their new pledge class by waving flags on the staircase of their fraternity house. Photo courtesy of Lambda Chi Alpha BROTHERHOOD FIRST TKE’s new members of Gamma Delta’s Spring 2022 class celebrate after being announced after rush. Photo courtesy of TKE BALANCED MEN Sigma Phi Epsilon’s new brothers for 2022 embrace their motto of building balanced men on campus. Photo courtesy of SPE
237
ALL SMILES Alpha Sigma celebrated their new Gamma Eta class after a week of rushing, and celebrated by enjoying a group outting. Photo courtesy of ASig

providing a

SAFE OUTLET

The Multicultural Greek Council provides an outlet for cultural conversations and interactions that gird the international and ethnic core of our campus

238 GREEKS MULTICULTURAL GREEK COUNCIL & NPHC
Design by Giselle Spicer BE THE MATCH The Multicultural Greek Council hosts a bone marrow registry to help treat cancer and other illnesses. Photo courtesy of Depsi CONTINUING THE LEGACY The Nu Chapter of Delta Epsilon Psi welcomes their newest line Upsilon Ultra: Yasith Yapa, Vatsal Lahoti, Dhruv Jain, and Prabhat Datre. Photo by Depsi MAKING A DIFFERENCE Junior Jordan Juilen writes a card to support Cards for St. Jude hosted by LTA. Photo by Lambda Theta Alpha

DIVINE NINE

The NPHC at the university is comprised of eight out of the nine historically black fraternities and sororities

Design by Giselle Spicer

HISTORY LESSON

Brothers Juan

239
GREEK UNITY Members of the NPHC fraternities and sororities capture the moment after their Black History Month halftime performance at a women’s basketball game during NPHC mini-week. Photo courtesy of NPHC SHOWING LOVE Members of the Mu Nu Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. and the Iota Chi Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. give out roses during their annual Valentine’s Day event RHOses on the RoKK. Photo courtesy of Eboni Arnold SERVICE FIRST Members of the NPHC made and packaged over 250 PB&J sandwiches to donate to Lotus House for an MLK Jr. Day of Service hosted by the Omicron Delta Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc. Photo courtesy of NPHC Carlos Ramirez, Grey Peoples, and Ellington Rutledge of the Omicron Delta Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. table during Black History Month. Photo courtesy of Ellingotn Rutledge SHINE BRIGHT Sophomores Marcela Lynch and Yazmin Castelo, seniors Leila Metellus and Devin Foster, junior Ryan Scott, visiting student Precious Kufarimai, and senior Eboni Arnold attend ‘Canes Shine Bright event during the Friday Bash to close out NPHC mini week. Photo courtesy of NPHC

ABOUT UM GREEKS founding facts

Numbers, statistics, history and a spotlight on the dedication and commitment offered by UM Greeks

Facts provided by the Director of Greek Life

PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION ASSOC. OF GREEK LETTER ORGANIZATIONS

PURPOSE: The Panhellenic Association is the largest student organization on our campus. The Panhellenic Association is home to seven sororities: Alpha Delta Pi, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Phi Epsilon, Pi Beta Phi, Sigma Delta Tau and Zeta Tau Alpha.

PHILANTHROPY: Raised over $30,000 for the community service event "Circle of Sisterhood" to date

LOCATION: 1306 Stanford Drive

ABBREVIATION: AGLO

MEMBERSHIP: 27 recognized social fraternities and sororities

PURPOSE: AGLO is the umbrella organization for Greek Life at UM, collaborating with IFC, MGC, NPHC, and the Panhellenic Association to ensure Greek Unity and a Positive Image. Provides a forum for discussion between all four councils

MULTICULTURAL GREEK COUNCIL INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL

FOUNDED: 1998

ABBREVIATION: MGC

MEMBERSHIP: 10 Organizations

PURPOSE: An umbrella council for ten multicultural fraternities and sororities that promotes multiculturalism by advocating for justice and equity, cultivating interfraternal relationships, and empowering its member organizations

NATIONAL PANHELLENIC COUNCIL

FOUNDED: May 24, 1902

FOUNDER: Pi Beta Phi

ABBREVIATION: NPC

PREDECESSOR: National Panhellenic Congress

PURPOSE: To assist collegiate and alumnae chapters of the NPC member organizations in cooperating with colleges and universities and to foster interfraternal relationships

PI BETA PHI

CHAPTER: Florida Eta

NICKNAME: Pi Phi

NATIONAL FOUNDING: April 28, 1867

FOUNDING LOCATION: Monmouth College

FOUNDING AT UM: March 27, 2021

MOTTO: "Friends and Leaders for Life"

COLORS: Wine and Silver Blue

240 GREEKS ABOUT THE GREEKS

PURPOSE: An IFC exists where there are two or more NIC member (or non-member) fraternities on a campus. The Council’s purpose is to advance fraternity on campus and provide interfraternal leadership to the entire community. The NIC provides direct support, resources and services to IFC officers, representatives, advisors and alumni to further the health and success of local fraternity communities.

DELTA DELTA DELTA

CHAPTER: Alpha Chi

NICKNAME: Tri Delta

NATIONAL FOUNDING: November 27, 1888

FOUNDING LOCATION: Boston University

FOUNDING AT UM: 1962

MOTTO: "Let Us Steadfastly Love One Another"

COLORS: Silver, Gold and Cerulean Blue

ZETA BETA TAU

CHAPTER: Alpha Omega

NICKNAME: ZBT or Zebe

NATIONAL FOUNDING: December 29, 1898

FOUNDING LOCATION: New York City

FOUNDING AT UM: December 7, 1946

MOTTO: "Brotherhood for a Lifetime"

COLORS: Medium Blue and White

CHAPTER: NICKNAME: NATIONAL FOUNDING FOUNDING MOTTO: COLORS: CHAPTER: NICKNAME: NATIONAL FOUNDING SYMBOL: MOTTO: COLORS: CHAPTER: NICKNAME: NATIONAL FOUNDING SYMBOL: MOTTO: COLORS: CHAPTER: NICKNAME: NATIONAL FOUNDING FOUNDING MOTTO: COLORS:
2,500

CHAPTER: Omega

NICKNAME: DPhiE

DELTA PHI EPSILON

NATIONAL FOUNDING: March 17, 1917

FOUNDING LOCATION: New York University Law School

SYMBOL: Unicorn

MOTTO: "To Be, Rather Than to Seem to Be"

COLORS: Royal Purple and Pure Gold

CHI OMEGA

CHAPTER: Upsilon Delta

NICKNAME: Chi-O

NATIONAL FOUNDING: April 5, 1895

FOUNDING LOCATION: University of Arkansas

SYMBOL: Owl and Skull

MOTTO: "Sisters on Purpose"

COLORS: Cardinal and Straw

ZETA TAU ALPHA

CHAPTER: Gamma Alpha

NICKNAME: ZTA or Zeta

NATIONAL FOUNDING: October 15, 1898

FOUNDING LOCATION: Longwood University

FOUNDING AT UM: 1992

MOTTO: "Seek the Noblest"

COLORS: Turquoise Blue and Steel Grey

TAU KAPPA EPSILON

CHAPTER: Gamma Delta

NICKNAME: Teke

NATIONAL FOUNDING: January 10, 1899

FOUNDING LOCATION: Illinois Wesleyan University

FOUNDING AT UM: October 28, 1949

MOTTO: "Better Men for a Better World"

COLORS: Crimson Lake Cherry and Pure Silver Gray

2,500

ALPHA DELTA PI

CHAPTER: Gamma Delta

NICKNAME: ADP i

NATIONAL FOUNDING: May 15, 1851

FOUNDING LOCATION: Wesleyan College

SYMBOL: Diamond and Lion

MOTTO: "Many Hands, One Heart"

COLORS: Azure Blue and White

SIGMA DELTA TAU

CHAPTER: Alpha Mu

NICKNAME: Sig Delt

NATIONAL FOUNDING: March 25, 1917

FOUNDING LOCATION: Cornell University

FLOWER: Golden Tea Rose

MOTTO: "One Hope of Many People"

COLORS: Cafe au Lait and Old Blue

PHI BETA SIGMA

CHAPTER: Epsilon Delta

NICKNAME: Sigmas

NATIONAL FOUNDING: January 9, 1914

FOUNDING LOCATION: Howard University

FOUNDING AT UM: April 1, 1971

MOTTO: "Culture for Service and Service for Humanity"

COLORS: Royal Blue and Pure White

ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA

CHAPTER: Iota Nu

NICKNAME: AKA

NATIONAL FOUNDING: January 15, 1908

FOUNDING LOCATION: Howard University

FOUNDING AT UM: April 30, 1975

MOTTO: "By Culture and By Merit"

COLORS: Salmon Pink and Apple Green

241 Greeks
Greek students in over 10 fraternities and sororities across all Greek organizations at UM

what are the

SORORITIES WEARING?

Whether its to themed parties, philanthropy events or formals, Greek sorority fashion is always an eye catcher on campus. The sororities make bold and fashion decisions wherever they go

ONE TWO THREE FOUR

242 GREEKS SORORITY FASHION

who is who

ONE

Tri Delta girls Emma Tishler, Brooke Harrison and Grace Braider wear their sport gear to represent their sorority and our UM sports teams.

TWO

Alpha Delta Pi girls Jill McSheffrey, Brooke Jaffe, Sofia Palacios, Kayla Trainor and Gianna Pasacreta choose donut themed attire for their big and little sister reveal.

THREE

Caroline Kevin and Emily Goldstein celebrate the arrival of their custom sorority sweatshirts.

FOUR

Chi Omega new members Morgan Lutes and Olivia Hennon, both freshmen, wear white dresses and nude heels; a signature outfit.

FIVE

Alpha Delta Pi girls Abby Pak, Natalie Bone and Allison Micale eat together at their crush party where the theme was red.

SIX

Chi Omega members Jamie Kushnir and Jamie Moses, sophomores, wear ski attire to a themed frat party.

SEVEN

Members of Pi Phi Ashley Margaritondo, Sophie Wright, Brianna Frank, Jess Jacobs, Chloe Stemerman, Kaylee Reyes wear their orange shirts to rep UM b efore a big football game.

243
FIVE SIX
SEVEN

GREEK LIFE giving back

Service and community philanthropy is very important for members in greek organizations across the world

Greek life isn’t all about partying and have fun, they are also dedicated to giving back to their communities.

Throughout the year, fraternities and sororities alike participated in events to raise money for different organizations. These organizations were working in pursuit of causes that represented ideas each sorority or fraternity supported.

The sorority Chi Omega raised money for a Wish Enhancement through the Make-a-Wish foundation to allow a young girl with cystic fibrosis to go to Disney World. On the first day alone, Chi Omega raised over $1,000. Janie Lobel, a sophomore and Chi Omega’s philanthropy chair, put together a week of events to raise money. “Chi Omega has been with the Make-a-Wish foundation for years,” Lobel said. “It’s been so

much work but so much fun being able to raise money for a young girl who is so deserving of happiness.”

Fraternities like Lambda Chi Alpha held their philanthropies twice this academic year, raising money for Feeding America. At just one event, the members raised over $2,500, which is equivalent to 7,500 meals offered to food banks across the country. Ethan Robbins, a junior and president of Lambda, took a big part in the philanthropy events. “While we may love to party, we love being able to help out others in need,” Robbins said.

To encourage and bring together these philanthropic efforts, there was a competition held to see which sorority or fraternity could raise the most amount of money. This, led to numerous fundraisers and activities to support various different charities.

244 GREEKS SERVICE AND PHILANTHROPY
DISNEY IN MIAMI Claire Connelly and Abby Pinkteron dress in pink and style their outfits with Mickey ears at Chi Omega’s celebration for Make-A-Wish. They raised money for a young girl with cystic fibrosis. Photo by Shea Halpenny BOOK DRIVE Atlantis Hofstetter ‘24, Elizabeth Hahne ‘24, Valeria Hunter ‘23 and Renee Merrimack ‘24 manage the Pi Beta Phi book drive benefiting the Read, Lead, Achieve initiative. The book drive took place on The Rock steps. Photo by Allie Salvucci MAKING A DIFFERENCE Zeta Tau Alpha members at the Fountain Lighting for their Breast Cancer Awareness event hosted by their VP of philanthropy Aliya Redd. Photo from Zeta Tau Alpha
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CRUISIN' IN Pi Kappa brothers Nathan Taminger senior, Connor Stevens junior, Evan McKay junior, Alex Senich senior, and A friend participate in the 4x4x48 race to raise money for those suffering from ALS . Photo from PI Kappa RETAIL THERAPY Jayme Podgorowiez and Samantha McCullough of the Sigma Alpha Iota greek chapter Women’s Music Fraternity sell clothes in front of the Shalala Student Center to support UM’s music program and Nicklaus Childrens Hospital Photo by John Yayi Bondje FUNDRAISING Members of PIKE, Colton Weeks, Vincent Barbaro, Alex Schrock and Luke Brienzi,fundraise with Chick-fil-A sandwiches to raise money for Coral Gables Fire Rescue. Photo by Allie Salvucci PIE A PHI Erin Spinner, Salvatore Imbro, and Alexander Klein, all sophomores, get to throw shaving cream at each other during Phi Delta Epsilons ‘Pie a Phi’ event to raise money for Nicklaus Childrens Hospital. Photo by John Yayi Bondje A SPLASH Lucas Burkholder, TJ Malloy, David Paul, Geoffrey Albert, Sebastian Khairkhahan, Tim Callahan and Zach Fishman run a dunk booth event for the charity RAINN. Photo by Allie Salvucci FOOD FRENZY Members of PIKE, Colton Weeks, Vincent Barbaro, Alex Schrock and Luke Brienzi fundraise with Chick-fil-A sandwiches to raise money for Coral Gables Fire Rescue. Photo by Allie Salvucci SHADES OF GREEN Tri Delta members Jessie Bulanda, Emily Goldstein, Sydney Benson, Ally Parr, Amanada McCorksindal and Ellyn Darke partner with St. Jude to raise money for their patients. Photo by Jackie Abreu GRANTING WISHES Chi Omega members celebrate all of their acomplshments as they raise $15,000 for Make-A-Wish, granting a young girl with cystic fibrosis her wish to go to Disney. Photo by Shea Halpenny

Greek students spend time giving back not only through raising money, but with their time. These are the volunteer hours committed by Greek organizations in the Miami community and beyond

Each Greek organization raises funds for their own nationally appointed charities throughout the school year

GREEK WEEK: $17,572 GRAND TOTAL: $624,092 INDIVIDUAL: $606,520

246 GREEKS PHILANTHROPY STATS Alpha Delta Pi ------------------ $72,961 Alpha Epsilon Pi --------------- $10,475 Alpha Sigma Phi ---------------- $4,500 Beta Theta Pi ------------------- $13,000 Chi Omega ----------------------- $24,269 Delta Delta Delta ------------ $103,000 Delta Epsilon Psi ---------------- $2,882 Delta Phi Epsilon ------------- $60,342 Lambda Chi Alpha ----------- $11,390 Pi Beta Phi ------------------------- $3,380 Phi Delta Theta ------------------ $2,568 Pi Kappa Alpha ---------------- $14,687 Sigma Alpha Epsilon ------- $80,568 Sigma Chi ------------------------ $68,968 Sigma Delta Tau -------------- $38,343 Sigma Gamma Rho -------------- $851 Sigma Phi Epsilon -------------- $4,130 Zeta Tau Alpha ---------------- $90,204
greek volunteer hours
3443 400 40 330 1472 1137 770 102 Alpha Delta Pi -----------------------Alpha Epsilon Pi ----------------------Alpha Sigma Phi ------------------------Beta Theta Pi ---------------------------Chi Omega ----------------------------Delta Epsilon Psi -------------------Delta Phi Epsilon ---------------------Lambda Chi Alpha -------------------326 18 738 13 25 19 170 408 1891 Pi Beta Phi ------------------------------Pi Beta Sigma ---------------------------Phi Delta Theta -----------------------Sigma Chi ----------------------------------Sigma Delta Tau ------------------------Sigma Gamma Rho -------------------Sigma Phi Epsilon -------------------Zeta Beta Tau -------------------------Zeta Tau Alpha -----------------------
amount raised per greek organziation

national philanthropies

List

ALPHA DELTA PI Ronald McDonald House

ALPHA EPSILON PI Heroes to Heroes

ALPHA PHI ALPHA March of Dimes and Relay for Life

ALPHA SIGMA PHI Canine Companions for Independence

BETA THETA PI Dan Marino Foundation

CHI OMEGA Make-A-Wish Foundation

DELTA DELTA DELTA St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

DELTA EPSILON PSI Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

DELTA PHI EPSILON The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, and The Delta Phi Epsilon Education Foundation

DELTA SIGMA TAU Global Women’s Empowerment Fund

KAPPA ALPHA PSI Kappa Alpha Psi Foundation, Guide Right Program, St. Jude Children’s Research

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA North American Food Drive

LAMBDA THETA ALPHA Children of the Community

OMEGA PSI PHI American Diabetes Association

PI BETA PHI Read>Lead>Achieve

PI BETA SIGMA March of Dimes and Sigma Beta Club

PHI DELTA THETA ALS Association

PI KAPPA ALPHA Cycle for Life

PI KAPPA PHI Push America

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Children’s Miracle Network Paddy Murphy Week

SIGMA CHI Children’s Miracle Network & Huntsman Cancer Research

SIGMA DELTA TAU Prevent Child Abuse America

SIGMA GAMMA RHO Operation Big Bookbag

SIGMA LAMBDA GAMMA Breast Cancer Awareness and TRIO Programs

SIGMA PHI EPSILON Week of the Heart

ZETA BETA TAU Children’s Miracle Network, Jewish Women International

ZETA PI BETA National Education Foundation

ZETA TAU ALPHA Breast Cancer Education and Awareness

EFFORTS philanthropic

Greek Week brought in both smiles and cash in support of a local hunger relief organization through its festive competitions

In addition to being the social apex that Greek life was known for, fraternities and sororities emphasized their role as philanthropic organizations during Greek Week. Greek Week worked with Feeding South Florida (FSF), a hunger relief organization for Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe counties. Members of the National Panhellenic Council and the Interfraternity Council divided themselves into Nickelodeon-themed teams to participate in various events throughout the week raising money for FSF.

Notable events were a rowing competition, coin wars, and OCheer, where sororities and fraternities paired up for a dance-off. Sophomore Chi Omega Simone Weatherspoon was one of the coaches for Team Rugrats OCheer team, “OCheer was a lot of work. Getting everyone to cooperate to create a dance isn’t easy, but performing on the IM field and placing second made it worth it.”

While these events did enable bonding across sororities and fraternities, the priority was philanthropy. Sophomore Lambda Chi Alpha Thomas McPherson was also on Team Rugrats, the champions of Greek Week.“It was great being able to raise money for such a good cause. I loved being able to participate in events with other members of Greek life, and winning feels great too,” McPherson noted.

Greek Week brought students together socially and philanthropically as they fundraised for an organization directly helping the surrounding communities and strengthened their inter-Greek relationships.

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BAND TOGETHER Chi Omega, Lambda Chi Alpha, Pi Kappa Theta, and the National Pan-Hellenic Council join together as team Rugrats in the Nickelodeon themed Greek Week. Photo by Shea Halpenny
of charities that each Greek organization is dedicated to nationally

awards THE AGLO

The Interfraternity Council, National Panhellenic Council, Multicultural Greek Council and Panhellenic Association award and honor hard working members of the Greek community with certificates at the annual Association of Greek Letter Organization (AGLO) Awards

Outstanding Administrator Award Denise

Outstanding Chapter President Award

PA: Allison Gherovici, Zeta Tau Alpha

NPHC: Leila Matellus, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

Outstanding Philanthropy Award

IFC: Sigma Chi

PA: Delta Delta Delta

NPHC: Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.

MGC: Delta Epsilon Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Outstanding Community Service Award

IFC: Lambda Chi Alpha

PA: Chi Omega

NPHC: Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

MGC: Delta Epsilon Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Outstanding Chapter Advisor Award

PA: Carolina Yera, Delta Phi Epsilon

IFC: Steve Chaneles, Sigma Phi Epsilon

NPHC: Dr. Alexandra Holloway, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Outstanding Chapter of the Year Award

IFC: Lambda Chi Alpha

PA: Zeta Tau Alpha

NPHC: Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.

MGC: Delta Epsilon Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Sorority Woman of the Year Award

Oliveah Hope, Delta Phi Epsilon

Outstanding Campus Involvement Award

IFC: Lambda Chi Alpha

NPHC: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Outstanding Sophomore Award

IFC: Justin Tulloch, Lambda Chi Alpha

PA: Kyra Early, Chi Omega

NPHC: Yazmin Castelo, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

Outstanding Junior Award

IFC: Alex Terr, Beta Theta Pi

Outstanding Senior Award

IFC: Jean Pierre Vilcherrez, Lambda Chi Alpha

Phi Sigma Sigma, May. A Brunson New Member Award

PA: Skylar McEvoy, Chi Omega

Outstanding New Member Award

IFC: Jose Enrique Haro, Lambda Chi Alpha

NPHC: Marcela Lynch, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

Most Improved Chapter Scholarship Award

IFC: Alpha Sigma Phi

NPHC: Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

Highest Chapter Scholarship Award

IFC: Tau Kappa Epsilon

PA: Alpha Delta Pi

MGC: Delta Epsilon Psi Fraternity, Inc.

NPHC: Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.

Dean’s Award for Service

Andrew Teller, Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Arianna Amato, Delta Delta Delta

Rodith Edupuganti, Delta Epsilon Psi, Fraternity, Inc.

Eboni Arnold, Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.

Alpha Epsilon Phi Marilyn Gernstein Coller Outstanding Junior Award

PA: Sarah Mills, Chi Omega

Brenda Smith Tucker Memorial Award for Outstanding Campus Involvement

PA: Chi Omega

Sorority Woman of the Year Award

Oliveah Hope, Delta Phi Epsilon

William W. Sandler Jr. IFC Fraternity Man of the Year

Ethan Robbins, Lambda Chi Alpha

Marilyn Gerstein Coller Memorial Award to the Outstanding Senior

PA: Logan Ciuci, Delta Phi Epsilon

Mary B. Merritt Panhellenic Award

PA: Marissa Katz, Chi Omega

Rho Lambda Spirit Award

Rachel Lange, Delta Delta Delta

248 GREEKS AGLO AWARDS
Information provided by the Dean of Students Office SO SOPHISTICATED After the AGLO Awards, Zeta Phi Beta members Nicole Esquen, Chantel Omene, Leila Matellus, Marchela Lynch and Yazmin Castelo celebrate their chapter award for ‘Outstanding Community Service’ and member awards for ‘Outstanding Sophomore,’ ‘Oustanding New Member,’ and ‘Outstanding Chapter President.’ Photo from Zeta Phi Beta MEN OF HONOR Brothers of Lambda Chi Alpha show off their awards as they were the most awarded fraternity at this years AGLO Awards. Among the awards are the ‘Outstanding Community Service,’ ‘Outstanding Chapter of the Year’ and ‘Outstanding Campus Involvement’ awards. Photo by Shea Halpenny
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SHOWING OFF Eboni Arnold of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. and Ben Madison of Lambda Chi Alpha are awarded the 1959 Scholarship of Service award. Photo by Shea Halpenny

ORGANIZATIONS

At the university, students can choose to be a part of a unique community of like-minded individuals by choosing to join an organization hosted on campus. Each organization allows students to feel personally connected to people with similar interests, and builds a sense of community among them. With over 300 organizations active on campus, students have options when deciding how to get involved with peers.

250 ORGANIZATIONS

BETTER AS A TEAM Distraction Magazine is the magazine of students of the University of Miami capturing the culture, lifestyles and interests of those who attend. Photo by Emmalyse Brownstein

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ON MY SIGNAL Drum Major Shelby Devore, sophomore, conducts the Band of the Hour during a football game halftime show at Hard Rock Stadium. Photo by Alexandra Carnochan 252 ORGANIZATIONS BAND OF THE HOUR IN TUNE Band of the Hour freshman, Kat Horrigan, plays the saxophone in the stands at a football game as the team makes a touchdown. Photo by Alexandra Carnochan INSTRUMENTS UP At Hard Rock Stadium, the brass section of the Band of the Hour plays for the crowd. Photo by Jared Lennon

MAKE noise

The Frost Band of the Hour prepared for a season full of new performances and opportunities without COVID-19 regulations

Band . . .

atten-hut! With this past year being the first that worked similarly to how it did before the pandemic, there were many differences that changed the way the Frost Band of the Hour performed, and how everyone worked together.

During the year before last, the Frost Band of the Hour would made videos that would be played at football games, since they weren’t allowed to play in person. For the events that they were allowed to attend, members had strict mask mandates, and COVID-19 testing protocols were enforced. As these regulations were lifted this past year, the process of performing looked much different than it did just months prior. Instead of submitting videos, performances were able to happen in the stands of athletic events again. Additionally, members weren’t required to wear masks or bell covers, and didn’t have to stand six feet apart.

With these changes, members of the brand noticed the difference in the response from the crowd. “It felt like there was much more energy from the crowd and that manifested itself into the ensemble,” said sophomore, Sophia Martinez. With everyone working together, there was a stark contrast between the spirit of the Band.

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GAME READY The Frost Band of the Hour performs before the start of Miami’s game versus Michigan State at Hard Rock Stadium. Photo by Jared Lennon FEEL THE BEAT Jonathan Castellanos, junior, plays his horn during a touchdown at a football game. Photo by Alexandra Carnochan ALMA MATER Nikki Lyons, sophomore, holds up her finger and sways during the singing of the Alma Mater at the end of a home football game. Photo by Alexandra Carnochan

FRONT ROW: Kailyn Oganivoch, Allyssa Beatty, Kathryn Jackson, Kailynn Fleches, Lilly Miller; SECOND ROW: Allie Andryski, Gaby Lopez, Allison Marsh, Rachel Alonso, Kayla Janas, Juliana Friedman, Riley

Scheier, Mackenzie Howell; BACK ROW: Paula

Barreiro, Danielle Lovetro, Ashley Howell, Allie Janotha, Cameron Cruz, Sydney Cooper. Photo by Bert Budde

sunsations

The Sunsations is the official dance team of the Miami Hurricanes and serve as representatives for the University at various athletic and community events

FRONT ROW: Sarah S. Machado, Dr. Nina Miville, Alexa Mascellaro, Lillian K. Sanchez; BACK ROW: Brandon Runner, Vanessa

Quezada, Nathan Bonet, Lucia Moas; NOT

PICTURED: Paulina Padilla Valenzuela

by Allie Salvucci

FRONT ROW: Kailyn Oganivoch, Allyssa Beatty, Kathryn Jackson, Kailynn Fleches, Lilly Miller; SECOND ROW: Allie Andryski, Gaby Lopez, Allison Marsh, Rachel Alonso, Kayla Janas, Juliana Friedman, Riley

Scheier, Mackenzie Howell; BACK ROW: Paula Barreiro, Danielle Lovetro, Ashley Howell, Allie Janotha, Cameron Cruz, Sydney Cooper. Photo by Bert Budde

The Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineering is the organization for Industrial Engineers and has student chapters at universities across the nation

The UCheer all-girls team members cheer on the sidelines at football games and men’s and women’s basketball games, as well as volleyball games

254 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
ucheer
iils
Photo

FRONT ROW: Kailyn Oganivoch, Allyssa Beatty, Kathryn Jackson, Kailynn Fleches, Lilly Miller; SECOND ROW: Allie Andryski, Gaby Lopez, Allison Marsh, Rachel Alonso, Kayla Janas, Juliana Friedman, Riley Scheier, Mackenzie Howell; BACK ROW: Paula Barreiro, Danielle Lovetro, Ashley Howell, Allie Janotha, Cameron Cruz, Sydney Cooper. Photo by Bert Budde

co-ed ucheer

The UCheer co-ed team is made up of male and female members that cheer on the sidelines at football games, basketball games, as well as volleyball games

coso

The Committee on Student Organizations is dedicated to providing, developing, and improving services and resources for student organizations

FRONT ROW: Megan Valcq, Carly Payne, Amrutha Chethikattil, Kyushu Shah, Vrinda Kareddy, Pritika Reddy; BACK ROW: Dylan Greenwald, Leila Metellus, Paige-Tatum Hawthorne, Demi Trimm, Naynika Juvadi, Arjun Bajaj. Photo by Allie Salvucci

Miami International Outreach is a student-led service group at the University of Miami dedicated to serve communities alongside with the San Lucas Mission

FRONT ROW: Randy Cockrell, Christian DiCicco, Grace Braider, Adrianna Fulbright. Photo by Allie Salvucci

255
mio

BACK AND better than ever

The Hurricanettes open a new season with a big change to their coaching leadership that will change the team dynamic

The dancers who travel with the Band of the Hour had another exciting season, led by the new coach Tess Guidry. Tess was a member and coach of the Dallas Cowboys for five years. Her experience brought a new touch to the Hurricanettes. Every performance has been bigger and brighter, with the girls putting their all into every performance they put on this year.

The girls celebrated their season with three of their alumni making the Miami Dolphins Cheerleading team. Madi Brand, a first-year student and health sciences pre-med major, is a first-year rookie on the team. When asked what she was looking forward to most her first season on the team, Madi said “I am excited to continue my passion for dance throughout my medical studies and to have the opportunity to establish a sisterhood within a team of amazing girls.”

256 ORGANIZATIONS HURRICANETTES
Story by Shea Halpenny Design by Carolina Camus GRAND ENTERANCE Before the start of football games, Arden Woltman, Kylie Prieto and Lily Morgan walk into Hard Rock Stadium as they cheer and welcome football players. Photo courtesy of Tess Guidry IN LINE Georgia Macy and the members of the Hurricanes perform in a kickline before the start of Miami’s game versus Appalachian State at Hard Rock Stadium during the season opener. Photo by Jared Lennon

HYPING UP THE CROWD

The Frost Band of the Hour, Sydney Tomlinson and the rest of the Hurricanettes perform during halftime of Miami’s game versus NC State University at Hard Rock Stadium.

LETS DANCE During football games, Arden Woltman and the rest of the Hurricanettes perform routines next to the Band of the Hour. Their routines are danced to songs played the Band of the Hour.

257
Photo courtesy of Tess Guidry Photo by Jared Lennon

FRONT ROW: Emmalyse Brownstein, Isa Marquez, Daniella Pinzon, Lindsay Jayne, Teagan Polizzi; BACK ROW: Sydney Burnett, Maria Emilia Becerra, Keagan Larkins, Cat McGrath, Kylea Henseler. Photo by Carolina Camus

distraction magazine

Distraction Magazine is the magazine of students of the University of Miami capturing the culture, lifestyles and interests of those who attend

FRONT ROW: Toni-Ann Farquharson, Cassandra Michel, Samantha Armstrong, Angel Cruz-Viola Photo by Allie Salvucci

speak what you feel

Speak What You Feel is a student organization that focuses on verbal and written forms of creative expression, such as poetry, songwriting, singing, and literature

FRONT ROW: Rebecca Menendez, Stephan Rasco; SECOND ROW: Claire Fandel, Andy Perez, Madison Capote; BACK ROW: Erick Martin, Miguel Silveira, David Raez, Andres Florez. Photo by Cindy Marquez

The Association of Commuter Student (ACS) is a second home for its members; a place to bond with fellow students and to participate in all that UM has to offer

258 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS & WVUM
acs

WE’RE on the air

Content that is produced on campus is heard and broadcasted to all of Miami

Student-run WVUM-FM is home to alternative and electronic music found on the 90.5 radio station. The organization is a hub for creative college students to practice their craft and artistically contribute to their community through an expansion of blogs, merchandise and programs.

WVUM held various programs throughout the year to be more involved with the community that the station served. One of their biggest events was the Radio-thon, which was a week-long donation drive where WVUM asked their listeners to donate to keep the station up and running. For the event, they featured a lineup of artists to interest listeners and offered a variety of merchandise packages. Some of their events also promoted friendly competition, like the Battle of the Bands event, where students would go toe-to-toe by performing against each other on the Lakeside Patio. Their events and live music allowed students interested in music to explore their craft. Senior Niaz Ellie spent four years working with WVUM. She held the role of the specialty show host,where her work on the station allowed her to put her passion for music into practice and connect with her peers. “One of my favorite experiences has been connecting with my listeners every week and creating a bond built on our shared love for music,” Ellie said.

WVUM provided opportunities for their employees and their peers to share a common interesting music through the radio station, programs, and blog posts, which Ellie said allowed her to make meaningful relationships with her listeners.

LIVE PERFORMANCE

Under their band name, Damn Janis, Aaron Bissoondial ‘22, James Hasell ‘22, Mike Ramos ‘23 and Kyle Skarshaug ‘23 perform live in the WVUM office for Spookathon 2021.

THROWBACK TIME

259
RADIO DJ Senior Haley Valentini acts as a DJ for her live show on WVUM 90.5. Photo by Allie Salvucci Photo by Allie Salvucci Junior Patrick M. Denny DJs his show, The Decades Show, playing a range of music from the 20th century. Photo by Allie Salvucci

FRONT ROW: Nate Raisner, Daniel Guthart, Patrick M. Denny, Kyle Kifejevas; SECOND ROW: Layne Nagele, Destiny Vergara, Gwyneth Johnson; BACK ROW: Alexis Martin, Bridget Craig, Betsy Mullins, Riley Simon, Lia Mussie. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

college democrats

The Young and College Dems at UM, often referred to as UDems, is the Democratic voice on campus who often engage and educate students in political processes

Perez, Cataryna Rodriguez, Daniella Sucre.

by Genesis Del Toro

the volunteer link

The Volunteer LINK is a service-based organization that works to provide opportunities to students through service activities and projects

Kyra Chiappini, Phoebe Oyana, Angelina Macchio, Mollie Blank, Sarah Guarachi, Malcolm Griffin.

Ganchala Pizarro

alpha lamba delta

Alpha Lambda Delta is an honor society for students who have achieved a 3.5 GPA or higher and are in the top 20% of their class during their first year at UM

260 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
Photo by Sergio Jackeline Photo

hurricane steppers

The Hurricane Steppers bring the culture of step dance to the University of Miami campus as well as to grade school students needing an outlet for creativity

mangrove journal

Mangrove is the undergraduate literary journal, publishing student art and writing that pulses with human language, sits under our skin and settles into our soul

hosa

The purpose of the HOSA organization is to develop leadership and technical HOSA skill competencies through a program of motivation, awareness and recognition

Yoland Victor, Kyana Brown, Hulaimatou Bayo. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

FRONT ROW: Sakina Qazi, Anandi Bien-Aime, Stephanie Wallcot, Sophia Rebollar; BACK ROW: Hugh Burgdorf, Mecca McCain, Julia Wisell, Serene Thompkins. Photo by Allie Salvucci

FRONT ROW: Aihber Khan, Preeti Shukla, Shriya Patel. BACK ROW: Lucwilerna Raymond, Sabrina Levin, Anisha Bhandari, Remi Patel. Photo by Charisma Jones

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DYNAMIC POSES Sunsations dancers incorporate intricate and timed poses for their routine during a timeout in the second quarter of Miami’s game versus NC State University at Hard Rock Stadium.

AWARENESS

the fourth quarter while wearing their pink uniforms to raise awareness for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

262 ORGANIZATIONS

Photo by Jared Lennon

TO THE BEATdancing

The all-girl dance team had an amazing season by continuing their dance legacy with each performance

The Sunsations dance team has been performing for nearly 100 years, and the student-athletes performed in numerous school events including football and basketball games. With an amazing set of new routines each season, members of the team always had the best energy that both the students and their fellow teammates could feel. These students felt that their participation provided a lot more than defined dance skills, but it also gave them many relationships and opportunities. Senior, Ashley Howell,was a member of the Sunsations for multiple sea sons. “Not only are these girls my teammates but they are also my sisters. I am so grateful to be a

part of the dance team. They provide me with a second family here at school and I’m looking forward to many more memories with these girls on the field,” she said. The excitement of being a part of the Sunsations wore off on everyone they performed in front of, and it definitely paid off. They competed in the Conference Championships with ten other schools, performing in both the Fight Song Divisions and Performance Divisions, and they placed in the top five for both categories with their stunning routines. After all of the hard work that they put in throughout the past year, members of the team were able to see the outstanding results. Whether it showed through the bonds they formed together, the roaring crowds at sports events or the high rankings at competitions.

263
choreographed routine that involves extensive floor work, precision and technique from all LETS GO ‘CANES During a football halftime show, the Sunsations incorporate pom-poms into their spirit routine to get the crowd ready for the second hald of the game. Photo by Bert Budde

FRONT ROW: Baylee Brochu, Daniela Rodriguez, Julie Erhardt, Natalie Martinez, Rachel Alonso; SECOND ROW: Schayma Hammoud, Bhavya Sharma, Alexander “Coach” Sanjurjo, Chris Damond; BACK ROW: Rahul Kumar, Madison “Lilac” Mutzman, Mark Locco, Samantha Salvi Cruz, Bambi, Chelsey Guastucci. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

camp kesem miami

Camp Kesem provides a peer-based support system anchored in a network of free summer camps for children impacted by a parent’s cancer

FRONT ROW: Mia Madrigal, Trishika Gupta, Aarohi Talati, Sahiti Koganti, Ashna Ahya, Khyati Pandya, Sofia Evenson; BACK ROW: Celeena Memon, Shreya Dutta, Shayla Modi, Gargi Yadav, Kareena Patel, Rajvi Shah, Akanksha Shukla, Aavni Gupta, Emerald Khan. Photo

ujhoom

UJhoom unifies different dance styles such as Bollywood, hip-hop, bhangra, contemporary, classical, and more to create a unique fusion performance

FRONT ROW: Emma Warrner, Allie Kelley, Ana Claure; BACK ROW: Ben Broyles, Logan Beatty, Jaun Flechas. Photo by Allie Salvucci

bmes

The purpose of the Biomedical Engineering Society is to promote the increase of biomedical engineering knowledge and its utilization

264 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
by Mia Madrigal

inspire u academy

Inspire U Academy is dedicated to impacting the trajectory of underrepresented local high school students and fosters a connection between the two

oleku

Oleku is was created to teach and showcase the versatility of African dance styles across the University of Miami

nscs

The National Society of Collegiate Scholars at the University of Miami is an honor society inviting high-achieving freshmen and sophomores

FRONT ROW: Becca Knight , Cassandra Michel, Damaris Zamudio-Galvan, Ashlee Sealy, G’vanni Puchi; SECOND ROW: Veronica Gilbert, Yurisleidys Palacios, Kennedy Taliaferro, Luis Diaz-Longoria, Mary Jimenez; THIRD ROW: Brandon Lee, Eduardo Lago-Chamero, Layomi Adeojo, Xinrong “Cindy” Ye; BACK ROW: Caleb Stacey, Logan Beatty, Ogden Toussaint, Zavier Bell.

Photo by Carly Payne

FRONT ROW: Sakina Qazi, Anandi Bien-Aime, Stephanie Wallcot, Sophia Rebollar; BACK ROW: Hugh Burgdorf, Mecca McCain, Julia Wisell, Serene Thompkins. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

FRONT ROW: Cataryna Rodriguez, Valeria Caballero; BACK ROW: Jaylen Sanders, Mohamed Mbaye, Berk Mankalye, Sebastian Vargas. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

265

FRONT ROW: Chase Glatz, Mora Bustos Martin, Yuchen Sun, Alexandria Cashman, Laura Fernandez, Gabriela Gutierrez; BACK ROW: Chuck Suarez, Nina Kuznetsova, Ethan Kumar, Robert Jimenez, Collin Dion, Elijah Oran, Adeena Ademu-John. Photo by Mia Madrigal

anime club

A club to appreciate the Japanese media form known as anime and its surrounding culture. The club hosts games, movie nights, discussions and more

FRONT ROW: Katie Zgorski, Kassidy Fishma, Georgia Ahumada, Allison Blatter, Meghan Roberts, Kaela Preston; SECOND ROW: Athena Santomero, Sophia Santomero, Nikki Lyons, Tiffany Ortner, Sage Plumley, Emma Borgsmiller Robinson, Jackson Baer, Cameron; BACK ROW: Evan Petkis, Ross Bunch. Photo

marine mammal rescue

MMRT (Marine Mammal Rescue Team) is a volunteer organization that is trained to respond to marine mammal strandings in the South Florida area

MEMBERS: Jillian Tarini, Alina Astacio, Emilie Frias, Haley Galante, Anna Olszewska, Vincent Shipe, Emma Miller, Allie Salvucci Skye Eppel, Nicole Gazo, Karla Magallanes.

UThrift is UM’s free pop-up thrift swap where you can bring lightly-used items to donate, such as clothes, shoes, accessories, books, and anything else

266 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
uthrift
by Danielle Tenberg Photo by Zoe Arscott

ibis yearbook

The Ibis Yearbook covers campus as completely as possible with sections including lifestyles, academics, sports, Greeks, organizations and people

porcolombia

PorColombia aims to educate and raise awareness of present and future opportunities to build a stronger and dynamic community with friendships

canes crossfit

Canes CrossFit Club promotes healthy living through the teachings and practice of the CrossFit methodology both on and off campus

FRONT ROW: Allue Salvucci, Mia Rivas, Shea Halpenny; SECOND ROW: Molly MacKenzie, Genesis Del Toro, Margarita Sinko, Marcela Lynch, Michael Sampino; BACK ROW: Elyse Roscoe, Samuel Raus, Stephanie Flores, Daniel Fernandez. Photo by Emmalyse Brownstein

Gladiz Velez, Erik Trebilcock, Yliuz Sierra, Juan Flechas, Vanessa Bonilla, Lizeth Camacho, Carlos Solares, Timothy Lende.

Domonique Folkes, Isabel Ogilvie, Melanie Ruis, Joshua Kostiner, Jack Balseiro. Photo by Allie Salvucci

267
Photo by Farha Reshamwala

POM POMS

in the air

Students put their all into every performance this season, pumping up the crowds at sports events both home and away

The cheerleading teams have a long tradition at the University of Miami, having been founded in 1925. UCheer is made up of both the all-girls dance team and the co-ed team. The cheer team is at every game, home or away, hyping up the crowds and keeping team spirit high for everyone to enjoy.

Rain or shine, these student athletes put their all into every performance, working tirelessly to perfect their choreography so that every trick is a suc-

cess on the stage or floor.

Spending hours a day together, they create a support system for each other. Dezirae Gilliard, a sophomore at UM, said, “UCheer has given me special opportunities to be a part of fun events and traditions at this school, as well as given me a family that I can rely on whether it’s at practice, on the field, or outside of cheer. I’m sothankful to be a part of such an amazing organization and made friends that’ll last a whole lifetime.”

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HANDS IN THE AIR During the halftime show, Dylan Barron, class of 2024, throws up the U during Miami’s game versus Appalachian State. by Jared Lennon LETS GET LOUD Sophomore Olivia Carfagno pumps up the crowd during Miami’s game versus Appalachian State at Hard Rock Stadium on Sept. 11. Photo by Jared Lennon WIN FOR THE ‘U’ Members of UCheer and Sebastian the Ibis hold up a finger and sway during the playing of the alma matter after Miami’s 25-23 win over Appalachian State. Photo by Jared Lennon WARM WELCOME Members of the UM Cheer Team stand together as the Canes Take Flight program ends in the Watsco Center. Photo by Jared Lennon GETTING HYPED UCheer cheerleaders support the football players as they enter the stadium before the start of Miami’s game versus Appalachian State at Hard Rock Stadium on Sept. 11. Photo by Jared Lennon

WE GOT SPIRIT

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PUMP UP THE VOLUME UCheer member Shadiya Ewing, sophomore, encourages the crowd to make noise during the fourth quarter of Miami’s game versus Michigan State. Photo by Jared Lennon CHEERING ON THE TEAM Cheerleaders pump up the crowd by performing a cheer routine before the start of Miami’s game versus Appalachian State at Hard Rock Stadium on Sept. 11. Photo by Jared Lennon Mackenzie Murrin stands on her teammates hands as she shakes her pom poms in the air at ‘Canes Take Flight. Photo by Jared Lennon

FRONT ROW: Abby Johnson, Jyotsna Rao, Allison Reyes, Mia Madrigal; SECOND ROW: Natalie Mastalerz, Kamryn Charles, Zoe Arora, Julia Pilavin; BACK ROW: Kayla Wig, Anisha Bhandari, Zanaiah Billups, Anna Aupke, Morgan Welliver, Rohan Wadhwa, Sarah Mills.

tufaan

UMiami Tufaan is University of Miami’s premier fusion multicultural a cappella group, blending western and eastern influences to create a unique sound

mission ja

The purpose of Mission JA is to foster a sense of community, cultural identity and personal development among students of Jamaican backgrounds

FRONT ROW: Gabriela Rodriguez, Felipe Rangel, Andres Palacios; BACK ROW: Maria Fernanda Terceros, Sebastian Nunez, Valentina Restrepo.

The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers is a nation-wide society dedicated to the empowerment and success of Latinos in STEM fields

270 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS & ALTERNATIVE BREAKS
Photo by Mia Madrigal
shpe
Okera Hastings, Collette Thomas, Asheka Newman, Rivaldo Harris. Photo by Genesis Del Toro Photo by John Yayi Bondje

TO ACTION comitted

After a two year break, Alternative Breaks came back strong to celebrate their 15th anniversary

UM Alternative Breaks (UMAB), a student-run organization that offers alternative trips for students during winter and spring breaks, celebrated its 15th anniversary by hosting four service trips instead of the usual two. The goal of UMAB is to address social action in local, national and global communities.

The four trips accumulated 1,100 collective service hours for 33 participants. Students traveled to Lexington, Texas; Abilene, Texas; Manchester, N.H.; and Houston, Texas. The volunteers leading and

attending the trip aided victims of domestic violence, refugees, homelessness, food insecurity and disaster relief.

The Co-Chair of UMAB, Bao Duong, remarked on in-person service opportunities and increased interest from peers and community partners.

“Some students from two years ago re-applied to attend this year. It was exciting to have the nonprofit partners that wanted to host us two years ago before the trips were canceled due to COVID-19 restrictions,” Duong said.

ALL FOR THE ecosystem

Some of the community service events that Alternative Breaks hosts are in the interest of environmental safety. Students participate to keep the planet healthy

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BIRD LOVE A volunteer of Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center, Miranda Melians, is reading about one of the bird nature enclosures. Photo by Bao Duong PLANTING IT Freshmen Reid Jansen and Nitika Joshi work on plant rehabilitation to help prevent erosion at the Blowing Rocks Preserve in Jupiter, FL. Photo by Bao Duong FOOD FOR CHANGE Caitlin McGee, junior, stacks food for the nonprofit United Against Poverty in St. Lucie. This is a store that gives free and discounted food for those that have a low socioeconomic background. Photo by Bao Duong HELPING THE KEYS Miranda Melians, junior, and Hanna Campos, senior, gather sand to help rehabilitate the trails of the Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center in Tavernier, FL. Photo by Bao Duong FEEDING THE PEOPLE A group of volunteers is preparing dinner after a long day. They are cooking in a local church where they are staying. Emma Miller, junior, and Christian Houston, freshman, are plating food. Photo by Bao Duong

FRONT ROW: Angelica Mendez, Lex Calderon, Zoe Fundora; SECOND ROW: Adrian Perez, Lance De La Cruz, Adriana Ramirez, Isabella Rodriguez; THIRD ROW: Juan Carlos Ramirez, Joe Anillo, Daniel Fernandez, Elliot Farr; BACK ROW: Collin Miller, Christian Peacock, Sydney Stropes, Hugo Mijares-Bracho, Jose Haro, Jake Sage. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

FRONT ROW: Carolina Garcia, Nicole Ivanova, Ariyanna Thomas, Ashley Mendoza, Ana Gabriela Jimenez Plaza, Angelisa Fernandez; Claive Chang; SECOND ROW: Ali Alzayadi, Gabrielle Ramsaney, Lydia Yisehak, Cleide Velasquez, Kelly Mayol, Nicolette Brigante, Eangelique White, Elizabeth Gonzalez, Angelica Tacoronte, Jonathan Plata; BACK ROW: Soamuel Bonhenguel, Skyler Kahng, Adrian Perez, Shelsa Menard, Carolina Aceredo, Jonathan Prussel, Anthony Cherubino, Ricardo Quintana, Christian Lamantia, Bernie Burman. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

fecThe Federación de Estudiantes Cubanos is dedicated to keeping the Cuban culture alive within the UM community for Cuban and Non-Cuban students alike

pre-dental students

The purpose of the American Society of Pre-Dental Students is to help prepare predental students for entrance into dental schools , and promote dental health

David Paul, Alex Terr, Sabrina Zeghibe, Matthew Waldman, Marc Chodos, Gabriel Tejada, Derek Nissly, Franco Damico, Holden Hargrave,Jack Simon, Ivan Cadavid, Eddy Maldonado, Tillman Richardson, Carlos Ottley, Javier Acosta, Sterling Hunt Natalia Calderon, Tahrey Delancey, Brandon Cornejo, Kevin Basden, Ben Johnson, Cubby Mentowski, Josh Carlson, Jake Falcons, Charlie Lihota, Anna Cohen, Anna Mimick Cameron Tovin. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

special olympics

The purpose of Special Olympics at UM is to organize and plan student participation in the Special Olympics Miami Dade Program, primarily through unified sports

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FRONT ROW: Antonezca Criscoca, Devin Foster, Caroline Moody; BACK ROW: Marisa Spada, Cole Plominski, Rohan Duieja.

gotv

Get Out The Vote is a nonpartisan student led political organization that registers, educates, and mobilizes voters in the University of Miami community

above the bar

Above the Bar is a multicultural organization for the University of Miami pre-law students to ensure their successful matriculation into law school

FRONT ROW: Shiuani Koka, Sterling Cole, Jordan Farrell, Ysabella Muñiz; BACK ROW: Adeena Ademo John, Zachary Winer, Amrutha Chethikattil.

FRONT ROW: Lina Gral, Hannah Hassouni, Brett Siegal, Jocelyn Rodenstein, Danielle Mullen, Julian Pollak, Hannah Cohen, Hannah Friedman; SECOND ROW: Daniela Marta Abbo, Amelia Byrd, Sophie Weed, Sofia Sonntag, Dan Snitzer, Yamo Oeniz; BACK ROW: Jordan Chesebrough, Olivia Watanabe, Chloe Stemeran, Ronald Manning, Roban Thananeg, Gabriel Torres, Odgen Toussaint. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

The American Marketing Society is the leading organization for undergraduate students at the University of Miami who are passionate about marketing

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Photo by Genesis Del Toro Photo by Genesis Del Toro

GET

274 ORGANIZATIONS ASSOCIATION OF COMMUTER STUDENTS
FOR THE TREE Some members from ACS participate in the Spirit tree ornament decorating vent. ACS took the win for best ornament this year. Photo by Cindy Marquez THAT FLAG Peter Muina, Allegra Garcia, Madison Capote, Carolina Hassun, Anthony Crespo, Adrian Ferrarati, Cristian Alvarez and Lynette Perez play co recreational flag football with other organizations on campus. Photo by Cindy Marquez CHEER WIN All of the ACS members celebrate their Homecoming Week OCheer competition win with Sebastian the Ibis at the Lakeside Patio. Photo by Cindy Marquez

FOR A RIDE we’re going

An org recruited a record-breaking number of new members and brought the entire campus together via spirit

The Association of Commuter Students (ACS) has struggled to grow in the COVID-19 climate as a social organization based on forming an in-person community. However, they made waves as pandemic restrictions waned with 300 new members, the biggest influx of participants since the organization’s founding. The sense of family for commuter students had finally returned, and people had a lot to say about it.

ACS creates a home away from home for students, as they fight for a presence on campus amongst all their traveling back and forth. President of ACS, Andres Florez, commented, “We’ve had residents, transfers, and even faculty and staff ask about ACS and how to attend more of our events. The organization has improved tremendously and there is such a diverse community where people can come together, make friendships, and build memories.”

Even though ACS is focuses on commuter students, they are known campus-wide by the activities they host that bring serious school spirit. ACS Outreach Chair, Erik Martin shared, “From our various homecoming wins, insane amounts of spirit at the football games and great outcomes in the fundraisers we host to get more involved with our community, ACS is always trying to get involved with campus.”

Regardless of their residential status, Hurricanes as a whole appreciated ACS in energy they bring to campus and the diversity, community and familiarity their group represents.

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OUR HERITAGE Cuban ACS members and allies gather around the ‘U’ statue with Cuban flags to promote Cuban freedom and celebrate their heritage. Photo by Cindy Marquez DONUTS FOR A CAUSE Rebecca Menendez, Jessica Colon, Cindy Marquez and Mark Fernandez run a booth and sell donuts to raise money for breast cancer awareness month. Photo by Cindy Marquez SPORTY FUN ACS boys dress for the occasion and play intramural volleyball together to build relationships and recruit students to join. Photo by Cindy Marquez PRETTY IN PINK ACS members dress head-to-toe in pink to support Breast Cancer Awareness, and conduct their first fundraiser of the year. Photo by Cindy Marquez

Nick Richard Pericles, Julian Chapman, Caleb Taylor, Rayan N Excellent, Khalil Bland.

bond club

Brothers Overcoming Negativity and Destruction, or BOND, is an organization based on promoting male pride by self-enrichment and self-education

FRONT ROW: Antonio Mora, Rachel Sullivan, Jessica Diez, Emma Dominguez, Allison Bliss; SECOND ROW: Wyatt Kopelman, Isabella Didio, Parker Gimbel, Rahul Kumar, Pari Walter, Josh Halper; BACK ROW: Jarrod Houseknecht, Christian Weiman. Photo by Amrutha

the miami hurricane

The Miami Hurricane is the University of Miami’s student newspaper which covers a variety of topics relating to the UM community

sase

The Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers’ helps students reach their full career potential by offering opportunities for professional advancement

276 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
Photo by John Yayi Bondje Amira Mansuri, Nina Phan, Celeena Memon, Christopher Wu, Larisa Thai. Photo by Genesis Del Toro Chethikattil

Dido Franceschi, Leti Milesi-Halle, Arryanna Jordan, Will Jaffee, Drew Goheen, Michael O’Reilly, and Eboni Arnold Sama. Photo by Carolina Camus

aglo

AGLO is the umbrella organization for Greek Life at UM, collaborating with IFC, MGC, NPHC, and the Panhellenic Association to ensure Greek Unity

FRONT ROW: Kayla Davis; SECOND ROW: Sydnee Levett, Nevaeh Williams; THIRD ROW: Kayani Alcantara, Jovanie Joseph, Jordan Crenshaw; BACK ROW: Taylor Burrel, Alana Bernard. Photo by Shea Halpenny

Black Female Development Circle is an active organization that strives to empower, educate, and support black women

asu

The purpose of the African Students Union on the University of Miami campus, is to raise cultural awareness and knowledge of the current issues that face Africa

FRONT ROW: Zoey Mutombo, Norachi Ejie Angella Nakasagga, Okera Hastings; SECOND ROW: Kimberly Ogun, Emily Ezeogu Caroline Mwenda, Ajiri Uzere, Brittney Mensah, Edua Atu, Samantha Ewiah, BACK ROW: Kofi Bame, Najy Sadig, Anthony Akinrinmola. Photo courtesy of Brittney Mensah

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THE SPIRIT we bring

Essential pride and spirit team is dedicated to making every week a great week for all Hurricane students

Hurricane Productions (HP) organized and hosted a variety of events tailored to the student body ranging from first-week social events, Homecoming traditions, holiday craft-making, and many smaller events sprinkled in between the larger ones.

Whether students found out about their events through their Instagram page, by walking by the Foote Green or through the Breezeway, Hurricanes enjoyed free food, giveaways, free merch with a simple swipe of their ‘Cane card. HP events also proved to be a great way to meet new people. Freshman Alshely Rodriguez recalled her HP experiences, “I loved how everyone was so nice and it was a way to de-stress between classes; plus, the free merch was always a bonus.”

Hurricane Productions has many branches, including Patio Jams and the Rathskeller Advisory Board (RAB). Each branch provided an opportunity to enjoy the community on campus noting Freshman Isa Juara often stayed for Patio Jams, “I’ll sit in a glider and have them as my background music. I love how it’s students that perform, and I appreciate the large variety in genres and performers.”

HP provided so many ways to get involved in the school community, to make new friends and to fill up any free time with interactive activities. Whether it was making DIY Christmas ornaments or going to trivia nights at The Rat, there was always something to do thanks to the dedication and creativity of HP’s members.

278 ORGANIZATIONS HURRICANE PRODUCTIONS
SMOOTHIES AND SMILES At the ‘Canes Island event, hosted on the Lakeside Patio by HP, students take complimentary smoothies.The smoothies were made by the staff at the oncampus Smoothie King in Lakeside. Photo by Sharron Lou Story by Maria Rojas Design by Carolina Camus

DONUT FUN Samantha Price, class of 2023, oversees the HP table on the Foote Green that is stacked with free Mojo Donuts. She gives them out to students at the Candy ‘Canes event for the holidays.

THE ELEMENTS In an event celebrating the four elements, Tatiana Alvarado, class of 2023, runs the check in booth, where students input their information in order to recieve free bracelets and merchandise bags.

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SWEET SIPS AND TREATS In between classes, students wait in line at an HP tent for free coffee and hot chocolate provided by Hurricane Productions at their “Falling For You” holiday event. Photo by Sofia Ramirez ARTISTIC SIDE Kiana Gaviria, freshman, paints a football helmet in UM green and orange at the ‘Canes Games event hosted by HP on the Foote Green. The event was held to celebrate the start of football season. Photo by Sofia Ramirez Photo by Charisma Jones Photo by Sofia Ramirez

FRONT ROW: Gina Preson, Ainsley Vetter, Kate Stapleton; BACK ROW: Max Lagano, Jarrod Maloney, Cameron Masiello, Riley Pfieffer, Luke Arends. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

canecast

CanesCast is UMTV’s weather show, featuring forecasts for South Florida, plus intermittent stories about weather-related topics and climate change

FRONT ROW: Katie Brubaker, Kylie Prieto, Mia Scholl, Georgia Macy; SECOND ROW: Delaney Greenwald, Luciana Zappala, Bri Arluk, Amina Mohammad, Lily Morgan; BACK

ROW: Tess Guidry (Coach), Jordyn Solages, Natalie Blahnik, Arden Woltman, Sydney Tomlinson, Kate Stapleton.

hurricanettes

FRONT ROW: Kailah Strickland, Gianna Terranova, Megan Asbrand, Angelica Adams, Marcela Torres, Darien Mozingo, Izzi Guzman, Sammy McCullough, Emma Gladden; SECOND ROW: Christina Smiley, Amanda Bower, Olivia Damasco, Sofia Heyl, Mia Laping, Jayme Podgorowiez; BACK ROW: Isabelle Bepler, Samantha Price, Charlotte Kiehn, Mia Flora, Jade Luo-Santos, Kelly Bork.

sigma alpha lota

Sigma Alpha Iota is a professional music fraternity for women that strives to promote music in the community and throughout the world

280 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
& PLANT BASED ‘CANES
Photo by Carly Payne Photo by Carly Payne The Hurricanettes Dance Team performs with the Frost Band of the Hour at football games and select basketball games, as well as at alumni and community events

FOR FOODplants

Student org aims to promote a new way of eating by emphasizing the wellbeing of animals

Plant Based Canes made it their mission to inform people outside of the organization on animals, the environment and food sustainability all while providing a community for vegans and vegetarians, and it made quite the difference.

Oftentimes members taste tested vegan meals throughout Miami and on campus, and they shared the best retail locations for perspective or veteran vegans and vegetarians.“Having our very own fully plant based food spot on campus, Fresh Fusion, informs people of all the different meals and aspects the plant-based lifestyle provides,” said President Jessica Colon.

Every member raved about the fun moments with their fellow members, but the organization was about more than following a vegan or vegetarian diet, it was about educating others. Colon also said, “It’s important for even non-plant-based people to be aware of the plant based community because it is constantly growing. Even if you yourself are not plant-based, learning what your food is made out of is very beneficial.”

Plant Based Canes has motivated people to discover new foods that better appeal to plant-based lifestyles and sustainability. As they have continued to provide safe spaces for people who follow a plant-based diet, as well as people who would like to learn how to have one, the organization has truly made its place on campus and in the hearts of those students.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

CARING FOR our animals

The Plant Based ‘Canes organization provides a sense of community for vegans and vegetarians as well as education and outreach on the benefits of eating more plants for health and safety of animals

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FROZEN TREAT The PBC take a trip to a vegan block party where they enjoy vegan ice cream from a small shop called Angie’s. Photo by Jessica Colon PLANT FRIENDLY At a vegan block party, PBC members order traditional Cuban dishes that are made entirely from plants and vegan friendly. Photo by Jessica Colon VEGAN FRIENDLY The Plant Based Canes met with UM Dining representatives at Fresh Fusion, which is a vegetarian and vegan dining option on campus. They prepared a sampler event for PBC to try foods. Photo by Jessica Colon Miranda Melians, junior, and Hanna Campos, senior, gather sand to help rehabilitate the trails of the Florida Keys Wild Bird Rehabilitation Center in Tavernier, FL. Photo by Jessica Colon GET TO EAT Plant Based Canes had their first outing of the semester in which they walked around and spent the day at Wynwood trying various delicious vegan foods from food trucks and restaurants. Photo byJessica Colon

FRONT ROW: Isaac Attuah, Patrick Harris, Justin Jenkins, Elias Jallo, Kyla Stewart, Eric Huddleston; SECOND ROW: Eruly Suarez, Gaby Antonio, Giovana Andrade, Anaya Iglesias, Deseray Sida, Ciera Gomez, Carlos Solares; BACK ROW: Eduardo Chavez, Lindsey Summaru, Osvaldo Espino, Brigette Vazquez, Alex Walch. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

mexicanes

The Méxicanes are a group of students interested in fomenting Mexican culture and traditions and tearing down walls that divide the University of Miami community

FRONT ROW: Byron Fang (coach), Hunter Fu, Noah Teer, Cooper Ohlsson, Oliver Cerne, Lux Sovann, Nicholas Montes, Eliseo RieraGomez, Lucas McConnell, Brandon Wittrock, Max Graivier, Timothy Hunsdorfer, Calvin

Leung; BACK ROW: Kai Robinson, Jackson

Baer, Cameron Masiello, Matthew Duval, Cadence Dimen, Pierce Kinney, Owen Fleming, Alex Costabile, Elias Kilshaw, Jason Kinasewitz, Daniel Bennett.

men’s ultimate frisbee

Their goal is to teach students the game of Ultimate Frisbee and to display the powerful life lessons that it brings about

FRONT ROW: Joya Lahoud, Maya Allison, Emily Chiong, Allie Salvucci, Briana Vargas, Kayla Soyer, Stephanie Do Nascimento, Amanda Rose Cabrera, Phoebe Klein, MJ Barnes, Ysabella Maldonado, Alessia Petricca, Mona Abuzahra, Lena Bruscato, Julia Sackett; SECOND ROW: Brian Goldberg, Angelo Candelario, Jay Hurst, Jonathon

Macchiaroli, Sophie Rodriguez, Jennifer Vega, Jared Harwin, Margaret Christovich, Geethika Kataru, Elle Kakaletris, Ashleigh

LLoyd, Alyssa Miller, Alex Berman, Jake

Tessler, Olivia Fox, Michelle Bogaert

Tavares, Julie Schoen, Max Schwartz, Sami Frankel, Sharron Lou, Sophia Savitz, Sophia

Sturek, Madeline Earle, Kumani Riley, Amber

Quettan, Phoebe Oyana, Ally Polner, Shivani

Koka, Nicole Reyes, Raphael Vulcain, Alex

Maruca; BACK ROW: Michael Marino, Allie Finkl, Mallory Garber, James Coccaro.

orange umbrella

Orange Umbrella functions as a student collective of experiential education beyond the classroom by combining professionalism with curiosity

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ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
Photo by Allie Salvucci Photo by Carly Payne

FRONT ROW: Jacob Foster, Carleigh Walter Jordan Tygh, Montgomery Nicholas, Zachary Danney, Sasha Menard; SECOND ROW: Elias Vihtelic, Anthony Ustariz, Franciso, Gretchell Cano, Ronald Vera; BACK ROW: Juan Carlos Jimenez, Caden Nall, Alex Benitez, Justin Kasenberg. Photo by Carly Payne

veteran students

Veteran Students Organization was established to educate and enhance the experience of military-connected students at The University of Miami

kids and culture

Kids and Culture is a volunteer student organization that strives to show students college is attainable regardless of gender, race, ethnicity or socioeconomic status

Inaayah-Bint-Muhammad, Sacha Braggs, Justine Marie Joseph, Michelle StJuste.

Photo by Genesis Del Toro

SpectrUM is University of Miami’s largest undergraduate LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and more) organization

FRONT ROW: Jarret Lord, Ruby Waterman, Craig Scully-Clemmons, Mia Rivas; SECOND ROW: Allison Reish, Veronica Geoghegan, Nathaly Gonzalez, Taylor Jagolinzer, Jet Porter, Adrianna Marrero; BACK ROW: Nicholas Edwards-Martin, Atha Pol, Dija Thomas, Ryan Hires, Maddy Cerrito, Sam Hinds. Photo by Vanessa Kania

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284 ORGANIZATIONS UMTV
FOR THE LAUGHTER Senior Jarrod Maloney operates a camera for Off The Wire. Off The Wire is UMTV’s late night comedy show. Photo by Allie Salvucci BEHIND THE SCENES Senior Christina Herrera makes the show rundown and writes scripts for Pulse, UMTV’s entertainment and lifestyle show. Photo by Allie Salvucci IN THE EDITING BOOTH Junior Mackenzie Beckham runs the server while filming UMTV’s The Culture, which is UMTV’s show highlighting the Black experience. Photo by Allie Salvucci IN CHARGE Senior Maria Toledo acts as floor manager to monitor and direct the filming of UniMiami, a Spanish-language show that features news and topics that affect young Latinos. Photo by Allie Salvucci

TELEVISION legacy

Creation and management of award winning student television productions through UMTV leaves a unique impact for the futures of aspiring broadcast journalists

UMTV boasted seven television shows including NewsVision, SportsDesk, The Culture, NewsBreak, CanesCast, UniMiami, Pulse and Off The Wire. In March, the 41st College Television Awards nominated SportsDesk and NewsVision for the Television Academy Foundation awards. SportsDesk took home the win for the news and sports category of the competition.

UniMiami was UMTV’s show en Espanol, which focused on issues related to Latinos. Senior Josh Stewart, who worked on UniMiami since his freshman year, cited his favorite project as the Special Topics segment. “I hosted for a few semesters in which I was able to speak about topics that I was passionate about that were

otherwise not discussed such as climate change and I did so in Spanish.” Throughout each show, the students hosting it would often participate in various segments to keep viewers engaged. Stewart described the show as “a table talk about topics of our choosing” and he particularly enjoyed creating his own segment titled “Esooo”. As a senior, he was proud to leave a legacy at UniMiami. “I find it super cool that a term my friends and I use on a day to day basis to emphasize something that is exciting, has been made into a segment on a show.”

Students like Stewart have been able to take advantage of UMTV to relay information while creating unique shows and segments for students and faculty alike.

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Story by Amrutha Chekthani Design by Carolina Camus READY FOR THE CAMERA Junior KiAnna Dorsey practices her toss and opening lines while reading the prompter as co-host of UMTV’s show called The Culture, which highlights the Black experience. Photo by Allie Salvucci COSTUME ON SET Freshmen Ryan Novak dresses up in a bacon costume and operates a camera for Off The Wire’s special Halloween episode. Photo by Allie Salvucci TRACKING ATHLETES Senior Samantha Velez manages the master board in the control room for SportsDesk. SportsDesk highlights student athletes and coaches and analysis of various upcoming sports games. Photo by Allie Salvucci

FRONT ROW: Valentina Gomez, Allison Blatter, Haley Galante, Hannah Heath, Katherine Devore, Madeline Wagner, Justin Jenkins, Brian Bagley; SECOND ROW: Georgia Ahumada, Matthew Birtman, Caiden Gagner, Jayda Rodriguez, Sarah Nichols, Ellie Barkyoumb, Becca Buwalda, Brooke Weiser; BACK ROW: Madeline Carr, Khrista Nicholas, Cameron Hallett, Allie Cook. Photo by Shea Halpenny

rho rho rho

Rho Rho Rho is a friendly and adventurous group of RSMAS and University of Miami students who plan fun marine outings to encourage enthusiasm for our oceans

FRONT ROW: Joseph Torres, Amanda Ribnick, Allegra Rosa, Greta Hicks, Kate Reilly, Christopher Milano; SECOND ROW: Brooke Hall, Emilia Torello, Johanna Loughran, Penelope Hinds, Luciana Ragolia, Chloe Friedman, Eliza Knode, Jenna Hochkammer; BACK ROW: Caleb Polsky, Diego Pfieffer, Darren Hannan, Samantha Yates, Samuel Wetson Evans, Eli Jacobson. Photo by Mia Madrigal

theatre action group

The Theatre Action Group aims to promote the study and celebration of the craft of theatrical performance on and off of the University of Miami campus

Michael O’Rourke, Logan Beard, Sky Berninghaus, Julian Reiter, KT Palmer, Dan Snitzer, Tyler Gallant, Kayla Painter Alex Green. Photo by Carly Payne

wakeboarding

Provide members with opportunities to go wakeboarding, attend recreational and compestitive wakeboarding events and improve their skill levels

286 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS

FRONT ROW: Chelsea Pauhas, Brigitte Vazquez, Aileen Flores, Pahola Bustos, Genesis Del Toro; BACK ROW: Laura Landetta, Dunia Mejia, Estefania Caputo, Caroline Vazquez, Sabrina Mosqueda. Photo courtesy of Genesis Del Toro

lucha latina

The mission of Lucha Latina, Inc. is to empower young Latinas across the United States from all walks of life in order to help them achieve their goals

nsbe

The mission of the National Society of Black Engineers is to increase the number of culturally responsible Black Engineers who excel and succeed professionally

FRONT ROW: Zoey Efford, Niani Mays, Jennifer Verdelus; SECOND ROW: Vivien Dominick, Kaitlyn Wright; BACK ROW: Taylor Washington, Liam Olagbaju, CJ Kemp. Photo by John Yayi-Bondje

best buddies

The mission of Best Buddies is to establish a movement that creates opportunities friendships for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

FRONT ROW: Mikayla Riselli, Michelle Fleishaker; BACK ROW: Alexander Douma, Tyler Jaquays, Alex Boshnick, Rohan Dureja. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

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STUDENTS leading

UPROAR administration oversaw a diverse term dedicated to engagement

With over 300 members and 39 Senate bills, the student government administration pursued various avenues to address student needs.

There were over 15 tabling events to promote interaction.“With a fervent commitment to social justice, equity, and community involvement, this administration has strived to maintain visibility,” said Coles. They passed two key initiatives: Legislation for Indigenous Land Acknowledgement and Indigenous Peoples Day Celebration and Advocacy for Installation of Sustainable Feminine Hygiene Products.

In addition to the external projects that were implemented on campus, there were many goals to improve upon student government itself. “Our most important contribution, however,will remain our shift to the internal culture of our organization where every member feels as though they can succeed,” concludes Coles, emphasizing the underlying principles of equity and inclusion driving the administration.

At the core, many members predict that these strides for innovation and improvement will lead to the empowerment of the next generation of the student administration and student body.

CELEB FACES Member of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council, Niles Nissem, interviews Josh Peck at the Student Government What Matters To ‘U’ event. Photo by Ally Gaddy SHOWING OFF AWARDS Student Government members pose with their “SG Icon” awards that they won at the annual Student Government fall retreat. Photo by Ally Gaddy LOVE FOR THE EARTH
288 ORGANIZATIONS STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Members of the Student Government ECO agency participating in one of the beach clean-ups held during 2021. Photo courtesy of Student Government

IT IS OFFICIAL Director of Campus Liaison Council Ian Malesiewski, Speaker Pro-Tempore Paul Douillon, Elections Commissions Chair Asia Chester, and Director of Communications Ally Gaddy get sworn into their positions at the Student Government Inaguration.

IMPORTANT FACES Abigal Adeleke and Miles Pendleton accept awards during the Student Government Inaguration.

Jenny Abreu

FRONT ROW: Cassandra Swilley, Frantzline Gaudard; BACK ROW: Chamanta

Prud-Homme, Lucwilerna Raymond, Isaiah Alzume, Laura Francois, Esther Alexandre, Sasha Menard, Maydeleen Guiteau

Pierre-Noel, Cheyenne Clelland. Photo by Farha Reshamwala

planet kreyol

Planet Kreyol is the Haitian Student Organization whose mission is to promote cultural awareness while servicing and preserving the ancestry of Haiti

Natalia Gonzales, Daniel Vaughn , Abigail Edwards, Jonathan Snow, Josvianny Rosa

Alvarado, Jacob Esquivel, Fatima Navarro, Marcus Colón, Keely Brunkow, Victoria Gayles, Fabian Treviño. Photo by John Yayi Bondje

ufuerza

UFuerza Latino Dance Team works to promote Latin dancing around campus through their community mission and performances

FRONT ROW: Meera Patel, Kim Sookoo, Snigdha Sama, Avery Boals, Gabriella Guerriero; BACK ROW: Austin Berger, Megan

Piller, Ainsley Hilliard, Megan Buras, Abigail

Adera, Anam Ahmed. Photo courtesy of Anam Ahmed

scientifica magazine

Scientifica Magazine is a student-led undergraduate publication that seeks to spark curiosity and passion for science in students from different fields

290 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS

FRONT ROW: Joey Pinzone, Jamari Wilkins, James Allen, Chenchua Xu; BACK ROW: Ye Chen, Alden Findley, Julio Hernandez, Rodrigo Elias. Photo by Allie Salvucci

fencing

Fencing Club is all about promoting the sport of Fencing at the University of Miami while encouraging physical fitness and building friendships

FRONT ROW: Isaac Attuah, Justin Jenkins, Kyla Samuels Stewart, Omari Lewis; BACK ROW: Patrick Harris, Elias Jallo, Eric Huddleston, Joe Lortie (Pastor). Photo by Genesis Del Toro

University Christian Fellowship is a inter-denominational campus ministry that is open to God’s powerful working in and through His people

aasa

The Asian American Students Association at the University of Miami promotes the awareness of Asian culture and the Asian American identity

FRONT ROW: Bao Duong, Zach Ng, Ann Sia, Laurie Vuong, Lauren Colaco; BACK ROW: Ethan Kumar, Kevin Li, Justin Yang, Nicholas Tong, Mintra Putlek. Photo by Carly Payne

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WEEK OF cuban culture

From March 27 - April 1, FEC hosted a week full of events commemorating Cuban heritage which included a domino tournament, Jose Marti Day of Service and ‘Cafecito on the Rock’ for UM students of every ethnicity

CHEERING ON Wearing their Week of Cuban Culture shirts, FEC members attend a baseball game together to cheer on their baseball team and kick off the new season.

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ORGANIZATIONS FEDERACION DE ESTUDIANTES
CUBANOS ONE LAST DANCE Sending off Senior Christian Peacock, FEC members Sydney Stropes, Collin Miller, Christian Peacock, Adriana Ramirez, Zoe Fundora and Hugo Mijares take one last picture together. Photo courtesy by Sydney Stropes PERFORMING LIKE CHAMPS Dressed in their OCheer outfits, Junior Sydney Stropes and Senior Maria Calandranis celebrate with Sebastian after performing at the annual OCheer competition. Photo courtesy of Sydney Stropes Photo by of Sydney Stropes FRESHLY PAINTED Junior Collin Miller and senior Maria Calandranis show off their Homecoming week album creation. Photo by Sydney Stropes FRESH VICTORY Isabella Rodriguez, freshman, and Zoe Fundora, junior win the annual domino tournament after defeating a dozen teams also participating. Photo by Sydney Stropes

CUBANOS somos

FEC aims to exhibit Cuban Culture across campus by inviting students to experience Cuban food, music, and other activities

The Federacion de Estudiantes Cubanos (FEC) grew over the years to represent the increasing number of Cuban students attending the Univeristy of Miami. The organization has focused on exposing the student body to Cuban culture through a variety of events. Many students, both Cuban and non-Cuban, have joined the organization to partake in many Cuban traditions and experience classic UM activities like sports games and homecoming with an increased sense of community.

FEC has maintained some old traditions and with most members now in person, they’ve been able to create some new ones as well. The ‘Cafecito on the Rock’ events give students the opportunity to taste Cuban coffee and pastries in between their classes while learning some fun facts about Cuba. Moreover, new events like the Domino Tournament on the Rat allowed students to practice playing a new game and compete for prizes. One tradtion that is likely to stick around is the annual formal FEC gathering where seniors are officially ‘sent off’ by receiving their membership certificates and farewell speeches.

Freshmen Michaela Torres, who was recently elected to be next years club Secretary, mentions: “Joining FEC has helped me navigate my first year on campus by giving me a family that is always there for me. Whether we are hanging out in the FEC office or attending an event, I feel at home with this group.”

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HEAD IN THE GAME Jose Haro ‘25 jumps into a domino game with Andrew Dubinett ‘25 at the FEC booth during Homecoming opening ceremony celebrations. Photo courtesy of Sydney Stropes Story and Design by Daniel Fernandez COMPETING WITH FAMILIA The annual FEC kickball game led to a narrow victory for current ‘Cane students who competed against FEC alumni who had previously graduated. Photo by Syndey Stropes THE NEW AND THE OLD Newly elected FEC members met with current board members at Doce Provisions Cuban cusine to discuss the future of the organization. Photo by Christian Peacock BANGING A TUNE Andrew Dubinett, freshmen, practices playing some instruments during the first WOCC ceremonies. Photo by Joe Anillo

MEMBERS: Joseph Broehl, Gabrielle Aguiar, Alexander De La Rua, Anandi Bien-Aime, Nicey Raiyani, Olga Pilichowska, Natalia Jimenez Sierra, Raghad Alkandari, Yoland Victor, Dylan Thompson, Eboni Arnold

FRONT ROW: Isaac Attuah, Anya McDonald, Hulaman Bayo, Gideon Raghunadam, Amanada Raghunandan; BACK ROW: Nhdya S. Lawes, Erie Hellans, Lance Kreitzer, Ixe Aderoju. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

TEDxUMiami aims to provide students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to give their own TED Talk, sparking deep conversations about emerging ideas

hammond butler gospel

The Hammond-Butler Gospel Choir is the University of Miami’s premier gospel choir which enjoys praising God through all types of Christian music

FRONT ROW: Christopher Fischer-Hilton, Brianna Dessa, Reagan Silver; SECOND ROW: Gregory Goo Alvarado, Anh Phan Dao, Amari Manning; THIRD ROW: Richard Aurrecoechen, Anaraelha Ramelin, Drew Chesltin;

FOURTH ROW: Maximo, Henry Grant, Hernan Aviles; BACK ROW: Aaron Thuaites, Zachary Coleman Curtis, Evan Broholski. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

boxing club

University of Miami Boxing Team and Boxing Club is designed to improve the quality of life for students who share an interest in the fitness aspects of boxing

294 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS & SCIENTIFICA MAGAZINE
tedx

LOVE THE science realm

Scientifica Magazine reached new audiences in a digital platform and covered science central to current affairs

Scientifica, the student-run scientific magazine, prides itself on making science accessible and enjoyable to all UM students. Although a relatively new publication, Scientifica received a great amount of attention. The staff showed a dedication to quality content, with their work covering the opioid epidemic in South Florida and the COVID-19 effects on at-risk populations in Miami. Their dedication was rewarded by winning the Silver Print General Magazine award at CSPA Crown Award 2021 in the fall. Editor Anuj Shah shared, “A lot of the stories we are reporting on have been important things happening, and it was really meaningful to see that CSPA appreciated that work.”

Scientifica also created their own original YouTube series called “Groundwork” in the fall which highlighted research being conducted across campus. Each episode followed the UM researcher as they explained their work and the progress they made. Members of Scientifica Magazine were excited to expand their writing and creativity into this new platform and digital space.

THE WHOLE TEAM

The entire Scientifica Magazine staff celebrates the publication of their 19th issue by having a photoshoot with their magazines. Staff members include Anam Ahmed, Abigail Adera, Austin Berger, Snigdha Sama, Megan Buras, Megan Piller, Meera Patel, Kim Sookoo, Avery Boals, Gabriella Guerriero and Ainsley Hilliard

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PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE NO. 21 ENVISION ISSUE NO. 3 ISSUE NO. 21 OF SCIENTIFICA ISSUE NO. 22 OF SCIENTIFICA
Photo by Anam Ahmed
296 ORGANIZATIONS CATEGORY 5
SLAM DUNK Category 5 Basketball chairs, Jacques Calixte ‘24 and Rohin Vaidya ‘23, model the Category 5 WNBA-inspired hoodie and sweatshirt giveaway for women’s basketball at the Watsco Center. Photo by Jackie Abreu STANDING TALL Derek Hart, ‘25, waves the Category 5 flag at the start of a baseball game at the Mark Light Field Stadium. Photo by Gabriela Torna THE EYE Zander Samarasinghe ‘25, Mia Raffaele ‘23, and Vincent Shipe ‘24 model in front of the athletic center wearing sweatshirts inspired by the eye of a hurricane for a student basketball giveaway. Photo by Gabriela Torna THE FLAG Freshman Category 5 member Joshua Applebaum waves the hurricane warning flag in the student section at the start of a football game. Photo by Kaylee Mendoza LEADING THE TEAM Ty Phillips ‘22, Nathan Dumont ‘22, Kaylin Yudice ‘23 lead Category 5 as External Vice Chair, Chair, and Internal Vice Chair. Photo courtesy of Category 5 THROW WHAT ‘U’ KNOW Sebastian the Ibis joins students in the student section at a football game at Hard Rock Stadium, and throws up the ‘U’ to celebrate a ‘Cane football win. Courtesy of Category 5

WARNING a storm

Category 5 is a spirit organization that is tasked with being the bridge between students, spirit and pride for all athletic sports

As the spirit programming board on campus, Category 5’s goal as an organization was to rile students up to attend as many athletic events as possible. They did this through giveaways, social media and integrated morale-boosting game traditions for the student sections to take part in.

The executive board consisted of chairs for each sport on campus and each chair had a council committee that worked with them on promoting events for that specific sport. Junior Rohin Vaidya was one of the two basketball chairs who ran the basketball committee.

“My committee is in charge of the basketball student section giveaways and promotions, making it easy for students to go to games,” he said.

This year Category 5 focused on bringing the spirit back to the student section at basketball games. The

basketball student section was rebranded from “storm surge” to “the eye”, in addition to creating new traditions and bringing back old ones. This included singing nursery rhymes when the opposing team shot free throws and releasing a confetti cannon when our team scored their first three pointer of the game. For previous traditions, Rohin shared, “We brought back the smoke blower to the basketball student section this year and people are really excited about it.”

Part of Category 5’s purpose was to get students excited about all the campus athletic events by cultivating strong school spirit, and with the basketball team having one of its most competitive seasons yet, it was important to seize the opportunity to stir excitement and spirit for the crowds attending the events.

the teams

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FOOTBALL Nathalia Torres ‘22, Benjamin Shokiran ‘24, Hailey Reiter ‘24, Amber Dunn ‘22, Victoria Palmer ‘24, Zander Samarasinghe ‘25, and Chase Renninger ‘23. Courtesy of Category 5 BASKETBALL Sydney Divozzo ‘25, Joshua Applebaum ‘25, Jacques Calixte ‘24, Rohin Vaidya ‘23, Nathan Sfida ‘24, and Gabby Biondi ‘25. Courtesy of Category 5 BASEBALL Vincent Shipe ‘24, Jean Pierre Vilcherrez ‘22, Esther Cusnir ‘24, Lexi Mnich ‘22, Samantha Lawson ‘21, and Derek Hart ‘25. Courtesy of Category 5 O-SPORTS Kyle Rowley ‘22, Rebecca Marcus ‘24, Camille Awono ‘21, David Shannon ‘24, Cynthia Blanco ‘22, Emma Alonso ‘23, and Brendon Hobbes ‘23. Courtesy of Category 5 THE SMOKE Junior Gaby Torna stands in the student section at Hard Rock Stadium and participates in the Student Smoke at a football game during the fall semester. Photo courtesy of Category 5

FRONT ROW: Darinka Borrego, Felipe Echeverri Tribin, Rebecca Menendez, Madison Hawthorne, Jack Lee, Kimberley Wyse-Sookoo; BACK ROW: Andrew Lahrheim, Miguel Silveira, Julian Taliafero, Jungwoo Kwak, Wesley Rifai, Logan Beatty. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

tau beta pi

Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honors society, recognizes academic and professional excellence rooted in personal integrity

Dahas Bennett, Jackson Porter, Diamond Fowler, Nakiyah Saisingh, Caleb Tayler, Jayda Hunte, Paul Douillon Zac Smith, Denn Osborne. Photo by Genesis

Del Toro

The Baptist Collegiate Ministry is a Christian ministry that exists to connect students to the person and mission of Jesus

FRONT ROW: Kayla Davis, Samantha Velez, Anna Coon, Ethan Gany, Isabella Clark, Hope Geissler; SECOND ROW: Andrew Klein, Natalie Blanding, Annalise Iraola, Kate Stapleton, Spencer Askinazy, Julia Hecht, Tyler Walsh, Blake Atwell, Benjamin Ezzy, Dan D’Amico; BACK ROW: Boriana Treadwell, Lauren Lennon, Quinn Davidson, Jarrod Maloney, Michael Mok, Derryl Barnes, Daniel Toll, Angel Santiago, David “Embrik” Eyles, Trevor Green, Harvey Duplock. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

UMTV is the University of Miami’s student-run television network which has provided students hands-on training in TV production

298 ORGANIZATIONS ORGANIZATIONS
umtv
bcm

FRONT ROW: Allegra Garcia, Danielle Ojeda, Lindsey Rosenbloom, Morgan Nicholson, Shirsika Kummeta, Kareena Shetty, Hannah Raveh; BACK ROW: Jack Brixius, Margarita Sinko, Alec Studnik, Joaquin Martinez, Snigdha Reddy Sama. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

ethics society

The UM Ethics Society endeavors to spread understanding of ethics and critical thinking throughout society in law, medicine, politics and business

FRONT ROW: Carolina Carvajalino, Laura Francois, Lynette Martinez, Peyton Hodges, Melanie Sousa, Nina Ally; BACK ROW: Karla Magallanes, Carolina Garcia, Ashley Babulal Dahmoya Kennedy, Annella Durand,Jael Jean Charles, Mya Osibogun, Rosaline Polycarpe, Maria Kaber. Photo by Genesis Del Toro

Minority Women in Medicine is an encouraging and supportive pre-health organization that fosters the academic and social development of its members

soc-crim club

The Sociology and Criminology club offers a positive learning environment for students with an interest in the fields of sociology and criminology

FRONT ROW: Dr. Sokol Katz, Samantha Katz, Audrey Greer, Simone David, Onella Mendise; BACK ROW: Paul Douillon, Scarlett Bouchard, Brianna Marshall, Kasey Michaud, Sydney Wisnosky, Julia Russel.

Photo by Genesis Del Toro

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kendall colaluca JUNIOR

"UThrift has been so fun. I have loved working at the stand every week. The best part is that I have first pick for all of the new donations that come in. I love being able to refresh my wardrobe with new and unique items from our stand."

300 ORGANIZATIONS UTHRIFT

WHO WE ARE UThrift is the on-campus thrift swap that runs solely on donations. The club typically gets 100 or more item donations every pop-up. Students are able to visit the booth and take clothes for free. Photo by Allie Salvucci

CLOTHING FUN Junior Hafsha Rahman looks through a rack of clothes on display at UThrift’s weekly pop-up in front of the Shalala Student Center. Photo by Allie Salvucci

THRIFTING lets go

The weekly UThrift tents provide the opportunity to trade clothing with other fashion enthusiasts

UThrift was a student-founded organization that sold donated clothes to students to avoid contributing to putting clothes in landfills and to provide an alternative to fast fashion. UThrift was one of the most well-known student organizations as they began to integrate this environmentally-sustainable mission into everyday life on campus through a series of projects, events and collaborations.

This past year, UThrift partnered with sororities and fraternities on campus during Greek Week. A student could earn points for their sorority or fraternity by donating items, encouraging people to re-home things they would otherwise throw out. Rachel Levy, a junior and a member of the sorority Chi Omega, donated numerous bags of clothes during Greek Week. “I am glad I could not only earn my sorority points but also clean out my closet! It’s great to have a place to bring clothes where I know other people will use them,” Levy said.

UThrift also hosted their yearly fashion show on The Patio. Girls and guys alike modeled their thrifted finds to show that thrifting isn’t just beneficial for the planet, but also stylish. Jaden Kim, a junior who modeled in this year’s show, shared his opinion on the organization. “Thrifting is a great way to constantly change my style without buying too many clothes. It’s great that we have our very own thrifting right on campus!”

With partnerships with other groups on campus, social media promotion and tons of traffic at their weekly tent, UThrift brought back new and old ideas that allowed them to increase community involvement and promote sustainable fashion.

READY TO THRIFT PROFESSIONALLY UThrift partners

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STAY ORGANIZED Senior Sofia Mesa, who is the Sustainability Director of UThrift, manages volunteer check in and donations at the stand by the Shalala Student Center. Photo by Allie Salvucci TAKE YOUR PICK Johann Escobar, sophomore, looks through the bins of free t-shirts at the UThrift stand in front of the Shalala Student Center. Photo by Allie Salvucci MY CREATION Sophomore Emilie Frias shows off the T-shirt she reconstructed during the UThrift DIY tailgate event.. Photo by Allie Salvucci with the Toppel Career Center’s Sebastian’s Closet, which offers students the option of thrifting professional attire for their classes, presentations and jobs. Photo by Allie Salvucci ACHIEVEMENTS AND RECOGNITION Above the Bar receives the Ibis Star Organization of the Year Award providing the most positive impact on the UM community. Photo by John Yayi Bondje WELL-DESERVED Seniors Charis Pitter and Ajiri Uzere collect awards including President of the Year for the Caribbean Student Association . Photo by John Yayi Bondje HOSTS WITH THE MOST Carly Payne and Arjun Bajaj host the 2022 Student Organization Achievement & Recognition Awards, where they announce winners and deliver certificates to student winners. Photo by John Yayi Bondje BUZZING EXCITEMENT Student nominees for organization awards enter the Shalala Ballroom after checking in at the front desk before the ceremony.
302 ORGANIZATIONS SOAR AWARDS
Photo by John Yayi Bondje

GIVE awards

Student organizations receive awards for their involvement at the end of the year

Design by Giselle Spicer CELEBRATORY Involvement Chair Vrinda Kareddy, Chair Amrutha Chethikattil and Invovement Chair Leila Metellus receive flowers for their hard work. Photo by John Yayi Bondje CAPTURING MOMENTS Treasurer Naynika Juvvadi and friends take a 360° video at the SOAR awards.
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Photo by John Yayi Bondje

our HONOR SOCIETIES

ALPHA EPSILON DELTA PRE-MEDICAL

ALPHA EPSILON RHO ELECTRONIC MEDIA

ALPHA ETA MU BETA BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

ALPHA KAPPA DELTA SOCIOLOGY

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA FRESHMEN GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA MEDICAL

ALPHA RHO CHI - AGAMEDES ARCHITECTURE

BELTA ALPHA PSI ACCOUNTING

BETA BETA BETA BIOLOGY

BETA GAMMA SIGMA BUSINESS

CHI EPSILON CIVIL, ARCHITECTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

CHI EPSILON PI METEOROLOGY

ETA KAPPA NU ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

ETA SIGMA PHI CLASSICS

GAMMA KAPPA ALPHA ITALIAN

GOLDEN KEY GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

HONORS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

IOTA TAU ALPHA ATHLETIC TRAINING

MORTAR BOARD GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF COLLEGIATE SCHOLARS GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

OMICRON DELTA EPSILON ECONOMICS

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

ORDER OF THE COIF LAW

PHI ALPHA THETA HISTORY

PHI BETA KAPPA GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP

PHI DELTA PHI FRENCH

PI KAPPA LAMBDA MUSIC AND MUSIC EDUCATION

PI LAMBDA THETA EDUCATION

PI SIGMA ALPHA POLITICAL SCIENCE

PI TAU SIGMA MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

PSI CHI PSYCHOLOGY

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA - SIGMA CHI MUSIC

SIGMA DELTA PI SPANISH

SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

SIGMA DELTA PI SPANISH

SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

SIGMA PI SIGMA PHYSICS

SIGMA TAU DELTA INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH

SIGMA THETA TAU NURSING

TAU BETA PI ENGINEERING

TAU BETA SIGMA BAND

THETA ALPHA KAPPA RELIGIOUS STUDIES

304 ORGANIZATIONS HONOR SOCIETIES

WHO THEY ARE

Iron Arrow Society was founded in 1926 by Dr. Bowman Foster Ashe in conjunction with the University's opening. Iron Arrow is the first and oldest student organization. It is the highest honor that can be attained at the university and it can be awarded to an undergraduate, graduate, law or medical student, faculty, staff, administrator, alumni, or Trustee. Based on Seminole Indian tradition, Iron Arrow recognizes those individuals in the University of Miami community who exemplify the following qualities: Love of Alma Mater, Character, Leadership, Scholarship, and Humility.

RECENT TAPPEES

FALL 2021 Cecilia Amaro, Asia Chester, Bao-Tien Duong, Santiago Freire, Carrie Furman, Drew Goheen, Justin Hier, Charlotte Kiehn, Sydney Knapp, Anisha Kore, Ian Malesiewski, John Tiger Oliva, Sydney Stropes, Fred Telischi; SPRING 2022 Paula Arias, Zachary Danney, Fabrizio Darby, Isaiah Holmes, Corey Jones, Jenna Jurado, Julie Braman Kane, Nhadya Lawes, Kelly Malloy Deborah Moskowitz, Zach Ng, Tori Simkovic, Gene Sulzberger, Hansel Tookes III, Nathalia Torres, Gustavo Tovar

IRON ARROW ORDER OF OMEGA

WHO THEY ARE

Order of Omega Greek Honor Society was founded here at the University of Miami in 1959 by a group of outstanding Fraternity men, who felt that individuals in the Greek community should be recognized for their service to the Greek system and the University.

WHAT IT TAKES

The Purpose of Order of Omega is to recognize those fraternity men and women who have attained a high standard of leadership in interfraternity activities, to encourage them to continue along this line, and to inspire others to strive for similar conspicuous attainment; To unite outstanding fraternity men and women and create an organization which will help to mold the sentiment of the institution on questions of local and intercollegiate fraternity affairs; To bring together members of the faculty, alumni, and student members of the institution’s fraternities and sororities on a basis of mutual interest.

HIGHEST HONOR Zachary

Danney is tapped into Irown Arrow during the spring ceremony. He celebrates with John Ness, who is a UM alumni and current academic advisor. Ness was tapped in the ceremony of spring 2020.

GATHERING AWARDS Drew

Goheen, alongside Jean Pierre, was elected for the Order of Omega Leadership Award. This award is given to a leader that exemplifies character, scholarship, leadership, and service in the Greek community. This award is extremely prestigious and highlights a student's contributions to the Greek community. Photo by Jean Pierre

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ALL MEMBERS Iron Arrow members don their unique jackets. Each jacket is handmade by the Miccosukee Indian Tribe, and no two jackets are the same. They are given to members after they are tapped. Photo by John Ness Photo by John Ness
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PEOPLE
GROOVE TOGETHER Students dance as members of the EQ Collective DJ at the Hurricane Productions ‘Canes Carnival on the Foote Green. Photo by Jared Lennon

PEOPLE

A diverse group of faculty, staff and students make up the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs offered at the university. Each member of the ‘Cane community adds a unique perspective to campus, making it one of the most diverse in the country. With over 63% of the university population coming from outside of Florida, UM ensures that it builds a community and safe space for like-minded individuals from all over the world.

307

UNDERGRADS

WELCOME ORG FUN ‘Canefest was back at the beginning of the fall semester, and was held in the Watsco Center for the first time since the pandemic began. Incoming freshmen and transfer students stop by various org booths to sign up and join. Photo by Jared Lennon

308 PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES

Nicholas Abrams

Carolina Acevedo

Dylan Acevedo

Chester Adams

Adeena Ademu-John

Jesulayomi Adeojo

Iteoluwalayomi Aderoju

Ashna Ahya

Kayani Alcantara

Kahnya Alicandro

Gabrielle Allen

Ali Alzayadi

Isaiah Alzume

Julia Antunes De Oliveira

Mia Merie Atrio

Trey Austin

Victor Austin

Tirek Austin-Cave

Eden Summer Avolio

Lara Azank Apasse

John Murphy Bachner

Michaela Baker

Thomas Baker

Mimmi Balaam

Kyle Banker

Andrew Barnes

Daniella Barrett

Dylan Barron

Romir Basu

Isabel Bauer-Nathan

Maximilian Baumann

Sydnae Becton

Mikayla Bell

Trent Bell

Dallas Jon-Henri Bennett

Ethan Bennett

Isabelle Bepler

William Berents

Benjami Berman

Ya’Hyness Berry

Kyra Berwitz

Harlond Beverly

GEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN OF ALL UNDERGRADUATES AS OF FALL 2021 MIAMI-DADE 21% BROWARD 5% OTHER FLORIDA 11% OTHER U.S. 52% INTERNATIONAL 11%

Source: UM Fact Book

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B A

Niloy Bhattacharyya

Olympia Binos

Annalise Blair

DANIEL FERNANDEZ, FRESHMAN

“My favorite aspect of UM is the vast number of opportunities available to students both academically and socially. I have loved joining orgs that have helped me get involved with the community and working alongside professors who are both passionate about their work and invested in my education.”

Chad Born

Brenis Bostick

Sacha Braggs

Julio Brea

Samuel Brooks

Delaney Brown

Jada Brown

Joshua Bruce

Teodoro Bueres

Megan Buras

Jacqueline Burke

Noah Burstyn

Eben Butler

Gabrielle Butman

Sara Byrne

Ella Caggiano

Peter Calano

Soffia Caliva Rojas

Priscilla Calle

David Campbell

Isabella Campo Osorio

Carolina Camus

Sophia Canepari

Ashley Carr

Madeline Carr

Austin Carrizales

Dylan Carter

Mickey Carton

C 310 PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES
Alec Bleyer Robert Bolton Jackson Bond Sofia Bond William Borchers Luke Borelli

Adrianna Cera

Morgan Champey

Donald Chaney

Ethan Charlton

Joseph Cherubi

Drew Cheskin

Patrick Chisholm

Katherine Chlopak

I-Asiah Christmas

Jakai Clark

Cherise Clough

Randy Cockrell

Cameron Cohen

Sam Colman

Emily Conti

Joao Corbellini

Te’ Cory Couch

Antonio Couto

Jessie Creed

Raquel Cueto

Kimberly Dacius

Melissa Dagenais

Nathan Dankner

Anthony Dao

Fabrizio Darby

Gal Dardashti

Nicole Dauost

Hannah Dawbarn

Jessica Degen

Mojania Denis

Patrick Denny

Keyur Dhungana

Maxwell Dimarzo

Nada Dimovska

Michael Dominguez

Alan Doron

Kianna Dorsey

Matthew Dumbroff

Lucien Duprey

DAnnella Delano Durand

Ricky Durga

Alix Earle

Adam Edelstein

Nailah Edmead

Julia Edwards

EGabrielle Eichler-Len

Abdulwahab Eisa

Adam ElGammal

Christopher Elliott

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Bibiana Escobar

Luis Espinal

Leonardo Espinosa

Jacob Esquivel

Liliana Esquivel

Marie Exantus

Rayan Excellent

FClaire Fahmy

Jamar Fairweather

Seth Falber

Amanda Falck

Isabelle Farah

Margaret FarleyStevenson

Lillianna Fedew

Rachel Fein

Jonathan Feld

Lana Jean Fell

Moulay Fenni

Charlotte Claire

Fernandez-Hoffman

Tristan Ferreira

Molly Ferris

Sean Festa

Dillon Fields

Alex Fink

Paulina Fiore

Paulina Fiore

Christopher FischerHylton

Kassidy Fishman

Nathan Fitzpatrick

Corey Flagg Jr.

Devin Flaherty

Hayley Flanagan

Juan Fernando Flechas Beltran

Mason Fleisher

Maxwell Flory

Nicholas Forcone

Dawn Ford

Una Forsythe

Amelia Fox

Paula Fraile Ruiz

Sarah Frankel

Steven Friedman

GAlexandra Gaddy

Christopher Galindo

Mariana Gamboa

Tomas Garces

Abbey Garcia

Jake Garcia

Nicole Garcia-Tunon

312 PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES

Jordan Haynes

Patrick Henry

Samuel Geoffery Heroux

Samuel Hershkovitz

Savannah Hewson

Larry Hodges

Charlotte Gardner

Jake Garland

Caitlin Gaspich

Patrick Geoghan

Veronica Gilbert

Thomas Glyman

Ethan Goldberg

Eli Golden

Anna Golikova

Jessica Gomez

Nyayongah Gony

Dustin Goodwin

Mario Gordon

Shelly Gottlieb

Max Graivier

Robert Grande

Josephine Gray

Angela Grieve

Jacob Grujic

Sarah Guarachi

Diana Guevara

Matthew Gurewitsch

Nataliya Guseva

HLuis Gutierrez Vallejo

Daley Hall

Alexander Harper

Ethan Hartz

Jahfari Harvey

Jacob Hoffman

Jalar Holley

Jarius Howard

ALLIE SALVUCCI, SOPHOMORE

“One of my favorite things about UM is the large variety of clubs and student organizations to get involved with. I joined a handful of clubs my freshmen year and now I hold leadership roles in many of them. I’m part of clubs in such categories as media, community and identity. I’ve met so many friends, organized and partook in super innovative events, so it’s made my college experience really special.”

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Tai’Asia Hueston-Franks

Leo Hurst

Sarah Hutchison

Georgia Inggs

Jose Izarra

Paige Jackett

Ella Jacobs

Michelle Jacome Arellan

J I

Axel Jager

Dhruv Jain

Nia James

Jasmine Jarrett

Zayna Jebailey

Tony Jenkins

Sierra Jensen

Zhengfei Jiao

Chase Johnson

Natalie Johnson

Quayon Johnson

Reese Johnson

Moulayna Sheriffa

Johnson Sidi Baba

Michael Jones

Danielle Jordan

Nathaniel Joseph

Madeline Joyce

Jordan Julien

Judith Hermine Juste

Jackson Kalfus

KHee Kang

Collin Kayfus

Justin Kellner

Sebastian Khairkhahan

Diana Khodan

Jaden Kim

Jullian Kiser

Benjamin Andrew Klein

Skylah Klein

Jaylan Knighton

Jacqueline Koerwitz

Sidney Kordy

Ethan Kumar

Jungwoo Kwak

Romulo

Evan Lampsa

Lander Torbar

Kathryn Langston

Dorel Last

Daphnee Lavassas

Jacob Leader

Janice Leao

L 314 PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES

JOHN YAYI-BONDJE, SOPHOMORE

“Who am I because of the U? I am athletic and I am an innovator. I am balanced in my campus involvement and my education. I love the athletic culture that UM brings to its athletes.”

Siqi Liu

Rory Loftus

Jacoby Long

Carlo Longordo

Liane Lopez

Blaise Lowen

Brett Lubliner

Andrew Madden

John Maddox

Conor Maenpaa

William Mahoney

Hannah Maile

Juan Malagon

Dominic Mammarelli

Alexandra Marinelli

Sidney Marques

Cindy Marquez

Allison Marsh

Sophia Martinez

Zachary Mascarelli

Julia Mastrangelo

Brianna Mathurin

Peyton Matocha

Alexios Matthaiou

Serene Mattis

Alexander McFarlane

Giana McGaughey

315
Omari Lewis Massiel Leyva Chengze Li Hanqi Li Jessica Li Savannah Linares Lauren Lennon Bryson Leonard Louis Levitan MAlexander Maciulewicz

Molly McGrath

Sean McHale

Evan McKay

Patricia McMenamin

Lucas McNamara

Kasey McPherson

Alison McWalters

Victor Mederos

Katherine Melesko

Alexandra Meltzer

Emily Mendez

Michael Mesbah

Clara Meyerfreund Lavrador

Meghna Mhatre

Bryce Mielke

Hugo Mijares-Bracho

Gianna Milan

Alyssa Miller

Joshua Miller

Ryann Miller

Michael Millimaci

Sarah Mills

Katerina Molina

Olivia Moll

Miquela Montana

Nick Montes

Ana Montes

Hector Montoto

Yohandy Morales

Sydney Moses

Alexandra Moutafis

STEPHANIE FLORES, JUNIOR

“One of my favorite things about UM is how spirited everyone is. Being a commuter even the limited time I spend on campus has provided a genuine and exciting experience with all the events organizations host throughout the week and the participation and interest of the students.”

Alexandra Moutafis

Sheikh Muhtade

Ryan Muni

Alexander Munroe

Jake Murphy

Mason Napper

316 PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES

Maria Navas Gonzalez

Joshua Neely

Franco Negron

Asheka Newman

Zachary Ng

Shadae Nicholas

Carolina Nusser Contreras

Kendall Onley

Kylie Oquendo

Jose Orellana

Aino Otava

Kesia Otieno

Esmie Otter

Carson Palmquist

Morgan Pankow

Jacob Panzer

Aleah Parafinczuk

Leena Pasricha

Jordan Passman

Carly Payne

Jeremiah Payton

Aleksandra Peeva

Bryce Rowe Pendleton

Lindsey Pepper

Diego Perdomo

Anissa Perez

Carlos Perez

Jackeline Perez

Aryanna Peters

Philip Peters

Gabriela Petrone

Isabella Pfennig

Martha Philipos

Ashley Phillips

Ross Pierson

Dominic Pitelli

Dominick Pizzonia

Julian Pollak

Ally Polner

Rosaline Polycarpe

Kennedy Prince

Skylar Prinz Von Anhalt

Robert Prosek

Gabriel Proulx-Wein

Kylee Pufko

Joshua Purvis-Torello

Andrey Pytalev

Marcelo Quadros

Alexander Quant

Q P O
317
N

Deidre Quinones

Cecilia Quinones-Witek

Ricardo Quintana

SAM RAUS, SOPHOMORE

“UM has a great, open atmosphere that has allowed me to thrive in my professional, academic and social life. I could not have picked any better place to attend undergrad.”

Rachel Ramnarine

Gabrielle Ramsamy

Jasmine Ramsarup

Shariq Ramsubhag

Nonii Randall

Pradeep Ravi

Michael Redding

Adrian Redl

Benjamin Reese

Nicholas Regalado

Allison Reish

Agilia Enriquez

Rementeria

Farha Reshamwala

Xavier Restrepo-Padgett

Paul Rhoades

Amanda Ribnick

Bennett Richter

William Rinearson

Jacob Ripps

Justin Rittenhouse

Mia Rivas

Brittney Rivera

Victor Rivera

Brittney Rivera

Jalen Rivers

Russell Robinson

Tatiana Robinson

Simone Robinson

Stephaney Quintero Andrade

Andrea Rabinovich Moreinis

RSaloni Radadia

318 PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES
Sean Rafferty Rasul Rahman Yashwanth Ramanujam

Sydnee Roby-Washington

Thomas Rodberg

Carolina Rodriguez

Cataryna Rodriguez

Christian Rosa

Alejandro Rosario

Max Rossi

Joshua Rotman

Madeline Rumpke

Gabriella Rusek

Kenza Salgues

Allie Salvucci

Julia Sanbe

James Sanders

Dina Sarwani

Brodie Scapens

Riley Scheier

Jordan Schooley

Joseph Scotti

Jack Scully

Jackson Seagrave

Jacious Sears

Patrick Sebastian

Ryan Sedagat

Claire Seinsheimer

Michael Sejas

SNathalia Senna Endres

Mariajose Serrano

Taboada

Gianna Sesto

Holden Seward

Shane Shakoor

Zachary Shanbom

Ortal Shazo

Matthew Shiembob

Aden Siegel

Alexis Simons

Justin Simonton

Lawrence Simpson

Hunter Singewald

Kyle Skarshaug

Franziska Sliper

Katherine Smith

Kevin Snyder

David Serrano

Carlos Solares

Yoobin Song

Brandon Soto

Adelaide Spain

Alyson St. Mary

319

Kylea Stamps

Kaja Stanecki

Dominique Stater

Sarah Stehling

Philip Steinberg

Isabelle Sterba

Constance Stirling

Sierra Straker

Christina Athena Strates

Evalynn Strauss

Sebastian Suarez

Logan Sudholz

Anna Swirski

Yen Ta

T

Maya Tahan

Ena Taslidza

Ashanti Tate

Ryan Tavarez

Sebastian The Ibis

Alex Thomas

Jared Thomas

Sophia Torres

Victoria Torres

Sophia Tosti

Walter Toub

Dina Toum-Benchekroun

Ahkeel Townsend

Isabel Traba

Haley Traub

Naom Tsegaye

Emma Tucker

Connor Turknette

Andrea Tuthill

Miranda Urdinola Garces

Maria Urrutia

Mia Vallee

Tyler Van Dyke

Alec Vargas

Alanys Viera Ortega

Alex Vivas

Elizabeth Von Dietrich

Anthony Walker

Andrew Walters

Yu Wang

Zihan Wang

Christopher Washington

Keshawn Washington Cailey Wesolowsky

PEOPLE UNDERGRADUATES

W V U 320
Michael Torres

Andrew Miles Westervelt

James Wheaton

Alexander White

Cassandra White

Michaela White

Cameron Williams

Chantz Williams

Ben Williamson

Anyae Wilson-Worley

Elliott Wirshba

Melissa Wohl

Nanseera Wolff

Isaiah Wong

Joseph Wong

Dazalin Worsham

Kaitlyn Wright

Yi Han Xiao

Yiyun Yang

Xinyu Yao

Xinrong Ye

Emmaus Yonas

Rainier Young

Jack Zalta

Saige Zervos

Youchi Zhang

Ruohong Zhu

Zhixuan Zhu

Lily Zimmerman

Y321
BEAD IT UP At Hurricane Productions's "Don't Worry, Bead Happy" event at the Rathskeller, Melanie Bergunker, junior; Mikayla Bell, junior; and Gianna Terranova, sophomore, make bead bracelets. Photo by Charisma Jones

FACTS undergrad

Tap into the number of credit hours, residential division and size of the university’s undergraduate students

Source: UM Factbook

UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT HOURS

TAUGHT BY SCHOOL

ARCHITECTURE 5,597

SENIORS: 3,245

The senior rentention rate has gradually increased to 95.3%.

NON-DEGREE: 164

This is the largest freshman class ever for the university.

FRESHMEN: 3,247

This is the largest freshman class ever for the university.

ARTS & SCIENCES

78,611

Juniors make up 14% of all students.

JUNIORS: 2,656

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS BY CLASS: 12,089 322 PEOPLE

Only 2% of sophomores are part-time students.

SOPHOMORES: 2,777

BUSINESS

37,821

COMMUNICATION

13,626

EDUCATION

8,505

ENGINEERING

7,589

FROST MUSIC

9,829

NURSING

7,412

MARINE 5,535

TOTAL: 174,525 CREDIT HOURS

UNDERGRADUATE FACTS

5,157 undergraduate students live on campus in the university's seven residential areas including freshmen dorms and upperclassmen apartments making up about 27% of undergraduates

THE FINAL YEAR Students celebrate Hecht Residential College in its last year housing students. Photo by Sharron Lou

ON CAMPUS VS OFF CAMPUS UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENCE BY CLASS

13.938 undergraduate students live off campus making up 73% of the undergraduate communiity as more senior students live off campus versus the majority of freshmen living on campus

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 ON CAMPUS UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENCE
323
FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS NON-DEGREE 0 50010001500200025003000 FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS NON-DEGREE
BY CLASS
EATON HECHT MAHONEY PEARSON LAKESIDE STANFORD UV
ON CAMPUS OFF CAMPUS
CAMPUS LIVING Moving into Pearson, sophomore Noah Brown pushes a cart to the elevator.
2,638 609 1,531 1,246 661 1,995 591 2,654 143 21 791 738 0 630 0 20 317 419 160 1 194 0 16 18 214 299 9 38 74 0 22 9 11 0 17 67 80 11 18 53 64 217 32 66 552
Photo by Allie Salvucci

SENIORS

324 PEOPLE SENIORS
ONE LAST TIME Senior Sebastians, Nate Dumont and Jake Schloemann do the ‘Cane spell out before collecting their deplomas and graduating in the spring ceremony. Photo by Mike Montero

Samya Ababou

Bana Abdo

Osamah Abdulkareem

A

Alexis Abundio

Isabella Adamson

Naomi Aganekwu

Andre Agostinho Dalem

Gabrielle Aguiar

Adeeb Ahmed

Anam Ahmed

Fahad Al Ajmi

Ibrahim Al-Mansouri

Ahmad Al-Salem

Dhari Alasfoor

Valentina Alfonzo Albornett

Jonathan Ali

Naser Alkandari

Nora Alkhalaf

Abdulmajeed Alkhamis

Husain Alkhayat

James Allen

Khaled Almanae

Andrew Almeida

Samer Almousbahi

Omar Almutairi

Ali Alqanaee

Hessah Alrefaei

Bader Alshawaf

Mohammed Alshuaib

Cristian Alvarez

325

Hamad Alzankawi

Mubarak Alzewayer

Cecilia Amaro

Sharif Amastha

Arianna Amato

George Andris

Esther Animalu

Yaa Annor

Trevor Antonucci

Ryan Appleby

Giovanni Aprigliano

Juan Arango

Aidan Arbona

Andy Armand

Elizabeth Armas

Eboni Arnold

Lizzie Arthur

Adnan Asad

Ammar Asad

Tamilla Askerova

Morgan Asmussen

Kenz Assaf

Bri Astorino

Andrew Athanas

DeAndre Athias

BIsaac Attuah

Andrea Avellaneda

Camille Awono

Cameron Aynehchi

Corinne Badeer

326 PEOPLE SENIORS

Arjun Bajaj

Gabriella Baldassarre

Bianca Baldi

Srinidhi Banala

Dakota Banner

Julia Barger

ASHLEY STAND, SENIOR

Maia Barile

David Barnhard

Victoria Barr

"There are so many things I loved about being a student at UM. From the people I met, to all of the amazing professors, as well as everything it had to offer, it was one of my favorite places to be for the past four years."

Dailianys Barrios

Salahuddin Bawaney

Angela Bayron

Maria Becerra

Chelsea Beckelman

Chelsea Beckford

Victoria Beglane

Matthew Bell

Diana Bengoechea

Abdelaziz Benmehrez

Emily Bennett

Gabe Berkowitz

Alexandre Bernardini

Tom Betton

Francesco Bianchi

327

ADEEB AHMED, SENIOR

Alex Boshnick

Scarlett Bouchard

Yasmine Boughou

Brooke Boyd

Oliver Bradburn

Claire Bisson

Tiffany Bittar

Connor Bradley

Chloe Bragg

Paige Brala

Bales Bransgrove

Justin Braun

Cynthia Blanco

Mitchell Bloom

Michelle Bogaert Tavares

Daniela Bolivar

Jacob Bolling

Kara Borden

Maria Jose Brea Savinon

Spencer Bright

Nicole Britez

Baylee Brochu

Ryan Brooks

328 PEOPLE SENIORS
Nicole Biegel
"UM PROVIDED ME THE ENVIRONMENT NECESSARY TO DEVELOP MYSELF INTO THE PERSON I WANTED TO BE. IT ALSO HELPED ME CREATE MEMORIES, EXPERIENCES AND FRIENDSHIPS I’LL CARRY WITH ME FOREVER."

Jacob Brouillard

Emmalyse Brownstein

Laura Brueggeman

Julia Buan

Tyler Burd

Jessica Burg

Pahola Bustos

Christopher Butler

Christopher Buzzetta

Claudia Bez

Micaela Caballero

Valeria Caballero

Amanda-Rose Cabrera

Caleb Calaway

Nicholas Calzadilla

Lizeth Camacho Lopez

Dylan Camenzuli

Taylor Campanella

Nicholas Campanini

Christina Cancio

Wanying Cao

Wenxin Cao

Ashley Caples

Estefania Caputo

Rebecca Carrasco

Angel Carrasquillo

Griffin Carter

Alexia Casalins

Franco Cassoni Fraga

Francheska Castillo

329
C

Natalie Castillo

Ricardo Castillo

Jake Celler

Catalina Cepero

Chantal Chalita

Jalen Checo

Guanhua Chen

Guanzhao Chen

Jiaxin Chen

Siwan Chen

Vivian Chen

Ye Chen

Yubei Chen

Hope Cherian

Matthew Christie

Kelly Churchill

Blaise Ciarrocchi

Danielle Clayton

Shane Clayton

Madison Clinger

Jake Cohen

Michael Cohenmehr

Marina Colon

Michael Concilio

Deven Connors

Paulina Corcoran

Jack Coyne