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BUSINESS CONNECTIONS Houston

Community News & Business Reports

Published By Aubrey R. Taylor Communications Proudly Serving The Houston Community Since 1998

• Email: news@houston-businessconnections.com • NOVEMBER 2005

Voters Guide

ELECTION 2005 THIS VOTERS GUIDE IS DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF ROSA PARKS 1913-2005

The Spark That Lit The Modern Civil Rights Movement has passed away In 1943 and 1944 Rosa Parks tried to register to vote but was denied both times. To push forward the quest for black voting rights, she joined the Montgomery Voters League. Parks one of the most powerful icons of the civil rights era has passed away. However, its in part

due to her contributions that African Americans have the privilege to cast their vote in this year’s election. All citizens should value their sacred right to vote and be thankful for the contributions of individuals who were willing to stand up for their beliefs. SEE PAGE, 10B

EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT TO VOTE ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2005

Your Vote Can Make A Difference!

Statement From Houston City Controller Annise Parker

“You may not be a city council person, you may not be a legislator, but, you can effect whether or not those people get in. So, when you see people with your views, your philosophy, and your values, those are the people you should vote for.”

For Houston Business Connections Readers

I

am one of the lucky elected officials. I do not have an opponent in my campaign for re-election as Houston City Controller. But I am still running a campaign, appearing at candidate forums, answering questionnaires, and speaking with citizens. I do it because I believe we deserve not only to hear from our leaders, but to ask them tough questions, share our ideas for a better city, and ultimately hold them accountable on Election Day. That is why I encourage every Houston voter to exercise his or her sacred right to vote. Does your vote matter? One needs only to look at the results of the last few elections to see the Parker power of a single vote cast, from two consecutive Presidential elections decided by a small number of votes in a single state to a Governors race in Washington state decided by less than 100 votes and taking months to sort out. Two current Houston Council Members won their seats by less than 40 votes out of thousands of votes cast. Much is at stake for our city. In my campaign, I talk about making sure our city has the resources it needs to deliver the quality services our residents deserve. That means managing our tax dollars wisely, continually examining the performance of city departments and programs,

and preparing accurate estimates of the budget so that the Mayor and City Council can make informed decisions on spending tax dollars. Many of the services of which I speak are necessary to sustain life. The city provides the water you drink and the sewage system to carry away waste, the roads you use to get to work and the ambulance that would come in an emergency. Much more, however, is at stake for our existence as a free people. I want my daughters to know and appreciate how much has been sacrificed for our right to vote, and how the long struggle for civil rights sadly continues today. I want them to understand the power that comes with freedom, and how quickly it can be lost. I want them to grow up and hold candidates and elected officials fully accountable for the trust we place in them. In short, I want them to exercise their right to vote, and to teach their children to do the same. Please join me and vote in this and every election. Election Day is November 8. Early voting begins October 24. Thank you.

Jefferson

INSIDE Candidates RESPOND to Questions Asked by Houston Business Connections Publisher.......................2B 2005 Internet Poll Results.................2B Proposed Constitutional Amendments On The November 8, 2005 Ballot.....3B Online Voting Results On Propositions.......................................3B

Houston City Controller

First Time Using e-Slate?.................7B

Rosa Parks Was A Noble Princes From God By Reverend Jesse Jackson

Jackson

“We are saddened by the passing of Rosa Parks. We rejoice in her legacy, which will never die. In many ways, history is marked as before, and after, Rosa Parks. She sat down in order that we all might stand up, and the walls of segregation came down.

Paradoxically, her imprisonment opened the doors to our long journey to freedom. Known as the mother of the civil rights movement, she wove glory with grace. History knocked on her door, and with quiet courage she answered with non-negotiable dignity. She offered her body as a living sacrifice. She embodied the

hopes, healing and the longing of three centuries of prayers and the desire for freedom. Her light in darkness illuminated the path for the majestic leadership of Dr. King. Together, they changed the course of American and world history. Long live the glory of this noble princess from God, Rosa Parks. Ironically I am in South Africa

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735

as the guest of Nelson Mandela preparing to meet with him to discuss poverty, peace and freedom. These three giants, Rosa Parks, Dr. King and Mandela - without bombs, bullets or wealth - have shown the awesome power of right over might in history’s long journey toward peace and freedom.”

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT • 1B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

2005 Internet Poll Results (Voting Closed On These Polls On Tuesday, October 11, 2005 )

ver the past few weeks Houston Business Connections has been hosting a “Mock Election” poll for the races and Propositions to be voted on in the November 8, 2005 election. The charts below represent the voice of the “Mock Poll” participants. The results of the “Mock Election” polls do not serve as an indorsement of any candidate in any race. Nor does the charts reflect the opinion of Aubrey R. Taylor Communications, it’s advertisers, supporters, or in any way shape or form serve as a scientific poll for the 2005 election. However, the poll results do show the voter patterns of Houston Business Connections readers. The polls furthermore show which candidates had the most name recognition and support among voters participating in the “Mock Election” polls during the open voting period.

O

Candidates RESPOND to Questions Asked by Houston Business Connections Publisher andidates vying to seek or retain seats at City Hall were recently asked to respond to a series of questions by Aubrey R. Taylor, president and CEO of Aubrey R. Taylor Communications, the publisher of Houston Business Connections. The questions were submitted to each candidate that could be located. Below you will find Mayor Bill White’s response. All other responses are on the following pages. We urge you to make an informed decision in the upcoming election by voting for the candidate you feel will best represent you at City Hall. The General Election will be held on Tuesday, November 8, 2005. Exercise Your Right To Vote!

ONLINE POLL RESULTS (At Time Of Printing Of This Issue)

Mayors Race House

Ullrich

15% 0% Terence White 3% 81% 1% Dutrow

C

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS BILL WHITE (i). Should prevail on election day.

At-Large Position #1 Morales

Griffin

16%

9%

Brown

75%

Bill White City Of Houston Mayor TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? MAYOR WHITE: Over the last two years, we’ve worked hard together to make our city even better. Thousands of new jobs and significant corporate relocations have come to Houston. A detailed and comprehensive plan for ending our flooding and drainage problems has been put into place. Traffic congestion has been drastically curtailed, with commute times being reduced as much as 20%. Our government is now more efficient, while funding for important services like our Police and Fire Departments has been increased. I want to continue to fight hard for what’s important to our city, including revitalizing some of our most blighted neighborhoods with Project Houston Hope. Project Houston Hope is aimed at cleaning neighborhoods and combating urban blight. Abandoned properties will no longer serve as magnets for crime and life threatening accidents. We want the community to know we are serious about protecting neighborhoods from these conditions. Overall, the quality of life in Houston is improving with more parks and libraries, fewer accidents, and less flooding. I look forward to having the opportunity to work with you to improve Houston even more. Please see WHITE, P.16B

2B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS PETER BROWN. Should win without a runoff.

At-Large Position #2 Lovell

Acosta

Neal

25%

5%

1%

Aiyer

45%

Elford

25% Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS JAY AIYER. Race could end in run-off.

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Proposed Constitutional Amendments On The November 8, 2005 Ballot Proposition #1 HJR 54 — McClendon - Staples Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment creating the Texas rail relocation and improvement fund and authorizing grants of money and issuance of obligations for financing the relocation, rehabilitation, and expansion of rail facilities.” Brief Explanation: HJR 54 would create a Texas rail relocation and improvement fund in the state treasury and would

Online Voting Results On Propositions (At Time of Printing Of This Issue)

Are You For or Against Proposition #1? 60% For Proposition #1 31% Against Proposition#1 9% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

Are You For or Against Proposition #2? 64% For Proposition #2 31% Against Proposition#2 5% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

Are You For or Against Proposition #3? 68% For Proposition #3 7% Against Proposition#3 25% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

authorize grants of state revenue and issuance of public debt to relocate, rehabilitate, and expand privately and publicly owned passenger and freight rail facilities and to construct railroad underpasses and overpasses.

Proposition #2 HJR 6 Chisum - Staples Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment providing that marriage in this

state consists only of the union of one man and one woman and prohibiting this state or a political subdivision of this state from creating or recognizing any legal status identical or similar to marriage.” Brief Explanation: HJR 6 would provide that marriage in Texas is solely the union of a man and woman, and that the state and its political subdivisions could not create or recognize any legal status identical to or similar to marriage, including such legal status relationships created outside of Texas.

Proposition # 3 HJR80 Krusee - Ogden Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment clarifying that certain economic development programs do not constitute a debt.” Brief Explanation: HJR 80 would provide that local economic development program loans or grants

. Jarvis

Please see PROPOSITIONS, P.20B

JOHNSON

Visit www.jarvisfordistrictb.houstonbusinessconnections.com

LEADING BY EXAMPLE

Are You For or Against Proposition #4?

Houston City Council District B

23% For Proposition #4 72% Against Proposition#4 5% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

Paid for by Jarvis Johnson Campaign, Velika Hines, Treasurer

Are You For or Against Proposition #5? 66% For Proposition #5 19% Against Proposition#5 15% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

ENDORSEMENTS: • Harris County Democrats

Are You For or Against Proposition #6?

• Harris County Young Democrats (*Very Quality Rating).

66% For Proposition #6 13% Against Proposition#6 21% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

• Communication Workers of America, AFL-CIO

Are You For or Against Proposition #7? 81% For Proposition #7 15% Against Proposition#7 4% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

• Transportation Workers Union, AFL-CIO

Are You For or Against Proposition #8?

• Mailhandler Union, AFL-CIO

40% For Proposition #8 10% Against Proposition#8 50% Haven’t Decided Yet ...............................................

Are You For or Against Proposition #9? 78% For Proposition #9 17% Against Proposition#9 5% Haven’t Decided Yet The results of the online poll are not scientific and the percentage of error is unknown.

• African Methodist Episcopal Ministerial Alliance As a Father, Husband, Home Owner, Civic Leader, Businessman, and College Graduate, Jarvis Johnson pledges to listen and work with all Residents to make Our Neighborhoods Safer from crime and more Secure from flooding. Vote for Jarvis Johnson!

• ACORN PAC • American Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO

Vote For Jarvis Johnson On November 8, 2005

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735 •

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT • 3B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from Houston Highlights Publishing, L.L.C. Peter Brown Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #1 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? BROWN: Houston needs a coherent vision for its future, and a Plan for how to get there. Houstonians should support my candidacy because government needs a

Roy Morales Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #1 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should voter for your candidacy? MORALES: Houstonians are voting for the security of their families and City. As a retired United States Air Force Lt Col and a former Executive for the City of Houston, I am the most qualified candidate

Jay Aiyer Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #2

TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? AIYER: I believe Houstonians should support my candidacy because I am the best qualified person in this race to serve on Houston City Council. The

John Elford Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #2 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? ELFORD: I am the most experienced and qualified candidate for At Large Position 2. I am an experienced and successful businessman and my environmental engineering, design and con-

“man with a vision,” a “man with a plan.” I am running for City Council because I believe we can and must Build a Better Houston. We have immense potential, and as an architect and urban planner I understand that great cities must be built, neighborhood by neighborhood, for that potential to be realized. Too many of our neighborhoods are Please see BROWN, P.12B

ONLINE POLL RESULTS (At Time Of Printing Of This Issue)

At-Large Position #3 Partsch-Galvan

19%

Sekula-Gibbs

81%

because of my education, training, crisis planning, and experience. I have a B.A. in Psychology (summa cum laude), a B.S. in Computer Science and M.S. in Space Operations from the Air Force Institute of Technology. I have received commendations with the Air Force in support of DOD/NASA missions and as one of the top Air Force

Please see MORALES, P.16B

challenging events of the last several weeks remind us of the importance of having strong, experienced leadership at City Hall – local government matters in people’s lives, now more than ever. I have the public service and private sector experience to get the job done on City Council. I served as Chief of Staff to Houston Mayor Lee Brown, and am cur-

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS SHELLY SEKULA-GIBBS (i). Should be re-elected.

At-Large Position #5 Stoma Berry

17%

83%

Please see AIYER, P.12B

struction experience is crucial in today’s infrastructure oriented city climate. I am determined to make Houston the best place for all people to live, work, study, and worship and enjoy. We must expand our tax base, create jobs, improve the quality of life by adding parks and greenspace and most importantly lower our taxes. We must also provide continuing Please see ELFORD, P.12B

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS MICHAEL BERRY (i). Should be re-elected.

City Council District A Carter

Sue Lovell Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #2 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? LOVELL: When I moved to Houston at 19 years old I had 3 suitcases, $35, and 2 good friends. In the 33 years since I made Houston my home, I’ve been blessed with a beautiful family, a

Shelley Sekula-Gibbs, M.D. Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #3 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? SEKULA-GIBBS: My goal is to create a healthy Houston, a city where families will enjoy a better quality of life, and workers will earn a good living. As a

Lawrence

14%

86%

Please see LOVELL, P.12B

member of the Houston City Council for the past four years, I have worked hard to bring about solutions to many problems facing Houstonians. I spearheaded the development of neighborhood clinics (Federally Qualified Health Centers), which provide health care for uninsured and low-income Houstonians, reducing

Please see SEKULA-GIBBS, P.12B

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS TONI LAWRENCE (i). Should be re-elected.

City Council District B Hunter

Bush

Gray Lewis

3% 2% 0% 0% Curtis 0% 29% Allen

tion and increasing public safety. I vote in the best interests of all Houstonians even though my choices are sometimes unpopular with special interest groups.

Michael Berry Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large Position #5 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? BERRY: During my four years on City Council representing Houstonians citywide, I have remained committed to the principles that led me to seek office in the first place — improving transporta-

4B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

rewarding career and friends from all over this city. Houston is a city of opportunity, and I want to make sure our people have access to affordable housing, good jobs, affordable healthcare, good public transportation and safe neighborhoods. I direct a jobs training program for The Mills Corporation that helps people find jobs by providing training, trans-

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? BERRY: I hired a great team of people to help me serve at City Hall, and

Please see BERRY, P.12B

Ingram

0%

Johnson

48%

Galloway-Hall

17%

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS JARVIS JOHNSON. Race could end in runoff.

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735


lected to Houston City Council from District F in 2003. M.J. Khan has worked tirelessly to fulfill his campaign pledge to improve the quality of life for Houston and for District F. In just a short time on City Council, M.J. has logged a number of accomplishments, and has defended the core values of hard working families in District F and the City.

E

Only one M.J. Khan

Record of Fiscal Responsibility

EDUCATIONAL & PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND

• Proposed$1.3 million in General Revenue Fund Saving • Voted to reduce 2004 property tax rate • Proposed zero-based budget for all city departments • Saved taxpayers’ money by eliminating duplication of city contracts

• Bachelors of Science Degree, University of Sind • Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Karachi University • Masters Science in Civil Engineering, University of Illinois • Masters of Business Administration, Rice University • Professional Engineer in the State of Texas • President of MAK Development, Inc.

Only one M.J. Khan RECORD OF LEADERSHIP

Record of Community Leadership • Assigned U.S. Speaker by the U.S. Department of State • Member of the City’s Flooding & Drainage, MWBE, Housing and Development, and Transportation committees • Served on the Small Business Advisory Board of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission • Past President of PAAGH • Past Vice-President of ISGH

Record of Improved Quality of Life • Organized three crime summits with Houston Police to reduce gang activity, prostitution and other serious crimes • Organized Itinerant Vendor Town Hall meeting to curb illegal “Flea Market” activity in District F • Organized District F Community Cleanup Project (“C3”) in Sharpstown, Alief and Gulfton • Represented community residents against sexually oriented video establishments and nightclubs that fail to control illegal activity around their establishments • Protested liquor licenses for nightclubs that fail to control illegal activities around their establishments • Voted for smoking ordinance • Supported more comprehensive Neighborhood Protection initiatives and enforcement

Paid for by Re-elect MJ Khan Campaign, Daniel Hrna, Treasurer NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735 ••

NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT • 5B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS Michael Stoma Candidate for Houston City Council At-Large, Position #5 TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should voter for your candidacy? STOMA: I am a Native Houstonian who was born in St. Joseph’s Hospital in 1952. I was raised in the Aldine area of North Houston where I graduated Douglas Mac Arthur High in 1971. The

Toni Lawrence Candidate for Houston City Council District A TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? LAWRENCE: A lifelong resident of District A, I attended Garden Oaks Elementary, Black Middle School, Waltrip High School, earned a Bachelors of Science from the University of Texas

Candidate for Houston City Council District B

Please see STOMA, P.12B

at Austin and a Masters of Education from Sam Houston State University. After spending seven years as a teacher, my husband and I founded Craftsman Fabricated Glass Inc. During my first term as a Council Member, I have prioritized City spending by meeting our immediate needs first and then focusing any available funds towards Please see LAWRENCE, P.13B

TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? GALLOWAY-HALL: I will continue the much-needed progress that District B deserves. I possess the leadership skills, integrity, commitment and a service- Please see GALLOWAY-HALL, P.13B oriented passion for the people of District B.

Jarvis Johnson Candidate for Houston City Council District B TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should voter for your candidacy? JOHNSON: Houstonians should vote for me because Leadership is determined by what you are doing not what you are promising to do. Let me tell you

Tommie Ruth Allen Candidate for Houston City Council District B TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should voter for your candidacy? ALLEN: Houstonians should vote for me because I have a proven track record as a coalition and consensus builder that is experienced in cultural diversity. I have over thirty years experi-

Anne Clutterbuck Candidate for Houston City Council District C TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? CLUTTERBUCK: For 7 years I served as the District Director for Congressman Bill Archer. In that capacity I had 2 main responsibilities: overseeing constituent service and flood control for

what I have done: I have rehabilitated homes over 25 homes for Senior citizens; I have provided over $100,000 in financial aid for parents to help promote healthy families; I employ over 40 fulltime employees; I provided over 19 Scholarships for District B students to attend college; I provide childcare for over 400 children; I provided 2000 comPlease see JOHNSON, P.14B

ence working with the community. This experience includes eighteen years in Corporate America, HL&P, as a Public Relations Representative and Spokesperson. There I coordinated the company’s first Black History Exhibit and Reception that invited over 4000 students from throughout the HL&P service area to view the exhibit. Was a member

City Council District C Jones

1%

24%

Litt

3%

Clutterbuck

5%

Cweren

3%

Siverson

Hittner

1%

62%

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS GEORGE HITTNER. Race could end in run-off.

City Council District F Shike M.J. Khan

70%

8%

K.A. Khan

22%

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS M.J. KHAN (i). Should be re-elected.

City Council District H Williams

26%

Garcia

74%

Please see ALLEN, P.14B

the 7th Congressional District. In the area of flood control, I had direct, hands-on experience for 7 years working with Harris County Flood Control, US Army Corps of Engineers, and FEMA in implementing the vital flood control projects in the northwest part of the county. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita have highlighted the importance of having quali-

Source: www.houstonbusinessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS ADRIAN GARCIA (i). Should be re-elected.

City Council District I Parras

Please see CLUTTERBUCK, P.14B

VOTE NOVEMBER 8, 2005! 6B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

(At Time Of Printing Of This Issue)

Lee

I am a homeowner, and a lifelong, thirty nine years resident of District B. Serving the people should be the overriding reason for seeking office. As a United States Department of Defense employee, I served. In the United States Department of Social Security, I served. As a Claims Representative for the United States Railroad Retirement

Felicia Galloway-Hall

ONLINE POLL RESULTS

Houston area has been my home, always, where I’ve parented my two children to adults; and, where I, actively, participate in my grandson’s life and education. As a US Air Force, Vietnam Era Veteran, I know the value of public service. After my tour of military duty, I served as a civilian employee for the Houston Police Department; taught at

29%

Alvarado

71%

Source: www.houston-businessconnections.com internet poll results through October 11, 2005. Internet poll is not scientific and the error percentage is unknown. POLL WINNER IS CAROL ALVARADO (i). Should be re-elected.

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

First Time Using e-Slate? Follow These Easy Steps

7 After entering all your choices, then review the summary list of your choices. When you are finished, press the CAST BALLOT button. You will see the American flag on screen indicating your ballot has been recorded.

1 Use the SELECT wheel and ENTER button to select English, Spanish, or Vietnamese language.

6 Press the HELP button once to get instructions on the screen; press it twice to ask for help from a pollworker.

2 Use the SELECT wheel and ENTER button to enter the number code you will receive, the ballot for your precinct appears on screen.

5 Use the PREV and NEXT buttons to move back and forth between ballot pages.

4

Press the ENTER button to mark your choice.

3

Turn the SELECT wheel to move the blue bar over the choice you wish to make.

e-Slate Questions & Answers Q:

Is the system based on a touch screen?

A: No. The voter uses a SELECT wheel to navigate through the ballot and a button labeled ENTER to mark his or her choice – giving new meaning to the phrase “C’ville Counts…so ENTER your vote!” This interface was chosen because it is more accurate and durable than touch screen systems, requires less maintenance, and voters with limited or no vision find the system very easy to use.

Q:

How can we be sure this system is working as it should be?

A: Before any vote is cast, there is a process of testing the machines to be sure they are working as expected. This process, known as logic and accuracy testing, allows election officials to be sure votes are counted as they are cast.

Q:

How do I know that the way the voting system recorded my vote is the same way I cast my vote?

A: After you have voted in the last contest on the ballot, a screen will appear listing all the choices you have made and letting you know if you missed voting in any race. If you choose not to vote in the last contest listed on the bal-

lot, simply press the NEXT button to get to your ballot summary screen. From this screen, you can make changes, as desired, to be sure your votes are counted the way you want them to be. When you are finished reviewing your ballot, press the CAST BALLOT button to put your ballot into the electronic ballot box.

Q:

How do I know my votes are private and there is not a database in the computer somewhere that records how I have voted?

A: There is no way for the system to connect your vote to you. When you vote, there is no identifying information recorded with your vote. You will be given a randomly generated four-digit access code tied to the ballot for your precinct. The access code is not associated with your name. Therefore, it is impossible to trace your vote.

Q:

What if I change my mind or make a mistake after I have pressed the ENTER button?

A: You can change any vote at any time until the CAST BALLOT button is pressed from the Ballot Summary page and you see the American Flag waving on the screen. To change a vote, just use the dial to highlight the candidate you want to vote for and then press ENTER. The earlier vote is erased, and the new vote is recorded.

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735

Q:

What if I don’t want to vote in a particular race?

A: Then you don’t have to. It is your decision and right to choose not to vote in any race. Just use the dial to scroll past the race you want to skip. After you have voted in the last contest on the ballot, a Ballot Summary page will appear listing all the choices you have made and lets you know if you missed voting in any race by showing No Selection. You can either go back and vote in the skipped race, or press the CAST BALLOT button to submit your ballot with no votes in the races you intend to skip.

Q:

What if I accidentally vote twice in a race? Will my vote be discarded?

A: You cannot vote for more than one choice unless the instructions specifically state you may select a higher number. In that case you may vote for the number stated or less than that number. The system is programmed, however, to prevent "over voting," which is when someone accidentally casts more than the permitted number of votes in a race. Please see Q&A ON E-SLATE, P.19B

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT• 7B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS George Hittner Candidate for Houston City Council District C TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? HITTNER: As lifelong resident of Houston and District C, and with nearly a decade’s worth of experience in government in state and local issues (in both the private and public sector), I have been

working on issues affecting District C for many years. If elected, my priorities will include: 1) Strengthening neighborhoods and improving the quality of life by encouraging citizen interaction in government, while providing prompt and responsive attention to constituent concerns; 2) Ensuring the city’s top priorities remain its core responsibilities of provid-

Please see HITTNER, P.14B

VOTER INFORMATION FROM TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE

Who may vote in Texas? Any United States citizen residing in Texas who is: • Legally registered to vote in Texas • At least 18 years old on Election Day • Not a convicted felon (unless sentence, probation and parole are completed) • Not declared mentally incompetent by a court of law

Have you registered to vote in Texas? Judy Siverson Candidate for Houston City Council District C TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? SIVERSON: Houstonians should vote for Judy Siverson because I have experience working on neighborhood improvement projects throughout District C. I led the effort to bring $40 million

Mark Lee Candidate for Houston City Council District C TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should voter for your candidacy? LEE: The City Council District C doesn’t need a professional politician as its representative, but a qualified public servant-someone who knows and loves District C as one of its own. My work as

Ray Jones Candidate for Houston City Council District C TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? JONES: At Houston City Council, I will continue to be a voice for the whole community. In my community activities over many years, I consistently emphasize the importance of open government,

John Shike Candidate for Houston City Council District F TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? SHIKE: People should vote for me because: I want to be in the service of America with an idea to make it even a better place for each man, woman and

worth of street improvements to Braeswood Place. I have worked to rehabilitate a local park with improvements valued at $500,000. I joined with neighborhood volunteers to correct design and construction flaws at Linkwood Community Center. I have been focused on community improvement projects for 15 years and have attended every District Please see SIVERSON, P.14B

President of my civic association, board member for SPARK Park board, Buffalo Bayou partnership, Children at Risk and Friends of Westbury High School Foundation gives me the hands-on experience to serve the community. My education and work as a CPA and an attorney gives me the know-how to do so effectively and efficiently. Please see LEE, P.14B

fiscal responsibility and citizen participation in all public processes. Maturity, experience, public trust, sound judgment, strong management skills, determination and compassion are key components of an effective public official. I have demonstrated these strengths in my civic activism. Examples of recent accomplishments are public Please see JONES, P.15B

child. I have been a member of many civic and community organizations. Ever since 1960, moving from Canada, I have been residing in Houston, which gives me the standing as native Houstonian. I am a successful businessman and have ample knowledge of management techniques, marketing know-how, accounts supervision and balPlease see SHIKE, P.15B

Register with the Department of Public Safety when applying for or making changes to a driver’s license; Register in person at the county Voter Registrar’s Office. (In most Texas counties, the Tax Assessor-Collector is also the Voter Registrar. In some counties, the County Clerk or Elections Administrator registers voters); or Register by mail. You may obtain an application from the county Voter Registrar’s Office, the Secretary of State’s Office, libraries, many post offices, high schools and on the web at http://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/voter/reqvr.shtml. Read the instructions on the form, fill it out and mail it, postagefree, to the Voter Registrar in your county; or take it to the Voter Registrar’s Office in your county. You must be at least 17 years and 10 months of age on the date you apply. With your permission, your spouse, parent or child may fill out and sign an application for you if that person is a registered voter or has applied for voter registration. This person is known as your “agent.” The application must be received in the voter registrar’s office or postmarked 30 days before an election for you to be eligible to vote in that election.

Are you a first-time voter? If you register to vote by mail for the first time in a county, then you are a first-time voter. A first-time voter must enclose a copy of identification along with the voter registration application or a first-time voter may instead present identification the first time the voter votes in a federal election. Acceptable identification includes: a driver's license, bank statement, utility bill, pay check, or other government document that shows your name and address.

Need a voter registration certificate? Once you apply, a voter registration certificate (proof of registration) will be mailed to you within 30 days. Check your certificate to be sure all information is correct. (If there is a mistake, make corrections and return it to the voter registrar immediately.) When you go to the polls to vote, present your certificate as proof of registration. You may vote without your certificate by signing an affidavit at the polling place and showing some other form of identification (for example, driver’s license, birth certificate, copy of electric bill). If you lose your certificate, notify your county Voter Registrar in writing to receive a new one. You will automatically receive a new certificate every two years, if you haven’t moved from the address at which you are registered.

Have you moved within your county? K.A. Khan Candidate for Houston City Council District F TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? K.A. KHAN: I believe that Houstonians should vote for me because I am the only candidate that is really addressing the problems in district F. I

M.J. Khan Candidate for Houston City Council District F TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? M.J. KHAN: It has been my honor and privilege serving the people of District F. I have worked very hard to improve the quality of life in all the areas of the district, and have had great success.

am not a professional politician but am a community volunteer. I believe that the interests of district F are not being met by our current councilmember and that I am the solution to that problem. District F is one of the most diverse districts within Houston and one needs to understand its constituents in order to serve them at City Hall. I have lived in the district for over Please see K.A. KHAN, P.18B

I have worked to lower the crime in our area by bringing the Chief of Police, Harold Hurtt, and his command staff into our district to assess the prostitution, graffiti, gang, drug and other illegal activity. I protested nightclubs that fail to control illegal activity in and around their establishments. I fought sexually oriented businesses that lure our children with false advertisements and gimmicks. I worked

If you move within the same county, promptly notify the Voter Registrar, in writing, of your new address by: correcting your current voter registration certificate on the back and returning it to the Voter Registrar; filling out a new voter registration application form and checking the “change” box; or making simultaneous changes to your driver’s license and voter registration when you apply for or update your driver’s license. You will receive a new certificate with your new address. You will be able to vote in your new precinct 30 days after your change of address is submitted. If you miss the deadline (30 days before an election), you may vote in your former precinct as long as you still reside in the political subdivision conducting the election. Your residence is located in a specific “precinct,” which is an area within the county. There are many precincts within a county. The place where you will vote on Election Day is located in your precinct. There may be combined precincts in order to accommodate joint local elections; therefore, in some elections you may vote outside your designated precinct. The County Clerk or Elections Administrator can give you the specific location of your polling place.

Please see M.J.HAN, P.19B Please see VOTER INFORMATION, P.12B

8B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

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2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS Andrian Garcia Candidate for Houston City Council District H TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? GARCIA: It has been an honor to serve as the District H council member in my first term on council, I chaired the council’s Public Safety & Homeland Security Committee where I spearheaded

Carol Alvarado Candidate for Houston City Council District I TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? ALVARADO: I am a lifelong resident of District I. I have served on city council since 2002. From 1998 to 2002, I worked for Mayor Lee Brown at an executive level staff position. I have

John Parras Candidate for Houston City Council District I TAYLOR: Tell us in 200 words or less why Houstonians should vote for your candidacy? PARRAS: I am the better choice in the District I race. I have the independence, education, training and integrity needed to fight for the District’s residents and businesses. As a product of the East

an ordinance change to further protect neighborhoods against liquor establishments. In addition, I hosted the District H’s first ever health initiative, “Don’t Wait, Vaccinate: Viva La Vacuna” which encouraged a pro-active approach to immunizing our children, and promoted health services to our families. Moreover, I continue to push for the hiring of more Please see GARCIA, P.17B

been successful in getting city government to best serve the needs of the people of District I. I have served as their advocate and voice at city hall on quality of life issues. I have passed and balanced four budgets and serve on important city council committees including the Fiscal Affairs Committee. Serving as Mayor Please see ALVARADO, P.17B

side, I have been fortunate to earn, through hard work, an education in politics at Princeton University and a law degree from the University of Texas. I have used my hard work in school to earn the opportunity to train as an advocate under the best trial lawyers in America — Dick DeGuerin, Racehorse Haynes, and Michael Ramsey. In their Please see PARRAS, P.17B

OTHER CANDIDATES ON THE BALLOT Candidates listed here either did not respond to the request to participate; did not meet the deadline for answering the questionnaire; or were not available. RACE FOR MAYOR: Anthony Dutrow, Jack Terence, Luis Ullrich. CITY COUNCIL AT-LARGE POS.#1: Michael Griffin. CITY COUNCIL AT-LARGE POS. 2: Hipolito Acosta, James Neal. CITY COUNCIL ATLARGE POS. #3: James Partsch-Galvan. CITY COUNCIL AT-LARGE POS. #4: Ronald Green (Unopposed). CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT A: Dennis Carter. CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT B. Angle Bush, Anna Gray, Charles Ingram, Etheal Lewis, Robin German-Curtis, Willie Hunter. CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT C: Herman Litt. CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT D: Ada Edwards (Unopposed). CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT E: Addie Wisemen. CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT G: Palm Holm (Unopposed). CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT H: Larry Williams.

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• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT• 9B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Rosa Parks (1913-2005)

The Spark That Lit The Modern Civil Rights Movement n December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus. Her arrest for violating Montgomery’s segregation laws precipitated a mass boycott of the city’s buses. The successful boycott brought its leaders, Martin Luther King, Jr., to national prominence and paved the way for innumerable future protests and demonstrations against racial injustice. Rosa Parks, then, played a crucial role in sparking the modern civil rights movement. She was born Rosa Louise McCauley in Tuskegee, Alabama, on February 4, 1913, the elder of tow children of James and Leona (Edwards) McCauley. Her father was a carpenter, and her mother was a teacher. At the age of two, she moved to her grandparents’ farm in Pine Level, Alabama, with her mother and younger brother. After several years of schooling in Pine Level and nearby Spring Hill, Rosa, moved to Montgomery at the age of eleven and was enrolled in the Montgomery at the age of eleven and was enrolled in the Montgomery Industrial School for Girls, a private school who’s philosophy of self-worth had a lasting effect on her. She completed the fifth through eight grads at the Industrial School, the ninth grade at Booker T. Washington Junior High School, and the tenth and eleventh grades at the laboratory high school division of the state teacher-training college in Montgomery (now Alabama State University). After her junior year, she dropped out of school to take care of her ill grandmother. In 1932, Rosa married Raymond Parks, a barber who was active in black voter registration and other civil rights causes. At about that time she went back to Alabama State, earning her high school diploma in 1933. During the following decade, Rosa Parks held a various jobs, for example, at Saint Margaret’s Hospital and at Maxwell Field, a local army base. Usually she supplemented those jobs by taking in sewing jobs.

O

Rosa Parks Awakened a Nation and Shook the World A Message from Congressman Al Green (TX-9)

“I extend my deepest regrets as we mourn the loss of one of our nation’s most revered women in the struggle for freedom and justice, civil rights icon, Rosa Parks. Her legacy will live in the hearts of many and her courageous stand against injustice will continue Green to inspire the work of millions. The impact of her gallant sacrifice helped to ignite the beginning of a movement that awakened our nation and shook the world. She will be missed terribly.”

10B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

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2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Early Work for Civil Rights In 1943 and 1944 Rosa Parks tried to register to vote but was denied both times. To push forward the quest for black voting rights, she joined the Montgomery Voters league. In 1943, she was elected secretary of the Montgomery branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and in 1945, she became an adviser for the NAACP Youth Council. In the summer of 1955 she met Martin Luther King, Jr., the young pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, who was in the early stages of his interest in civil rights activism. During the 1940s and 1950s, Rosa Parks earned a living mainly by sewing, and by December 1955, she was employed as a seamstress at the Montgomery Fair department store. To get to and form work, she depended on the Montgomery City Lines buses.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott The Montgomery buses, like other buses throughout the South at that time, were segregated; the first ten seats of every bus being reserved for white passengers. If the whit section was filled to capacity when more white patrons boarded the bus, passengers in the black section were required to give up their seats to the whites. On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks and three other black passengers were asked to vacate an entire row of seats—the first row behind the white section—so that one white man could sit down. The three other blacks stood up, but Rosa Parks refused.

Rosa Parks being fingerprinted in 1955. Rosa Parks was taken to jail booked, fingerprinted, and locked up. One of the three civil rights activists went to the jail to bail her out with a one-hundred-dollar bond was E.D. Nixon, who together with other leaders was looking for a case like

hers to challenge segregation laws in the courts. Nixon asked Parks if she would be willing to user her own case for that purpose. She replied, “If you think it will mean something to Montgomery and do some good, I’ll be happyto go

“We deserve a councilman who is respectful to our community. A

along with it.” On December 5, Rosa Parks, represented by Fred Gray, one of Montgomery’s tow black lawyers, was tried, convicted, and fined fourteen dollars—ten dollars for her infraction and four dollars for court costs. Her attorney immediately started the appeal process. The city’s black organizations, headed by the Women’s Political Council (WPC), began a boycott of Montgomery’s buses on that very day. That night a large group of black ministers and citizens met at a local church and resolved to continue the boycott until the bus company provided fair service to blacks. The meeting led to the formation of the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA), which elected Martin Luther King, Jr., as its president. In the following weeks the MIA and the WPC repeatedly met with city and bus company representatives to no avail. Many boycotters, including Rosa Parks, lost their jobs. Blacks were harassed and attacked. On January 30, 1956 King’s house was bombed while he was away. Still the boycott continued. “In February 1956, after the appeal of Park’s conviction was dismissed on a technicality, lawyers filed suit in U.S. district court on behalf of five women, including Parks, who had been mistreated on the buses. The suit claimed that bus segregation was unconstitutional.” On June 5 a three-judge panel of a United States district court in Alabama voted two Please see PARKS, P.12B

www.kakhan.com

Councilman who will listen to us and acknowledge us. I believe we have found him. My friend, K.A. Khan will treat us with respect and work hard for our community. On November 8th, I humbly ask that The ‘A’ is for Accountability

you support my friend, K.A.Khan for city council district F.”

Derrick D. Wesley Former City Council Candidate

“As your Councilmember, I will fight to reduce the crime that has plagued our district F. It is time for a CANDO councilmember that will fight for our district.” —K.A. Khan

Vote K.A. Khan on November 8th! • As a natural born leader, K.A. Khan has the plans and experience to bring back the glory that district F once had. • K.A. Khan will make it easier to have access to city hall. K.A. Khan

Derrick D. Wesley

• K.A. Khan will improve our neglected district F that had been forgotten for so long.

Candidate for Houston City Council District F

Former City Council Candidate

• K.A. Khan will fight for our fair share of funds to improve our city streets • K. A. Khan will Promote Health and safety for our neighborhoods

November 8 , Vote K.A. Khan th

Paid Political Adv.by K.A.Khan campaign,Lenny Yaffie,Treasurer

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• K.A. Khan will Increase opportunities for economic development in our city • K. A. Khan will establish the necessary resources to reduce crime in our neighborhoods

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT• 11B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Brown continued from P.4B in decline, beset by crime, infrastructure problems, urban blight and a declining tax base. We need a comprehensive livable neighborhood plan all across Houston, I have that plan. We face real traffic, transit, air pollution, and flooding problems here in Houston. We need a workable plan to reduce congestion, expand mass transit options and transit-oriented development. We should and work with the County to plan to solve our stormwater management and flooding problems. I will use my professional experience in 40 Houston neighborhoods to tackle those problems. In light of all that’s happened in recent weeks, we need experienced leadership and long-term planning for Houston’s future. I am the candidate qualified to work with the Mayor to help get the job done on City Council. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? BROWN: I believe it is having a coherent vision for our city, along with my years of urban planning and city building experience that will best serve Houstonians on City Council. Houston has historically lacked an over-arching vision for its future growth, as well as coordinated planning. This, in part, explains many of the problems the City faces today. We can come together with a shared vision for the kind of future city we want, and a nuts and bolts, practical plan to get us there. We must think big to shape Houston’s future, for success in the 21st century. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? BROWN: Good leadership is essential during difficult times. In the last weeks we have seen the benefits of strong leadership during a crisis, as well as the disastrous consequences when it is lacking. A good leader must also have a good plan and good execution. Our response to Hurricane Katrina is admirable, and much of the response to Rita is positive as well. Obviously, the evacuation of the Houston area can be improved, particularly in terms of getting fuel to motorists, better use of other forms of transportation, and early access to “contra-flow” lanes on the highways. I also think local government can set up a communication network with citizens by using civic clubs and super-neighborhood organizations to disseminate timely messages on a neighborhood level. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? BROWN: 7.5, based on the need for better coordination and pre-planning.

Aiyer continued from P.4B rently a Trustee for the Houston Community College System. I know how City government works and how to get things done. As a management consultant and attorney in the private sector, I have worked with public organiza-

tions to improve their processes and performance. I will do the same at City Hall to get the most out of taxpayer dollars. Houston is a great city of hope and opportunity, but we face challenges. We must improve public safety, repair our aging infrastructure, revitalize communities and expand economic opportunity for all. Community needs are great and resources are scarce, but with strong leadership on Council, working with the mayor, we can achieve a bright future for Houston. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? AIYER: I have been able, in both public service and the private sector, to develop innovative solutions to difficult problems. The City faces challenges and the budget is tight. City government must think “outside the box” to meet these challenges. The City must look at working with other local governments and the private sector to maximize taxpayer dollars and delivery of vital services, such as public safety protection and badly needed infrastructure improvements. In the private sector I have worked with public entities to solve these kinds of problems, and have done the same in my service with HCCS. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? AIYER: Good leadership is vital in times of crisis, and we have been lucky here in Houston to have strong leadership from the City and County. Looking back at any situation, there are always things that can be done better. The evacuation for Hurricane Rita clearly could have gone more smoothly, and the influx of evacuees from Hurricane Katrina has caused some difficulties. But overall, the response in Houston has been excellent. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? AIYER: Houstonians get a 10 for their amazing generosity in helping Katrina victims. The problems associated with Rita’s evacuation and those few bad apples who took advantage of the situation hurt a little bit, but I would give our city a 9 for how it has handled a very challenging several weeks.

Elford continued from P.4B improvements in our Police and firefighters to protect our citizens and neighborhoods and work closer with the County, State and Federal government in securing the funds needed to make the improvements. These are accomplishable goals and I am the candidate most experienced with business, environmental and financial issues and most capable of helping the Administration and all the citizens achieve these goals. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? ELFORD: My greatest strength lies in my ability to not just address and correct problems but to make changes that result in lasting

12B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

and continually improving long term solutions. My communication skills, experience and relationships on the County, State and Federal levels will help the entire Council and City obtain the resources we need to take Houston to the next great level. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? ELFORD: I believe that determined and responsive leadership is critical in such situations. Houston responded in a first class manner as did our Leaders in both Katrina and Rita. And of course there are lessons to be learned. In the future we must be more specific in terms of what areas need to be mandated to evacuate. And we must be more prepared to meet the needs associated with transportation caused by such mass movement, such as fuel. I have recommended establishing fuel depots at all arterial truck weigh stations in evacuation routes and be prepared to fill those depots with fuel on a rapid basis. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? ELFORD: Overwhelmingly a 10.

Lovell continued from P.4B portation and childcare. I am a former small business owner and worked for the Texas Comptroller’s Local Government Assistance Division. I have started successful nonprofit organizations. I’ve been a leader bringing people together to fight gangs and drugs in my neighborhood, start an inner city Little League, create after-school and women’s healthcare programs, and revitalize parks. My work in jobs creation and economic development has given me the experience Houston needs now. I have worked in every community in this city. That’s why I have the support of diverse leaders like Congressman Al Green, Representative Garnet Coleman, Commissioner Sylvia Garcia, Council Member Adrian Garcia, and Rev. Bill Lawson. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? LOVELL: My greatest strength is that I care about people, my neighborhood and my city. Because I care, I have been active in my church, my neighborhood and my children’s schools, and in working to improve the quality of life for many different communities. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? LOVELL: We learned from Katrina and Rita how important our city government is in a time of crisis. The partnerships that were brought together between the city and the county worked. This model should continue as we move forward. But clearly, the issue of traffic congestion during an evacuation has to be fixed. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster?

LOVELL: I would rank our response as an 8: quick, decisive and competent, but with some lessons to be learned.

Sekula-Gibbs continued from P.4B the need for emergency room visits and saving taxpayer dollars. I fought for and helped pass a stronger smoking ordinance, helped roll back property taxes, and worked to pass a resolution to end the San Jacinto Rail project which would have routed toxic chemicals through the East End, South Houston and Clear Lake. I am a strong supporter of Homeland Security and the preservation of Ellington Field. In order to move our city forward, I need your support and your vote. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? SEKULA-GIBBS: Since joining City Council I have worked hard to increase the number of federally qualified community health clinics from one to nine, with four more in the wings. Yet, Harris County qualifies for twenty-five such clinics and the need is great, with over one million uninsured. These clinics provide high quality health care to low-income and uninsured Houstonians on a sliding scale basis, helping to take pressure off of crowded emergency rooms. My goal is to improve access to health care for every Houstonian, reducing the high infant mortality rate, improving childhood immunizations and reversing dangerous childhood obesity trends that are so devastating to minority communities. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would do differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? SEKULA-GIBBS: Decisive leadership is crucial in times of crisis. We need effective communication between elected officials so we can have more information on who is to shelter in place and who needs to evacuate. When a mandatory evacuation is called, we must immediately implement contra flow lanes on all major freeways and highways and have regular stops for gas and water. We should evacuate citizens by zip code instead of by zones, which was very confusing to some. We should also consider passenger rail and freight rail for short outof-town evacuation trips. They should be equipped with toilets and water, and clearly marked as emergency vehicles. In times of crisis things will go wrong, but practicing will help reduce the risks to our most vulnerable: the elderly, the very young, the disabled, the ill and our pets. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? SEKULA-GIBBS: Houston has done a good job of dealing with two very different but very challenging disasters. With Hurricane Katrina, we opened the gates of the city to receive visitors from New Orleans who were in serious need of shelter, food, clothing and medical care. These were provided in a timely, respectful and professional manner. With Hurricane Rita, over 2 million Houston-area residents became evacuees. We learned some important lessons about mandatory evacuations and will hopefully be

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better prepared for the next disaster, whether natural or man-made.

Berry continued from P .4B I give them the latitude, support and encouragement to enable them to make a difference in the lives of people we serve. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would do differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? BERRY: Good leadership is extremely important. During Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita, the nation saw that Houston is a city of heroes, from our police officers and firefighters who put their lives on the line every day to our school children who volunteered their time to help those less fortunate. Each of these heroes, however, looked to the City leadership to coordinate and guide them in these efforts. Outstanding leadership ensured that resources and manpower were directed to the areas where they were most, and that our City employees and citizens worked together to provide a great result. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? BERRY: I rate our city’s response as a 9. While our response was outstanding, we can learn from our recent experiences to improve our response during the next crisis.

Stoma continued from P.4B North Harris College and the University of Houston; and served as a legislative aid in the Texas House of Representatives. I hold a Master of Business Administration Degree from Houston’s University of St. Thomas and a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Sam Houston State University. My professional career is as a business and technology consultant working for Fortune 500 companies and government agencies, like NASA, in bringing business solutions to market that enhance profits or cut operational costs. I have 15 years of experience in managing profit and loss centers where my performance is measured on commitments made and commitments kept; and, the bottom-line is execution. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? STOMA: I am a proven business and technology problem solver who has been responsible for delivering and executing business solutions for senior management at Fortune 500 companies. As a senior business manager having over 15 years experience in defining and managing business profit and loss centers and I have extensive experience in managing multi-million dollar projects, integrating business acquisitions, and formulating business strategy. Having a proven track record in state government as a Legislative Aid in the Texas House of Representatives, I have co-authored legislation that has become law in Texas.

Please see NEXT PAGE, P.B9


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Stoma

Lawrence

continued from P.12B

continued from P.6B

TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? STOMA: Good leadership is not needed in times of crisis; EXCEPTIONAL leadership is required. Mayor White, Judge Eckels, and our combined emergency response teams provided exceptional leadership during the Katrina and Rita crisises. Lessons learned should include making provisions for distributed fuel depots along evacuation routes and providing mass transit evaluation centers (perhaps around our Park N Ride facilities) that would easy traffic congestion and move many people quickly and efficiently.

addressing our long term flooding and drainage requirements. It is vital to Houston’s economic future to rebuild our aging infrastructure and ensure that our neighborhoods and businesses have proper drainage and flooding protections. Secondly, we reduced the tax rate for our constituents. Finally, we have shifted City Hall’s attention back to strengthening our neighborhoods and offering them better protections. We created a flooding and drainage committee to develop long term solutions to our neighborhood flooding. We made it illegal to bring in fill dirt to areas within our flood plain. We moved the Neighborhood Protection Corps into HPD to bring about better enforcement. I feel I have demonstrated that I can best represent the needs of District A. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? LAWRENCE: My greatest

TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? STOMA: Definitely, a 10!

strength lies in my ability to lay aside any personal agenda and work to craft bi-partisan solutions to the problems which face our great City. Rejecting pride of authorship, I simply work to learn all that I can about an issue and then work with my colleagues to fashion common sense approaches to our problems. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? LAWRENCE: I offer Mayor White and County Judge Robert Eckels as an example of laying aside any potential personal agenda and working for the betterment of our City and region. Certainly, they should be applauded for working together and offering such a strong and effective response to the challenges provided by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. I think common sense tells us that we need a direct line of communication to the Governor’s office during an emergency and that the State has to react faster to any prob-

lems that surface during a time of crisis. In the days ahead, we should revisit our emergency response plan(s) and make any necessary corrections to it. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? LAWRENCE: 9, there is always room for improvement!

Galloway-Hall continued from P.6B Board, I served. As volunteer staff member for the office of Houston City Council, I lovingly served the constituents of District B. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? GALLOWAY-HALL: I work well with all people, I am a consensus builder, and having attended Prairie View A&M University, I have a voracious appetite for knowledge and I know and understand the role of a councilmember. Also one

of my strengths is my negotiation skills. Leadership is also one of my strong suits. Having organized and been elected to served as a PTA president, Vice President and Secretary of the Heather Ridge Homeowners Association, this skill was exemplified. Lastly, I am personable, thoughtful, thorough and caring of others. My philosophy is that it is not about “Me”, it is about “you”. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? GALLOWAY-HALL: Good leadership is imminently important at all times, not just in a crisis. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? GALLOWAY-HALL: I would rate Houston’s response to Katrina Please see HALL, P.14B

Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS

LET’S BUILD A BETTER HOUSTON

• Build A Booming Hi-Tech Economy Expand Jobs, Investment & The City Tax Base

• Build Strong, Safe Neighborhoods Home Ownership, Family Values

• Build A Real Quality Of Life City Infrastructure, Clean Air, Flood Control, Green Space, Beautification

• Build Efficient, Transparent City Government Better Services; Less Bureaucracy

—Plan Ahead—

Give Taxpayers A Break www.peterbrownforcouncil.org Paid political advertisement by the Peter Brown Campaign, Fred Zeidman, Treasurer. NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT• 13B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Galloway-Hall continued from P.13B as a 10 (ten). Before Katrina victims asked for The City of Houston’s help, City leaders extended their hand of assistance, canceling conventions and entertainment engagements to create a “One Stop facility” complete with cafeteria, pharmacy, dentist, gymnasium and more for the victims of this horrible natural disaster. I would give The City of Houston a 9 (nine) on a scale of (1 to 10). Because Hurricane Rita marked Houston’s first disaster evacuation, it was not perfect. However, I believe that because of the lessons learned during Rita, City leaders will perform much better in future disasters.

Johnson continued from P.6B puters in the City through his alliance with Bridging the Digital Devise; I Provide summer jobs for over 120 high school students during summer for the last five years; I Host Job Training conferences for the District B community; I Host Back To School Drives within the community. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? JOHNSON: My greatest strength is my ability to build strong institutions and create a multitude of opportunities for my community. After the passing of several years of plans in process, good speeches and promises broken it is time for action. I have created Jobs in District B I have rehabilitated homes in District B. I provided fifty computers during Hurricane Katrina to the George R Brown Convention Center Prior to FEMA arriving, ACTIONS!!! TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? JOHNSON: Good Leadership in a time of crisis cannot be placed on any higher plain then to say that at its very nature it can be the difference between life or death Inept leadership can cause unnecessary hardship and unneeded heartbreaks. Dr. King said “That it is not where a man stands in a moment of peace but where he stands in a moment of controversy that will determine the true character of the man”. During Hurricane Katrina we saw the consequence of political favors and nepotism. Mike Brown the FEMA coordinator was slow to act either out of poor planning or no true disaster planning experience. We cannot assume that because a person has worked on a campaign that he or she is now qualified to be placed in a leadership position. Leadership is evidenced by a proven track record. As member of City Council I will choose leaders who have shown through their education and experience their capability to lead. Second, I will listen to the community leaders and when they say there is a problem and a solution that will prevent the problem from further causing any damage to the community I will use every tool within my jurisdiction to prevent any harm to my constituents. Third and Final I will work with all the

departments involved in the disaster to ensure that the communication breakdown between the Governor and the Department of Transportation that happened during Rita does not happen in my office. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? JOHNSON: In light of the amount of people involved in the evacuation I must commend the Mayor for a job well done by giving the city an 8.

would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? CLUTTERBUCK: Houston gets a 10 for dealing promptly and effectively in helping our Louisiana neighbors during their time of crisis after Hurricane Katrina. There is room for improvement in Houston’s evacuation planning and execution following Hurricane Rita. It is imperative that Houston work quickly, while the evacuation issues are fresh on our minds, to evaluate what we did well and prepare a plan to remedy the errors.

Clutterbuck Hittner continued from P.8B continued from P.6B

fied, experienced officials in local government. As President of my neighborhood civic club for the past 2 years, I have seen the need for effective leadership to address the important issues of drainage and infrastructure improvement and to provide a timely response to needs of the taxpaying constituents. As a former part-owner of a small business (5-P Photographic Processing Laboratories), I know that small business is the economic engine that drives our economy, employs our residents, and provides a tax base for our city. I know firsthand the challenges and rewards of providing quality service, maintaining a physical plant, complying with government regulations, and making a payroll. As a member of City Council, my small business experience will be the standard by which I evaluate ordinances and regulations. As a mother, as a homeowner, and as a community leader, I know the needs of District C and I have the unique experience necessary to provide outstanding service on City Council. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? CLUTTERBUCK: My greatest strength lies in my ability to work well with others and to find solutions to complex issues. I have a track record and a history working in our community on neighborhood issues of safety and infrastructure, working as a team captain in the Habitat for Humanity SuperBuild, and volunteering and directing programs at my church. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? CLUTTERBUCK: Good Leadership is essential in a time of crisis. The events of the past month in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita have highlighted the need to have experienced elected officials at all levels of leadership. As the one candidate for Houston City Council who has had direct, hands-on experience working on flood control matters for our region I know how to work with all levels of municipal, county, state and federal government both on matters of preparedness as well as crisis management. Any future plan for hurricane or disaster evacuation must include collaboration with the State to open counter-flow lanes sooner, plans for delivery of fuel and water, a regional evacuation agreement whereby communities are staggered in their departure and return times, plans for placement of porta-potties along evacuation routes, etc. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how

14B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

ing excellent city services to its citizens (i.e., police protection, fire, EMS, infrastructure improvements, etc.); 3) Lowering property taxes; 4) Promoting partnerships with the county and other governmental entities to consolidate efforts and eliminate duplicative and wasteful government spending; and 5) Fighting to ensure immediate and effective flood control measures are implemented to protect District C and its citizens. As a graduate of Texas A&M (B.S.) and the University of Texas (J.D.), I also earned a Master’s Degree in Public Affairs (with a concentration in city issues and planning) from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT. I ask for your support to continue my service to the community as a member of Houston City Council. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? HITTNER: 1) Leadership abilities; 2) Hard work ethic; and 3) Experience and background in government. As the Houston Police Officers’ Union observed: “When it is all said and done, the Union is looking for one thing in the candidates we decide to support, and that is leadership.” said Hans Marticiuc, President of the HPOU. “Like many candidates, we found George to be very informed on the issues affecting HPD; but what set him apart was his commitment to making sure the 4,800-plus men and women who proudly wear our uniform have the resources they need to fulfill an increasingly difficult mission.” TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? HITTNER: The citizens of Houston deserve exceptional leadership from their elected officials every day. Such leadership becomes even more critical during times of crisis. What most pleased me most during Houston and Harris County’s response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita was how our elected officials were able to put political differences aside, and work together to achieve a common and critical goal of protecting citizens. The lasting effect of these experiences is now the proven coordination and communication abilities our local, county and state governments. This needs to remain government’s goal. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? HITTNER: 8.5 – very good; but there is always room for improvement.

Vote! Nov. 8, 2005!

Siverson

Lee

continued from P.8B

continued from P.8B

C Capital Improvement Project (CIP) meeting for eight years – the only candidate to have done so. I am also the only candidate who has attended CIP meetings in all 9 Districts, demonstrating a long-term commitment to learning about city-wide problems and improvement efforts. In addition, I owned a small business for several years. My experience as a “hands on” manager, working with tight budgets and a small staff to meet diverse needs, is an asset needed by the future Council Member. District C needs a Council Member who has the maturity and experience to get the job done and will make serving the residents of District C their highest priority. I am that candidate.

First and foremost I am committed to making our City and this District a better place to live for our families and neighbors. I will be responsive to my constituents. You are the greatest asset to the District, and I want to make sure that I respond to your concerns-on deed restrictions, traffic projects and safety issues. When you call or email my office, I plan to get back with you within 24 hours. And to make the office more accessible I propose to have weekend office hours at local libraries-so that you can bring your concerns directly to me. Finally, I will push for efficient use of city assets and resources.

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? SIVERSON: My greatest strength is my problem-solving ability. I am able to prioritize needs and use available resources to achieve results. I have excellent organizational abilities and am able to utilize my leadership skills to develop successful projects and implement plans. District C residents need a Council Member who recognizes the needs in our area are great and has a plan for moving forward. I am that candidate. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? SIVERSON: Good leadership in a time of crisis is imperative. Good leadership can be the difference between success and failure, and in extreme cases, life or death. Hindsight is always 20/20. It is easy to see things that should have been done differently after the fact. I applaud city and county officials and employees for their efforts during recent weeks. Now that the hurricanes have passed, we must assess the job that was done at every level and work to improve our response. Long-standing assumptions about disaster response must be reevaluated. When mass disasters occur, buses should not be kept waiting in the parking lots for long periods of time, or worse, turned away from the Astrodome. Initial coordination of volunteers could be greatly improved. Space should be provided inside for people to wait and water and bathroom facilities should be available at all times. As for the evacuation prior to Hurricane Rita, contraflow lanes must be opened earlier and law enforcement officials must be stationed at bottlenecks as soon as evacuations are ordered. Gas and water must be available on evacuation routes and citizens must be advised to prepare for heat, thirst and hunger during prolonged trips. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? SIVERSON: I would give the city 10 points. I think our citizens responded in such a compassionate and generous way to the survivors of Hurricane Katrina and Rita. City and County officials and employees went above and beyond the call of duty to see that citizens in need received help. We must continue to build on our successes and implement changes that will better prepare us for future disasters.

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TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? LEE: My greatest strengths are my professional background and my community. I am a tax lawyer and CPA currently serving as an Associate General Counsel in the Legal Department of AIG American General. I currently serve on the boards of Children at Risk; SPARK Park; Marilyn Estates Civic Association; and the board of the UH Law Alumni Association. I am a graduate of the United Way ‘s Project Blueprint and a senior fellow of American Leadership Forum. Also I am member of the Downtown Association, the Downtown Kiwanis Club, the University of Houston Alumni Organization, and the Texas Exes. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? LEE: Leadership is extremely important in times of crisis. In situations such as Rita and Katrina, citizens look to elected officials to provide answers, direction and reassurances. Leading in times of crisis requires that our city elected officials be visible and available; communicate supportively, carefully and regularly; control their behavior and reactions; and give the situation perspective to create alignment of purpose. I believe the City and County, given the circumstances, responded extremely well to the Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. With regard to the evacuation from Hurricane Rita, my primary concerns were the slowness of converting inbound highway roads into counter flow lanes and the lack of fuel on evacuation routes. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? LEE: I would give the City a “7” on its recent response to Rita.

Allen continued from P.8B of the Speakers Bureau and later became the coordinator. Was a part of the planning and implementation of the SHARE program for senior citizens and wrote the first SHARE brochure. Three years in the Private Sector as a Director of Community Outreach and Spokesperson for the Houston Eye Clinic. I was responsible for planning the opening of five of the nine clinics as well as coordinating health fairs. The last 14 Please see ALLEN, P.6B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Allen continued from P.14B years in Public Service as a Community Liaison and Administration Manager in the Public Affairs Division of HPD serving under four Police Chiefs. Directly responsible for all activities of the four Ministers Against groups, planned and coordinated cultural diversity workshops, the Chief’s Crime Summits, the MultiCultural Receptions and the Chief’s Annual Grandparents Luncheon. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? ALLEN: My greatest strengths include getting along with diverse groups of people and working together to get projects accomplished. I enjoy helping people and sharing knowledge. I am blessed to be “ old enough to know how it was and young enough to appreciate how life is today.” TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? ALLEN: Good leadership is needed at all times, especially in time of crisis. You must have a person that can look at a situation, come up with a plan and have the nerve to implement the plan. A good leader must be able to make a decision. The one thing I possibly

would have done in responding to Hurricane Rita is planned to make I45 and I-10 one-way freeways earlier. However, I think the Mayor and County Judge did an excellent job in preparing the city for the situation at hand. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? ALLEN: Perhaps I am biased, but I think the City deserves a 10. This was our first, and even with the Katrina survivors, Houston has done a fantastic job in both disaster cases.

Jones continued from P.8B works projects such as drainage and flood control, mobility and transportation, pedestrian safety, infrastructure and historic architectural preservation. I have been a strong voice for results in the area of compliance by the city with accessibility for persons with disabilities. I have also fought for tax fairness particularly for small business owners and homeowners against taxation by quasi-governmental agencies. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? JONES: My personal strength includes the ability to listen to citizens, evaluate options, and recommend appropriate actions on issues important to the community. As a

result, I have been able to consistently bring leadership in getting things done in a bipartisan manner. TAYLOR In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? JONES: Leadership is critical in any serious endeavor and particularly in a time of crisis. Citizens need to be able to trust the judgment of their leaders to make the right decisions at critical times. The Hurricane Rita evacuation, while considered a success by many, demonstrated that more coordination, planning and education in the movement of virtually an entire city needs to be developed. All of us can use the Rita experience as a learning exercise to improve upon our response in the future. Hurricane Katrina demonstrated the importance of leadership to make quick sound decisions and to act in a humanitarian way to the interest of the evacuees. We now have that ability to assess our homeland security plans and evaluate our readiness in similar situations in the future.

county responded in an exemplary manner. Citizens, businesses, religious organizations and other nonprofits also responded with a tremendous outpouring of support. The generosity of citizens in volunteering time, money, shelter, goods and services made the Katrina relief effort a model of humanitarian effort to the nation and world. With respect to Rita, gridlock and confusion on the freeways, lack of fuel, food, water and EMS service, demonstrates the urgency to develop a comprehensive plan of evacuation. Any evacuation plan needs to coordinate the entire effort of local, state and federal government in a more unified approach in an emergency.

and effectively. I have also been producing and directing educational and current affairs documentary movies. . For the past 10 years, I have been hosting a highly rated Radio and TV talk show, known as “Voice of Freedom.” This experience has given me a deeper insight of human values, its problems and solutions. During the last democratic elections in Pakistan, the Government of Pakistan invited me as an U.S. Media Observer.

Shike

TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? SHIKE: Yes. Good leadership is extremely important. I would have set up a better plan for evacuation and would have made sure that there was gasoline, water and wood available for all our innocent citizens. I would have demanded from the “DOT” to make sure that the highways are open from both sides so the citizens would have not gone through the atrocious punishment.

continued from P.8B ance sheet preparation.I have been running a profitable mortgage company called Atlas Mortgage, located in the heart of District F. I have also trained many young people in the art of managing mortgage business, for the past twelve years. I have extensively traveled around the World. It has broadened my intellectual horizon that I can take correct decisions when faced with problems and issues. During my numerous travels, I have also observed the functioning and set up of many types of government. This will enabled me to serve the City of Houston efficiently

TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? I would rate our city’s response to hurricane Katrina as an 8 or Aand hurricane Rita, a 7 or B-. Katrina required coordination of the city and county to quickly prepare shelter, medical care, clothing, food and water to evacuees. The city and

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? SHIKE: Listening, working and sharing with people. I make sure that a project is completed before jumping on a new project. Never put today’s work on next day.

Please see PAGE, P.17B

Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS

ECT

RE-EL

Shelley

Sekula-Gibbs Houston City Council At Large, Position 3

www.sekula-gibbs.com

FOR A HEALTHY HOUSTON • • • • • • •

Increase Access to Health Care Exercise Fiscal Responsibility Enhance Quality of Life Protect Neighborhoods Improve Mobility Promote Economic Growth Strengthen Public Safety

Pol. Adv. Pd by the Shelley Sekula-Gibbs, M.D. Campaign Itze Soliz-Matthews, Treasurer, P.O. Box 890954; Houston TX 77289-0954

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• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT • 15B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS VOTER INFORMATION

Important 2005 Dates To Remember:

FROM TEXAS SECRETARY OF STATE

Have you moved to another county?

OCTOBER 24, 2005: First Day Of Early Voting

You must reregister! Fill out a new application and mail it, or take it in person, to the Voter Registrar of your new county. You will be registered 30 days after your application is submitted. You will receive a new certificate. If your registration in the new county is not yet effective, you may be able to vote a “limited” ballot in your new county of residence on candidates or issues common between your old and new county. You may vote this “limited” ballot after moving and only during early voting by personal appearance (not Election Day) or by mail, if: you were registered to vote in your former county at the time you moved; and your registration in your new county is not effective.

NOVEMBER 1, 2005: Last Day To Apply for Ballot by Mail NOVEMBER 4, 2005: Last Day of Early Voting November 8, 2005: Election Day

White continued from P.2B

Has your name changed? Promptly notify the Voter Registrar, in writing, of the change using the same steps as for IF YOU MOVE WITHIN THE COUNTY. You will receive a new certificate 30 days after your name change notice is submitted. You may continue to vote during this period. If you do not have your certificate in hand, you may sign an affidavit at the polls and present a form of identification.

Commonly Asked Questions That Every Voter Should Know: Q. Where do I vote? A. Polling places are usually listed in your local newspapers in the weeks before the election. Call your County Clerk, County Elections Administrator, or political subdivision conducting the election in order to find your polling location. Q. What is “early voting?” A. "Early voting" is a way to cast your ballot before Election Day either in person or by mail.

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? MAYOR WHITE: Probably my greatest strength is the strength and depth of resources of this incredible city. Through building active partnerships with community leaders, other governments and corporate citizens utilizing these resources, I can effectively address the problems facing our great city. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? MAYOR WHITE: The strong working relationship I share with Judge Eckels and county government officials and leaders in government from surrounding jurisdictions was imperative to successful implementation of safety procedures. Our duty is to work together to address the dangers our city faces, setting aside political differences and exerting our leadership to protect and serve the citizens who elected us.

Public Officials Contacts & Email Addresses Your Opinion Counts! Houston City Council meetings are conducted each week on Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. and Wednesdays beginning at 9:00 a.m. Any citizen may speak before Council on a Tuesday beginning at 2:00 p.m. To reserve time to address City Council (up to three minutes), contact the City Secretary’s Office (713.247.1840) prior to the commencement of the meeting. All Council meetings are open to the public and held at City Hall located at 900 Bagby, 2nd Floor in Downtown, Houston.

mayor@cityofhouston.net

Office of City Controller 713-247-1440 controller@cityofhouston.net

City council Distict F 713-247-2002

At-Large Position #2 713-247-2013

districtf@cityofhouston.net

atlarge2@cityofhouston.net

City Council District G 713-247-2007

At-Large Position #3 713-247-2005

districtg@cityofhouston.net

atlarge3@cityofhouston.net

City Council District H 713-247-2003

At-Large Position #4 713-247-2012

districth@cityofhouston.net

atlarge4@cityofhouston.net

City Council District D 713-247-2001

City Council District I 713-247-2011

districtd@cityofhouston.net

At-Large Position #5 713-247-2006

districti@cityofhouston.net

atlarge5@cityofhouston.net

City Council District E 713-247-2008

At-Large Position #1 713-247-2014

At-Large Position #3 713-247-2005

districte@cityofhouston.net

atlarge1@cityofhouston.net

atlarge3@cityofhouston.net

districta@cityofhouston.net

City Council District B 713-247-2009 districtb@cityofhouston.net

City Council District C 713-247-2004 districtc@cityofhouston.net

TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? MAYOR WHITE: Our city responded appropriately to Katrina and Rita both in safety precautions taken and in aid rendered to our neighbors after these devastating events. The evacuation that occurred in response to hurricane Rita reduced the risk of loss of thousands of lives. While many things went well, a number of things did not. The state’s procedures to facilitate the increase flow of traffic outside our city as well as ensuring sufficient fuel along evacuation routes were not successful. Consequently, too many people evacuating were caught in gridlock. The resolution of these problems, which aren’t within the control of local officials, will be the focus of the task force that the Governor, Judge Eckels and I have appointed.

engineers. I have provided the White House with plans to deter nuclear war. During a Korean continued from P.4B peninsula exercise, I crafted a plan to greatly reduce Korean civilian causalities. I authored the Global Information Operation Planning Order for defeating terrorism. I was handpicked to correct the problems of the Houston Emergency Center. I reduced emergency call response times for EMS and Fire incidents. I helped the City win over $6 million in Homeland Security grants. My goals are to 1) Significantly improve Emergency Services and Homeland Security, 2) Support an immigration program that enforces all laws and 3) Provide “smart limited government” that will improve public services.

Morales

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? MORALES: Integrity, leadership and vision are my strengths. General Macarthur’s credo was Duty, Honor, and Country. I place honor first. If you live an honorable life then everything else falls in place and you don’t get into a position that the end justifies the means. Living an honorable life also makes you a better leader. Being a great leader means you take care of those that work for you and for the one you work for. One must lead by example for people to follow. Finally, a great leader must have the vision necessary to navigate the uncertainties of the future.

Office of the Mayor 713-247-2200

City Council District A 713-247-2010

The unfortunate occurrences of Katrina and Rita have given us the opportunity to realistically evaluate the emergency response procedures our city has in place. I have appointed a task force and we are meeting with leaders in the region to assess the current emergency procedures and make recommendations for change based on these recent experiences. We are going to address the problems head-on and come up with viable solutions.

16B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? MORALES: Leadership is a critical component in times of a crisis. Experience is also important. But what is needed is leadership before a crisis happens. One of the reasons why I am running for office is because our leaders were not listening to problems we have with emergency services. We were very fortunate that the Rita missed the city; otherwise our vulnerabilities could have been exposed. Here are just a few items that I tried correct before a natural disaster: We Need More Police Officers, Fire Fighters And Paramedics; We Need To Improve Our Emergency Planning And Preparedness; We Need To Receive Our Fair Share Of Federal Government Funding; We Need More Emergency Crisis Training and Exercises; We Need To Fix Our Old Unreliable Emergency Communications; We Need An Evacuation Plan That Includes All Major Metropolitan Areas Of The State; and We Need To Ensure There Is Adequate Food, Water And Fuel Available Inside and Outside The City. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? MORALES: Katrina – 8. We need to ensure next time that we have better accountability of evacuees. Too many sex offenders were allowed into our City with out any knowledge on their whereabouts.

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2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Shike continued from P.15B TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? SHIKE: I would say it was about six (6) because the highways, gasoline, water and food was not available.

Garcia continued from P.9B

GARCIA: A task force committee has been formed to review the city’s evacuation efforts and I have already held hearings in my committee to review what measures can be enacted immediately. We are still in the hurricane season and while I was very impressed with our evacuation efforts and leadership of our public safety officials, I believe we can always do better. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? GARCIA: I would give us a rating of 9.

in times of crisis is crucial. We learned valuable lessons during Katrina and Rita. These lessons will no doubt be factored into future emergency management plans.

me to follow through on my convictions. If I need to stand against special interests, only my independence will let me do so. My independence is my greatest strength.

TAYLOR:: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? ALVARADO: Our local government demonstrated great leadership. I’d give us an 8.

TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? PARRAS: Good, strong, competent leadership is essential in times of crisis. Without it companies fail, countries falter, and people die. Katrina. I think that Houston did a fine job responding to the aftermath and failures in the Louisiana and federal government. Houston responded with compassion and understanding to a region that was destroyed. Residents responded with an outpouring of care and love unmatched almost anywhere. I am very proud of the City’s response to Katrina and can think of little significant thing that I would do to change the City’s response.Rita. With the benefit of hindsight, I certainly would have responded differently. First, it was a mistake to call for evacuations or ring the alarm bell without being adequately prepared for the resulting traffic congestion. People died and they didn’t have to. On the heels of Rita we should be more alert to the needed coordination between local and state authorities. We weren’t. And, I’ve heard of reports that plans for counter flow lanes had been dismissed in the past because local officials thought they were too difficult to implement.

Parras continued from P.9B

public safety, especially as our city continues to grow. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? GARCIA: I believe in working hard for my constituents. It is a trait my late father instilled in me and anyone, who knows my work ethic, knows that I am accessible and willing to listen. A good example of this is my District H C.A.R.E.S. project where I saw the need to clean up clogged ditches, culverts, and abandoned weeded lots. My office now has a program in place where we can clean up these problem areas in a timely fashion. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would do differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita?

Alvarado continued from P.9B Pro Tem, I have the opportunity to work closely with Mayor White on key policy and budget issues. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? ALVARADO: My knowledge of city government at both the administrative and legislative levels, my passion for public service, my commitment to the community, and my experience in resolving issue are traits that I bring to this office. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? ALVARADO: Good leadership

offices I was trained to fight governmental abuse, injustice, and unequal treatment. I was trained to stand up for the disadvantaged. My education and training in politics and the law, as well as my career as a defender, make me uniquely qualified to forcefully advocate for District I residents. TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? PARRAS: Independence. Unlike career politicians I have built a career of my own and now seek to enter politics without owing anybody anything. I have built a reputation for hard work, superior quality, and successful results in my life’s work. I will lend my education and training to public policy debates. I will study options and make the best choice for my constituents. In the end, however, it will be my independence that allows

If this is true then it is unfortunate for those that lost their lives.I am also concerned that too much suffering, frustration and money was needlessly spent by City residents. People that did not need to evacuate did so because they were alarmed and frightened, not because they were truly in danger. In an orderly evacuation, no one dies because they are stuck in traffic. Something went seriously wrong in this evacuation and more study of our response and preparations is needed. The plan was more akin to yelling fire in a crowded theatre. Houston was lucky and our officials need to be better prepared, that’s their job. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? PARRAS: Katrina — 8 — very little room for improvement.Rita — 6 — better than average response but lots of room for improvement. Our recently shared experience with widespread danger demonstrates the importance of voting for highly competent and qualified officials. What we’ve learned from the New Orleans is that a city will ultimately be judged by the way it treats its poor and disadvantaged residents. Houston can do better.

Vote! Nov. 8, 2005!

Exercise Your Right To Vote On November 8, 2005! A message from HOUSTON BUSINESS CONNECTIONS

Houston City Council At-Large Position #5

Vote For Michael (Mike) “I salute Black History and want to pay tribute to it’s heroes. Please help me, John Shike, Candidate for Houston City Council District F to change the name of Wilcrest Dr. to Rosa Parks Dr. To make our hero Dr. King’s dream comes true.”—John Shike

Elect An ACCOUNTABLE INNOVATOR!

JohnSHIKE

MICHAEL (MIKE) STOMA

FOR HOUSTON CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT F

DEDICATED • QUALIFIED • COMMITTED •

Do you want to re-elect a hypocrite??? If your answer is “NO” then vote for the only best choice:

John Shike for Houston City Council District F

Endorsements: AFL-CIO Council • Tejano Democrats • Harris County Young • Democrats GLBT Political Caucus • Houston Black Democrats • Blackdems •

What John Shike Will Do For You: • I will help engage our youth through more attractive after school programs • I will do what I can to lower taxes • I will help and try to minimize crime in District F • I will work to bring economic boom for District F

Thank You for Your Vote. Let’s Clean up and Redirect Spending Priorities to better City Services.

VOTE NOV. 8TH, 2005

Pol. Ad. Paid By John Shike campaign for Houston City Council District "F" N. Renteria Treasurer 6523 Briar Glade Houston, Texas 77072 Phone: (281)561-8400 www.johnshike.com Email: shike2004@yahoo.com

READY TO SERVE THE PEOPLE OF HOUSTON! Paid Political Advertisement by the Michael Stoma Campaign,13838 Hollowgreen Drive • Houston, TX 77082

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT • 17B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL 11 years and have done business in the district for over 20 continued from P.8B years. I know what our district really needs. We need solutions to our problems and not just lip service during election time.

K.A. Khan

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? K.A. KHAN: My greatest strength is the ability to listen. I am a patient listener and believe that people need to be heard in order to understand them and their problems. In order to find an adequate solution one must be understanding and patience into City Hall. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would have done differently in responding to Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Rita? K.A. KHAN: I believe that leadership during time of crisis is very much needed. Citizens elect us to do a job and in time of crisis they expect us to come true . During the last few months we have seen natural disasters and we have seen how leaders in different cities react to crisis. It is my opinion that one’s best qualities are exposed during such times. I believe that the City of Houston did an extremely good job during Katrina hurricanes by taking in our Louisiana neighbors and a better job evacuating our city when Rita arrived . The only thing that I would do different was that I would recommend that we have a plan for our return back to our cities in time of evacuations. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? K.A. KHAN: From 1 to 10, I believe that the City of Houston performed a 9. I believe that we were better prepared than New Orleans in terms of logistics. I believe that we did a great job informing the community and evacuating our city. The only thing that I would do different is have a better plan for our return to our City.

Let Us Help You Keep Your Hard Earned Money! • Register to win a BIG SCREEN TV when you file your Tax Return with us!

to one in favor of the plaintiffs. The city of Montgomery appealed continued from P.11B the case, called Browder v. Gayle, to the United States Supreme Court, which on November 13 upheld the lower court’s decision. December 20, 1956, therefore, United States marshals served an order on city officials compelling them to desegregate the bus system, and the next day blacks, after a 382-day boycott, began riding integrated buses. Because of her role in the boycott and the desegregation of the buses, Rosa Parks and her family were continually threatened by Montgomery whites. Her husband suffered a nervous breakdown and became unable to work.

Parks

Work With Congressman John Conyers In August 1957, Rosa and Raymond Parks, both without employment and without local prospects, moved form Montgomery to Detroit, Michigan. Their first few years in Detroit were difficult. She took in sewing, and he worked as caretaker of a building. Meanwhile, Rosa Parks continued her civil rights activities. She raised funds at rallies for the NAACP around the country, and she worked with Martin Luther King, Jr., and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) for nonviolent social change. In 1963 she participated with King in the March on Washington, D.C., and spoke at the SCLC’s national convention. In 1965 she joined the Detroit staff of Democratic United States Congressman John Conyers, Jr., and worked for him in various clerical capacities for over twenty years. During those years, she remained active with the NAACP, the SCLC, and other groups. She frequently gave speeches at churches, conventions, and official celebrations of the anniversaries of such events as the Montgomery civil rights actions and the birthday of

Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1987, she founded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self-Development, which offers career and leadership guidance to black youth. Her husband had died ten years earlier, but she wanted to memorialize his name with hers in this project.

Rosa Parks’ Retirement Years Rosa Parks retirement from her job with Congressman Conyers in September 1988 at the age of seventy-five. She attended ceremonies at the White House marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act on June 30, 1989, was present at the dedication of the civil rights memorial in Montgomery in November 1989, and was honored on her seventy-seventh birthday in 1990 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. A bust of her was unveiled at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., in February 1991. Parks was honored in Montgomery on December 1, 1995, the fortieth anniversary of her refusal to give up her bus seat. In June 1997 she announced plans to set up one of the first charter schools in Detroit, the Raymond and Rosa Parks Academy for Self-Development. Since 1963, the SCLC has annually sponsored the Rosa Parks Freedom Award, and beginning in 1979 the Virginia-based organized Women in Community Service has issued its own annual Rosa Parks Award . Parks herself ha received the NAACP’s Spingarn Award (1979), Ebony magazine’s Service Award (1980), the Martin Luther King, Jr., Award (1980) the Martin Luther King, Jr., Nonviolent Peace Prize (1980), and the Martin Luther King, Jr., Leadership Award (1987). In September 1996, she was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. “I had no idea when I refuse to give up my seat on that Montgomery bus that my small action would help put an end to the segregation laws in the South,” Rosa Parks wrote. “I only knew that I was tired of being pushed around.”

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NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Q&A on e-Slate continued from P.7B

Q:

If the power fails or if there is some other system failure, will my vote be lost?

A: No, your vote cannot be lost once you have pressed the CAST BALLOT button and see the waving American flag. Your votes are stored in three separate places, and all data is protected and cannot be lost in the unlikely event that the system fails.

Q:

How do I know that my vote has been cast and counted?

A: Whenever a voter presses the CAST BALLOT button and the waving American flag appears, the vote is cast and counted.

Q:

with the State, county and city to target illegal continued from P.8B itinerant vendors that make our district look like a giant flee market. I led the first District F community cleanup project that targeted Sharpstown, Alief and Gulfton. I secured millions of dollars more in CIP funding, including money for our parks, libraries and a new multi-service center. But most important, I have tried to empower the most vulnerable and disenfranchised in our district by encouraging them to exercise their civic duty. That is why I’m asking my constituents to re-elect me to another term on Council.

M. J. Khan

What if a recount is necessary?

A: This system provides City election officials with a Cast Vote Record that shows what votes were cast on each voting device. Election officials can, if desired, print this Cast Vote Record to provide a manual means of recounting votes and ensuring that results are accurate. They may also conduct an electronic recount.

TAYLOR: Tell us in 100 words or less about your greatest strength? M.J. KHAN: A city leader must have many leadership qualities to be effective on behalf of their constituency. It is important to work closely with one’s colleagues and to be able to compromise in order to obtain the best results for one’s district. I have created wonderful working relationships with the Mayor, my colleagues and Department Directors in order to secure the best possible results for my constituents. My greatest attribute would probably be my relentless advocacy on behalf of my constituents, my sincere respect for the office I hold, and wisdom to show restraint when necessary. TAYLOR: In your opinion how important is good leadership in times of crisis? Is there anything you would do differently in responding to Hurricane

Katrina or Hurricane Rita? M.J. KHAN: It is crucial to have good leadership in times of crisis. Good leadership can be quantified in many ways. For me, it is an important attribute to stay calm under pressure, have a tireless work ethic, and to show compassion to those who are vulnerable during crisis. During Hurricane Katrina and Rita I worked around the clock to assist those displaced. I was the first public official to secure permanent housing for Katrina victims, and continued this effort long after federal, county and city officials created their joint housing taskforce. During Rita I walked door to door and developed a communication network among my constituents to help them stay updated on transpiring events. I worked hand-in-hand with the Mayor and County Judge to resolve the fuel crisis Houston experienced and to restore electricity throughout my district. I am very proud of the job we did during these difficult circumstances. TAYLOR: On a scale of (1 to 10) how would you rate our city’s response to the recent national disaster? M.J. KHAN: There is a t-shirt that is being circulated that plays on the NASA expression by stating, “Problem? We have a Houston!” That shirt best expresses my sentiment for the job Houston has done with Hurricane Katrina, Storm Rita, and the earthquake in Pakistan. Houstonians are the most generous people of all the major cities. I am proud to represent this great City, and give us the highest rating for the compassion we show to the less fortunate. I would continue to encourage the citizens of Houston to give their best to those who are displaced and vulnerable.

“ T h e r e I s A B e t t e r Wa y ”

Gladys

HOUSE FOR MAYOR City of Houston I Promise To:

Be HONEST With The Citizens Of Houston.

Be FAIR With All Houstonians.

Bring EMPOWERMENT To All Citizens.

Bring More ACCESSIBILITY To The People. Vote For Me Gladys House on

November 8, 2005 Political Ad Paid For By The Gladys House For Mayor Campaign. To get involved call 713.742.6995. NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735

• NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT • 19B


2005 ELECTION SPECIAL

Propostions

(other than debts secured by a pledge of ad valorem taxes continued from P.3B or financed by the issuance of any bonds or other obligations payable from ad valorem taxes) do not constitute or create debt. Any provision of state constitutional law that may prohibit or limit the authority of a political subdivision of the state to incur debt does not apply to those loans or grants.

Proposition #4 SJR 17 Staples - Gattis Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the denial of bail to a criminal defendant who violates a condition of the defendant’s release pending trial.” Brief Explanation: SJR 17 would authorize a district judge to deny reinstatement of bail or new bail to a person accused of a felony, if the person’s bail had been revoked or forfeited as a result of the person’s violation of a condition of release related to the safety of a victim of the alleged offense or to the safety of the community.

Proposition #5 SJR 21 Averitt - Flynn Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment allowing the legislature to define rates of interest for commercial loans.” Brief Explanation: SJR 21 would authorize the Legislature to exempt commercial loans from state usury laws that set maximum interest rates. “Commercial loans” are loans made primarily for business, commercial,

investment, agricultural, or similar purposes and not primarily for personal, family, or household purposes.

Proposition #6 HJR 87 Farabee - Lindsay Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment to include one additional public member and a constitutional county court judge in the membership of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct.” Brief Explanation: HJR 87 would increase the size of the State Commission on Judicial Conduct from eleven to thirteen members by increasing from four to five the number of public members and by adding a constitutional county court judge. The additions would ensure that the commission has an odd number of members, which is required by another provision of the state constitution.

Proposition #7

similar device to obtain an advance; (2) prohibit the charge or collection of a transaction fee solely in connection with any debit or advance, after the time the extension of credit is established; and (3) prohibit the lender or holder from unilaterally amending the extension of credit.

Proposition #8 SJR 40 Eltife - Hughes Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment providing for the clearing of land titles by relinquishing and releasing any state claim to sovereign ownership or title to interest in certain land in Upshur County and in Smith County.” Brief Explanation: SJR 40 would clear individual land titles by relinquishing and releasing all claims of state ownership interests, including mineral interests, in two local areas, namely, a roughly 4,600 acre area located roughly 14 miles southeast of Gilmer, Texas, and a separate 900 acre area located north of Tyler, Texas.

SJR 7 Carona - Hochberg Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment authorizing line-of-credit advances under a reverse mortgage.” Brief Explanation: SJR 7 would authorize new options for reverse mortgage agreements for senior homeowners allowing them to draw advances at unscheduled intervals, if and when needed, and only in the amounts needed, during the loan term. These are in addition to options that would allow a lump sum payment after settlement or regular periodic, predetermined equal amounts over a term of years or the lifetime of the homeowner. Additionally, SJR 7 would: (1) prohibit the agreement from requiring the use of a credit card, debit card or

Proposition #9 HJR 79 Krusee - Staples Ballot Language: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to provide for a six-year term for a board member of a regional mobility authority.” Brief Explanation: HJR 79 would authorize the Legislature to provide staggered six year terms of office for board members serving on regional mobility authorities, with no more than one-third of the board positions being appointed every two years.

Judge Georgia Dempster. Efficient, Respectful, Compassionate and Fair.

Judge, 308th District Court

T

hese are indeed difficult times for families effected by the devastating Hurricanes we’ve come to know as Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita. While the times are difficult, I do see hope for a brighter tomorrow on the horizon. My court is a Family Law Court, and I see very tragic and discouraging situations every day. So, I have seen and feel the pain of families being virtually torn apart. The reason I do not get depressed is the children. They are my all-consuming concern. How can we give them a chance?

The way the people of our great state and others around the country have come to the aid of the victims of Hurricane Katrina touches my heart deeply. Moreover, it is this spirit of love, and caring for our fellow Americans that will give our children the chance to recover from this terrible tragedy. Restoring their lives to a since of normalcy as quickly as possible is of the utmost importance. As their little lives return to a normal state, they will begin to work, learn, and strive to succeed beyond their wildest dreams. They just need to know that restoration is possible. I believe this can and will happen. I extend this message of hope to those affected, and to those helping the affected during the very difficult time in our nation’s history.

Judge Georgia Dempster Judge , 308th District Court

Efficient, Respectful, Compassionate, and Fair.

Pol. Adv. Pd. for by the Georgia Dempster Campaign In compliance with the voluntary limits of the Judicial Campaign Fairness Act. P.O. Box 236, 5315 FM 1960 West, Houston, TX 77069.

20B • NOVEMBER SPECIAL REPORT •

NOW PUBLISHED BY AUBREY R. TAYLOR COMMUNICATIONS • 832.212.8735

November 2005 Houston Business Connections Newspaper  

This is the November 2005 edition of Houston Business Connections Newspaper published by Aubrey R. Taylor Communications. Houston Business C...

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