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N EWSLETTER 2017

Digging Deep

To Solve the Tristate’s Geologic Mysteries, Allison Young Pg. 48

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MARS OR BUST Dr. Andrew Czaja teams with NASA


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Letter from the Department Head....................................................................................................................... Pages 1-2 Faculty & Students News................................................................................................................................... Pages 3-25 Defying Expectations, Dr. Paul E. Potter’s Sidney Powers Memorial Award..................................................... Pages 4-6 The Great Miami Groundwater Observatory, Dr. David B. Nash.................................................................. Pages 13-15 Geology Donor List........................................................................................................................................Page 18 & 39 Departmental Fall Field Trip.................................................................................................................................. Page 21 Graduate Degrees 2016-2017................................................................................................................................. Page 23 Alumni Advisory Committe................................................................................................................................... Page 24 Mars or Bust, Dr. Andrew Czaja teams with NASA.............................................................................................. Page 26 Commuting at the Top of the World, Examining soil pollution along India’s Manali-Leh Highway............. Pages 28-29 Alumni News.................................................................................................................................................... Pages 30-54 Ex-Oil Professional Injects Professional Experience Into Curriculum, Dr. Daniel Sturmer ....................... Pages 34 -35 Allison Young, Digging Deep To Solve the Tristate’s Geologic Mysteries ....................................................... Pages 48-49 Call to Action.......................................................................................................................................................... Page 55

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nother year has flown by! It seems like it was just a couple of weeks ago that I was writing a letter for the Upper Crust. I hope your year was as exciting and productive as ours, and that you and your families are in good health. This year’s Upper Crust will again provide you with some insights into what your fellow alumni and what we have been up to over the past year. Hopefully it should allow us all to catch up with departmental news.

the petroleum industry, geologic surveys, engineering and academia. Many of us were deeply touched by the generous complements our alumni gave us about their experiences as students in our department and how those experiences helped them prepare for their professional lives. It made many of us very proud to have been involved in a small part of their career paths. I am particularly looking forward to next year’s Careers Days and will hopefully see some of you join us for that event.

The highlight of my year in our department was our Career Days event. Another highlight of the past year This was held over a three-day period was a week-long fieldtrip to Califorin March and was organized by our Pontificating over the Quaternary nia. This fieldtrip was very generously new faculty member in basin dynam- evolution of the San Andreas-Gulf of supported by Paul Potter to help us ics, Daniel Sturmer, and our distin- California transform plate margin examine the tectonic and landscape guished alumnus, John Thaeler. We while on our California fieldtrip evolution of the San Andreas-Gulf brought in 12 alumni to talk with our of California Transform Plate Boundstudents and faculty about their work experiences ary. Thirty-four undergraduates, graduates and faculty and to provide advice about employment in the geojoined the fieldtrip. We flew into Las Vegas and then sciences. The Career Days event came towards the end drove to California, visiting Death Valley, Owens Valof a new course that Dan has been teaching on careers ley, the Los Angeles Basin, the Salton Trough and the in the geosciences. The new course is attracting many Mojave Desert, and camping along the way. We examundergraduates and graduates, and hopefully will ined aspects of Precambrian geology, basin dynamics, continue to evolve in the coming years. The enthusedimentology, geomorphology and paleontology. siasm of the speakers at the Careers Days event was Classic locations such as Badwater, La Brea Tar Pits, contagious and it was thrilling to see the breadth and Salton Sea, and the San Andreas fault were studied. depth of their work, and how they had developed their (Editor’s note: For some trip photos Dr. Czaja has some geologic skills throughout their careers. Talks covered posted at http://bit.ly/2qBEDYC) many aspects of geoscience jobs including those in

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S t u d e n t S Science Foundation, USGS, National Geographic Society and industry. These grants are helping to continue to boost our reputation and are providing invaluable resources for us to help train students for the future workforce. We have also published an impressive number of papers in the past year, with most appearing in very highly ranked journals such as Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Lithosphere, Palaios, Geomorphology, Quaternary Science Reviews, Journal of Geophysical Research, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, and Paleogeography, Paleoecology and Paleoclimatology.

Other fieldtrips this past year included a two-week long excursion to the Bahamas that was lead by Krista Smilek. This fieldtrip examined the aspects of marine sedimentology and paleontology. Craig Diestch directed our fall fieldtrip and it included an exploration of the geology of southern Illinois. We continue to provide modest subsidies for student fieldwork thanks to your contributions to our endowments. This support is very much appreciated by all. Thank you. Our undergraduate students have had another busy year taking a broad range of geologic and associated courses. Our students continue to do a lot of outreach, including running booths at the Cincinnati GeoFair and the SW Ohio Science Fair, visiting local schools, participating in science fairs, and arranging picnics and holiday parties. All are highly motivated and very enthusiastic about their major. Our undergraduate geology club has been flourishing and they have organized some exciting fieldwork. Many of our undergraduates are working with our faculty on research projects and like previous years some have presented their work at GSA meetings. We continue to enhance research opportunities for our students using our endowments, funds from the College and research grants to provide them with training in geologic and transferable skills, and critical thinking. Our graduate students continue to excel as teaching and research assistants while undertaking world class research on a diverse range of topics. Many have published research papers in the leading journals in our discipline and have been very successful in obtaining numerous grants to support their research, including awards from the Geological Society of America, National Geographic Society, Sigma Xi and the Paleontological Society. This past year we graduated five masters and four doctoral students, and we will be bringing in ten new graduate students from distantparts of the US this coming fall. We have submitted an impressive number of research grant proposals again this past year and have received significant funding to develop many new projects. This has included funding from the National

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Our colloquium series was very successful again this year. Dr. Andrew Czaja did a superb job in arranging the program, which included a mixture of students, faculty and external speakers. External speakers included: Eric Carson (Wisconsin Geologic and Natural History Survey), Donna Surge (University of North Carolina), Scott McCoy (University of Nevada, Reno), Richard Lease (USGS), Dione Rossiter (Carnegie Science) and Alex Godet (University of Texas). A sincere thanks to all of you who have generously supported our program this past year and in previous years. Your continued support is extremely appreciated as it helps us to continue to do many exciting educational and life transforming things for our students. Please do not hesitate to contact me to find out more about what we have been doing with our students and how you might help us continue to provide our students with a stimulating learning environment and help prepare them for the future workforce. You might also like to check out our very informal weekly newsletter, Rolling Rocks (at http://www.artsci. uc.edu/depar tments/geology/news- and- events. html). I should like to sincerely thank Warren Huff and Tim Phillips again this year for their dedication and hard work in compiling and producing this newsletter. Please visit us in our department if you are in town. Best wishes,

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At Stan Schweinfurth’s (BS ’52, MS ’58) suggestion the faculty/staff page will begin with a link to the department website that has more information about them: http://www.artsci.uc.edu/departments/geology/faculty--staff-and-students.html

J. B arry M aynard You Mean Moisture is 110%! Twenty Roadblocks to Communicating Engineering Geology J. Barry Maynard, Mark T. Bowers, Paul E. Potter

Introduction Like most disciplines, in the geological sciences there is an unfortunate tendency to write papers and reports as though the information will only be read by those initiated into the culture and practices of their own group. This is the source of the consternation expressed in our title, when we encounter an unfamiliar culture, in this case geotechnical engineering. These cultural boundaries give rise to countless examples of confusion in communicating, sometimes with tragic consequences. A seminal work that analyzes issues of poor communication is the book by Robert Graves and Alan Hodge “The Reader Over Your Shoulder” first published in 1943 in the UK and in a 1971 US edition with many reprints. They urge writers to constantly keep in mind the members of their audience, imagining their complaining about confusing sentences or undefined jargon. In the same spirit we urge geologists to write with a wider audience in mind rather than other geologists. To facilitate this broader approach to writing, it is essential for geologists to realize and appreciate some of the subtle but important distinctions in the way geologists and other scientists and engineers use seemingly identical terms. It may seem an annoyance to have to carefully explain what would seem to be understood by every geologist, but this body of assumed knowledge does not extend outside of geology and worse, many terms that look familiar are in fact used in surprisingly different, even opposite ways. This potential for a breakdown in communication is great. J.K. Mitchell, in his 2004 Seed Lecture identified communication, in particular the failure to adequately define terms and conditions, as the number one reason for geotechnical failures. n

K rista S milek I recently concluded another successful two-week Ocean Margins field trip to San Salvador, Bahamas. I had a fantastic bunch of students, which included geology majors, minors, and a graduate student. We spent our days in the field learning about carbonate geology and classification, the geologic history of the island and the Bahamas in general, the karst topography of the island, and various modern marine environments. Students did a wonderful job measuring and drafting strat sections at multiple outcrops, conducting beach transects to later produce profiles and maps, exploring a fossilized reef, building on their field note taking skills, and familiarizing themselves with modern corals, fish, and invertebrates. Evenings were spent back at Gerace Research Centre where we discussed what we had seen throughout the day and worked on a variety of projects. Highlights of the trip (besides all of the fascinating geology, of course) include swimming with a very playful dolphin, tromping through a moon rock-filled mangrove swamp to reach a flank margin cave, and swimming with curious reef sharks at the drop off. I had an absolute blast on the trip thanks to enthusiastic, adventurous students and the incredible outdoor laboratory that San Salvador provides. I already can’t wait to run the trip again in 2019! n Editor’s note: There are additional photos of Krista’s trip at http://bit.ly/2rYjb0v The link to my Google Drive album is https://drive. google.com/drive/folders/0B7jd1SAqf3Doc2ZtU3lqX0s xQ0k

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N ot everyone can be an outstanding student of geology . AAPG Honorary member Paul Potter said his undergraduate work was mostly mediocre.

“I got a lot of Cs, and a few As,” he recalled. And geology was Potter’s second choice of majors after he decided his attempt to earn a degree in physics wasn’t working out. As he tells it, some of his professors considered his geology work lackluster, and couldn’t have expected him to go far in the profession. Fast-forward to today: at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition (ACE) in Calgary, Canada, Potter will receive the Sidney Powers Memorial Award, the Association’s most distinguished honor. It will be the latest of numerous awards for the famed geologist and educator, including the Pettijohn Award for Excellence in Sedimentology from the Society of Sedimentary Geologists, the Mather Medal for contributions to Ohio geology studies, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Professional Geologists of Indiana and the AAPG Eastern Section’s Outstanding Educator Award.

‘J ust A bout E verywhere ’ Potter began his career as a geologist with the Illinois State Geological Survey in 1952. He then moved into academia, first as an assistant professor at Indiana University and then progressing to professor and eventually professor emeritus of geology – his current title – at the University of Cincinnati.

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He also began consulting in the petroleum industry in the 1950s and has served as consultant or special instructor with Shell, Schlumberger, Total, Petrobras and several other companies. His research activities have included work with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, the National Geographic Society and many other organizations. Along the way, he’s authored or co-authored a seemingly constant stream of papers and seven influential books. The first two of those books were issued in the early 1960s, when Potter received a Guggenheim Fellowship and moved to Johns Hopkins University, where he began collaboration with Francis Pettijohn. They produced “Paleocurrents and Basin Analysis” and “Atlas and Glossary of Sedimentary Structures,” which became standards. A later collaboration with Pettijohn and Raymond Siever led to the publication of “Sand and Sandstone” in 1972. Potter’s area of geology fieldwork can be described as “just about everywhere” with a focus on 16 of the United States, Saskatchewan and Ontario in Canada, the Bahamas, Mexico, Spain, France, Italy, Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, Guayanas, Venezuela, Colombia, Chile and Peru.

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Fac u lt y In his peripatetic professional career he has constantly moved into new areas and bigger challenges. “After about 10 years, I get bored with what I’m doing,” said Potter. His studies of the geology of the greater Cincinnati area provide an insight into the forces that have shaped the city and its landscape and infrastructure. Potter related that when he first moved to Cincinnati, he thought it would be boring geologically. “But there’s a lot of interesting geology under every city,” he said. In the 1990s, Potter began a seven-year period serving as an assistant professor of geosciences at Brazilian universities. He cited his work in Brazil as an example of an experience outside North America that prolonged his career, “made me a much wiser person and kept me interested.” “I had worked in Paris when I was very young. And I had been to the Sahara Desert. I was interested in foreign languages,” he said. He’d already traveled to Europe 13 times “but it was nothing like stepping off into Brazil,” he recalled. “I went when I was 67 because if I’d had to put down my age as 70, I thought, ‘No one would give a job to a 70-year-old man,’” he said. Not everyone can take advantage of their youth at age 67 and start a new chapter in their career. “It’s painful. When I sat on an airplane going to Brazil I thought, ‘Should I be doing this?’ And I said to myself, ‘Paul Potter, if you don’t have the guts to do this, you aren’t going to do anything,’” he recalled.

L essons L earned Based on his extensive experience and background in geology, Potter suggested three major lessons a professional geologist should learn: Learn how to work with people. “Everyone in modern science has to do that, almost. And working with people outside American culture – that’s very important,” he said. He feels his work in other countries and his interest in languages other than English have

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given him a better perspective on the profession. “It’s made me more respectful of non-Americans,” Potter noted. “At various times I have given about D-minus talks in French, Spanish and Portuguese. That’s a learning experience, to see how other people express ideas,” he said.

Learn other sciences.

Potter earned his doctorate in geology from the University of Chicago but also acquired a master’s degree in statistics from the University of Illinois. Geology today involves contributions from numerous other scientific disciplines, so the geologist needs a broader view, he said. While people often note the world’s rapid change in technology, they sometimes overlook advances in science. “There’s no end to science,” Potter said. “Science is just like technology. M.K. Hubbard said we were going to run out of oil, but he forgot about technology,” he observed. Learn how to write and communicate well. “Learn to sell a subject in writing. Learn to convince people in words and text,” Potter said. Geologists should be able to write a scientific paper “with minimal jargon.” “That can be hard but that’s what you need to do,” he added. Give back to society. “I had never thought of that as a student until one day (when) I was out in the Adirondacks. I was with a European professor. He said to me, ‘Paul, you know one thing every geologist should do is give back to the community.’ That’s lost now,” Potter said. Geologists can work on a landslide study, lead sixthgraders on field trips, write popular articles about geology, serve as advisers to politicians or boards and give back in many other ways, Potter noted.

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What all the above ideas have in common is “getting outside your own envelope, and not just for a couple of weeks,” he observed. Better Than Expected Potter’s view of geology in contemporary higher education might help explain his own approach to academics and even his partial inattention as a young student. “Too many departments today want to follow the National Science Foundation model, which is to do high science,” he said.

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Potter obviously is more interested in geology that actually exists in the real world. His advice to beginning geologists is to always broaden your horizons.“One thing that never fails is to do things better and better and wider and wider. A lot of people have had successful careers that way,” he said. What would he have done if geology hadn’t worked out as a career? Economics or banking, definitely, Potter stated. “I would have liked to have been a banker. I think banking would have been interesting – I’ve always admired bankers,” he said. But geology did work out for him as a career, in a big way, and in a way others might not have guessed. “I would say that I’ve turned out a lot better than some of my professors would have expected,” he said. n

Potter described high science as “science that wants to use not field work, not subsurface geology, but they want to support people who do theoretical work in geology.”

I took a semester sabbatical in the late summer and fall of 2016 and, in about 100 days of fieldwork, studied Paleozoic geology on four continents. I also attended several meetings, worked for the Ohio Geological Survey, and ran a short course in China. As a result I became involved in a couple of new projects! Meanwhile, graduate students continued to make good progress on various projects. In the spring of 2016, Matt Vrazo completed and successfully defended his dissertation on depositional environments and taphonomy of Silurian eurypterids. He is continuing to do research at the US National Museum in Washington, DC and we are collaborating on several projects. Dr. James Thomka (former student, now at University of Akron, OH) and I have continued working on the detailed sequence and cycle stratigraphy, taphonomy, paleoecology (especially of echinoderms) and paleoenvironments of the early Wenlock interval in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. In addition, I am continuing research on Ordovician-Silurian chemostratigraphy with Dr. Pat McLaughlin (PhD UC 2006) of the Indiana Geological Survey and on Devonian se-

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s Lewis highlights in his Head’s letter, we are delighted to welcome Dr. Daniel M. Sturmer as the Paul E. Potter Assistant Professor of Basin Dynamics beginning in the upcoming academic year. Daniel received his Ph.D. in geology in 2012 from the University of Nevada, Reno and has subsequently worked for Shell Exploration & Production in Houston, TX. His responsibilities at Shell included prospect identification, risk and volumetric analysis; regional subsalt seismic interpretation; lease sale coordination; well log analysis; source rock and fluid evaluation; and data evaluation and integration. His primary accomplishments at Shell include: 1. Evaluation, re-mapping, and completion of new risk and volumetric analyses for Shell’s Miocene play prospect portfolio in deepwater Gulf of Mexico. 2. Creation, organization, and oversight of a successful play-based exploration field course in Nevada in 2014.

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(Continued) “You have to give up something to do it. But it’s so easy to do,” he said. “Most of these things are not expensive, except in terms of time and gasoline.”

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This resulted in a request to re-run the course again in 2015. 3. Coordination of all Shell lease sale activity for the western Gulf of Mexico lease sale 238, which led to winning 1 block. 4. Completion of a study on turtle structures in the Gulf of Mexico and development of a tool to rank the turtle prospect portfolio; this tool was used to rank the Shell portfolio in the Gulf of Mexico & offshore Canada, which was recently released worldwide. 5. Completion of a study of the source rock families in the Gulf of Mexico, the results of which were integrated into a re-evaluation of the deepwater Miocene play. 6. Mapping portions of six contiguous deepwater lease blocks in the Atwater Valley area of the Gulf of Mexico and identification of ten Miocene leads. n

quences in Kentucky with Dr. Jay Zambito (UC PhD 2011) of the Wisconsin Geological Survey. Allison Young continued research in cooperation with Dr. Peter Holterhoff (UC PhD, 1993) of Hess Corporation and Pat McLaughlin, on sequence stratigraphy and carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in the subsurface Ordovician in Ohio. In spring 2017, she put together and defended an ambitious dissertation proposal Meanwhile, PhD candidate Christopher Aucoin spent a productive year studying Ca-

nadian Ordovician successions, on a Fulbright Fellowship at University of Ottawa under the mentorship of our colleague André Desrochers. He returned in fall 2016 to continue developing his dissertation project on the fine-scale fabric of Late Ordovician bioevents including the Richmondian invasion; he also successfully defended his proposal in spring 2017. Masters students Tim Paton and Cameron Schwalbach have made good headway on their respective projects this year. After a leave of absence of the past couple of years, Cameron will

defend his Masters thesis this summer. Tim was fortunate to receive a grant from the National Geographic for studying remarkable fossil assemblages attached to a hardgrounds- rocky seafloors- that had been suddenly buried in mudflows-a bit like Pompeii. He also hopes to complete the thesis in summer of 2017 before returning to his undergraduate department at University of Tennessee Knoxville to pursue a PhD. Early in 2016 Professor Wout Krijgsman of the Utrecht University in the Netherlands invited me to come to Holland be an outside examiner for the dissertation of Nathan Marshall, a former undergraduate and MS student at UC. The Utrecht University provides support for external examiners (called “opponents”) to come to Holland and attend Nathan’s thesis defense. So, I headed for Europe on a multipurposed trip, re-reading Nathan’s extensive dissertation as I went. On July 1 This was a very interesting ritual that included all examiners or opponents in black robes, white ascots, and odd caps in an

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C arl B rett (Continued) old library building: all marvelously medieval in feel. Nathan very effectively defended his interesting dissertation. Among other highlights: distinct Milankovitch-driven sea level cyclicity in very thick deltaic deposits of Miocene in Borneo and reefy carbonates recurrent in transgressive successions above coal-bearing sediments. After the defense in Utrecht I spent some time examining Belgian Devonian sections with a colleague, Dr. Anne Christine (AC) DaSilva, a research scientist at Utrecht and Liege Belgium who would also visit us in NY in August. She has a lot of experience with Devonian reefs, magnetic susceptibility and time series analysis near the beautiful city of Liege. Subsequently, we caught a train to Ghent, another beautiful city in Belgium where we had a large joint meeting of the Ordovician-Silurian and Devonian workers as well as researchers studying climate, sea level and biotic changes during this interesting time interval. It was superbly run by Prof. Thjis Vandenbroucke of Ghent University. I was involved in three presentations dealing with volatility and models of biotic events in the mid Paleozoic. Allison Young also attended and presented a paper on her research on the Ordovician of the Ohio subsurface. Following up on long-standing invitations from Czech colleagues, I then visited the beautiful city of Prague and spent five days reviewing the classic so-called Barrandian sections to get a bit of an overview. Colleagues Olda Fatka and Petr Budil met us for the first couple of days to show some Cambro-Ordovician sections along the Beroun River valley west of Prague. Ladislav Slavic, secretary of the Devonian Subcommission showed some Devonian sections including the classic Barrandov section along the Vltava River. In summer of 2017 I will return to this area to pursue collaborative study of Devonian sequences and bioevents with Czech colleagues. In August, together with my New York colleagues and former students, Alex Bartholomew (PhD UC 2006) and Chuck Ver Straeten (NY State Museum) and Tim Paton, I helped Anne-Christine DaSilva to locate, measure

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C arl B rett (Continued) and sample some of the classic Lower Devonian spectacularly rhythmically bedded Schoharie Formation for gray scale and magnetic susceptibility data to assess astrochronology of this unit and hopefully improve the time scale for the Emsian. In September, as we were both on sabbatical, Betty Lou and I both headed to beautiful Cape Town, South Africa venue the international Geological Congress (IGC); the “olympics of geology” that meets every four years. I was there to represent the Devonian Subcommission on Stratigraphy (SDS) as vice president, at the International Stratigraphic commission meeting and that was good because I had a great chance to talk and do field work with the only other participant, SDS secretary, Ladislav Slavic-the same paleontologist who had shown me around the wonderful outcrops of Prague earlier in the summer. My former PhD student, Wendy Taylor, teaches part time at the University of Cape Town where her husband is a professor of geology. It was great to reconnect with Wendy who introduced me to her graduate student Mhairi Reid (pronounced “Very”). Together with an outstanding young geologist from Pretoria, Cameron PennClarke, we spent time in the field examining a remarkable site Mhairi had discovered beds of sandstone that are packed with beautiful fossil starfish. I ended up working with them on this site and presenting a talk with them a few weeks later at the Geological Society of America in Denver. Wendy also showed us the spectacular coastal area of the Cape Peninsula south of Cape Town and Table Mountain, spectacular, Ordovician quartz conglomerates and sandstones that tower up 3000 m above the city (which is of course near sea level). After the meeting we participated in the “great Southern African geosafari”. On the morning of September we met at the Cape Town train station and boarded the Shongolola Express (“Shongolola” is a native word for millipede) a renovated Victorian era train that would be our home for the next 10 days. During this trip we rode all night on the train and when we arrived at a station the next day, drivers backed vans off a flatbed car and off we drove to explore a particular area. In this way we covered the 1800-mile trip from Cape Town to Victoria Falls by train and did

an additional 1000 miles by minivan. The trip northeast through South Africa, Zimbabwe and Botswana was remarkable, surreal, but not restful. The narrow, uneven rails made for a rough, noisy and lurching ride. Many times we were nearly shaken from our little beds, there were frequent bangs and lurches; one night we hit a cow, many times it felt like we had.

Back in the US for a few days and it was time to head for Geological Society of America meeting where I presented the Strimple Award of the Paleontological Society to my dear friend Sam Ciurca and presented the paper with Wendy Taylor and Mhairi Reid on the wonderful South African brittle star assemblages with spectacular CATscan videos of the slab.

The trip took us through the amazing scenery and geology of the Swartberg Mountains developed in spectacularly folded Ordovician to Devonian sandstones, the high plateaus of the famed Triassic fossil rich beds of the Karoo, and on to the flat territory of Kimberly- from whence the name kimberlite, for the main diamond containing rock. Near Pretoria, we visited the “Cradle of Mankind” and semi-crawled through the famed Sterkfontein limestone cave where the famed Mrs. (or is it Mr.?) Ples skull (“Plesioanthropus”; of one of the first discovered australopithicene hominids) was excavated in 1947 by the redoubtable Robert Broom and revolutionized the study of paleoanthropology.

In October Betty Lou accompanied me on a cold and somewhat stormy trip in southern Ontario. These beds are in the top of a limestone quarry near Lake Simcoe, north of Toronto. As noted, Tim Paton received National Geographic funding to document the remarkable encrusting faunas on Ordovician hardgrounds spectacularly exposed along the rim of a new quarry. The quarry owners have been very cooperative and thanks to my friend George Kampouris, a great deal of information and many specimens were recovered. But the critical site was slated to be blown-up (early January, 2017) and turned into crushed stone to build roads around Toronto. Hence, we took advantage of this last opportunity to excavate and carefully document the surface. A highly successful mission; now Tim is working up extensive data for his thesis.

The trip ended at the remarkable Victoria Falls, where the Zambezi River plunges over cracked basalts and descends 350 feet into a narrow chasm parallel to the falls front, before exiting in a narrow, perpendicular canyon, which was cut before the river hit a fractured zone in the basalt allowing the gorge to flare out side to side for nearly a mile. As a result one can walk parallel to and just a few hundred feet from the falls front for nearly a mile. We also spent a wonderful day at the Chobe National Park in neighboring Botswana (our visa allowed a one-day visit to that country without extra charge). Without doubt the most profound memory of this trip was a river cruise on the Zambezi. We came upon a place where some 50 elephants were ambling down to the riverbank and playing in the water. Somehow it seemed like a scene from the Pleistocene: one could imagine that this was still a world unspoiled by the ravages of the “Anthropocene”, which were all too evident throughout much of the landscapes.

I was invited by colleagues Drs. Renbin Zhan and Junyuan Fan of the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology and Academy of Science, (NIGPAS) to spend three weeks in China in November, 2016. I presented a short course on sequence stratigraphy and taphonomy at Nanjing Institute, and Betty Lou and I accompanied these paleontologists and their students, to a variety of Chinese Ordovician and Silurian localities to aid in facies and sequence stratigraphic interpretations and help document bioevent intervals.


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C arl B rett (Continued) We arrived in Nanjing on November 15, weary and after a day of touring the Jiming temple and old wall of Nanjing we were off by train to the center of China in Yichang with our colleague Renbin (Zhan) and his student Luan Xiaocong where we examined and sampled interesting outcrops of Ordovician reddish limestones and the famed Pagoda Formation with its enigmatic cracks. Other highlights of the trip included examination of geologic sections in spectacular vistas along the steep gorges of the upper Yangtze River. Here we were on a narrow meandering back road cut into the cliffs. But it was those cuts that brought us here to study the patterns of sea-level and climate change in the Middle to Late Ordovician. When we returned to Nanjing after more than 10 days in the countryside it was time for me to buckle

down and teach an intensive four-day short course from 9:00 to 4:00. I actually quite enjoyed this as it forced me to condense a good many ideas and it provided inspiration for a book that I am trying to write. Among the other successes of this year I would certainly count my new association with the Ohio Geological Survey. Throughout the late summer and fall I worked off and on with the survey in providing field seminars and workshops as well as doing original research on the Silurian rocks of Ohio. We have many common interests and objectives and this is exactly the type of relationship with a state survey that I have long hoped for. n Editor’s note: A list of Carl’s publications over the past year can be found at http://bit.ly/2pTpNMg

W arren H uff This past year was a very pleasant and rewarding one, in many respects. I continue to teach intro courses in both face-to-face and online formats as well as clay mineralogy. Enrollment in the online sections of my physical and historical geology classes continues to grow, at the expense of the face-toface sections. I am delighted to welcome back Jeff Hannon as a PhD candidate. As many of you know, Jeff received his BS degree here in 2010 and his MS in 2012. After spending some time working for Weatherford Labs in Colorado Jeff is back focusing on Cretaceous bentonite isotope geochemistry. And I am privileged to work with Mike Lees, who is completing his MS degree while working full-time. Mike is really Barry Maynard’s student but since Barry has retired I stand in his place as Mike’s mentor. My own research is divided between some collaborative studies with a Chinese colleague on Proterozoic and Lower Paleozoic bentonites along the margin of the North China Craton and an ongoing project in Sweden with Swedish and German colleagues regarding the nature and stratigraphic correlation of Ordovician and Silurian Kbentonites recovered during some drilling in the Siljan

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Ring, a Devonian impact structure in south-central Sweden. And I continue to collaborate with a Russian colleague, Andrei Dronov, on studies of Ordovician K-bentonites from Siberia. Recently I was pleased to be included as a principal investigator in a research grant of twenty thousand euros for three years awarded by the French L’Agence Nationale de la Recherché. The project is entitled Volcano destabilizations: from observation to an integrated model of active deformation, and includes colleagues from both France and the U.S.

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And words cannot express my surprise and delight at being the recipient of this year’s Faculty Protagonist award from the Graduate Geology Club. You never really know how much fun life can be until something like this happens. n

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Life before Oxygen

UC geologist uncovers 2.5 billion-year-old fossils of bacteria that predate the formation of oxygen. By Melanie Schefft Somewhere between Earth’s creation and where we are today, scientists have demonstrated that some early life forms existed just fine without any oxygen. While researchers proclaim the first half of our 4.5 billion-year-old planet’s life as an important time for the development and evolution of early bacteria, evidence for these life forms remains sparse including how they survived at a time when oxygen levels in the atmosphere were less than one-thousandth of one percent of what they are today. Recent geology research from the University of Cincinnati presents new evidence for bacteria found fossilized in two separate locations in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. “These are the oldest reported fossil sulfur bacteria to date,” says Andrew Czaja, UC assistant professor of geology. “And this discovery is helping us reveal a diversity of life and ecosystems that existed just prior to the Great Oxidation Event, a time of major atmospheric evolution.”

In his research published in the December issue of the journal Geology of the Geological Society of America, Czaja and his colleagues Nicolas Beukes from the University of Johannesburg and Jeffrey Osterhout, a recently graduated master’s student from UC’s department of geology, reveal samples of bacteria that were abundant in deep water areas of the ocean in a geologic time known as the Neoarchean Eon (2.8 to 2.5 billion years ago). “These fossils represent the oldest known organisms that lived in a very dark, deep-water environment,” says Czaja. “These bacteria existed two billion years before plants and trees, which evolved about 450 million years ago. We discovered these microfossils preserved in a layer of hard silica-rich rock called chert located within the Kaapvaal craton of South Africa.”

I continue as Secretary of The Clay Minerals Society and also as an associate editor for both Clays and Clay Minerals and The American Mineralogist. I continue to spend time scanning a lot of departmental documents and posting them on a web page in order to preserve a lot of our departmental history documentation. You can see the status of this project at http://bit.ly/2oqZdfK. I suspect that more will be added from time to time, and I’m happy to have any comments, suggestions or, for that matter, contributions that you wish to make.

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3-D image showing the wrinkled surface of the compressed fossil, originally round, the bacterial outer shell is now preserved in the shape of a deflated beach ball. Image created using confocal laser scanning microscopy in the Czaja Geology Lab at the University of Cincinnati.

The 2.52 billion-year-old sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are described by Czaja as exceptionally large, sphericalshaped, smooth-walled microscopic structures much larger than most modern bacteria, but similar to some modern single-celled organisms that live in deepwater sulfur-rich ocean settings today, where even now there are almost no traces of oxygen.

With an atmosphere of much less than one percent oxygen, scientists have presumed that there were things living in deep water in the mud that didn’t need sunlight or oxygen, but Czaja says experts didn’t have any direct evidence for them until now. Czaja argues that finding rocks this old is rare, so researchers’ understanding of the Neoarchean Eon are based on samples from only a handful of geographic areas, such as this region of South Africa and another in Western Australia. According to Czaja, scientists through the years have theorized that South Africa and Western Australia were once part of an ancient supercontinent called Vaalbara, before a shifting and upending of tectonic plates split them during a major change in the Earth’s surface. Based on radiometric dating and geochemical isotope analy-

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sis, Czaja characterizes his fossils as having formed in this early Vaalbara supercontinent in an ancient deep seabed containing sulfate from continental rock. According to this dating, Czaja’s fossil bacteria were also thriving just before the era when other shallow-water bacteria began creating more and more oxygen as a byproduct of photosynthesis. “We refer to this period as the Great Oxidation Event that took place 2.4 to 2.2 billion years ago,” says Czaja. n

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12/5/16 Construction has begun on our groundwater observatory (GMGWO). Attached is the construction schedule. Rotosonic drilling is scheduled to start later today and go on for the rest of the week. Any of you who would like to observe the drilling and other progress are more than welcome to do so (hard hat and steel toed boots are required). All the best, Nash

Participants in 2014 field excursion to collect fossils near the town of Kuruman in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. From L to R: Clark Johnson,University of Wisconsin, Madison; Aaron Satkoski, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Nicolas Beukes, University of Johannesburg, South Africa; Breana Hashman,University of Wisconsin, Madison; and Kira Lorber, University of Cincinnati

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The Great Miami Groundwater Observatory D r . D avid B. N ash

A ndy C zaja (Continued)

During the past year, I have continued my research and teaching that focuses on the Quaternary geology and geomorphology of tectonically active mountain belts and their forelands. This has involved fieldwork with students and colleagues in the Himalaya of India, Nevada and Southern California, and Argentina and laboratory work in our geochronology laboratories. During this period, I continued to work on my NSF and Nation Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program

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(NEHRP) research grants on active tectonics in Nevada and California. I also had the chance to visit Denver, San Francisco, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Stockholm, Zaragoza and Scotland for meetings and conferences. I have continued to work as an Editor for Quaternary Research and an Associate Editor for the journal Geomorphology. This past year, I continued to work with my graduates Kate Hedrick, Sourav Saha, Liz Orr and Jenny Arkle, and post-doctoral researcher Paula Marques Figueiredo. n

12/7/16 It was pretty soggy out at the GMGWO site this morning but the Frontz Drilling crew was hard at it. They have completed the shallow (30’) 4” well at (P2a) and are nearing completion of the deep well (90’), P2b. As you can see from the attached photos. The recent rains have softened the ground and the rig’s wheels have sunk in enough that that the process of moving to the second drill set will be involved. The drillers thought they would have the second well set completed tomorrow… hopefully it’ll stop raining. 12/8/16 This morning Scherzinger erected the central instrument pylon (picture attached). The drill rig successfully extricated itself from the P2 site (picture of temporary casing attached), moved to P1, and drilled to bedrock ~92’. The sampling boxes are of great quality (see attached photo). 12/9/16 Frontz Drilling completed the final observation well pair at P3 and was in the process of grouting them. P3a was drilled into bedrock (~90 feet). All of the cores have been boxed, loaded onto a pallet and are ready to be transported to the Field Station on Monday or Tuesday of next week (picture of the ~27 boxes attached). 12/12/16 Frontz is drilling the 8” diameter pumping well today. They will install the custom-built Johnson Well Screen pictured. This screen is constructed of a single, continuously-wound wire with a trapezoidal cross section. Although costly these screens have a very high crushing strength and large open area. 12/13/16 Wintery conditions prevailed at the GMGWO site this morning but excellent progress was made nonetheless. The pumping well has

been installed and grouted and is in the process of development which is expected to last most of the rest of the day. Development is being done by air surging using the compressor on the rig. “Back in the day” we air developed with a trailer-mounted, gasoline powered air compressor, using the hose to produce spectacular geysers. Frontz uses a much less spectacular but significantly more efficient method. During the development, Rob the driller had a bit more time to chat. He said the rig cost $875K and is built around the sonic drill head which costs $250K and was manufactured in Canada. 12/15/16 The 8” pumping well was developed for more than a day and is now running clear and should be able to produce more than 500gpm (see photo). Most of today’s activity will involve lowering (regrading) the surface elevation at the P2 cluster so that water will drain from the central pylon back to the wells (see photo). The P2 site is the closest to the river and is on a levee (natural). Once P2 is regraded, the construction of the wellhead enclosures will begin. 12/16/16 Progress continues at the GMGWO site today and once again I was delighted by the quality of Frontz’s work. They are now working on the well heads and a problem has turned up that I want to take a minute to explain. The water level (piezometric surfaces) in the various wells and the adjacent Great Miami River are close but not identical… the difference in levels are what determines whether groundwater flows towards, away, or parallel to the river and the velocity of that flow. During normal river levels, there is no problem measuring these differences in water levels. When the river rises over

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The GMGWO (Continued)

the top of the wells, however, if river stage and aquifer levels are not isolated at the well heads, then they will be recorded as identical and it will appear there is no exchange between the river and aquifer but that will not be the case. During spring floods, washoff from agricultural fields will bring applied nutrients, herbicides, and insecticides to the river which will in turn be “pushed” into the aquifer by the elevated river stage. This phenomenon, known has “bank filtration” is important and GMGWO is designed to study it. The original design called for the well head enclosures to be water tight: sealed with a rubber gasket. The well head vaults that are being used (pictures attached), however, are not water tight. They are very nicely designed and otherwise suit our purpose well. This means that the well must be isolated from flood water by bulkhead caps through which the instrumentation cable passes into the well (maybe something like this). This is a problem that doesn’t necessarily need to be resolved until GMGWO is instrumented in January but will call for some redesigning. 12/19/16 Frontz continues their excellent work despite the chilly temperature today. They will be installing the wellhead vaults this week. The past weekend’s very heavy rains caused river stage to come up substantially (see attached) but still well below the wellhead elevations. 12/20/16 Today Fontz was backfilling around the wellhead vaults and may start pouring concrete today. Last weekend’s heavy rains caused the sides of some of the excavations to slump. The slumped material froze solid in yesterday’s temperatures in the mid-teens making excavation difficult… particularly when it had to be done by hand! 12/21/16 Temperatures were above freezing this morning so the concreting in of the wellhead vaults is progressing. The deep 4” diameter well (P2a) is complete (see attached photo). I couldn’t be more pleased with the quality of work. The vaults are spacious and well-constructed with ample space for coiling excess cable and installing sensor hardware. Rob is marking each vault and each well with engraved metal tags. The Frontz team hopes to complete their work at the site (at least until the aquifer test this spring or summer) tomorrow.

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The GMGWO (Continued) 12/22/16 The first and most important phase of the GMGWO project is now complete: The Frontz crew has done an absolutely superb job… right down to the meticulous labeling plates for each well vault. This phase of their work complete (they will return to perform the aquifer test in mid-2017), they’ll be heading back to Wooster today (photo attached). Alec Simunich, the site engineer from Turner, has been meticulous in monitoring construction and safety at the site. Photo is attached of Alec “glowing with pride” at the P2a well vault. 1/4/17 The next phase of GMGWO construction, installation of the vent/conduit piping between the wellheads previously constructed by Frontz and the pylon erected by Scherzinger, began today (photo attached). Sunesis is doing this phase of the work and I have been delighted by the care they are taking to make sure the gradient is uniformly down from the pylon towards the wellhead. Sunesis is carefully measuring the gradient with a tripodmounted laser level. They are flooring the pipe trench with a thick layer of pea gravel. Alec informs me that this phase of the project should take about a week and a half to complete. 1/5/17 The vent/conduit between the P3a&b wells and the pylon was completed yesterday and the connection between P2a&b and the pylon (picture attached) should be completed today. Alec estimates the entire project should be completed before the end of this month. 1/6/17 Despite the cold, Sunesis continues to make good progress: The vent lines connecting both P2 and P3 with the central pylon are now complete and they are currently connecting P1 with the pylon. There are a couple of “hiccups” but Alec is confident they can be resolved. 1/9/17 The vent/conduits from the six observation wells have been connected to the central pylon, the surface has been regraded, and the base of the pylon is ready to be cemented in 1/10/17 The second phase of construction is now complete. Sunesis has done an excellent job of restoring the site to its initial contour. The only construction above grade is the pylon. The attached 360° QTVR will allow you to pan around the site with QuickTime (just click, hold, and drag). This will only work with Quicktime (a free application from Apple available for Windows and standard with macs).

1/17/17 The third phase of the GMGWO project, installation of the instrumentation is well underway and the entire construction of the project may be finished as early as next Thursday. When I visited the site this morning, the enclosure was in the process of being mounted on the Tony Mette designed pylon (picture attached). Len Thomas and I have both commented how the Pylon resembles a striking piece of abstract sculpture. It’s a wonderful piece Tony! The drillers referred to as the “Totem Pole” and there’s something to that. YSI (Florida) has sent a technician, Chris, up to install the sensors and electronics (a picture of him holding one of the YSI600LS is attached). 1/18/17 If the weather holds and there’re no last-minute glitches, GMGWO will be operational tomorrow. When I visited this morning, the sondes were installed in the wells and the cabling was connected to the instrumentation. Alec informed me that today the system would be powered up and tested. A picture is attached of the nearly completed pylon with enclosures (one for instrumentation the other for batteries) and solar panel mounted. All that’re missing are the anti-raptor guards and lightning rod. 1/20/17 GMGWO went “fully operational” (as they say in Star Wars) January 19, 2017! All sondes are in place and connected, the batteries are being charged from the solar panel, the datalogger is communicating with the sondes and with the cellular modem, and the cellular modem is communicating with the network. When I visited the site, the lightning rod was being installed (see attached image). Alec and Chris (the YSI tech who installed and programmed the system) came by my office yesterday and installed the communication and programming software on my office computer. Chris downloaded 12 hours of data from the six sondes (read at 15-minute intervals) and made a minor change to the datalogger’s program from my office! It was a thrilling moment and I was particularly delighted that, by a fortuitous coincidence, Mike Ekberg from the Miami Conservancy District was on campus and able to “share the moment”.

1/23/17 I wanted to share the very first data collected by GMGWO. Keep in mind that the water table elevation can’t be determined until the wellhead elevations have been shot (the plan is that the Kleingers surveying team will do that on Thursday). Without the water elevations, flow velocity and gradient can’t be determined. What you can see from the attached charts are that the groundwater levels are responding nicely to changes in the river stage measured at Miamitown. Note the change in amplitude and phase of the river stage change pulse with distance from the river. This will be used to determine changes in the river channel conductance. I’m not sure whether piezometer set A and B are shallow and deep or vice versa. It appears there’s a problem with the P2B and P3B sondes which stopped recording last Thursday around 4:30PM. It also appears that sondes P1A and P3A are giving identical readings. I’m confident that Alec and Chris (YSI tech) will resolve these problems.

2/21/17 This morning the University of Cincinnati Board of Trustees officially named the recently completed Great Miami Groundwater Observatory the CV Theis Groundwater Observatory in honor of groundwater luminary, Charles Vernon Theis, who earned his undergraduate and master’s (1922) degrees from UC’s Civil Engineering Department and earned the first PhD awarded by the UC Department of Geology (1929). The CV Theis Groundwater Observatory will be officially opened March 10, 2017 but the website is open now (albeit very preliminary) and data collected by the observatory in near real time are available here. n

A few relatively small items remain (e.g., locks and drains for the well vaults) but construction of the observatory is essentially complete. Although the GMGWO infrastructure is still far from complete (the website needs to be constructed and connected to the ever-growing database) much of that can be done from the comfort of my office!

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Y urena Y anes

The 2016-2017 academic year has been filled with adventures. My research program is continuing to grow in exciting ways. With the support of the National Geographic Society, colleagues and I spent a month in Kenya (Amboseli National Park) last summer studying the skeletal aftermath of a mass death event. We are using these data to understand more about how fossil records accumulate and how ecological events (including mass mortalities) are recorded in bone accumulations. My work in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is also moving full steam ahead. There, I am using accumulations of shed antlers to understand how caribou have used that landscape through time. It turns out caribou shed their antlers at particular times of year (males shed their antlers after they mate, while the females keep them until they give birth). Because antlers can survive on tundra surfaces for decades, centuries, and even thousands of years, I can map out how their preferred birthing areas (and mating areas) have changed across many generations. I recently returned from Alaska where I gave an invited talk to wildlife professionals from across the state. I am pleased that the methods I am developing to reconstruct historical population of wildlife (which are rooted in paleontological analysis) continue to gain interest among wildlife biologists and managers. You can learn more at http:// voices.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/17/bestjob-ever-collecting-bones-in-alaska-anwr/ I taught my “Age of Dinosaurs” class this spring to a solid crowd of eager undergrads. We pursue a lot of small group, project-based learning. I also have them use professional resources whenever possible so they can get used to thinking about the data behind the

Dear UC Geology Alumni

science (and the stories). This includes the paleobiology database (https://paleobiodb.org/), which hopes to one day contain data on all published paleontological materials. Our college at UC (McMicken College of Arts and Sciences) is also interested in increasing the use of technology in classrooms. As part of this, I have joined the “A&S iPad Initiative,” in which we are creating new ways to lead class periods and attempting to encourage broader and higher quality classroom participation and engagement. I am also working on an online version of the “Age of Dinosaurs”, so stay tuned for an opportunity dive into dinosaur science from the comfort of your couch! Starting in August, I am being promoted to a tenure-track Assistant Professor. I am very excited to be taking on this new role within our community. As part of this transition, I will also be welcoming a new graduate student, Abby Kelly. Abby graduated from Williams College and has been conducting work in Panama (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) for the past year. She is interested in conservation paleobiology and using the subfossil and recent fossil records to understand the ecological and environmental controls on mammal populations. For her honor’s thesis, Abby examined shifts in diversity, morphologies, and structure of microfossil communities during the late Devonian (Kellwasser) extinction. I am ecstatic that she will be joining UC this fall! Finally, I am pleased to announce a relatively new member of our family: Orion Lawson Miller. Orion recently turned one and has been a wonderful addition to our clan. Now, if he would only learn to sleep through the night… n

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Friends,

The Geological Society of America 2017 Annual Meeting will be held October 22-25 in Seattle, WA. (http://community.geosociety.org/gsa2017/home/). I would like to invite you to attend and to join us for an alumni get-together on Monday, 23 October 2017: 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Juniper. Hope to see you in Seattle, Warren D. Huff warren.huff@uc.edu

During the past year my research group have grown significantly. Two of my master students, Elizabeth Bullard and Alex Wall, successfully graduated in July

in the Northern Hemisphere that has been under-investigated. Finally, I have been working with undergraduate student Nora Soto. Nora is a second year Geology major and she has been looking at archeological marine mollusk shells from the Canary Islands and assessing variations in body size through time as a proxy for human predation pressure. All my students have been funded with one or more graduate student grants from GSA and SEPM during 2017 and they have presented their exciting research results at the NC/NE GSA meeting in Pittsburg this past March 2017.

2016. I currently work with four other graduate students and one undergraduate student. Working with Apart from my research, I have been busy teaching students has certainly become my favorite part of the several courses on “Foundations of the Geosciences”, job. Wesley Parker is a second year master student and “Holocene Environmental and Cultural History”, and he has continued working on marine mollusk shells “Tropical Islands: Endangered Paradises”. I am in the recovered from archeological sites across the Canary process of creating a Islands. Last summer we new course on “Ecology went to the field thanks and Paleoecology of the to the support from NaCanary Islands”, which tional Geographic Sowill include a fieldtrip ciety and collected all to the Canary Islands. samples necessary to This new exciting complete his research, course will allow UC unalong with undergradudergraduate students ate student Kayla Parr. to gain international Evan New is a first year educational experience master student working and conduct research on time-averaging in projects in these highly Quaternary land snail asFrom left to right: Evan New, Abigail Padgett, Yurena Yanes, Nora diversity and stunning semblages from Madeira, Soto and Wesley Parker at the NC/NE GSA meeting in Pittsburg . islands. Portugal. We are getting I am looking forready to initiate our field ward to this summer and accomplish expedition to Madeira in May 2017 and collect fossil all my research projects land snails from five different islands in collaboration with my students and with my Portuguese colleagues. Abigail Padgett is a colleagues. Workfirst year master student and she is interested on asing at the Universessing the effects of climate change on cultural transity of Cincinnati sitions. She is investigating a archeological land snail has helped me to records from Algeria using snail shells to reconstruct continue growchanges in Holocene climate in NW Africa. We visited ing my research the University of Illinois this past January 2017 to coland teaching prolect all necessary samples to complete this project grams, and I feel from the museum collections. Richard Javier Stephenfortunate to be part of son is a new graduate student who will start working the UC Department of Geolin my lab next fall. He is primarily interested on unogy. n derstanding spatial (geographic) biases in scientific datasets and paleoclimatic proxies. He plans to work From left to right: Kayla Parr, on small land snails from North America as paleocliYurena Yanes and Wesley matic proxies. His research complements my funded Parker conducting fieldwork in an archeological site in the NSF project, and he will expand to additional regions Canary Islands.

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Department of Geology Donors 2016 -2017 Eugene J. Amaral

Marathon Petroleum Company

Sheri K. Barksdale

Jack E. Mase

Rex L. Baum

John P. McAnaw

Donald J. Benson

Louis T. Mellinger

Bruce Braswell

David L. Meyer

John A. Breyer

Brian L. Nicklen

Charles S. Brockman

Occidental Petroleum Foundation

Leland W. Burton

Edward O’Donnell

John L. Carter

Lewis A. Owen

Marzena Chocyk-Jaminski

Paul E. Potter

Andrew D. Czaja

Eric M. Redder

Craig Dietsch

Stephen P. Reidel

Igor Effimoff

Cornelia K. Riley

Michael E. Effler

Edgar W. Roeser

Janet M. Elliott

Tod W. Roush

ExxonMobil Education Foundation

Sandra Schaber

Robert Ferree

Shell Companies Foundation, Inc.

Mark P. Fisher

Frederick E. Simms

Richard H. Fluegeman

Erwin L. Single

John R. Ford

John D. Thaeler

Linda P. Fulton

Amy Townsend-Small

Evelyn M. Goebel

William A. Van Wie

Wayne R. Goodman

Roy B. VanArsdale

William C. Haneberg

Steven M. Warshauer

Dominique M. Haneberg-Diggs

Raelyn E. Welch

F. D. Holland

Jenea L. Woods

Warren D. Huff

Maureen M. Wu

S. Duff Kerr Michael P. Krueger Lucile and Richard Durrell Special Fund

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Thank You All for Your for Contributions to the UC Geology Department’s Continued Excellence!

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C hris A tchison As part of Earth Science Week, we’ll be highlighting different leaders in the geosciences – from research to education and community outreach. We are posting Q&A’s on The Bridge asking geoscientists about the work they do. Today’s theme is Geoscience for Everyone Day and one of our featured AGU members is Dr. Christopher Atchison. Chris is an Assistant Professor of Geoscience Education at the University of Cincinnati, School of Education and Department of Geology. He is also the Executive Director of the International Association for Geoscience Diversity. He has a Ph.D. in Science Education from The Ohio State University. Could you summarize your research in a sentence or two? My research focuses on enhancing access and inclusion in the Earth Sciences through experiential learning opportunities for students with sensory and orthopedic disabilities. What progress has been made and what more needs to be done to make the geosciences more inclusive? Prior to the mid-2000s, few researchers were recognizing accessible conferences, workshops, and research programs. Geoscience programs around the world are now working to create accessible field courses that promotes the impact of including the multiple perspectives of all students in field-based learning experiences, regardless of physical ability. Why is it important that we make the earth sciences more inclusive?

Sean Thatcher and Jennifer Piatek test the radioactivity of dinosaur fossils at If we use the Dinosaur Ridge, Colorado.

same traditional methods of conducting science, we may fail to realize innovative advances that can be made through the consideration of diverse perspectives and world views of individuals who are commonly marginalized from full participation due to inaccessible classrooms, laboratories and field-based learning environments.

How do you see the role of science and earth science in society? Scientific literacy is as important today than ever before. The publicperception of Earth science is weak. There should be no argument against climate change, yet we struggle to get the broader public to see the result of their lifestyles. The zone of habitability within the entire Earth system is fragile, a non-renewable resource, and we are depleting it at an alarming pace. An educated society will be better informed about the impact of their daily choices and actions. How, if at all, is your work supported/affected by federal and state funding? My research is completely affected by state and federal funding. The increased focus on broadening participa tion in the STEM disciplines has enabled a growth in research. on access and inclusion in the geosciences in particular. Do you have a favorite photograph from your career? If so, would you share it with us and tell us why it is important to you? This photo (below) is important to me because it represents an instance during a geology field course when barriers were broken down to provide an opportunity for a group of students learning about cave and karst geology. A field site that was assumed to be inaccessible for individuals with Students learning about cave and karst geology. mobility disabilities was made accessible, and the students were able to focus on science, rather than worrying about how their disability may impact the learning experience and how they would be treated by the entire group. The amount of logistical planning that went in to making this experience possible was insignificant compared to the life-changing experience for the students, and the instructors. This photograph represents a single moment during a trip that introduced the need for more inclusive and accessible field-based learning experiences in geology, and one of the foundational moments during the formation of the IAGD. n

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C raig D ietsch This past year has been a time of welcoming our new colleague Dan Sturmer to the Department, enjoyable teaching, research projects in western New England involving undergraduates Ben Kehres, Andrew Michel, and Megan Brennan, a terrific tour of the AK Steel Mill and AK’s new Research Innovation Center in Middletown, NE GSA in Pittsburgh, and field trips. In late October, Dylan Ward and I took our geomorphology and mineralogy classes on a three-day trip following the Kanawha River into the New River all the way to Blacksburg, VA. I learned from Dylan about landscape evolution in the Appalachian Plateau and the very cool story of how the New River has yet to be captured across the Blue Ridge Escarpment. The trip ended atop Buffalo Mountain -- a klippen of deformed amphibolite facies mafic schist (nice!) -- with a 360° panoramic view from the Valley and Ridge to the north and west to the Piedmont to the south and east. A cool, clear night in Floyd, VA with local live music preceded our hike up Buffalo (also nice!).

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The Departmental Craig Dietsch, trip leader, along with 18 graduate students and special thanks to guest trip leaders  Brett Denny, Associate Economic Geologist, and Joe Devera, Senior Paleontologist, both of the Illinois State Geological Survey, Carterville Office, 5776 Coal Drive, Suite 121, Carterville, IL. 62918-3521

Other stops included New Albany shale metamorphosed to oil-saturated slate in the core of Hicks Dome, rare outcrops of the ultramafic breccia known as Grant’s Intrusion, and the stratigraphy of fossiliferous Devonian carbonates along the Mississippi River at Grand Tower. Bluffs of these carbonates provided beautiful overviews of the landscape along the Mississippi valley. The trip was stationed at Giant City State Park in Makanda where we camped. Breakfasts were in camp, lunches were done picnic-style on the road, and two of the three dinners were cooked in camp. On the last night, a celebratory dinner was held at the Giant City Park lodge, notable for its delicious fried chicken served “family style». Big yum! Transportation was done in the Department’s three vans and one private car. Funding from the Department supported the trip. Of special note, Professor Paul Potter underwrote the buffet dinner at the lodge. For Dr. Potter’s generosity and continued support of Department of Geology field trips, the Department is grateful. n

The Departmental Fall Field Trip 2016 was a full four-day trip to southern Illinois, complete with an 82-page guidebook. This trip is not new to the Department: 4-day fall fieldtrips to southern Illinois were previously run in 1975, 1999, and 2002. The theme of the trip this year (like the previous ones) was exploring the variety of bedrock geology, mineral resources, and geomorphology present in southern Illinois. Three bedrock quarries were visited: the Grand Rivers [limestone] Quarry (now owned by the Vulcan Material Company) located near Grand Rivers, KY; Hastie’s Quarry north of Cave-inRock, IL, one of the premier sites for collecting fluorite from the Illinois Kentucky Fluorite District, and the UNIMIN Mine at Elco, IL, a unique deposit of microcrystalline silica. Thanks to those folks who guided us through their quarries!

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This summer I’ll be spending a month doing STATEMAP-funded bedrock mapping in southwestern Connecticut as part of Shannon Neale’s M.S. thesis, a project that got started by the discovery of very high U in private well water. Many thanks are due to Margaret Thomas, Connecticut State Geologist, for getting us on to this project, and our friend and colleague Greg Walsh of the USGS who has been helping Shannon come up to speed with the latest in digital mapping technology. Have iPad, Bad Elf, FieldMove, Global Mapper, and ArcGIS will map! n

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During this past spring semester, I taught two new halfsemester courses: Optical Mineralogy and Thin Section Petrography...the polarizing microscope and looking at thin sections are alive and well. A mix of 10 undergrads and grads took both courses. We used Bloss’ 1961 classic, “Introduction to the Methods of Optical Crystallography” to learn the theory (purchased used for a little as 35¢ if you can believe that), and then spent the second half of the semester looking at a variety of crystalline rocks. The Department has a pretty terrific collection of suites of rocks and thin sections and I took advantage of some of Harvey Sunderman’s custom thin sections to teach optical: sections with biotite [001] planes; thin sections made up of six strips of grains of a single mineral (incredible!); and quartz grains oriented with their c-axis (the optic axis, of course) oriented perpendicular to the section. Note to Harvey: our students are still learning this useful skill.

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The petrology field trip this spring was a three-day trip to western North Carolina with undergraduates Salem Abdullateef, Nathan Green, Luke Jacobs, Andrew Michel, Hayden Owens, Ed Powell, and Chloe Veit, and our TA Shannon Neale. The weather was perfect and the mountains in this part of the Blue Ridge are impressive. Highlights included migmatites at Winding Stair Gap, ultramylonite in the

Brevard fault zone at Rosman, pegmatitic granite at Spruce Pine, the overlook of Linville Gorge at Wiseman’s View in the Pisgah National Forest, and a cold leftover onion ring-fried fish sandwich from a funky place called The Salty Dog.

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I led the Department’s 4-day fall fieldtrip to southern Illinois in mid-October; on another page is a description of this trip. Josh Bergbower continues his M.S. research on the geochemistry of fluorite from the Illinois Kentucky Fluorite District. John Rakovan at Miami U has been a great collaborator. Josh will be spending time this summer in Troy, NY using the LA-ICP-MS at Rensselaer with our collaborator Jared Singer.

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oming this fall: The 4-Day Field Trip When: Friday, September 8th through Sunday, September 10th. What & Where: The Geology of Ohio

All Alumni are welcome to join. This is an important opportunity to meet new graduate students and curent students to informally discuss research. Contact us for details of the fieldwork itinerary.

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Jani Sparks successfully defended her PhD dissertation in April and started working as a co-lab manager for the Stable Isotope Facility in the Earth Atmospheric Planetary Science Department at Purdue in June. Way to go Jani! Two of her dissertation chapters are currently in review and we are working on final edits of her third chapter for submission. In addition to completing her dissertation, Jani helped me produce geology descriptions for the 97 protected areas in Madagascar. This was a rather monumental task, but I now have a intimate knowledge of the island’s geology, which will be a great asset for my current and future research on the island.

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My recent Master’s student, Rajarshi Dasgupta, and I published his thesis project in Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. We examined pollution of soils along the Manali-Leh Highway in the northwestern Himalaya, India. We ascertained that the concentrations of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are currently low, but sulfur concentrations are higher than anything previously reported. Our study demonstrates the importance of using a multi-parameter approach when characterizing pollution. I am thrilled to see it published.

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My own research is also going strong. I have been working with undergraduate Kaitlin Sommer on a project that uses hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and strontium isotopes in feathers to identify natal regions for migratory small-bodied hawks. The project is funded by a STEM research award from the University (to Kaitlin) and a grant from the North American Falconer’s Association (to me). Kaitlin presented the hydrogen isotope data at the Northeast/North-Central regional meeting for the Geological Society of America in March, and will hopefully present additional data at the 2017 Goldschmidt conference this summer (abstract is currently being reviewed). Josh Miller and I published a paper in Biological Reviews that demonstrates the utility of geospatial isotope models for predicting bioavailable strontium isotopes in various biological materials, including plants, freshwater fish, and terrestrial vertebrates. Josh and I are currently preparing manuscripts for several related projects that will reconstruct changes in mobility patterns for extant and recently extinct large-bodied herbivores in North America.

ing at UC. I taught my hands-on Stable In other news, I spearheaded a special isIsotope Ecology course in the fall (this sue on advances in primate stable isoyear. Student projects included isotope ecology for the American Journal topic comparisons of conventional of Primatology that was published and shade-grown coffee, feral and last Fall. I was also an invited parindoor housecats in Cincinnati, ticipant at the Duke Lemur Center’s and invasive and native plants in 50th Anniversary Celebration in the Burnet Woods, and an investigaFall and a 40th anniversary sympotion of feather-diet offset in cocksium for Duke’s Division of Fossil atiels). I also had the pleasure of Primates at the American Associaco-teaching a new course called tion of Physical Anthropologists “Teaching Geoscience” with Chris in April. Both events allowed me Atchison. I learned a lot in this to showcase some of my current lecourse, and was very impressed mur research projects and provided with the creative lesson plans our excellent networking opportunities. students developed. I look forward to And I delivered colloquium presentateaching it again in Fall 2018. tions for the Departments of Chemistry and Biology at UC and I served Female sharp-shinned hawk, one of the The year ahead will be an exas an invited panelist for a public participants in my raptor project citing one. I will be on sabbatiforum at UC called “Uncertain Fucal during Spring 2018, which ture: Physical, Biological and Societal Impacts of means I should have plenty of fodder for next Global Climate Change” in the Fall. year’s newsletter. n Last but not least, I continue to enjoy teach-

Graduate Master’s of Science Frida Akerstrom

(Amy Townsend-Small)

Katie Dunn

(Eva Enkelmann)

Christopher Sheehan

2016-2017

Degrees Anatasia Fries (Amy Townsend-Small)

Alex Wall (Yurena Yanes)

Fred Santistevan

(Dylan Ward)

(Tom Algeo)

(Warren Huff)

Doctor of Philosophy

Liz Haussner Elizabeth Bullard

Julia Wise

(Yurena Yanes)

(Aaron Diefendorf)

Jeff Osterhout

Matthew Vrazo

(Andy Czaja)

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Highlights for 2016-2017 This has been another full year for me and my lab. Jenelle Wallace joined the department as a Master’s student in the Fall, and I have enjoyed working with her as she has developed her thesis project. She is using strontium isotopes to reconstruct changes in the mobility of horses that lived in northern Florida during the early and middle Miocene. This was a period of environmental change characterized by the expansion of grasslands and reduction in forest. Jenelle’s project is the first to test how this environmental transition impacted herbivore mobility. She has successfully obtained funding from Sigma Xi, the Geological Society of America, and she received a Caster Award from the department. I am very excited about her project and look forward to helping her interpret her data later this summer.

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HAIKUS

Alumni Advisory Committee

of Petrology trip

Wayne Goodman (MS ’76) wrgnle@alphacomm.net

Consulting Geologist/Board Member/ Owner Associate at Core Energy LLC Owner at Northern Lights Energy, Saginaw, MI

Edward O’Donnell (MS ’63) Edward.ODonnell@nrc.gov

Senior Geologist in the Regulatory Guide Development Branch in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Research

Thomas Klekamp (MS ’71) klekamp@bellsouth.net

Past-President of the New Orleans Geological Society. Senior geologist with Amber Resources LLC

Mike Effler (BS ’73, MS ‘76) msmr1974@gmail.com

Retired Geologist at ExxonMobil

Steve Wells (MS ’73, PhD ’76) stephen.wells@nmt.edu

President of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology

Tim Agnello (BS ’82, MS ’02) agnello@cinci.rr.com

Professional geologist in the Cincinnati area http://www.ohiovalleylandslides.com/

John Rupp (BS ‘78) rupp@indiana.edu

Senior Research Scientist at Indiana Geological Survey. Consulting Geologist at John A. Rupp Consulting

Mark P. Fisher (BS ’78, MS ’81) mpfisher@marathonoil.com Marathon Oil

Chad A. Ferguson (MS ’03, Ph.D. ’09)chad. ferguson@bhpbilliton.com

Exploration Geologist/Stratigrapher at BHP Billiton Petroleum

Jennifer J. Krueger (MS ’91) Jennifer.Krueger@gza.com

Associate Principal / Office Manager at GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.

David Lienhart (BS ’61, MS ‘65) dlienhart@armorstone.com

Consultant at DAL Engineering Geologic & Petrographic Services

John Thaeler (MS ‘79) john.thaeler@vexpl.com

COO at Vitruvian Exploration II, LLC

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When: Friday, September 8th through Sunday, September 10th. What & Where: The Geology of Ohio All Alumni are welcome to join. This is an important opportunity to meet new graduate students and curent students to informally discuss research. Contact us for details of the fieldtrip itinerary.

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Fac u lt y D an S trurmer Hello all! I am excited to join the geology faculty here at UC. I started here in January, and it has been quite a busy and exciting semester. To give you a bit of background, I am originally from southern California and I completed by undergraduate work at California State University, Fullerton. I started out as a music major, changing to business at the end of my first year. It wasn’t until my senior year that I took my first geology class and “saw the light”. I completed the business degree and a second degree in geology. From there I went to the University of Nevada, Reno, where I completed an MS in geology working on kinematics of the Olinghouse fault in western Nevada with Jim Faulds. I stayed on at UNR for a Ph.D. in geology working with Jim Trexler on carbon isotope chemostratigraphy and tectonics of the Pennsylvanian Ely-Bird Spring basin in Nevada and Utah. I then went on to several years working as an exploration geologist for Shell. I worked mostly on the Gulf of Mexico regional exploration team and spent some time on the Miocene Gulf of Mexico exploration team. Finally, before coming to UC, I spent most of 2016 as a post-doc at the University of Texas at Austin working with David Mohrig on physical models of transitional sediment flow interactions in the deep water. Part of my position in the department is to reestablish and strengthen tie with industry in addition to preparing students for entering the workforce. To that end, this spring I taught a course called “Careers in the Geosciences”. In the course, students learned about the many types of careers available to geoscientists, how to build tailored resumes and cover letters, and about interviewing and interview techniques. In conjunction with this course, I have also taken over organiz-

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ing the UC Career Days which were started by, and continue to be funded by, alumnus John Thaeler. This year we had 11 alumni from a wide variety of industries speak about their experiences. If you are interesting in participating in the UC Career Days next spring, please let me know. I am excited to kick off my research program at UC this summer. Much of my focus will be on understanding the stratigraphic and structural evolution of Late Paleozoic basins Nevada and Utah. One project that I will work on this summer is the subsidence history of the PennsylvanianPermian Bird Spring Shelf-Keeler Basin-Darwin Basin system, which is interpreted to record the arrival of a southward-propagating sinistral transform boundary in southwestern Laurentia. I also have a student (Adam Jones) who will be starting a project in the fall working on the Late Paleozoic Oquirrh Basin in Utah. I am also looking forward to starting several new collaborative projects with Carl Brett, Dylan Ward, and Warren Huff (more on that next year). I also want to take a moment to thank Dr. Paul Potter, for whom my position is named. Dr. Potter has been an excellent guide during my transition to UC. He has been generous with his time and has already taken me to meet researchers at the Kentucky Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky (with more trips planned for the near future). We are also co-teaching Basin Dynamics in the fall, which will be a unique and educational experience for all involved. n

D o you have any recollections of field trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues?

Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

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UC’s Andrew Czaja teams with NASA to decide where to send the next rover to look for ancient life on Mars. By Michael Miller

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University of Cincinnati geology professor is helping NASA answer one of science’s biggest questions: Is there life on other planets? Andrew Czaja, a Precambrian paleobiologist and astrobiologist, will help decide where on Mars to land NASA’s most sophisticated rover to date. Czaja is a member of the Returned Sample Science Board, which NASA created to help plan the Mars 2020 mission. NASA wants to collect rock samples that prove once and for all that a planet other than Earth sustained life. The board has helped narrow the potential landing sites from 30 to eight to just three. “I’m of the opinion that if life ever existed on Mars, it’s still there,” said Czaja, an assistant professor in the McMicken College of Arts and Sciences. “Killing all the bacteria on a planet is very difficult. If any of them survive, they could reproduce and evolve very quickly, adapting to new conditions,” he said. Czaja has always been interested in space. As a graduate student, he was a member of the NASA Astrobiology Institute. When he was invited to join the Mars 2020 science board in 2015, he jumped at the chance. Scientists still have much to learn about the Red Planet since taking the first photos of its surface from orbit in 1965. Several landers and four rovers have explored Mars, albeit a tiny fraction of it. This includes Sojourner, the rover featured in the sci-fi movie, “The Martian,” and the still-functional rovers Opportunity and Curiosity. A counterpart of Opportunity called Spirit launched in 2003, got stuck in soft sand in 2009 and ended its mission two years later. For Mars 2020, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is building its most sophisticated rover yet, said Ken Williford, deputy project scientist for NASA. The new Mars 2020 rover looks like Pixar’s WALL-E. It has an array of scientific instruments and cameras mounted on a flat six-wheeled platform the size of a golf cart to assess the geology and natural resources it encounters. And unlike other rovers, it will have microphones to record and broadcast the ambient sounds of Mars.

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The rover will look for potential hazards to human exploration, collect rock samples and try to extract oxygen from the atmosphere. Its work is a prelude to a manned mission to Mars envisioned in about 20 years. NASA aims to launch the rover from a rocket at Cape Canaveral, Florida, in 2020. NASA increases its odds of success with each mission by relying on parts or procedures that have worked in the past. They call this “flight heritage.” “We build a rover that looks almost identical to Curiosity but has important improvements and a new scientific payload,” he said. The new rover will have specialized tools that will give the mission its best chance yet to determine if Mars ever sustained microbial life. It’s the next step in a progression of missions that so far have established that Mars had liquid water and habitable environments. “In this mission, we’re taking the next step by directly seeking signs of ancient life,” Williford said. “It’s a big adventure. We don’t know what we’ll find.” Secondary objectives are to study the Martian surface for anything potentially toxic to humans and to demonstrate it’s possible to harvest oxygen from the atmosphere, he said. Mars is only half the size of Earth but with no oceans or lakes has nearly the same amount of land area to explore. Choosing the best site is key to success. Scientists want to go where they will have the best chance of finding a fossil record, Czaja said. “It’s like a historian going back and looking for ancient scrolls. If the library burned down like in Alexandria, it’s lost,” Czaja said. “It’s the same with rocks. If they get eroded or otherwise destroyed, fossil evidence in them is lost.” The farther back in time you look, the fewer rocks you find, he said. “Rocks are constantly being formed and eroded and destroyed,” Czaja said. “The rock record is the only place we have evidence of ancient life on Earth.” After months of debate, three landing sites remain under consideration: • Columbia Hills, the site explored by the Spirit rover between 2003 and 2011 and named for the seven astronauts killed aboard the space shuttle Columbia.

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• Northeast Syrtis, a region where there is apparent evidence of hydrothermal deposits. • Jezero Crater, the site of what might be an ancient river delta, which could harbor fossil evidence of past life.

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the future,” he said. By comparison, the rover’s instruments are small and less sensitive — a necessary trade-off in shipping a mobile self-contained laboratory 34 million miles away.

The rover will store the samples for safekeeping, probably somewhere shady like next to a boulder, Czaja said. The The decision poses a dilemma surface temperature ranges from for researchers: return to a place subfreezing to 70 degrees FahrNASA knows pretty well already or enheit during the Martian sumventure out to explore brave, new mer. The metal sample tubes will territory. Czaja sees merit in both be subjected to periods of freezarguments. He has not made up ing and thawing while awaiting his mind which of the three is best. their return to Earth. Likewise, “Are we alone in the universe? the sample tubes are designed to The question has been a recurring stay sealed to prevent contamione for mankind. Now NASA has nation during storage and transit the means and funding to answer back to Earth until NASA is ready it.” UC graduate student Andrew to open them. NASA is deterGangidine mined to prevent any Earth bacteria from reaching Mars, which Professor Czaja, right, and graduate student Andrew “At Columbia Hills we want to is tricky when it comes to sterilizGangidine use a spectroscopy machine in Czaja’s lab. sample these silica deposits that ing a rover loaded with electronmight trap organic molecules or they might trap textures like ics and lots of tiny moving parts. ministromatolites,” he said. Stromatolites are fossils found in some of Earth’s oldest rocks dating back billions of years. They have wrinkled ridges that suggest they were once covered in sticky mats of bacteria upon which additional sediment adhered. “Finding something like this on Mars would be amazing,” he said.

On the other hand, Jezero Crater might hold the best chance of retaining fossils, he said. “It’s like a river delta system with a branching pattern of channels stretching out into the ocean. This is a great place on Earth to look for evidence of past life,” he said. “Any biological material being transported downstream gets deposited at the ends of these deltas.” Czaja also embraces the spirit of adventure that comes with exploring a place never before seen by human eyes. “We’ve been very few places on Mars — just four rovers and a few landers,” he said. “There are lots of places to explore. Every time we go somewhere new, we learn something unexpected.” Ironically, NASA is avoiding places most likely to harbor existing life on Mars to reduce the possibility of contaminating the planet with invasive life from Earth. Instead, they will look for fossil evidence of life that existed billions of years ago. The rover will scout for and collect the most likely specimens with the goal of bringing back the first Martian souvenirs in a future mission. NASA opted to perform this ambitious goal in stages to improve the likelihood of success, Czaja said. But first they have to find something to justify the effort, he said “We want to bring samples back because we have access here to every instrument that exists, including instruments that don’t exist yet or that will be more sophisticated in

Czaja said he hopes to contribute to the science team when the rover reaches the Red Planet in 2021. And it could be many years or decades before he and other geologists get to see Martian samples with their own eyes back on Earth. In the meantime, he is sharing his work with his students who are equally intrigued by the possibilities. UC graduate student Andrew Gangidine hopes to incorporate the ongoing NASA mission into his own geology career. As part of his thesis, he attended the Mars 2020 board’s landing-site workshops with Czaja. The mission is fraught with technical challenges. But it gets at a fundamental scientific pursuit, Gangidine said.

Are we alone in the Universe? That answer has the potential to change the way people think about the universe and our place in it. So it is crucial to have utter confidence in the results, he said. “Just because it looks like life doesn’t mean it is life. There is going to be a huge burden of proof if we find something that looks like life,” Gangidine said. And Czaja said the Mars project is bound to captivate his students for years to come. “I’ll probably be pretty far along in my career when the samples come back. It’s my students who will be studying these samples,” he said. “We have to think long term with this.” n

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Commuting at the top of the world UC researchers find evidence of truck pollution in one of the most remote corners of the planet: the Himalayas. By Michael Miller

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and 10 types of heavy metal. This wide net was necesmog from cars and trucks is an expected health hazsary to capture the myriad potential pollutants caused ard in big cities, but researchers from the University of by truck traffic, Dasgupta said.

The study found low levCincinnati found pollution from truck exhaust on one of els of heavy metals and no relationship between their the most remote mountain roads in the world.

Brooke concentrations and distance Crowley, an assistant professor of geology and from the highway. But they found anthropology, and UC graduate student Rahigh concentrations of sulfur, a jarshi Dasgupta examined soil pollution along major pollutant in the exhaust India’s Manali-Leh Highway in the Himalaya of diesel-powered Mountains.

This tortuous 300mile route, much of it gravel or “At first glance, it’s easy to e n g i n e s . 

 “ T h i s dirt, winds its way over one of consider the region to be a area provided us with a rare opporthe highest navigable mountain pretty pristine place. But tunity to examine passes in the world at 17,480 there are environmental the effects of multiple contaminants in a feet. That’s 4,000 feet higher in elevaimpacts from humans. ” remote, diesel-dominated, mountainous tion than the top of Wyoming’s Grand Professor Crowley environment,” Dasgupta said.
 Teton.

The road’s very remoteness has made it an international tourist attracComparative studies have found that tion, drawing cyclists and adventurers keen on treading India’s diesel contains an especially high sulfur content, where so few have.

Even here in one of the most distant the UC researchers said. Sulfur dioxide in the atmocorners of the planet, a place of desolate valleys and aussphere contributes to acid rain.

“At first glance, it’s easy tere beauty, the researchers in UC’s McMicken College to consider the region to be a pretty pristine place. But of Arts and Sciences found evidence of pollution from there are environmental impacts from humans,” Crowdiesel exhaust.

“We measured incredibly high amounts of ley said.

Last year India ratified the Paris Agreement sulfur close to the highway. Some of those values are the on climate change. The world’s second-largest nation highest ever reported in the literature and were likely conby population produces nearly 5 percent of the world’s nected to truck traffic,” Crowley said.
 greenhouse gases. The agreement calls for participating countries The results were published in the to develop a plan to address temjournal Archives of Environmental perature rise.

India has a goal of Contamination and Toxicology. The producing 40 percent of its elecresearch was funded through grants tricity with renewable energy by by the UC Research Council, Sigma 2030.

Diesel fuel is popular in India Xi and the Oak Ridge Associated Unibecause it historically cost drivers versities. less there than regular unleaded. For the study, Dasgupta took soil Most of the buses and heavy trucks samples at four places along the that traverse the Manali-Leh Highhighway and at six prescribed disway burn diesel fuel. Completed in tances, starting with samples literthe 1970s, the road between Manali ally on the dirt road and extending The Manali-Leh Highway spans the beautiful Hi- and Leh sees about 50,000 vehicles out 150 meters. Soil samples were malayas. UC researchers found evidence of traffic per year, mostly during the sumcollected at 3, 9 and 15 centimeters pollution even here. (Photo by Brooke Crowley) mer when the mountain passes are in depth. free of snow, according to government traffic counts. Dasgupta said villagers in this area burn wood and cow Himalaya means “abode of snow” in Sanskrit.

UC researchers found the highest sulfur contents at the base dung for cooking and heating their homes. The resulting of the narrow ridges that are most prone to rockslides. smoke often contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Trucks sometimes must wait to use a single lane while a known carcinogen.

They tested the soil for these hyconstruction crews make repairs.

“The road is terrible, drocarbons along with sulfur, total organic compound

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– the central theme of all geographic research. This study fits that theme perfectly.”


In the Himalayas, the researchers found native wildlife such as ibex, herds of wild asses called kiang and UC professor Lewis Owen, the gecondors, one of the largest birds on ology department head, said Crowthe planet. Adding to the bucolic ley’s findings are in keeping with scene, many of the villagers who other studies on pollution impacts in live in the foothills tend goats.

“It’s the region.

“It’s not surprising at all if a beautiful landscape. The scale is you’ve ever been to the Himalayas and hard to comprehend when you’re “There is no doubt that inseen all the diesel trucks that use the driving on a plain at 15,000 feet above creasing economic develophighways,” he said.

Air pollution from sea level. That’s really high. It takes a Asian cities also ends up contaminatment will put more stress on enwhile to acclimatize to the elevation,” ing the remote region’s mountains vironments all over the world, Crowley said.

 The night skies were and streams, he said.

“There is no remote or not.” full of stars in that sparsely inhabpristine environment left. You see black Rajarshi Dasgupta ited part of India, with little moisture snow deposited on glaciers and snowin the atmosphere to obscure the view. The arid mounfields in Tibet,” Owen said. “This study is adding to our data tains have little vegetation and lots of exposed strata set about how we’re degrading the planet. Humans are the of rock.

“It’s a geologist’s dream. UC professors in geolbiggest geologic agents now. Some researchers are calling ogy have been conducting research and teaching classes this geologic age ‘the Anthropocene’ after the human influin this region for many years,” she said. “I am so grateful I ence.”

This study and others like it show the cumulative was able to join them in the field.”

But being in the field effect of fossil fuels on the environment, he said.

“The can be challenging. The researchers had to hire an exbiggest challenge is for the research to be disseminated to perienced driver to take them over the mountains. They people who can do something about it,” he said.
 used a filtration system to provide clean drinking water. Dasgupta said countries can monitor pollution and its In some of the low-lying areas, they had to help push resulting health effects and invest in more renewable entheir truck out of the mud.

“We’ve gotten a flat tire both ergy and other eco-friendly alternatives to reduce their times we’ve gone to India. You need nerves of steel to deal carbon footprint.

“There is no doubt that increasing ecowith the blind curves,” she said.

Crowley said places on nomic development will put more stress on environments the extreme edges of habitability such as the Himalayas all over the world, remote or not,” Dasgupta said.

UC’s could be the first to feel the effects of dramatic climate Crowley has published studies on topics as diverse as change. These mountain ranges provide water and nutriplant defenses against species of now-extinct lemurs ents for rivers in India.

“These are places that might have and the long-distance treks of extinct mammoths.

The perennial glaciers that are important sources of water. If study marked Crowley’s second visit to the Himalaya the glaciers disappear, that has major implications for region. But Crowley’s scientific interests have taken her people who rely on that water,” she said.

The samples colaround the world. She has made four trips to Madalected for this study provide baseline data if researchers gascar to study lemurs and reconstruct the causes and decide to revisit the topic of roadside pollution in 10 or consequences of extinctions on the island. She and her 20 years, she said.

And given her track record of travel students have examined the effects of sea spray on vegfor UC, Crowley might be the one leading that expedietation in Trinidad and looked at ways the first humans tion, too.

“One of the joys of being a professor is you have in the Canary Islands changed its ecology.

“I’m a paleosome freedom in the kinds of research questions you can ecologist. I’m interested in human-animal interactions. explore,” she said. “I have appreciated that opportunity I haven’t conducted pollution research previously, and here at UC.” n this study with Rajarshi has stretched me in a new direction,” she said.

Dasgupta said the study proved to be a learning experience for him as well.

“This study was the first of its kind for me, too,” Dasgupta said. “I am a geomorphologist. I study the evolution of the landforms around us. However, as a geographer, I have always been interested in the interactions of humans with the natural environment

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James “Jim” Alpha (MS ’67) Hi Warren, What a delightful surprise to hear from you after all these years. The last time we saw you was when you spent a few days with us when you did a SCCA drivers school at Watkins Glen in ’68 or ’69. Talking with you brought back all sorts of good memories of UC, Cincinnati, and bluegrass bars in Mt Adams. I went to work for Corning Glass Works (now Corning Inc.) after graduation in September ‘67. Corning was and is at its roots a materials company so it was a good fit with my geology background. While I was hired in to do development work on crystallizing glasses, by the early ‘70s I had shifted to the commercial side doing glass and glass ceramic materials market development work. My task was to try to link internal capabilities with external, emerging new market needs both in this country and internationally (Europe, South America, China, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore) mostly in Japan, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Through some of these efforts I was granted 4 U.S. patents in diverse markets (flat panel display, semiconductor packaging and hard disk magnetic memory). Retired in 2000. Karen and I celebrated our 50th recently with two weeks of hiking in Italy in Umbria and in and around

Sibillini National Park. At the end of May we’re going to be in the Czech Republic to hike the Czech Greenways and end up spending some time in Prague. We enjoy traveling and try to get to the 4 Corners and the San Juans around Ouray and Telluride as often as we can. Envy your being able to spend time at Chaco. Wherever we go we still find ourselves picking up rocks, examining strange and wonderful geologies. Old habits die hard. As always, I’m still fooling around with old cars and motorcycles for myself and our boys, restoring an ongoing fleet of small British conveyances. We continue to live in Corning enjoying the Finger Lakes and hiking in the relatively near Adirondacks. One of our sons, Chris, and his family are close by in Ithaca. Chris works at Cornell and manages part of the nanotechnology center. Our other son Nick lives in Seattle and works for an economics non-profit. If you’re ever in our part of the world…… Best Regards, Jim n

In Rememberance John Pojeta (MS ’61, PhD ’63) Dr. John Pojeta, Jr. passed away on July 6th, 2017 at Casey House, Rockville, Maryland. John is survived by his wife of 60 years, Mary Lou, his daughter Kim (TJ Oakes), son John (Christine Linn), brother Martin (Linda Pojeta), niece Lee Ann Selkowitz (Eric Selkowitz), plus six grand-children and two great-grand-children. John is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, where he founded a life-long domestic and professional partnership with Mary Lou. After graduation, he was appointed to the U.S. Geological Survey and served as geologist, paleontologist, and eventually Branch Chief through a rich and distinguished career. Since retirement in 1994, he remained active as Scientist Emeritus with the U.S.G.S. and a Research Associate of the Department of Paleobiology at the Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History. John’s career focus was Ordovician and Cambrian mol-

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lusks. He will be remembered for outstanding teamwork on fossils from Kentucky, Australia, and Antarctica as well as many other parts of the world. He was a career-long member and enthusiastic supporter of numerous professional organizations, but especially of the Paleontological Research Institution and the Paleontological Society. His and Mary Lou’s contributions are celebrated by the Pojeta Award (paleosoc.org/ grants-and-awards/pojeta-award), which commemorates their indefatigable and splendidly cheerful service to the Paleontological Society and its members over several decades. A celebration of John Pojeta’s life will be held at a future date. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Casey House hospice, Rockville, MD, the Paleontological Research Institution, or to the Paleontological Society.

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Gary Taylor (MS ’74) Hi Warren, It’s nice to hear from you. Hope all is well. I am still keeping busy is Westcliffe, Colorado; president of the board of KLZR 91.7 FM (Westcliffe) radio, the local community station, board member of High Mountain Hay Fever Bluegrass Festival, host of the Summer in the Park Sunday Concert series and cofounder of the High Peaks Music Festival. TC and I recently released our tenth CD, Smythe and Taylor “Things Have Changed” (http://www. smytheandtaylor.com) and continue to play in Texas, Colorado and beyond. Last year marked our 9th musical visit to England with extensions in the past to The Netherlands, Poland, and Ireland. Just returned from a winter trip to Yellowstone and the Tetons. I got close to the Wind Rivers where I first explored the Rockies in field camp as an undergrad Wishing everyone well Gary n

John Warn (MS ’71, PhD ‘74) (Photos) Over the past year (my 3rd for retirement from oil and gas exploration) I have added two new hobbies and have greatly expanded a hobby started 66 years ago. My new hobbies: 1) building atlatls from fine hardwoods (if you want I’ll send photos - send me your email address) and learning to throw atlatl darts with consistency, and 2) maintaining my Sasquatch gifting stations adjoining the Mount Evans Wilderness Area

My atlatls lined up on the wall of my study – they are left to right: (with all but one I throw 5-1/2 – 8’ aluminum, Tonkin cane, or pine darts that I build). Long carbon fiber – 2-handed – only for distance throwing (throws 4-1/2’ aluminum darts)

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Warn (Continued) (not sure how this will sit with the academic community). This summer I visited the gifting stations in a remote and rugged part of Colorado every 2-3 days with significant results - over 60 gifts taken, a few gifts left - whoops, barks, wood knocks, ground thumps broadcast for my benefit - pine cones thrown at me on a number of occasions - and a purposeful sighting! Now I am immersed in my passion. I have been collecting minerals since I was 4 years old. I have been a serious collector for the past 25 years. In the mid 1990’s I decided to concentrate on elbaite tourmalines. This past year I have been building a display of elbaites from the Himalaya Mine, Gem Hill, San Diego County, California from specimens scattered around my house in storage flats and on display shelves and from friends and recent purchases. The Himalaya Mine display will include history of the mine with special attention to its relationship to the Dowager Empress of China, Tz’u His, who loved pink and purchased every gemmy crystal from the mine from 18981908. The display will be comprised of 80-100 elbaite crystal specimens plus a number of fashioned cabochons, faceted gemstones, antique Chinese carved elbaite snuff bottles and Chinese carved elbaite signature stamps (photos later if you want). Oh yeah, I still scuba dive regularly (see my book Underwater Fiji by John M. Warn) and play as much golf as I can. Warren, I could expound on any of those topics, but I bet this is already more than you wanted to hear.

• Three in the works – Jatoba – Cherry – Jatoba – with deer antler spurs in place with rubber bands • Spanish Cedar with Peruvian Walnut grip - deer antler spur • Cherry – deer antler spur • Spanish Cedar – Peruvian Walnut grip – deer antler spur • Aspen – leather grip with finger loops – wood spur carved into atlatl • Spanish Cedar recurve – laminated Bloodwood grip – laminated Peruvian Walnut spur – carved deer antler spur • Jatoba – deer antler finger rest – deer antler spur • Ash – leather grip – carved deer thigh bone spur • Peruvian Walnut – laminated Cherry grip – deer antler spur • Australian Cypress – leather grip with finger loops – deer antler spur • Bloodwood – laminated Cherry grip – deer antler spur • Aspen – leather grip with finger loop – deer antler spur • Peruvian Walnut – deer antler spur • Jatoba – deer antler spur • Aspen – wood spur carved into atlatl • Hickory (broken axe handle) – wood spur carved into atlatl

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I have another I made from Box Elder – but it is not in the pic – and I have misplaced it The flex of the atlatl means almost nothing in the throwing – an atlatl needs only to be strong and well weighted The energy derives from the flex of the dart – my darts weigh 90-200 grams and have spines ranging from 4.8-7.5 pounds (the weight needed to bend them – they are really flexy) Also the farther forward of center the balance point is (center of mass) the less fletching is necessary for straight flight – I like FOC of about 10%, so on a 7’ dart the balance point would be about 8-1/2” in front of the center point For points I use copper pipe plumbing fittings, steel arrow points, and steel arrow point blunts Competition involves throwing 5 darts at 10 meters and 5 at 15 meters The world record distance throw is 848.56’ (I can throw light aluminum darts with my two-handed carbon fiber atlatl over 700’ – pretty good for a 70-year old – if I were in my 20’s or 30’s I could break the world record with that atlatl – I’m thinking about sponsoring a youngster to do that with this atlatl). Best wishes, John n

Jojok Sumartojo (PhD ‘74) Dear Dr. Huff, Thank you for your email, and it was indeed wonderful to hear from you after all these years. I am still alive and kicking in Marietta, Georgia, a small town north of Atlanta. Looking back, my professional life seems to meander compared to those of my former classmates at UC, whose careers seem to be more linear. I left home (Indonesia) in 1969 and immigrated to Australia where, as you probably know, I did my UC PhD thesis in the Flinders Ranges, in the outback of South Australia. I moved back to the U.S. because of limited job opportunities in Australia and Indonesia. Since then, I worked at Vanderbilt, Exxon Production Research Company and various environmental consulting jobs. I have also occasionally worked as an Indonesian interpreter for the U.S. State Department Office of Language Services and worked as an assistant to a retired U.S. Army three-star general who was a Vice President of a Belgian cellular telephone company doing some business development in Indonesia, and helped an American friend translate Indonesian novels and poetry into English. These days, most of my activities are voluntary. I have presented several workshops on “Fate and Transport of Petroleum Product Contamination in the Groundwater” and given review courses for geologists in Georgia who want to take State examinations. For the last ten years (every one and a half years) I have helped organize a two-day conference on “Environmental Assessment and Remediation

Technology” as part of the AIPG-Georgia Section activities. I have been responsible for organizing 22 speakers and reviewing their papers. At the tender age of almost 80 (yeah, and to slow down the onset of dementia!) I am taking a weekly classical guitar lesson, being reduced to a fumbling, mumbling idiot when I cannot do the correct fingering. For over two years, I have played guitar at an assisted-living (nursing home) facility to about 20 – 30 elderly residents. They enjoy it and so do I. My other voluntary work includes coaching two local Elementary School 4th-graders each year on “rocks and minerals” for the Science Olympiad; two years ago they won first prize at the County and State levels. I am not sure what will happen this year. My 50-year-long life’s companion, Esther, retired from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention four years ago, where she worked as a health scientist; she too is taking music lessons (piano). We have two daughters; one daughter, Shanti, is living with her family in Melbourne, Australia, where she is a research fellow at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University and her husband teaches European Studies at Monash University. We have two wonderful Australian grandchildren. Our second daughter, Rini, teaches human geography at Kwantien Polytechnic University and Douglas College in Vancouver, Canada. Esther and I enjoy travelling to be with our children and grandchildren and exploring new places. With warm regards, Yoyo n

Ronald Broadhead (MS ‘79) Editor’s note: The following appeared in the November 2016 issue of the AAPG Explorer: Ron Broadhead was recently honored for a lifetime of service to the oil and gas industry by the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. He is the head of the Association’s oil and gas program and also serves as a senior petroleum geologist at the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources. As a Member of AAPG, he has been the editor of Search and Discovery since 2011. He has also been a past recipient of the Distinguished Service Award, the A.I. Levorsen Memorial Award and the Long Service Award from the AAPG House of Delegates. n

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Sturmer (Continued) will be lost. Following years of layoffs and hiring freezes, too few experienced, younger geologists are available to fill their roles.

Into Geology Department Curriculum

UC professor Daniel Sturmer predicts career opportunity abundance for new geologists. Dr. Daniel Sturmer was raised in Southern California and, as a child, experienced earthquakes. His resultant interest in them would later shape his career path. In his senior year at California State University, while majoring in business administration, he took a geology course and realized it was time for a change. “I took the class and was hooked,” Sturmer said, because, “it reminded me of my childhood.” “I was fascinated by how we can use our observation skills and tools to read the history of the earth,” he explained. Sturmer completed his business administration degree in 2003, but returned to California State to pursue a second Bachelor’s in geology. He subsequently earned his Master’s in geology at The University of Reno—Nevada. Formative work in the fossil fuel industry. In 2010, while working toward his doctorate, Sturmer accepted an internship at Shell Oil Company. He spent two years there observing carbon dioxide sequestrations — processes by which waste carbon dioxide generated from shale oil and other fossil fuel production are captured and injected back into the ground, with the aim of reducing the buildup of atmospheric greenhouse gas levels. “In general, it doesn’t really affect energy production as much as it affects what is done with waste products from energy production,” said Sturmer. “It can affect the economics of producing energy by increasing the per unit cost of energy production, potentially offset by either a capand-trade or carbon tax.” In 2012, he was hired on by Shell as a geologist. He and his team were tasked with identifying open Gulf of Mexico region acreage that showed accumulations of microcarbons. His exploration team would present their leads to a senior manager, who would then decide whether Shell

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would submit a blind bid to purchase the land for fossil fuel production.

In the long run, Sturmer believes that the energy industry will adapt and create new career opportunities for geology grads. Already, energy providers are transitioning to renewable energy production and decreasing their dependence on hydrocarbons. Even given green energy’s current momentum, it will likely be many years before the entire global economy can shift completely away from fossil fuels, he cautioned. Geosciences students open to career opportunities outside the US are likely to find ready employment be-

“It was totally out of my comfort zone,” Sturmer recalled. “Being in that process and seeing how much goes in to just being able to have the access to drill a well was really interesting,” In 2014, Sturmer’s job was jeopardized by a steep decline in crude prices. By 2015, like many in the fossil fuel industry, he’d been laid off. The job loss, he remembered, was “not a fun experience.” But, he said, it gave him the opportunity to resume his academic career — part of his plan all along. Sturmer quickly landed at the University of Texas. There, he pursued a post-doctoral fellowship. Earlier this year, he accepted a tenure-track associate professorship in the University of Cincinnati’s Geology department. He hopes to inspire students and help them explore their career opportunities in the field. “I like when the students make connections and get excited about geology.” Sturmer smiled. “It’s really exciting to see non-majors switch their major, like I did.” This spring, he taught “Careers in Geosciences,” which showed students practical ways of advancing their geology-related careers, including best practices for résumé and cover letter writing, networking skills, and interview tactics.

Anticipating unexpected opportunities for today’s geology students. So, if jobs in the fossil fuel industry are less secure today, why should students pursue careers in geology? What other opportunities are there in the private sector? Are today’s geology students relegated to strictly academic career paths? Don’t be so quick to write off the energy sector, Sturmer cautioned. For one, he said, as older geologists (often Baby Boomers first hired on in the 1970s and 80s) continue to retire, their accumulated institutional knowledge

J. Todd Stephenson (MS ‘79) Things are going well for Becky and I after retiring from Chesapeake Energy in November 2015. Hard to leave Doug Jordan to fend for himself at CHK but he is doing some great work there with the staff. I also stepped down from my board of director’s role at Wireless Seismic, Inc., and from the technical director role in the URTeC (Unconventional Reservoirs Technology Conference). Becky and I spend about half of our time at our lake house in Brown Co., OH (Lake Lorelei) during the summer and then spend the remainder of the year in Edmond, OK. I was able to attend the 2016 AAPG Convention in Calgary and witness Paul Potter receive AAPG’s highest honor – the Sidney Powers Memorial Award and Mike Lewan receive the Robert Berg Award for Research Excellence in Geochemistry! Very proud of both of them. I hope to live vicariously through the Upper Ordovician in Cincinnati by being a member of the Dry Dredgers and hope to actively participate with them this year. n

cause, in the near term, fossil fuel-derived energy, “is forecast to increase as economies [grow] and populations increase, especially in Asia,” said Sturmer. And, he advised, there are plenty of opportunities now for new geologists outside the fossil fuel industry. New grads can pursue careers in environmental consulting. They can assist architects and developers in designing and constructing safer buildings. They can teach geosciences at the high school level, become exploration geologists, production geologists, geophysicists, or niche specialists. Although Sturmer acknowledged that higher paying geosciences jobs often require a Master’s degree, he noted that UC offers a “4+1” program, which allows students to earn both their Bachelors and Master’s degrees in a single five-year stint. Moreover, Sturmer said, students should study geology because it’s important to understand the environment and humans’ relationship to it. “Understanding the natural world, how our world has evolved over time, being able to go out and look outside and think about how the landscape has changed, and being knowledgeable,” he ventured, “is fascinating and cool.” n

Can you guess the who, what and when about this photo?

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Stephen G. Wells (MS ’73, PhD ’76)

Janette Hansen (att. 1988-9)

Jeff Spencer (BS ‘80)

Editor’s note: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology proudly welcomes its 17th President, A new chapter in the history of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology began with Dr. Stephen G. Wells officially beginning his duties as the University’s 17th president on July 1, 2016.

Hi Warren,

Chief Geologic Advisor - AMROMCO Energy, Houston, TX.

years earlier in his career and has worked at Los Alamos National Laboratories. Dr. Wells also brings a wealth of experience with over 37 years in higher education and track record of steady leadership to New Mexico Tech, having most recently served as the president of the Desert Research Institute in Nevada for the past 17 years. n

Dr. Wells is the first new president at New Mexico Tech in 23 years and has strong ties to the Land of Enchantment. He served on the University of New Mexico faculty for 15

Robert Garrison (MS ’77) Hello Warren, After 21 years with EOG Resources and 40 years in the industry I decided to take retirement. The previous two years I was EVP and General Manager for the Western US. I will be splitting my time between Northern Idaho and San Antonio Texas. My intent was never to completely retire, instead I want to keep involved but in more of a part time way. I am done working full time, I have too many things that I want to do. I have accepted a job with Quantum Energy Group as a Senior Advisor. This will allow me to work with various of their portfolio companies on my time table. Regards, Bob n

Greg Hinterlong (BS ’78) Still working the horizontal wolfcamp play in the Permian basin. Even with new technology there are still questions unanswered. Training at UC has really prepared me to deal with the uncertainty. n

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o you have any recollections of field trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues? Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

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My son Bobby graduated from NYU-Abu Dhabi two years ago. I was lucky to not only attend the graduation week festivities, such as a cookout in the desert and camel riding, but I stayed with an old friend from undergrad days who happens to be the US Ambassador. (Traveling in a motorcade is fun until you realize why an armed escort is needed.) Now Bobby is applying for medical schools while tutoring and shadowing a doctor in a stroke clinic. It is wonderful having him at home after nine years of living out of the house. Regards, Janette n

Just returned from a winter trip to Yellowstone and the Tetons. I got close to the Wind Rivers where I first explored the Rockies in field camp as an under grad Wishing everyone well Gary n

I’ve been at AMROMCO for about 4 years. We have 12 employees in Houston and over one hundred in Ploiesti, Romania. We explore/drill exclusively in Romania, primarily redeveloping old gas fields using 3D seismic and looking for overlooked gas sands (poorer rock, thinner pays, old logs, etc.). I go to Romania 3 or 4 times a year and attended an AAPG convention there last summer, including an excellent fieldtrip looking at the Cretaceous in the eastern portion of the country. My daughters are both at the University of Texas-Austin. The older one is in graduate school (public health) and the younger is a sophomore in mechanical engineering. I’m still active with my petroleum history hobby. Currently serve as the president of the Petroleum History Institute (www.petroleumhistory.org). Our 2017 Oil History Symposium will be in Findlay, OH this summer. I also serve as the Historian for the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies. I write a blog: petroleumhistoryblog.com. n

Michael “Mike” Lewan (PhD ‘80) Editor’s note: Mike received the Outstanding Research Award at the 2016 AAPG meeting, with the following citation: AAPG Robert R. Berg Outstanding Research Award 2016

Gary Taylor (MS ’74) Hi Warren, It’s nice to hear from you. Hope all is well. I am still keeping busy is Westcliffe, Colorado; president of the board of KLZR 91.7 FM (Westcliffe) radio, the local community station, board member of High Mountain Hay Fever Bluegrass Festival, host of the Summer in the Park Sunday Concert series and cofounder of the High Peaks Music Festival. TC and I recently released our tenth CD, Smythe and Taylor “Things Have Changed” (http://www. smytheandtaylor.com) and continue to play in Texas, Colorado and beyond. Last year marked our 9th musical visit to England with extensions in the past to The Netherlands, Poland, and Ireland.

It’s been over five years since I moved back to the Midwest (Chicago) to once again work for EPA protecting drinking water. While most of my work deals with Underground Injection Control, I have had some exciting temporary details. Last year I was heading a group dealing with enforcement and direct implementation of the drinking water supply program while the rest of the Branch handled a little issue in Flint Michigan. After that excitement I now get to wonder if there will be an EPA in a year. Going to work is like attending a funeral.

Citation - To Michael Lewan, whose passion to understand the origin and expulsion of petroleum has resulted in a quantitative understanding of factors controlling timing and extent of petroleum formation, petroleum charge, and petroleum types and quality. Born and raised in Chicago, Mike was well-rounded, lettering three times playing varsity football, active in Chemistry Club (this was prescient!), Drama Club and a drummer in his 60s rock-a-roll band. After graduation, Mike attended Northern Illinois University and declared geology as his major. He was fortunate in having Sam S. Goldich as his mentor, through whose mentorship he became totally impassioned with geochemistry - a passion that continues to this day.

Mike graduated with a B.S. degree in January 1971, and attended Michigan Technology University for his initial graduate studies. The field and laboratory skills he refined there have served him and our profession well. Mike graduated with a M.Sc. degree in June 1972 and joined Shell Oil Company in their New Orleans Offshore E&P office as an exploration geologist. At Shell, Mike became interested in the composition of recently discovered oils on the Gulf of Mexico shelf edge. Intrigued by a paper on the use of vanadium, nickel, and sulfur in characterizing sources and migration of Iraqi oils, he observed that the shelf-edge Tertiary oils appeared to be similar to the Smackover oils of southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana. In January 1975, Mike left Shell and took a research position at the Amoco Production Company Research Center in Tulsa. Through the amazing mentorship of John C. Winters, Robert Thompson, Jack Williams,

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Department of Geology Donors 2016 -2017 Mike Lewan (continued) and James Momper. Mike’s education in organic geochemistry flourished. John was most magnanimous in offering Mike a leave of absence to attend graduate school for his Ph.D.at the University of Cincinnati. The only stipulation was that he had to work at least two months each summer at the Research Center. In September 1975, teaching assistantship in hand, Mike started his Ph.D. graduate coursework and research in the Geology Department. The topic of his dissertation was the geochemistry of vanadium and nickel in sedimentary organic matter. He was the recipient of the 1977 Fenneman Research Fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. During the summer of 1977 at Amoco, John Winters asked Mike to work on experiments using water and source rock in some old recertified Parr reactors. These early experiments involving John, Jack Williams, and James McDonald were the start of the pioneering effort now referred to.as hydrous pyrolysis. In 1979, Mike with coauthors Winters and McDonald published a paper in Science, showing that pyrolysis of Woodford Shale in the presence of water generated an expelled oil that was similar in molecular and isotopic composition to natural crude oils. This finding was in contrast to anhydrous pyrolysis methods that obtained petroleum products by solvent extraction or vaporization. Mike left Cincinnati in November 1978 with his bride, Jeannie, and returned to Amoco. He continued his hydrous pyrolysis experiments and writing his dissertation, which was defended in June 1980. Mike’s experiments revived the previously noted concept that oil is not directly generated from kerogen, but rather bitumen is an intermediate phase that must be considered in evaluating petroleum formation. This was clearly demonstrated in hydrous pyrolysis experiments along with the important effects of kerogen-sulfur content on the tim-

ing of oil generation. These results were published in the Transactions of the Royal Society and received the 1985 Best Paper Award from the Organic Geochemical Division of the Geochemical Society. A petrographic study of immature Woodford Shale taken to different thermal maturities by hydrous pyrolysis showed the importance of the volume increase in organic matter associated with oil expulsion, and gave experimental support to James Momper’s concept that oil expulsion was a consequence of its generation. Mike received the 1987 George C. Matson Memorial Award for Best paper and was selected as a 1991-1992 AAPG Distinguished Lecturer. In 1991, Mike joined the Oil and Gas Branch of the US Geological Survey to start an experimental research program on petroleum issues. More than 40 researchers from 11 countries, including this fortunate scribe have worked with Mike on various petroleum issues. He has authored/coauthored 77 papers resulting in more than 4,400 citations. Mike has also transferred his knowledge via the classroom. He and fellow volunteer adjunct professor Paul Lillis taught an acclaimed graduate petroleum geochemistry course with me at the Colorado School of Mines for many years. Mike is a natural, caring teacher - and I have benefited from our collaboration and much-valued friendship for the last two decades. Mike retired from the US Geological Survey in June of 2014, but continues doing experimental research at the USGS as an Emeriti. Fittingly, RMAG awarded Mike their Outstanding Scientist Award in 2014. John B. Curtis AAPG Association Roundtable n

Editor’s note: Danita Brandt (MS ’80) and Trisha Smrecak (MS ’08) co-authored a paper entitled: The Future Of Geoscience Collections In An Evolving Academic Environment, that was published in PALAIOS, 2016, v. 31, 371–373 (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2110/palo.2016.058)

Eugene J. Amaral

Marathon Petroleum Company

Sheri K. Barksdale

Jack E. Mase

Rex L. Baum

John P. McAnaw

Donald J. Benson

Louis T. Mellinger

Bruce Braswell

David L. Meyer

John A. Breyer

Brian L. Nicklen

Charles S. Brockman

Occidental Petroleum Foundation

Leland W. Burton

Edward O’Donnell

John L. Carter

Lewis A. Owen

Marzena Chocyk-Jaminski

Paul E. Potter

Andrew D. Czaja

Eric M. Redder

Craig Dietsch

Stephen P. Reidel

Igor Effimoff

Cornelia K. Riley

Michael E. Effler

Edgar W. Roeser

Janet M. Elliott

Tod W. Roush

ExxonMobil Education Foundation

Sandra Schaber

Robert Ferree

Shell Companies Foundation, Inc.

Mark P. Fisher

Frederick E. Simms

Richard H. Fluegeman

Erwin L. Single

John R. Ford

John D. Thaeler

Linda P. Fulton

Amy Townsend-Small

Evelyn M. Goebel

William A. Van Wie

Wayne R. Goodman

Roy B. VanArsdale

William C. Haneberg

Steven M. Warshauer

Dominique M. Haneberg-Diggs

Raelyn E. Welch

F. D. Holland

Jenea L. Woods

Warren D. Huff

Maureen M. Wu

S. Duff Kerr Michael P. Krueger Lucile and Richard Durrell Special Fund

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Thank You All for Your for Contributions to the UC Geology Department’s Continued Excellence!

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Your contribution to some or any of the following endowments is greatly appreciated and strengthens the Department of Geology. Gifts enable us to better serve our students, staff and faculty. They help support a wide array of programs and services, including undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships.

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ndowment

Bucher Walter Fund: All-purpose fund for research and teaching.

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Fenneman Nevin H. Fund: Supports research and travel.

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$

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Support for graduate students in paleontology, including a summer $ fellowship.

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Student Sedimentology Research Fund: Support for graduate students in stratigraphy and

Rawlinson George and Frances Fund:

sedimentology. Graduate fellowships.

Caster Kenneth E. Fund:

Cook Walter and Kathryn H. Scholarship Fund: Used for scholarship awards to under-

graduates, and for field-camp scholarships. $

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Hoholick-Potter International Fieldwork Travel Fund: to be used for international fieldwork. $

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Durrell Richard H. and Lucile Fund:

Public education, including outside speakers.

Geology Alumni Graduate Fellowship Fund: To support graduate fellowships.

Klekamp Thomas C. Student Travel Fund: A relatively new fund, to be used for undergraduate $

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Larsen Leonard Fund: Instructional field trips.

$

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Student Field Experience Fund: Used for field camp, as well as other field experiences of students.

$

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student travel for research.

Research in Geology Fund: A primary repository for annual gifts. Open for investments of

any sort in research.

For additional assistance making your gift, or for more information, please contact: Shelly Deavy, Associate Director of Development, Kathleen Collins McMicken College of Arts and Sciences 513.556-6435 DEAVYRE@ucmail.uc.edu, COLLINKN@ucmail.uc.edu

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Sezgin Aytuna (PhD ‘84)

Almério França (PhD ‘87)

Specialities: Exploration Manager, Unconventioanl data evaluation, Exploration Coordinator, Host country negotiations

I am still living in Curitiba, Paraná Stat, Southern Brazil. I am retired from Petrobras for about 5 years and currently I am a visitor professor at the Universidade Federal do Paraná. Last September I visited Cincinnati. It was nice to see all the improvement on Campus and talk to some professors of good old times at the Old Tech Bldg. I talked to professors Kilinc, Huff, Meyer and had lunch with Prof. Maynard, who very kindly donated some precious thin sections to our geology department in Curitiba. Thanks to both, UC and prof. Maynard. On the other hand, it is kind of sad looking around and do not see my colleagues from early 80’s. I do hope all of them are doing well somewhere.

Since 2016 he has been a part time instructor at Sabancı University, teaching Petrol geology, unconventional exploration, shale gas, tight gas, coal geology and CBM for the Energy master students, also has worked for or with major US and British Oil companies, including; TransAtlantic, EOG , Zorlu Energy, Noble , Exall Resources, Aspect , 3 Legs Resources, Fronterra, CNPC, El Paso Production, TPAO, ARCO, BP, Socar and GDPA. His primary activities include exploration in structurally complex areas (over thrust zone in SE Turkey), conventional and unconventional (Dadaş/Bedinan and Mezardere/Ceylan and Hamitabat Formations), geochemical evaluation for unconventional prospect evaluations, lead geological field trips (Thrace, Black Sea, Sivas, Tuz Golu and SE Turkey Basins) well site operations, deep water offshore well drilling planning and technical coordination and contract negotiations with TPAO. He was also heavily involved in 3 oil discoveries in Mardin carbonates by ARCO; Cendere-Ozan Sungurlu and Migo jointly with TPAO and TransAtlantic’s Paleozoic oil discoveries in the SE Turkey. Sezgin has been working as exploration manager, exploration coordinator, senior unconventional geologist, operation geologist for 5 off-shores and over 50 onshore wells for ARCO and other companies in Turkey and is a consultant geologists for major international companies. n

My wife and myself spent some time with Prof. Paul Potter. I drove his nice red Malibu to Kentucky, visiting distillery and tasting bourbons. He never did that when we were down there in four-day field trip!!! It was a nice trip in a beautiful sunny day. Thank for the opportunity Prof. Potter. I teach sandstones and carbonate diagenesis and help other professors in petroleum geology. Please, if someone wishes to get in touch it will be a great pleasure here is my email: almeriofranca@gmail.com I have three granddaughters, Clara, Cecilia, and Julia. Carolina, my oldest daughter, is about to have another one, Marina who is going to be sister to Cecilia. n

The Geology Career Days is a program that brings UC Alumni in to talk about their experence in differnet industries following their time at UC. The goal is to give students an idea of potential career paths. All are welcome?

Geology Office: 513.556.3722

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Sezgin has accumulated 30+ years of International and Turkish petroleum industry experiences in unconventional and conventional explorations, production developments, surface and subsurface mappings, prospect evaluations, field mappings and license applications in all the Basins in Turkey, Northern Iraq, Azerbaijan and Georgia.

Mail checks to: The Department of Geology University of Cincinnati PO Box 210013 Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0013

http://foundation.uc.edu

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A CALL TO ACTION!

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Mark Mersman (BS ’78, MS ’81) Haven’t updated in forever, so here’s the last 36 career years in a nutshell, or maybe a geode. 1981 – 1985 Chevron in Louisiana. Loved it but wanted to try on my own. 1985 – 1989 Har-Ken Oil in Illinois Basin. I want to ask God how close my dry holes with good shows came to a gusher… Oil goes to $18 and I enter the environmental field. 1990 – 1996 Small environmental company back in Cincinnati. 1996 – now at Hull & Associates, Inc. a Midwest environmental company, with a sabbatical from 9/2003 to 10/2004 for leukemia and a bone marrow transplant. All went well as two brothers were both perfect marrow matches. Since 1996 less and less geology and more and more project management, but every once in a while I get to do cross sections. I have the best memories of the Fenneman room. Whenever I think of it the Cheers song plays in my mind “Where everybody knows your name, and they’re always glad you came.” An oasis in the storm of minerology, optical crystallography, etc. If anyone has any picture of playing cards or other in the Fenneman room I would sure be interested in a copy. No cell phones in the 80s so no pictures… Also great memories of the

camaraderie of fellow students, the great faculty and especially Dr. Larsen, and polarized microscope study of metamorphic and igneous sections. I may stop by some time and ask to spend an afternoon with a scope and sections. Mark n

Matthew Kearney (BS ’80) Hi Dr. Huff, After working with the Bass Family Oil Company (BOPCO, LP) for close to 10 years, ExxonMobil recently bought BOPCO, LP’s acreage positon in the Delaware Basin, New Mexico and the employees. Therefore, I have been working at XTO Energy, a subsidiary of ExxonMobil, for the last couple months. I’m a Senior Geologist still working the Delaware Basin and enjoying my new position. XTO’s offices are located in Fort Worth, and I still live in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Dr. Huff, I still appreciate your clay mineralogy course I took back in the late 1970s! Thanks, Matt n

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S okari B raide (PhD ‘82) Dear Warren, It is almost 35 years since I successfully defended my doctoral dissertation at UC (13 October 1982) under your expert guidance. What I learnt at UC, especially the professionalism you demonstrated in both teaching and research, has helped me tremendously in my career in both academics and the oil and gas industry. Upon returning to Nigeria after my Ph.D., I first pursued an academic career, rising to the rank of an associate professor of geology in 1990, before joining Shell Nigeria in 1991. I was utilized by Shell in various aspects of the company’s Exploration and Production portfolio, including in-house training for new hires over a 17 years period which culminated in my being appointed Shell Professor of Petroleum Geoscience and seconded to the University of Port Harcourt in Nigeria. On my mandatory retirement from Shell at age 60, I

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taught at the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India for 2 academic years, the University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa for 1 academic year, and the University of Dodoma in Tanzania for 2 academic years. I now live in my retirement home in Port Harcourt in Nigeria. Recently i was lured out of retirement to help a local university get their undergraduate geology program accredited by the National University Commission. Once again, I wish to put on record the tremendous influence your supervision of my research at the University of Cincinnati has had on my career. And I sincerely thank you for that. With my best wishes, Sokari n

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Douglas McVey (MS ‘93)

Elif Muftuoglu (MS ’98)

Greetings Dr. Huff and I hope all is well with you and the Department!

Hi Dr. Huff,

I am still based in Lansing, Michigan for SES Environmental. It has been an exciting time over the past year for SES as we became an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) company, merged with another firm in Grand Rapids, and opened an office in Detroit. We have grown from 25 employees to 41 which means we have had growing pains but most have been resolved. This also means my time has been mostly spent with Administrative duties instead of actual project work and a lot of driving between the offices. Never would have thought I would be involved to this degree in managing a company but it is exciting! Sara and I still take our annual vacations up north to the Traverse City/Suttons Bay area and down south to Carillon Beach, FL. We have started to discuss moving to the west side of the state near Grand Haven or up north to the Traverse City/Suttons Bay area to live in an area we truly appreciate for its lifestyle and beauty. Maybe in a couple of years we will make the move! Always enjoy reading the Newsletter to keep somewhat updated on research conducted by the Department - top notch as always! Take care and best wishes Doug n

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Join Us!

oming this fall: The 4-Day Field Trip

When: Friday, September 8th through Sunday, September 10th. What & Where: The Geology of Ohio All Alumni are welcome to join. This is an important opportunity to meet new graduate students and curent students to informally discuss research. Contact us for details of the fieldtrip itinerary.

I’m fine and everything is well. I hope you are fine also. My last year was pretty busy. I have been the CEO of GS1 Turkey for 3 years now, and we re-established the organization as a Foundation at the end of last year. In December 2016, I was elected as the Regional Executive Member of GS1 in Europe. So right now, besides Italy, England, France, Germany, Spain, Austria, Sweden, Switzerland and Poland, Turkey joined the Regional Executive Committee of the GS1 in Europe. We have started a new service for retail digital transformation and it is going well in Turkey. Deeply I’m sorry that I’m not doing anything related with Geology but maybe one day I can come up with a project related with Geology and that would be really awesome for me. Hope to see you soon, I miss being at UC. Best regards Elif n

Richard “Rich” Schultz (PhD ‘91) Hi Warren, I’ve accepted a position as Associated Dean of Distributed Learning at North Park University in the northern portion of Chicago. I’m in charge of online and hybrid courses at the university as well as faculty development ventures and professional development for technology training of faculty. I hope to be able to make a vast improvement in the way alternative courses are delivered from North Park in the future. I trust all is well with the Geology Department at UC and fondly remember my time there back in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Please give everyone my warmest regards. Best, Rich Schultz n

Terry Acomb (BS ’93, MS ‘97) Editor’s note: Terry is a co-founder of G.G.B.Y. (Gobble, Gobble, Bitches, Yeah), an amateur group devoted to slacklining. He sends the following link to their activities: http://www.redbull.com/us/en/adventure/stories/1331834718699/ggby-2016-moab-utah-highlineslackline-base-jump

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James Bonelli (MS ‘03)

Jeff Barrow (MS in Geotech Eng. ’04)

Hi Warren,

J oanne B allard (MS ’09)

Now in his 5th year as president of Civil Solutions Associates (CSA), Jeff Barrow continues to grow the company and expand into new areas. Civil Solutions has been providing geotechnical engineering, design consultation and project management throughout the Midwest since 2011. In 2016 Civil Solutions performed projects such as landslide remediation, design and construction management of multiple retaining walls for large commercial facilities, and numerous testing and inspections. The year saw the growth of CSA’s construction management department, managing commercial projects for companies like FedEx and DHL. To celebrate the success of 2016, Jeff and the rest of the Civil Solutions team took a welldeserved trip to Cancun. n

Hi Warren,

It was so nice to hear from you. I hope all is well. It’s hard for me to believe that nearly 14 years have passed since I graduated from UC. Time flies! As for an update: After leaving Cincinnati I completed a PhD at Penn State where I examined how tropical marine invertebrates responded to environmental change at the onset of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age. While at Penn State I met my wife and, after graduating, we moved to Anchorage Alaska and got married. Our time in Alaska was wonderful; we spent it enjoying the outdoors around Anchorage and my wife’s home village of Unalakleet, which is located on the coast of the Norton Sound. As you might imagine, jobs in paleontology were few and far between in Alaska. In the fall of 2008 I accepted a geologist position with Chevron in Houston Texas and we said our farewells to Alaska via a 5000+ mile road trip south. Life in Texas took some getting used to, but we have come to love it and couldn’t imagine a nicer place to raise our two daughters. For the last six years I have worked for the Spanish oil company, Repsol. Generally, my work focused on interpreting data from well logs, seismic, core, and biostratigraphy to construct regional depositional / sequence stratigraphic frameworks and map prospective reservoirs. My first five years at Repsol were spent on the Alaska North Slope exploration team, which recently announced the largest U.S. onshore discovery made in the last 30 yrs. This was a great project to be involved in and gave me the opportunity to spend two weeks on the North Slope of Alaska (in the middle of winter!) during one of our drilling campaigns. It was a cold, dark, and super interesting experience. In the last year I transitioned to a New Ventures team looking at exploration opportunities across the Americas. I’m happy to say that I have put my paleo and multivariate analytical skills to good use and recently gave a talk and coauthored a paper on the use of multivariate tools in the petroleum industry. Please give my best wishes to everyone and be sure to give Carl Brett and Arnie Miller a hug from me. Miss you guys and hope to see you soon! All the best , James n

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Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

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Smoky Mountains, there are only black bears.

I am currently teaching geology labs and a geology lecture at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville. I also work at Tennessee Valley Authority with archaeologists and use ArcGIS to manage their spatial data, and I am cleaning up the database which is linked to that spatial data.

In August 2016, I was visiting the big Niagara Falls in Ontario, and went on a Hornblower boat to see the falls up close, and I went up in the Skylon Tower ($10 to go up unless you buy dinner in one of the 2 expensive restaurants at the top). At Niagara Falls you can go on a tram ( Whirlpool Aero Car) to see the beautiful turquoise waters of the Niagara whirlpool, but the ride was probably only 5 minutes.

I traveled to Victoria, Vancouver Island last November to visit friends, and enjoyed seeing the sights and experiencing different geology and archaeology than in the Southeast. Victoria has the arguably tallest totem pole in the world. Goldstream Park has a lovely nature center, and I saw salmon spawning in the river nearby, with lots of bald eagles overhead. On Vancouver Island, there is also a Niagara Falls, but on a much smaller scale!

Ancient glass sponge reefs have been discovered off the coast of western Canada near Vancouver Island and measures are being taken to protect those reefs.

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I hope you and all my friends in the Department are doing well.

If in the area, be sure to visit the Goats on the Roof restaurant, Butchart Gardens, and Fort Rodd Hill Lighthouse. The Royal British Columbia Museum had a special exhibit on woolly mammoths, including the carcass of the baby mammoth, Lyuba.

o you have any recollections of field trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues?

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http://www.cbc. ca/news/canada/ british-columbia/ lng- crew- discoversrare-prehistoric-glasssponge-reef-1.3514548 Another fairly unique type of wildlife in this area is the Kermode or spirit bears, which are white, but not albino. Genetically they are black bears (so white black bears) with a mutation. They are typically only found in British Columbia, but one or two have been found in Minnesota. Here in the

https://www.niagaraparks.com/niagara-fallsattractions/whirlpool-aero-car.html I also went up in the CN Tower in Toronto ($40 Canadian which was $30 USD) where there were no strings attached to the restaurant visit and you could get a latte and sweet potato fries if you wanted. You can take a day cruise to Goat Island for only $10. Going at night, you can enjoy the Toronto night skyline but can’t see much on the island! In July, I plan to visit the ESRI User Conference in San Diego. In October, I will go to the AAPG conference in London and meet up with Zhenzhu Wan. Joanne :-) n

D e a r UC G e o l o g y A l u m n i

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Friends,

The Geological Society of America 2017 Annual Meeting will be held October 22-25 in Seattle, WA. (http://community.geosociety.org/ gsa2017/home/). I would like to invite you to attend and to join us for an alumni get-together on Monday, 23 October 2017: 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Juniper. Hope to see you in Seattle, Warren D. Huff warren.huff@uc.edu

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Katherine “Kate” Bulinski (PhD ‘08)

Utku Solpuker (PhD ‘07)

Hi Warren,

Dear Warren,

The 2016-2017 academic year at Bellarmine University has been a blur! We had our first child, E.J. in August and I was fortunate enough to get some parental leave so I could stay home with him for the fall semester. Since then I’ve been discovering new ways to try to find that elusive “worklife balance” that everyone is always chasing. In spite of juggling being a parent for the first time, this semester has gone smoothly and I’ve been productive. My classes are going well and I’m laying the groundwork for my upcoming sabbatical in the fall. I’ll be staying close to home, doing some field work at the Falls of the Ohio State Park in Clarksville, Indiana. While it’s a well-known paleontological site,

I often think about my time at UC and I miss every member of my UC family. I feel that this is a great opportunity for me to catch-up with my old friends and so here is a summary of what I had been doing.

it has been a while since anyone did a formal paleoecological study there, so I’ll be heading out there with an army of students to collect as much data as possible this summer and fall when the Ohio River is low. I’m going to try out some new data collecting strategies and technology, possibly using drones. I’ll also be coming through Cincinnati once in a while to do some museum work, so I’ll have to work out time for a visit to the department! Cheers, Kate Editor’s note: Kate and her husband are delighted to announce the birth of their son, Edward. n

Ryan Wilson (BS ‘09) Hi Warren, It is great to hear from you, wishing you all the best from deep in the heart of Texas. I have had an exciting year in 2016 and so far in 2017. I am currently involved with multiple unconventional R&D projects at Chevron ( Vaca Muerta, Avalon/Wolfcamp, and Duvernay), I will be sharing some of this work in AAPG next month and am publishing some of the Wolfcamp work. I am also actively involved in asset development of conventional plays in the GOM, more specifically investigating reservoir connectivity and seal analysis assessing the presence and distribution of membrane seal potential through mudstone characterization via core, petrography, petrophysics, and chemostratigraphy. As a Chevron subject matter expert in mudstone sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy, I am fortunate to have some freedom to pursue personal research initiatives, which resulted in my participation of the recent “Imaging Unconven-

tional Reservoir Pore Systems: AAPG Memoir 112” by publishing some of my PhD work from Indiana University on reservoir characterization of the Geneseo Formation in New York. Moreover, I have an article in the upcoming (April) AAPG Bulletin regarding lateral facies gradients in the Geneseo, which is a short paper within the larger AAPG Centennial Outcrop volume. This is an exciting volume which releases digital field guides on unconventional/source rocks around the world with captioned stratigraphic columns, geochemistry, petrography, and scanning electron microscopy. I have to admit I often reflect of my experiences at UC, especially all the field excursions with Dr. Carl Brett which certainly gave me the strongest foundation any geologist could wish for. Do keep in touch, and I wish the best 2017! Ryan n

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o you have any recollections of field trips, social events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues? Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

After graduation from UC, I taught introductory geology classes and worked as a researcher at the School of Earth Sciences of the Ohio State University. I worked there with Dr. Frank W. Schwartz. I did research on a variety of topics including concrete leaching, heavy metal sequestration using pervious concrete, developing cost effective geopolymer based controlled released materials for the in-situ oxidation of dilute plumes of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater, modeling variable density flow in porous media and acid-mine drainage, timedependent gelation behavior of oxidant-doped viscous silicate solutions in porous media. After my position had ended at the OSU, we decided to relocate to London, UK in February 2016. After living almost 13 years in Ohio, it was a very big change for me and for my family because I feel like an Ohioan and it was like leaving your home behind. I graduated from UC, married in Cincinnati, both of my sons were born in Ohio. We are still trying to adopt this new life style. It is very nice to live in this beautiful city that offers lots of things to do but at the same time, it is a quite expensive place to live. In London, I teach part time at the St. Mary’s University and do research at the Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering Department of the University College London. My research is about the use of industrial waste in concrete industry and the leaching behavior of hardened concrete. We utilize waste in two ways. The first one is to blend the finely ground waste with the Portland cement and the second one is to co-process cement clinker with waste. This process involves lots of laboratory work and computer modelling.

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Melissa McMullen (BS ’09) REEF is a non-profit organization that actively engages SCUBA divers and marine enthusiasts in marine conservation. It utilizes citizen scientists to collect marine ecology data and then works with government agencies, academic institutions and local communities to develop conservation programs. One of their largest projects is the Fish Survey Project, where divers and snorkelers conduct surveys of fish species and abundance, for sites they dive on, and then submit the data to an online database. I’ve been surveying fish now for about 5 years as a REEF member. My first experience with fish identification was during a Coral Reef Ecology course taught by Dave Meyer in Curacao, but REEF offers tons of resources to help divers learn how to identify fish. It’s a great way to learn about the ecosystems that you are diving on, and adds addition excitement to every dive. As a diver conducts more surveys in various regions, they are eligible to take exams to advance their experience level. I recently just took the level 3 exam for the Caribbean region, so I’m now a top-level novice surveyor. The experience levels provide surveyors milestones to work towards, but also act as a reliability filter to surveys in the database. Levels 4 and 5 are the expert levels and surveys conducted by experts are given more weight in the database. They are also invited to participate in trips and studies. Conducting surveys provides a stronger connection between recreational divers and the ecosystems that they are diving on. As a surveyor, you start to notice how some sites are much healthier with a high diversity of fish and abundant predators, than others that have been over fished. Because every survey is directly linked with a particular dive site, the Fish Survey Project provides years of data for individual sites, tracking overall reef health in almost real time at sites all over the world. n

I hope to see my UC friends in the future. So, if you are planning to come to London, please contact me (usolpuker@gmail.com). Warmest Regards, Utku Solpuker n

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To Solve the Tristate’s Geologic Mysteries

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BYLINE: Camri Nelson

U C G e ol o g y d o c to ra l c a nd i d ate’s wo rk reso lves linger ing q u estion s a b o u t ancient sho relines.

E ven in childhood, UC Geology doctoral candidate Allison Young was interested in fossils. That makes sense, given that she was raised here, where pristinely preserved organisms virtually litter stream beds and road cuts.

Indeed, the area in and around the Queen City is renowned by paleontologists the world over for its exposed, nearly 500 million-year-old Ordovician fossil beds. But Young wasn’t always set on being a scientist. When she first arrived at the University of Cincinnati (UC) in 2005, she pursued what she thought would be a practical degree in business. After she graduated, though, Young realized that she didn’t feel fulfilled by her career in banking. “It just wasn’t for me. I wanted something that was more challenging, more outdoors, more creative,” she said. Unsure what she wanted to do next, but recognizing her lifelong scientific curiosity, she went to the library and checked out journals in biology, chemistry, geology and other disciplines. Young found she was most drawn to the earth sciences. After setting an advising appointment and re-applying to UC, she returned as a declared Geology major, one step closer to embarking on a more rewarding career. And the biggest challenge she faced in coming back to school?

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“Just throwing myself into literature and this way of thinking and the scientific process,” Young laughed. “I hadn’t had science since high school.” “It’s changed the way I view the entire world,” she explained. “My critical thinking skills have improved. I’m more creative in the way I approach things.” Getting it right on the second go-round. Young enjoyed her two years of undergraduate prerequisite work in the Geology department. She carefully observed different faculty members’ work, so that she could figure out which researcher she wanted to work more closely with. After taking Freshmen Seminar I: Geology and Paleontology and Evolution of Earth Systems with Dr. Carlton Brett, she knew that his work would be the best fit for her interests. “I got involved in some research with his graduate students at the time, running around Kentucky and measuring sections, collecting fossils and samples,” Young recollected. Under Brett’s direction, she and a fellow Geology undergraduate co-conducted research on the Lexington Formation, a limestone interval named for the Kentucky city around which it is exposed. The two explored a newly-identified Lexington Formation outcrop that had, at the time, not been well-researched. While in the Bluegrass, they measured and compared the Lexington Formation to other, exposed outcrops in the area. Their research poster was thereafter presented at a national conference. “That solidified where I wanted to go with the next step,” Young said. That next step was post-baccalaureate work.

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(Continued) Drilling for clues to the Tristate’s geologic past. After applying for, and being accepted into, UC’s Master’s program in Geology, Young continued her work on the Lexington Formation. She asked Brett to serve as her primary graduate advisor.

Young has resolved several regional correlation issues that boggled previous researchers. In a sense, her work is to position pieces where they belong in a vast, 4-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.

“I think the most exciting thing is when I have a bunch of pieces and I get to put them together,” she stated. “He’s seen so much of the world and he has this grand “Tying all that [data] into a story is picture of how everything fits together,” Young said. “It’s really cool “It’s changed the way I view awesome.” to be a part of that and help him Giving back to the department and the entire world,” she exwork towards that goal.” the community. plained. “My critical Her current research involves ex- thinking skills have improved. Complementing her day-to-day reamining core samples — donated I’m more creative in the way I sponsibilities, Young is a graduate to the university by engineering member of UC’s Geology Club. She approach things.” firms — to develop a better unmost enjoys working with underderstanding of the mechanisms grad students and helping them to that shaped the Lexington Formaget involved in field research, just as she herself imtion and other geologic features around the region. mersed in Brett’s research projects. “They drill into the subsurface and pull out a tube of “Find someone that inspires you and attach yourself rock that’s thousands of feet long, so we can see the layto them and they’ll take you where you need to go, or at ers of rock that are below the surface.” Young explained. least help you get there,” Young adBy correlating subsurface similarities found in and vised. around Ohio with surface features found in the Lexington Formation in Central Kentucky, she is able to “Every profesdetermine how, where, when and why certain rock sor I know has relayers formed. search projects that [undergrads] can For example, Young noted, geologists know that work on,” she said. limestones formed in shallow, turbulent waters are “That’ll give you usually coarser-grained and fossiliferous, whereas the opportunity to limestones that formed in deeper water are, for the try out a few fields most part, usually finer-grained, less differentiated while you’re young. and fossil-poor. You’ll have the op“We’ve never really understood how the shallow water portunity to try out connects to the offshore water in this interval, because all these different of the extreme differences [in layer composition],” she things, get to travel said. ”What I’m doing is connecting those two records and really experience the world.” so we can look at the whole picture of what was hapYoung also volunteers at the Cincinnati Museum pening onshore and offshore during a period of time.” Center. Her role there is to photograph and cataloguYoung has been able to identify continuous layers ing fossilized invertebrate specimens at its Geier Colof sediment that now lie at varying depths across lections & Research Center, which hosts collection the Tristate. This enables geologists to see not only objects not currently on display. where the ancient coastlines were in this region, but “It’s fun. It’s a good way to give back and be involved also the differing offshore zones they abutted, how with the museum I grew up going to,” Young said, smilthose zones interacted with each other from morphoing. n logical and environmental standpoints and, in some cases, what forces (say, repeat hurricanes or geologic ___________________ upheavals) were acting upon them as they formed. Jonathan Goolsby contributed to reporting on this arShe’s also been able to catalog the various forms ticle. of sea life that were present at different locations around our ancient, shallow sea.

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Alex Borell (BS ’12) Hey Dr. Huff! I’ve been working in the oilfield as an MWD Operator. I was laid off soon after oil prices took a dive and have just been called back out as things are slowly starting to pick up again. I started out working for Nomac Drilling, which at the time was an affiliate of Chesapeake Energy and was working in the Marcellus shale play. I later went on to work for Childress directional drilling, LLC a small family run business out of Houston Texas owned by Ray Childress, a former Houston oiler in the NFL. In Texas I worked in various shale plays as an MWD operator in the eagle ford shale in south Texas and the Permian basin in west Texas. After oil prices crashed they were forced to lay me off and I moved home for a bit where I worked in construction. I was just recently called back to work in Texas again and I am currently working as a contract MWD operator for Von Energy Services, LLC and am currently working back in the eagle ford shale of south Texas and will be living in San Antonio, Texas. This past year has been exciting. Since drilling operations were few and far between throughout much of 2016, I had been working as an assistant superintendent for Empire Building Company constructing the new Health Innovation Center at NKU. As OPEC countries have come to an agreement to cut oil production, US shale producers have begun to start drilling again. In December I moved back to Texas and went back to work as an MWD consultant for Von directional drilling. As drilling activity has continued to increase, companies are beginning to offer full time employment opportunities again and I have recently been offered an full time position with Premier Directional Drilling as an MWD field engineer. I am glad to be back to work in the oil and gas industry once again and I am looking forward to seeing what the future has in store for me. I now have over 3 years of experience in directional drilling service industry and look forward to further my career with hopes of becoming a directional driller. I have been working mostly in the eagle ford shale in south Texas as well as the Permian basin of west Texas. As always it was great to hear from you Warren! I look forward to seeing what everyone else has been up to as well! Thank you for staying in touch. n

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Daniel List (BS ’13)

Gianna Evans (MS ’12)

Kathryn Lindenschmidt (BS ‘15)

Hi Dr. Huff,

Hi Dr. Huff,

Hi Dr. Huff,

Over the last year I have transitioned from offshore mudlogging to software engineering at a startup IT company in Houston. I work mostly on projects for oil companies involving frac sands and customer logistics. Living in Texas has been an enjoyable experience thanks to the mild winters and great road trip destinations like Padre Island and Big Bend National Park. In the near future I look to transition into a more Geology backed role such as Geophysical or GIS development.

My PhD is still chugging along. I won a grant with a renowned lab in Australia to do part of my research. It’s the Post Graduate Research Award (PGRA) at the ANSTO facility. It’s pretty awesome because I also get to go there to actually do the work - Itrax core scanning and radiocarbon sample preparation. Thankfully, I’m getting close to having my lab work completed and hopefully push out a few papers, although I’m not quite there yet. I did get to do a conference presentation in Chile at a Southern Hemisphere climate workshop. My presentation needs some work, but it was nice to see Esteban again.

After graduating I began working in the asbestos department for Australian Lab Services in the fall of 2015. I have been trained to use a phase contrast microscope (PCM) to analyze air samples. I have also received special training from McCrone Institute for asbestos identification in bulk samples using polarized light microscopes (PLM). I hope to continue being trained by learning how to identify asbestos using a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

Daniel n

Dominique Haneberg-Diggs (BS ’12) Hi Dr. Huff, This past year I was fortunate enough to take what feels like a big step forward in my career. I spent the first two and a half years of my career at the Ohio Geological Survey where I got to do a lot of very interesting research. I had a lot of projects I loved and I learned a lot while I was there. In the latter months of 2016 however, I was offered a promotion to a position at the Ohio Division of Oil and Gas as a geologist with the Underground Injection Control section. There, I perform geologic evaluations of the locations of proposed class II and III injection well sites. It is very different from a research based position, but I have truly been enjoying the applied nature of the job. I hope you and the rest of the Geology Department community have had yet another great year. As always, I’ll be looking forward to reading about everyone in the newsletter. Cheers, Dom n

Evan Krekeler (BA ‘12)

That’s pretty much all that’s been going on work wise. I’m still rock-climbing, skiing, and trying to see as much of New Zealand as possible. I’ve also been doing marital arts for over three years now, and I’ll be grading for my black belt in June. I’ll also be doing a sponsored kickboxing fight in the ring for charity in a couple months - which is a little scary but should be fun. That’s about it. I hope things are going well for you, and if you’re in New Zealand sometime you should come visit. Gianna n

Jessica Pauley (BA ’10 in International Affairs) Hi, Dr. Huff! Thank you so much for the message! It’s great to hear from you, and I sincerely hope you’re doing well. Just to update you, I’m enjoying being an RN on the neuro/ trauma unit at Children’s and slowly plugging away on my MSN to be a Family Nurse Practitioner. Scott (my boyfriend of 7 years now) has been a Cincinnati police officer for almost 1 year. He’s still in his probation time, but I believe your neighborhood is in his area (District 5). Scott’s mom was recently diagnosed with breast cancer and has dubbed me as her main caregiver (getting her to appointments, seeing that she has what she needs, etc.). My parents are doing well; Mom was hospitalized with pneumonia earlier this year but is bouncing back now. I recently saw a video of two student chefs making a chocolate & sugar crystal geode and thought of your course. I still have my volcanic rock from Iceland :) Take care! Jessi n

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Kevin Losekamp (BS ‘15) Warren, Greetings! I am still fighting the good fight on the environmental geology side. I was hired on at Tetra Tech right out of school in 2010 completing massive environmental investigations at Navy and DoD facilities from Alaska to Puerto Rico and completing environmental disaster response (oil spills, floods, tornados). I left Tetra Tech in April of last year to join EnSafe. EnSafe is a relatively small, employee owned company based in Memphis with offices in many states. My main focus here at EnSafe is hydrogeology and contaminate migration. Although, we are preparing to go to the field for a biological accumulation study of lead in worms at an old military shooting range. The theory is the worms have “picked up” excess lead from the contaminated soil which has bio accumulated through the food chain to a resident bald eagle population – pretty interesting! Another cool project we are completing is a tree core pilot study for explosives and select volatile organics. We have identified a known volatile and explosive groundwater plume within the shallow overburden groundwater. Contaminant uptake occurs in the root zone, either via aqueous or gas phase. Contaminants then migrate upwards with sap into the trunk and leaves. If successful, the tree core results will be used to identify plume dimensions downgradient of the site (where monitoring wells cannot be installed). That’s all I have. I hope everyone is doing great! Thanks, Kevin n

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Nathan Schriner (BS ‘13)

Elizabeth “Liz” Haussner (MS ’16)

Hey Warren,

Hi Dr. Huff,

I have not really done too much with geology and had a hard time finding a Geo job. I did work for a civil engineering firm for a while but decided it was not for me. So, for the past few years I have been pursuing my Cicerone and Sommelier Certificates. I was a high-end wine rep in KC for a year and now I run a boutique cafe that is associated with the top French restaurant in KC (Cafe Provence). The actual store is named French Market.

After graduation, I spent my summer as a Geoscientist in the Park intern at the Sandy Hook Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey. I lived at the beach in Park Service housing and worked with a team from Rutgers University doing coastal geomorphology monitoring of the New York and New Jersey coastlines. At the end of the summer, I was hired to continue with the coastal monitoring program into the fall and winter months. Then, just before the holiday season, I started a job at the American Museum of Natural History in New York working under the curator of mineralogy to assist in the renovation of the mineral hall at the museum. I no longer live at the beach, but I’m really excited about the position and have found the museum to be a fun and intriguing place to work and learn.

Nathan n

Patrick Cullen (BS ‘13) Hi Dr. Huff, Over the past year I have started my graduate studies at Miami University, I am pursing a M.S. at this time. It has been an interesting transition from working to going back to school. However, pursing a master’s degree is something I have always wanted to achieve. Currently my research is focused on the Ohio Shale within the Appalachian basin and trying to interpret cyclicity based on flooding surfaces, observed within well logs. I gave my thesis proposal on January 30th and passed. Also, I have an internship with Marathon Oil in the summer that I am looking forward to. I believe that is all that I have been up to. I hope everything is well with you and the department at UC. Best, Patrick n

Elizabeth Bullard (MS ’16) Elizabeth Bullard recently completed her MS in invertebrate paleontology investigating the ecology, paleoecology, taphonomy and conservation biology of terrestrial gastropods in the Canary Islands, and participated in a summer program in the Bahamas to study taphonomy and ecology in a modern warmwater carbonate reef. She is now starting the PhD at the University of California in San Diego, and plans to continue research in marine ecology & paleoecology in the Division of Biological Sciences. n

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Cheers, Liz n

Matt Vrazo (PhD ‘16) Following my dissertation defense in May, 2016, I switched from being a Predoctoral Fellow to Research Associate in Gene Hunt’s lab group in the Paleobiology Department at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. Here, I have been working on visitor outreach activities and a lab group project, while revising dissertation chapters for publication and searching for that elusive academic job. Carl Brett and I have a paper in press on our work on stratigraphic controls on eurypterid preservation in the Appalachian basin, and I am very close to finishing a paper with Aaron Diefendorf, Brooke Crowley, and Andy Czaja that investigates the organic geochemistry of arthropod remains from the Cretaceous of Tennessee. Using a multi-disciplinary approach that includes stable isotope analysis, biomarker analysis, and Raman spectroscopy of well-preserved crabs, we have identified the diet and habitat of crabs living in the northern Mississippi Embayment. Matt n

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Frida Åkerström (BS Evst ’14, MS ’16) Hi Dr. Huff,

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Rajarshi Dasgupta (MS ’14) Hello Dr. Huff,

This year I moved to a city called Växjö in southern Sweden, which is close to the birthplace of Carl Linnaeus. I’m training shot put full time and taking classes at the local University in environmental literature and communication. I competed at the indoor Swedish national championship in February and placed 2nd. And two weeks prior I competed at the Nordic championships where I placed 3rd. This summer my goals are to compete at the world University games in Taiwan in August and to finally enjoy a full summer in Sweden for the first time in seven years. All the best, Frida n

Katherine “Katie” Dunn (MS ‘16) Hi Dr. Huff! Since graduating last year I took a job as a lab manager at Stanford in the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, overseeing the mineral separation and cosmogenic nuclide laboratories. Also, the paper that I wrote from my thesis research at Cincinnati was selected by the editors of JGR- Earth Surface to be featured on the Eos website. They wrote up a short article about our research and it will be published online soon. Katie n

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How are you? I am pleased to write a note again for this newsletter. It’s always good to catch up with what folks are up to. The past year has been eventful for me in some ways. I changed jobs and now work as a contract-based lecturer in a local college in my hometown of Kolkata, India. It is primarily an undergraduate college with some graduate programs. My job profile includes teaching geography to undergraduate and graduate students in the college. I have also been working with my colleagues in Kolkata on various small research projects that are slowly beginning to bear fruit- that is exciting! Teaching and doing research are some things that I am very passionate about and so I am thrilled to be back doing them. In addition, I have also published two papers in international peer-reviewed journals this year, including the one based on my MS work at UC. The latter, co-authored with Drs. Crowley & Maynard, was accepted in March 2017 and should be out in the next few months. So it has been a buzzing year. Eventually, however, I would like to get back to grad school for higher studies, but we will see if and when that happens. Hope all is well at UC Geology. Take care. Sincerely, Rajarshi n

Ibrahim Olgun Ugurlu

(MS ’15)

Editor’s note: Ibrahim was awarded the best poster plaque at the 2015 Pacific Section Meeting of the AAPG. n

Join Us!

oming this fall: The 4-Day Field Trip

When: Friday, September 8th through Sunday, September 10th. What & Where: The Geology of Ohio All Alumni are welcome to join. This is an important opportunity to meet new graduate students and curent students to informally discuss research. Contact us for details of the fieldtrip itinerary.

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!

A CALL TO ACTION! Your contribution to some or any of the following endowments is greatly appreciated and strengthens the Department of Geology. Gifts enable us to better serve our students, staff and faculty. They help support a wide array of programs and services, including undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships.

Evan Krekeler (BA ’12)

Emily Cigolle (BASc ’16)

Dr. Huff,

Hi Warren,

I am currently employed by Schlumberger as a Technical Field Analyst III aboard a deepwater drill ship, the Ocean BlackRhino out in the Gulf of Mexico. I recently attended a month long training course in Paris, France where I was able to practice my French as well as become certified in Well Balance, Fluid Loss and Gain and Drilling Efficiency. A little over a year ago on a ski vacation to Taos, New Mexico I became engaged to my longtime girlfriend, Erica Baden on the edge of the Rio Grand River Gorge. Since then, we have been preparing for and anxiously awaiting our fast approaching October 7th, 2017 Wedding date. We are also looking forward to our subsequent trip to Greece where Erica will run the original 26.2 mile race from Marathon to Athens while I take in the local geology and culture and cheering her on.

Here’s an update about what I have been doing since graduation. I graduated April 2016 not knowing exactly what field I wanted to go into. I applied for all types of positions including: environmental education, environmental engineering, environmental health and safety, sustainability, non-profit, lab, gardening, etc. I got a few offers here and there but nothing felt right. During this time I did some traveling (went to South Dakota and Minnesota to see the badlands, Rushmore, Custer state park, and the mall of America) and I was doing volunteer work for nonprofits (Sierra club, greater Cincinnati Earth coalition, and Gabriel’s place). Finally, I placed an “internship” at milacron doing environmental health and safety. Because I was graduated they were hoping to train me for an upcoming open position. It never opened so I started to look again. Krista had emailed a job opening at AECOM so I did some research and applied. I have currently been working for AECOM for 8 1/2 months working for the Due Diligence group and sometimes Geoscience. I have learned so much since I started and enjoy the work I do. Hope all is well in the geology department!

Best regards, Evan n

D o you have any recollections of field trips, social

events, classroom experiences or other experiences during your UC days that you would like to share with your alumni colleagues?

E

$

.00

Fenneman Nevin H. Fund: Supports research and travel.

$

.00

$

.00

$

.00

Support for graduate students in paleontology, including a summer $ fellowship.

.00

Student Sedimentology Research Fund: Support for graduate students in stratigraphy and Rawlinson George and Frances Fund:

sedimentology. Graduate fellowships.

Caster Kenneth E. Fund:

Cook Walter and Kathryn H. Scholarship Fund: Used for scholarship awards to under-

graduates, and for field-camp scholarships. $

.00

$

.00

$

.00

Hoholick-Potter International Fieldwork Travel Fund: to be used for international fieldwork. $

.00

Durrell Richard H. and Lucile Fund:

Public education, including outside speakers.

Geology Alumni Graduate Fellowship Fund: To support graduate fellowships.

Klekamp Thomas C. Student Travel Fund: A relatively new fund, to be used for undergraduate $

.00

Larsen Leonard Fund: Instructional field trips.

$

.00

Student Field Experience Fund: Used for field camp, as well as other field experiences of students.

$

.00

$

.00

Send them to Warren Huff, email: WARREN.HUFF@ UC.EDU or Dept. of Geology, UC, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and we’ll include them in next years’ issue.

student travel for research.

Research in Geology Fund: A primary repository for annual gifts. Open for investments of

and

any sort in research.

For additional assistance making your gift, or for more information, please contact: Shelly Deavy, Associate Director of Development, Kathleen Collins McMicken College of Arts and Sciences 513.556-6435 DEAVYRE@ucmail.uc.edu, COLLINKN@ucmail.uc.edu

Friends,

The Geological Society of America 2017 Annual Meeting will be held October 22-25 in Seattle, WA. (http://community.geosociety.org/gsa2017/home/). I would like to invite you to attend and to join us for an alumni get-together on Monday, 23 October 2017: 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Juniper. Hope to see you in Seattle, Warren D. Huff warren.huff@uc.edu

!

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Bucher Walter Fund: All-purpose fund for research and teaching.

Emily n

Dear UC Geology Alumni

ndowment

Mail checks to: The Department of Geology University of Cincinnati PO Box 210013 Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0013 Geology Office: 513.556.3722

http://foundation.uc.edu

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