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HOUSING JAPAN VO L U M E 11

BETTING BIG A look at what Japan’s new gambling laws could mean for property.

DESIGNING PLACES

Interior designer, Takuma Inoue, on creating physical spaces rooted in the community.

A DRIVEN MAN

Living the dream and living it longer: Yuki Hayashi on the medicinal value of classic British cars.

BEAUTY IN ALL THE RIGHT PLACES

Kobe-born, Tokyo-based fashion model, Mari, talks to us about a few of her favourite places. YOUR KEY TO LUXURY LIVING IN TOKYO BY HOUSING JAPAN, THE CITY`S PREMIER INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE FIRM. Housing Japan

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Inside

Created in 2011, Netatmo is a dynamic and innovative French company developing consumer electronics for a better and connected lifestyle.

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www.netatmo.com Housing Japan

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Outside

Security and peace of mind

Discreet and secure

Netatmo Presence and Welcome put you in control of your home, remotely.

Sophisticated security camera with a powerful floodlight and infrared LEDs outdoors, sleek and minimalist camera indoors. All video is stored on a microSD card using end-to-end encryption.

Smart identification Recognizes family members and regular visitors, monitors domestic help, babysitters, tradesmen, caregivers, and deliveries, and detects people, cars, and animals on your property.

Seamless experience Easy Wi-Fi connectivity, remote control via smartphone or tablet, and full high-definition video with pinch-to-zoom. The Time-Lapse feature collates a quick movie recap of the past 24 hours.

Notification when it matters Alerts you to break-ins or damage in real time, and lets you know when kids or elderly parents arrive home. Customize notifications and select specific areas for alerts with the Alert-Zones feature.

No additional costs, no subscription required, and Netatmo never has access to your data.

NETATMO PRESENCE AND WELCOME are available in Japan at:

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VOLUME 11 2017

Housing Japan Magazine

EDITORIAL & DESIGN PUBLISHER / Mitsuo Hashimoto

ROBIN SAKAI

MANAGING EDITOR / Robin Sakai ART DIRECTOR / Alfie Goodrich CONSULTANT EDITOR / Adam German

Robin has been involved in the Tokyo property and media worlds for nearly 10 years. He has helped create several popular platforms that connect people with property, infomation and entertainment in Tokyo.

MANAGING EDITOR

ADVERTISING & SALES Custom Media

ADAM GERMAN

MARKETING DIRECTOR & CONSULTANT EDITOR

www.custom-media.com PRODUCTION & PRINTING DESIGN & LAYOUT / Japanorama PRINTING / Mojo Print

A well-known figure in both the marketing and sales side of Tokyo real estate, Canadian Adam has been been behind some of the most successful property services in Tokyo.

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY /Alfie Goodrich MODEL / Mari

ALFIE GOODRICH

COPYRIGHT All content of the Housing Japan magazine is copyright Housing Japan and / or its respective author. It is used here for editorial purposes. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the content within this publication, some information, such as contact numbers and addresses, may change without notice. Housing Japan and Japanorama accepts no responsibility for misrepresented content or information within this publication.

PHOTOGRAPHER & ART DIRECTOR

Alfie Goodrich is a renowned photographer and art director based in Tokyo. His work is highly regarded by clients, a prestigious list that includes some of the biggest brands in the automotive, travel, media, and consumer technology industries.

© Copyright 2017

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS ISSUE

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MARKET REPORT —

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MITSUKOSHI —

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TAKUMA INOUE —

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RURAL TOURISM

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YUKI TAKASHI

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PHOTOGRAPHING TOKYO

trends to look for in the year ahead.

a look at Japan's oldest department store, its services and traditions. designing space, Japanese interior designer shares his philosophy. — one way the Japanese regions are finding success.

— a story of classic cars, motor-racing and a lifetime's work in natural medicine. — getting the right shots of Tokyo with nothing but your phone.

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Creating Your Perfect Space One Designs tackles your needs from the inside

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inding the right property—and customizing it to your needs—is not always easy. That’s where One Designs Co., Ltd. comes in. The Tokyo-based interior design and construction company often hears from those who have found a property they liked, but, due to the language barrier, were unable to close the deal. The inability to explain the details of their desired floor plan and interior can be frustrating, and, ultimately, they break off the search. Those people may wonder why there isn’t an interior company that understands all their needs, and can work with them in English. In fact, there is. One Designs specializes in

working with buyers, developers, and real estate brokerage firms on all types of interior-related matters. With their rich and varied experience, the staff at One Designs can discuss virtually any interior-related matter, such as design and execution, interior coordination, furniture sales and installation, and lighting fixtures. One Designs can also take on more complex interior refurbishment and renovation projects, such as the merging of two separate units and modification of the existing floor plan. “Our extensive knowledge and versatility enable us to meet a wide range of requirements,” explained

One Designs Value Innovation Group Manager Takeaki Aso. “In the case of apartment renovations, which face numerous limitations in Japan, we specialize in proposals that build upon the basic skeletal structure of the apartment to create a space that perfectly meets your unique needs while fully complying with rules and regulations.” In addition to residences, One Designs, which holds the firstclass Kenchikushi license issued by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, welcomes inquiries about office design or hotel renovation, and can collaborate with real estate brokers to assist client property searches.

Designs to Spring work 2017 on your next home, workspace, or real estate project visit: www.koyou-onesd.co.jp/en 6For One Housing Japan


HOUSING JAPAN VOLUME 11 2017

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24 12 OLYMPIC VIEW A UNIQUE PROPERTY WITH SPORTING NEIGHBOURS

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MITSUKOSHI

INTERIOR DESIGN

AUTOMOTIVE

A LOOK AT JAPAN'S OLDEST DEPARTMENT STORE

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH TAKUMA INOUE

YUKI HAYASHI MAN, MOTOR & MEDICINE

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WELCOME This is volume 11 of the Housing Japan magazine, and as always we are proud to feature fine living from Tokyo, the world`s greatest metropolis. As the premier property agent for international residents and investors, we help introduce people to homes in Tokyo that they will love, and this magazine is an expression of all that goes into that - great places, great people and great culture. In this issue we talk to esteemed Japan-based entrepreneurs, automotive collectors and a young interior designer who is making a name for himself in Tokyo, Kyoto and abroad with creative and refreshing commercial spaces. We are also honored to feature Mitsukoshi, Tokyo`s oldest and most refined department store. They kindly take us on a tour of their culture and history, looking at how their rich heritage has informed an amazing customer experience for today.

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MITSUO HASHIMOTO PRESIDENT HOUSING JAPAN

Those looking to put down their own long-term roots in the city and purchase a property here will be interested to see some of our featured homes, as well as read up on our 2017 market report that looks at what opportunities and pitfalls lie ahead. This year Housing Japan is also pleased to offer luxurious apartments for short-term travellers as well as those who require a convenient and comfortable home in a beautiful downtown location for a month or more. Please enjoy this edition of the Housing Japan magazine and if you are interested in renting, purchasing or arranging property management for a home in Tokyo, then we look forward to hearing from you.

PHOTO / BEN TORODE

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A world of opportunities “Our family can dine out, work out and hang out all under one roof.� Carmen Roberts Monksmith

Start discovering your Club life by arranging a tour.

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03-4588-0687 | membership@tac-club.org | tokyoamericanclub.org


Photo: Steven Diazo/unsplash.com

TOKYO MARKET REPORT Trends to look for in the year ahead by ADAM GERMAN

By all accounts, globally 2016 was a landmark year. The Brexit. Trump’s election. The world’s Olympic attention focusing from Rio to Tokyo. Japan’s tourism numbers topped 24 million for the first time ever, beating the record breaking year prior. The list goes on. On the back of Abenomics, the Tokyo real estate market edged higher in pricing, pleasing owner’s who purchased when they did and frustrating buyer’s more and more. The good news for buyer’s; there is still time to buy and still make it a sound investment as the market looks to go higher in 2017. While the foreign press declares erroneously that Abenomics is faltering and even dead, what is really happening is that the famed economic policy only slowed down for the first half of 2016. It roared back to life nearer the end of that year. While wage increases were underwhelming and household spending remained volatile, on December 15th, 2016 the government passed legislation to give itself a year to ratify specifics on how Japan will allow integrated resorts to operate in the country (detailed article on page 33). With the Japan government poised to legalise gambling, it is the first inkling of moves geared towards sustaining the record high tourism

numbers post Olympics, so much so that the 2030 yearly tourism target is set at 60 million tourists per year. Why does this matter? A sustained increase in tourism is a precursor to immigration reform, which is Japan`s only way out of the demographic situation that it currently faces. Famously, Japan has the fastest declining population of any G20 nation. It is estimated that in 50 years, Japan will lose a third of the current population with a large portion of the remaining population drawing from, rather than contributing to, pensions and social insurance programs. Left as is, the economic portrait this paints for the country is grim at best. With that many working age people moving from the workforce to actively drawing from the pension system, Japan has a math problem at present that is tantamount to a brick wall. In order to provide liveable pensions to that many elderly even in the foreseeable future, Japan will need to create a working generation in a very short amount of time. Imagine this fictitious scenario: the government decrees that every couple must create three children to make up for the deficit. Even assuming that three children per couple could be birthed simultaneously, it would be another 20 years

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THE YOSHINO HOUSE. photo: AirBnB

before that generation would be of working age to begin to contribute to the pension and insurance programs and even then that generation would be contributing in the lowest, new graduate, contribution bracket. Japan simply has only one way to create a sustainable, contributing working class population in the time available; immigration reform. The Japanese government’s hesitation to openly attract working age people from other countries is well documented and the Abe government is no different…or is it? Since Abe took office, the tourism numbers have more than doubled since 2012 and the original 20 million by 2020 tourism target touted back then has been bumped up twice; once to 30 million and then again to 40 million by 2020. This has caused notoriously monolingual Japan to suddenly seem multilingual, evidence of which is seen more and more in all things necessary for daily life. Rapidly, train stations, department store guidance, hospital and police guidance as well as simple things like ATM’s have become multilingual offering services in Japanese, English, Chinese and Korean. What all this means is the tourism increase, born from a sustained overseas branding campaign and landmark events like the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympics , can be interpreted as a precursor for immigration reform. Whether intentionally or not, the tourism numbers are brought about by Abenomics is acclimatising a traditionally homogenous Japanese population to an enormous amount of vacationing foreign people; all of whom are in good moods and willing to spend much needed cash.

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This isn’t limited only to the urban areas of Japan either. Take AirBnb’s Samara project. Samara is an initiative that creates unique stay opportunities in lodging built and sustained entirely by local communities. The initiative was announced in 2016 with the small town of Yoshino, Nara prefecture as the host of the Samara initiative’s first project. According to a press release Airbnb released on August 2nd, 2016, the house is “…designed and built for Kenya Hara’s House Vision exhibition in Tokyo and created in collaboration with Go Hasegawa, a Tokyo-based architect, the house explores how architectural features can engender a deeper relationship between hosts and guests. “Following the exhibition, Yoshino Cedar House will be permanently installed in Yoshino…where it will be a bookable Airbnb that is maintained by the community. Proceeds earned from guests who book the listing will be used to strengthen the cultural legacy and future of the town, which has struggled as young people migrate away from rural communities.” If tourism as a precursor for immigration reform seems too much for Japan, one only needs to look in the direction of Niseko, a three hour drive from Sapporo in Hokkaido, to see the impact of what began as simple tourism can become a more permanent harbinger of change for the better. Up until the early 2000’s, Niseko was a place Japanese people didn’t want anything to do with. Ambitious Australians, always in search of adventure, saw huge opportunity in the unique geographic conditions that give the area 90 straight days of lift access, fresh powder snow every winter.


Photo: Jason Ortego/unsplash.com

The newly localised foreigners spurred new initiatives building rudimentary ski lodges that eventually turned into world class condominiums. The foreign-led gentrification of Niseko has attracted tourists from all parts of the world in numbers that allowed for a new, tourism based economy to thrive in a previously deserted area. In Niseko’s, all this started before anyone knew who Mr. Abe even was. The local Japanese population was at first very wary of these new residents. To them, building businesses and setting down roots seemed insane at best. On the other hand, with absolutely no other viable alternative for any kind of local revitalisation plan, the local Japanese people had to choose; continue working with the newcomers or continue down the certain path toward demographic oblivion. Over the years, this marriage of necessity has brought about co-operation and foreign involvement in town planning that hasn’t been seen since the Meiji Era. Today, ski in, ski out brand new condominiums in Niseko are trading at the same price per square meter as Akasaka in central Tokyo. What we are seeing now with nationwide tourism numbers is basically a macrocosm of what has been done in Niseko.

On a federal level, once the immigration reform discussion begins in the Diet, the real estate demand will increase even further and increasing demand means increasing prices. Will this happen in 2017? Not likely, but I predict the conversation will openly begin the closer we get to the Olympics. This means purchasing property in 2017 will require at least a 10 year hold horizon to realise the most gains. Tokyo, as always, will be the largest benefactor during this time period which means keeping your purchases limited to central Tokyo would be the safest bet, allowing buyers to take part in the market whilst waiting to see how the post Olympic conversation matures. If you own property and have held it for over 5 years, you may wish to dip your toes into the market. Selling this year could be profitable however if you have no pressing need to sell, you would be wise to hold for a couple more years to see how the above conversation plays out in the national discourse. In short, the Tokyo market is showing signs that it can sustainably escape the doldrums of the lost decades. Those who get on the boat before the ship sails will benefit the most.

More tourism equals a population more used to foreign people coming and going, practical infrastructure changes are implemented to accommodate these tourists and ultimately, when the government officials feel the time is right, the conversation changes to more permanent reforms to further economic growth.

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Property Portrait

WORDS | ROBIN SAKAI PHOTOGRAPHY | ALFIE GOODRICH MODEL | NORIE

SENDAGAYA OLYMPIC VIEW 14

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Just a 5 minute walk from the new Tokyo 2020 Olympic Park and a major new business and recreational center, this is a fully custom built, freestanding, luxury house built to exacting international tastes. The property was lovingly created by its current owner, who with a grown family has decided to downsize. It features a number of custom touches throughout 6 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, 4 toilets, extensive family rooms and dual level roof balcony. These include a two car garage with private entrance and dumb waiter elevator to carry groceries up to the kitchen or the lower family room. A vast living-dining area that can comfortably accommodate dining, a relaxation space and a huge separate kitchen with it own pantry. Dominating the living room are floor-to-ceiling windows that capture incredible amounts of natural light, but are angled with the blinds to maintain full and complete privacy. For winter months there is a western-style fireplace (a rare touch for a home in Tokyo and a great center for the space). Downstairs, in the basement level, lies a truly unique touch - a private wine cellar made of natural brick,mortar and wood, cooled via a specially imported temperature control system. This is perhaps the largest private wine cellar in Japan. Throughout the interior design there is inspiration drawn from a number of sources. Natural woods from Japan, fireplaces and large book cases from traditional western homes. The room layouts are designed with a deep sense of privacy, comfort and warmth. Details are of premier quality. Natural stone better aids the floor heating. Wide planked floors sooth the feet in the living areas. The aforementioned roof balcony brings al fresco living to the heart of the city. With 360 degree views of central Tokyo, you can take in the new Tokyo Olympic Park, the Shinjuku skyline, Aoyama and more. All the facilities are all in place to enjoy entertaining, relaxing or working with Tokyo as your backdrop. In the immediate area, the property is situated in a neighbourhood with a temple, which dictates that no tall buildings can be constructed nearby. It also ensures local roads and public footpaths are quiet, clean and open to residents.

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Step up See ahead Stand out

Award-winning, bilingual, content-creation and communication agency. Contact us: unique@custom-media.com | www.custom-media.com | www.bij.tv

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The Sendagaya / Gaienmae neighbourhood, which makes up the larger area around the property, has much more than just the Olympics for appeal. These are old samurai lands that are highly desired for their place at the centre of fashionable life in contemporary Tokyo. They provide an amazing lifestyle, but remain quiet and peaceful. The area is regarded for its boutiques, fine-dining and art galleries that are located all around. Within a 20 minute stroll of the property is Omotesando, Tokyo`s most famous (and fashionable) shopping boulevard - home to major brands and flagship stores of both Japanese and international retailers. In another direction lies the peaceful and elegant Meiji Shrine. With its expansive parkland, this is an impressive cultural centre that regularly hosts ceremonies and traditional weddings. Slightly further away, but still within easy access, are the world famous neighbourhoods of Shibuya and Harajuku, home to Japanese fashion and design; the modern Japan that has worldwide impact. Contact Housing Japan for more details. Tel: 03-3588-8861 Email: sales@housingjapan.com www.housingjapan.com Please note the property is subject to availability. It is listed on the market at the time of print.

Property Portrait

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Building your life in Japan Nihombashi Mitsukoshi is Japan's first ever department store, and a symbol of all Japanese omotenashi shopping culture has to offer. Since its founding in 1673, Mitsukoshi has prided itself on progression and innovation that matches the needs of its customers, providing value and integrity throughout its history.
 Now, with its priority being to make the store accessible to customers from all over the world, the company is aiming to do away with some of the cultural and linguistic barriers that would have once hindered people from enjoying the Nihombashi Mitsukoshi experience.
Information and insight is now offered in four languages online, as well as in-store through the Foreign Customer Service Counter, which can help with any aspect of your Nihombashi experience.
So international residents can now take their time to explore the spacious and historic store that contains everything needed to build an incredible life in Japan. Beyond Bespoke Service There ought to be no obstacle to getting the real Nihombashi Mitsukoshi experience. With a dedicated Foreign Customer Service Counter ready to cater to the specific needs of visitors from abroad, as well as international residents of Japan, those looking for a little extra help will have no trouble at all.
In addition to the free Wi-Fi, currency exchange, and tax-free shopping services you might expect, the multilingual staff aim to go above and beyond expectations so that you feel like a guest rather than a customer at the store. Whether you need interpretation in English or Chinese, to arrange a delivery, or just want to know more about the things that catch your eye, the Foreign

Customer Service Counter should be your first port of call. There, staff will be delighted to share their own personal recommendations, and inform each and every customer of the wealth of events and culture going on at Nihombashi Mitsukoshi every week.
Beyond the counter, staff can assist you elsewhere in the store as required. Once you've had your first taste of the sincere omotenashi shopping experience that Nihombashi Mitsukoshi is founded on, you will find it difficult to go elsewhere in Tokyo. It is this combination of service and history that has seen the Mitsukoshi mark welcoming generation after generation of the same family into its store across the years. The Roots and Future of Nihombashi Mitsukoshi Those looking to experience the founding spirit of Nihombashi Mitsukoshi would do well to visit the kimono section. The store actually started as a kimono dealer in 1673 under the name "Echigoya" in the Nihombashi area where the store now stands today. Much may have changed during the intervening time, both for Mitsukoshi and Nihombashi, but the importance of the kimono remains paramount. Visitors may be surprised to find that, unlike the traditional national dress of many countries, the kimono is still worn outside of ceremonies and is very much in fashion, with new designs for men

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and women always available to see in store. So, whether your tastes are traditional or contemporary, bold or cute, you'll find something to suit. Customers new to the kimono are sometimes understandably unsure where to start, and while there are simplified kimono sets that are easier to wear marketed to tourists, Nihombashi Mitsukoshi believes that its customers appreciate kimono perfected by tradition and craftsmanship. The philosophy is that if someone can learn how to tie a necktie, then they can learn how to tie the obi belt that closes the kimono. More importantly, it's in learning how to dress in kimono that gives the wearer an appreciation of the garment, as well as a sense of individuality. Allow our friendly staff to share the wonderful experience of kimono, bound by tradition, that remains unchanged at the heart of Nihombashi Mitsukoshi. Timepieces to Treasure at Our Nihombashi Watch Salon Investing in a fine timepiece is not something to be entered into lightly, forming as it will a bond with the wearer, hopefully over decades, or even generations of use. Rising to this challenge is the Watch Salon at Nihombashi Mitsukoshi, an oasis of composed calm and positive treasure trove of models, where you can take the time required to select the timepiece that is going to find a home on your wrist for the years to come. Visitors will find a staggering selection of brands that

accoutrements to become a daily source of pleasure. Elsewhere traditional Japanese crafts are respected, customers will find designs in wood, buffalo horn and even solid synthetic opal that make this the one-stop destination for serious eyewear connoisseurs, and rest assured that there are a wealth of conventional designs from the biggest names in Japan as well as abroad to match all tastes. Cosmetics at Nihombashi Mitsukoshi Grooming has always been a part of Tokyo metropolitan chic, and before that, during the Edo period there was a fine history of elaborate customs that extended to the urbane gent as well as the beauties of their day. Now contemporary Japanese skincare and cosmetics have risen to become one of the country's best exports, and with good reason, spurred on in part by the meticulous standards of the domestic consumers, and also by Japan's changeable and distinct seasons meaning that one's makeup and skincare routine has to adapt to stay in sync. Nihombashi Mitsukoshi has always placed a priority on guiding customers to meet their specific needs, both in the moment and in the long term. Something particularly evident in the setting where you can browse to your heart's content and find the product that is right for you.
 The selection in store features a full line-up totalling over thirty brands from abroad,

"...whether your tastes are traditional or contemporary, bold or cute, you'll find something to suit..." guarantees your needs will be met. Those looking for domestic Japanese designs will not be found wanting, with models from Seiko and Citizen, as well as smaller artisanal makers such as MINASE demonstrative of Japan's own ongoing watchmaking culture. With your timepiece selected, clients can relax in the certain knowledge that the team at the Watch Clinic counter are on hand to maintain and even update your watch for as long as it has a home on your wrist. From basic repairs such as maintenance, sizing adjustments, and battery replacements, right up to specialist consulting, our highly experienced team is on hand to help, and if you want to give an older piece a fresh lease of life, then watch straps are available in precious metals and leathers amongst other designs. A Focus on Exquisite Eyewear To those that wear them glasses may be an indispensable necessity, but they are also an opportunity for expression, whether of your own personal taste or for appreciation of the skilled craftsmen who make eyewear their raison d'etre. Nihombashi Mitsukoshi's own dedicated glasses salon starts with a view of the individuals' needs, starting with a free full ocular examination at our inhouse opticians and consultation, then guiding them through our extensive selection of luxurious, rare and remarkable eyewear that truly elevates the medium to that of jewelry and the kogei arts. Chief amongst the selection are jewelry frames in various shades of gold, platinum and precious stones that join your other

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including giants from the fashion world in addition to Japanese favourites. Connoisseurs of Japanese cosmetics in particular will delight in the full range of many premium brands, as well as the attentive staff waiting to guide you through them. Nihombashi and The Birth of Japanese Tailoring Nihombashi Mitsukoshi may owe its origins to its gofuku  or kimono section, but the move from traditional kimono to Western-style clothing in early Meiji Restoration Japan was to be a new chapter for Mitsukoshi, as the Nihombashi area as a whole became part of the hub for the wave of Western fashion that would eventually sweep Japan. Nihombashi Mitsukoshi was part of this first wave, and seeing an immense demand for skills and materials still rare in Japan began to take steps that would cement its reputation as the Savile Row of Tokyo. It was in 1906 that Nihombashi Mitsukoshi sought the council of British tailor Alexander Mitchell to guide their burgeoning team of Japanese tailors. The Tailoring Department was launched in earnest to great acclaim, and in the process started a new chapter for tailoring in Japan with Mitchell himself, noting that the skills he had learned in Britain would need adapting to meet Japanese sensibilities and lifestyle, the difference between sitting on chairs as opposed to on tatami mats in particular, requiring a different cut of trousers. It is now over 100 years since Alexander Mitchell first guided Mitsukoshi's team of inhouse tailors and with each generation and with every


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PHOTOS PAGE 19 & 20 1. Beyond Bespoke Service 2. The Roots and Future of Nihombashi Mitsukoshi 3. Timepieces to Treasure at Nihombashi Mitsukoshi's Watch Salon 4. A Focus on Exquisite Eyewear 5. Cosmetics at Nihombashi Mitsukoshi 6. Nihombashi and The Birth of Japanese Tailoring 7. Nurturing the Next Generation 8. A Toast to Japanese Sake 9. The Edo Artisan Spirit with Tokyo Teshigoto 10. Setting the Table for Washoku 11. Mitsukoshi's flagship store in Tokyo's Nihombashi district

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painstakingly cut and hand-sewn suit this evolution continues, now applying their well-honed craft and sensibilities in suits fit for the global stage. Needless to say semi-ordering and fitting is available, but for an experience unchanged in over 100 years, a fully bespoke service remains the store`s signature service for bridging Japanese craft and attention with the best of the world's fabrics and inherited expertise. Nurturing the Next Generation As a department store that regularly sees not just lifetime customers but even several generations of the same family pass through its halls, you will find every age catered to under one roof. For the youngest infants, their welcome to the Mitsukoshi family begins before birth with the maternity salon on hand to ensure that every last detail is taken care of under the guidance of attentive staff who can advise on all matters practical for the mother-to-be, as well as guide you to the perfect gift for the expectant mother or newborn. Elsewhere meeting the needs of the infant through to their first steps and beyond, the range in store spans the fashionable featuring exclusive Japanese lines from the likes of POLO Ralph Lauren and ANNA SUI mini, as well as more kawaii items from Japanese brands Shirley Temple and perennially popular MIKI HOUSE. For more formal occasions we have a salon that can offer fine tailoring and elegant dresses to fit any age and gathering, so whether sombre or celebratory you will find refined clothes that you will want to keep long after they have been grown out of. No-matter the concern, occasion or moment you will be sure to find what you need in store to ensure your child’s life in Japan is every bit as enriched as yours. A Toast to Japanese Sake Before the advent of refrigeration, sake was a drink that traditionally could be brewed only in the cold winter months. Even now, some of the most respected brewers still acknowledge this tradition, which is tied with the flow of the rice harvesting season, noting that there are few greater pleasures than sipping a gently warmed sake on a snowy night. Nihombashi Mitsukoshi honors this tradition with a sugitama, a ball of bound cedar leaves that hangs in the heart of the sake section--a traditional symbol of fresh sake brewed over the winter. Over the seasons, you'll find that not only does the selection of sake change, but so too does how it's best enjoyed with changes in temperature. Those looking to learn are well catered for with our expert team of staff ready to recommend not just what to drink, but how to drink them, in any situations. If you're still stuck, we regularly feature a nihonshu of the week, so if you follow our advice, we'll guide you through the plethora of distinctive varieties, from clear seishu to cloudy nigorizake, as well as sake exclusive to Nihombashi Mitsukoshi.

that exists in the city, with collaboration between the creative, whether artist or designer, and production by skilled craftsmen being key to turning a great idea into a great product. Accordingly, we find the Tokyo Teshigoto group, a Tokyo Metropolitan government project whose goal is to bring together designers with the craftsmen to make their dreams reality, and inspire each other in the process. In their output we frequently find work that unites disparate kogei, craft disciplines, such as kumihimo silk braiding with urushi lacquer, or application of traditional techniques to modern subjects. Join the people of Tokyo in celebrating the Edo artisan spirit, and allow their superb wares to be ambassador for the balance between design and execution that characterizes the creative heart of the city. Setting the Table for Washoku
 Washoku, or traditional Japanese cuisine, has enjoyed a justified rise in popularity worldwide with both the virtues of the diet and the delicious dishes themselves celebrated far and wide. However, one element of Japanese cuisine that can sometimes get lost in translation is the meticulous art of presenting the food at the table, with each dish on the washoku menu bringing with it a range of possible table arrangements according to season, occasion and of course the taste of the server. Indeed, there is frequently as much care put into presentation as the preparation of the food itself, with the Japanese arts and world of kogei crafts in particular making this their muse and pitting their talents to make tableware to match the finest of foods. Still, washoku is not only something to mark the special occasion, but to punctuate the everyday. From the simple and all too frequently rushed green tea of a morning to a slow-cooked nabe stew on a chilly night, washoku is best enjoyed in tune with the flow of daily life, and this is reflected in the range of tableware that will see you through breakfast to banquets alike.  Visitors to Nihombashi Mitsukoshi's vast tableware section will find this all too apparent, with everything from the humble ohashi,  chopstick rendered in gorgeous lacquer or rustic simplicity, tea pots in pure copper next to wrought iron, and a lifetime of different ways to set the table to match the diversity of washoku itself. Needless to say, the line-up captures the range of Japanese talent from exclusive esteemed makers sitting comfortably with contemporary talents finding new avenues for tradition http://i.isetan.co.jp/mitsukoshi/nihombashi/en/news/

The Edo Artisan Spirit with Tokyo Teshigoto Since its development as Edo, Tokyo has always been a creative city, a place where not only ideas are born but also a place where the creative vision is put into practice and actually made. It is an enterprising spirit that thrives from the tremendous support from a public, who values the innovation born on their own streets. Perhaps the strongest source of inspiration is the sense of community

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BETTING

BIG TEXT / Anthony FENSOM From the March 2017 issue of The Journal, published for the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan by Custom Media.

Japan's gamble on the global casino boom PICTURE: An artist's impression of the proposed MGM Resorts International development at Yumeshima, Osaka.

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After 15 years of political argument, the National Diet has approved a bill authorizing the establishment of integrated resorts (IRs) that combine casinos with hotels, conference, and entertainment facilities. Japanese lawmakers hope this will create a neverending Olympics-style tourism boom. Under the legislation, passed on December 15, the government gave itself another year to finalize an implementation bill that will lay down the terms of operation for what could become the biggest casino industry in Asia, if not the world. Japan’s move to legalize casinos has sparked a gambling gold rush, as foreign and local operators line up to get a share of a potential $40 billion jackpot. But having experienced setbacks in the past, few expect a trouble-free ride to the development of the first resort, likely to be in Osaka. Having quietly lobbied Tokyo for years, the industry is hopeful the government will not mess up what could become one of the most tangible reforms of Abenomics. “It’s been a frustrating journey, but with a surprising outcome. It felt like it was a Christmas tradition for the lawmakers to ditch the casino legislation, so last December’s move surprised everyone,” said Andrew Gellatly, head of global research services at GamblingCompliance, a provider of independent business intelligence to the global gaming industry.

“Japan has represented the holy grail for the gambling industry. It’s very rare that a new, regulated industry like gambling can appear from nowhere in a sophisticated G7 economy like Japan’s. If you go to any international hotel in Tokyo right now, chances are the lobby is full of American gaming lawyers and consultants—it’s a bit of a gold rush.” READY TO PLAY Legalized gambling in Japan is currently limited to lotteries and bicycle, horse, and motorboat racing. However, analysts suggest the pachinko industry, which operates in a legal grey area but generates sales of almost $200 billion a year, is indicative of the potential for casino gaming. “As we saw in Singapore, when you have a population that is already familiar with machine-based gambling, the resorts will open at full speed from day one,” Gellatly said. “The population will be absolutely ready to play.”

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Analysts estimate annual gaming revenue of more than $10 billion from two IRs, and this could exceed $40 billion should Tokyo allow numerous resorts nationwide. By comparison, gambling-mad Macau generated about $28 billion in casino revenue in calendar 2016, while the Las Vegas Strip earned $6.3 billion in gaming revenue in 2015.

When I started the task force, I was amazed at the number of industries that signed up,” he explained. “Obviously, I expected gaming operators to be interested, but we’ve seen banks, law firms, accounting firms, education and training companies, advertising and marketing firms, and consultants from a range of industries—it’s incredible the number of industries that expect to benefit.”

Singapore’s two IRs, the Las Vegas Sands Corporation-owned Marina Bay Sands and Resorts World Sentosa, operated by Genting Singapore PLC, are forecast by Fitch Ratings to generate $4 billion in revenues in 2017.

REGIONAL BENEFITS A study by global advisory firm Oxford Economics has estimated that an IR in the greater Tokyo area would support 103,000 jobs on an annual basis, while generating annual tax revenues of ¥470 billion ($4.1 billion) and providing an additional ¥180 billion boost to the local economy. Similarly, an Osaka IR could generate 77,500 jobs and annual tax revenues of ¥340 billion, while adding another ¥150 billion to the Kansai economy.

“Japan will be a supersized Singapore, and it can even outstrip Macau,” said Daniel Cheng, senior vice president of development for Asia–Pacific at Hard Rock Cafe International, speaking to Bloomberg News. Already familiar to Japanese with its Hard Rock Cafe outlets in Fukuoka, Tokyo, Osaka, and Yokohama, the Florida-based restaurant and casino chain is reportedly seeking Japanese partners, eyeing a “major investment” in Japan. Hard Rock and other operators face intensifying competition for the new IR licenses. Among those jockeying for position are the big two US operators—Las Vegas Sands Corporation and MGM Resorts International—along with US rivals such as Caesar’s Entertainment Corporation, Wynn Resorts Limited, and Boyd Gaming Corporation. Elsewhere, international competition is coming from Genting Malaysia Berhad and Australia’s Crown Resorts Limited. Significant investment will be required. Las Vegas Sands Chairman and CEO Sheldon Adelson, speaking at an investor conference in Tokyo on February 21, said that a Japan IR “would be at least what we paid in Singapore, $6 billion including the land, but it could be as much as $10 billion,” according to CNBC. MGM anticipates a similar cost and is touting the creation of a publicly traded real estate investment trust to attract investors. “The kind of IR project that would be developed in large locations across Japan would likely have an investment of up to $10 billion . . . [and] will involve a collaboration and consortium with many companies, likely with majority Japanese ownership,” Ed Bowers, senior vice president of global gaming development at MGM Resorts International, told The Journal. Similarly, Las Vegas Sands has flagged an “unmatched investment in Japan,” saying it would work to develop an IR based on meetings, incentives, conferences, and exhibitions (MICE), “while also recognizing and celebrating Japan’s unique heritage and culture. ”Several Japanese companies have expressed interest, including travel agency H.I.S. Co. Ltd., developer Intrance Co. Ltd., railway operator Keikyu Corporation, and contractor Taisei Corporation, along with trading houses Sumitomo Corporation and Mitsubishi Corporation. However, only gaming company Sega Sammy Holdings Inc. has casino experience, having built an IR in South Korea in partnership with local company Paradise Group.Pacifica Capital KK’s Seth Sulkin, chair of the Integrated Resorts Task Force at the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (ACCJ), suggests the beneficiaries could extend even wider.“

The Kansai Association of Corporate Executives is even more bullish, eyeing potential investments of up to ¥800 billion, annual revenues of ¥600 billion, and the creation of nearly 100,000 jobs by a Kansai IR. Osaka’s Yumeshima Island is a probable site, with about 80,000 square meters of municipal land available. With Japan’s third-largest city eyeing a bid to host the 2025 World Exposition, an IR could aid Osaka’s plans to regain its status as the nation’s commercial capital. Importantly, political support has strengthened Osaka’s position as the front-runner in the race to host Japan’s first IR. The governor of Osaka Prefecture and the mayor of the City of Osaka, along with local business and tourism organizations, have joined forces to promote Yumeshima. They are eyeing not only a casino, but also a convention center, hotels, shopping facilities, and exhibition halls. Other leading contenders include Yokohama and Tokyo; in addition, a range of regional sites from Hokkaido to Nagasaki have also entered the race. “Osaka and Yokohama are the two front-runners, although the issue is becoming politically contentious in Yokohama, with Mayor Fumiko Hayashi recently backtracking on some of her earlier support, while Osaka’s proposed site of Yumeshima will require billions of dollars of new infrastructure investments,” GamblingCompliance’s Gellatly said. A range of other IR sites have been proposed, including the Dutch theme park Huis Ten Bosch near Nagasaki, Wakayama Marina City, and various locations in Hokkaido and Nagoya. Backed by a number of local companies, Odaiba, an artificial island in Tokyo Bay, has also been touted as a potential site. “This has always been pitched by the politicians as part of regional development, so they’ll likely go for two IRs initially—at Osaka and Yokohama—and a regional site such as Nagasaki,” an industry source told The Journal. POLITICAL OBSTACLES According to The Japan Times, a Liberal Democratic Party task force is expected to submit recommendations to the government by the end of March, addressing such issues as problem gambling and operational details. The focus on problem gambling—or gambling addiction— reflects public concern over the industry’s potentially negative impact. A poll by public broadcaster NHK in late 2016 showed 44 percent of those surveyed were opposed to casinos, with just 12 percent in favor and 34 percent undecided.

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A 2014 health ministry study found nearly five million Japanese were addicted to gambling—principally pachinko—at an estimated rate five times that of Western countries such as the United Kingdom. The London-based newspaper The Economist estimates Japanese lose $24 billion a year on gambling, lagging only China ($62 billion) and the United States ($117 billion).

more tourism resources,” he said. “Combining a trip to Kyoto and Nara with an IR in Osaka is going to be an attractive option.”

“Any time you talk about an integrated resort and the activity of a casino, people immediately bring with them images of Las Vegas in the 1960s. What’s critical to consider, though, is that modern regulations cleaned that up,” MGM’s Bowers said.

”Winning the public over will require raising awareness of the benefits of IRs, along with mitigating the risks. Should the government and industry succeed, Japan just might have a shot at winning one of its biggest bets in decades.

Wynn Resorts chief executive Steve Wynn has described the Japan casino market as an “opportunity [that] is thoroughly Japanese and thoroughly delicious.

“Japan is going to want to have the best kind of regulation,” he added, “and fortunately there are many examples of it, with the closest being Singapore.” At GamblingCompliance, Gellatly suggested technology, such as identity cards linked to facial recognition software, could provide a solution to problem gambling. Training staff to address problem behavior can also help. However, he criticized Singapore’s move to charge locals a membership fee of S$100 (US$70) per day to restrict local access, suggesting it would be disastrous for addicts as it encouraged “loss-chasing behavior” by gamblers to win back the fee. The ACCJ’s task force has suggested options that “permit individuals to limit or restrict their own access to gaming,” while calling for regulatory frameworks, similar to those existing in other industrialized nations, designed to prevent the involvement of organized crime. Other potential stumbling blocks include the gross gaming revenue tax rate (the ACCJ suggests no more than 10 percent), and whether the government imposes consumption tax on casino gambling. Critics warn that corruption and organized crime also offer challenges. The ACCJ’s Sulkin also warned that a three-percent limitation on the casino portion of an IR’s total gross floor area could make it impossible for smaller cities to host resorts without special exemptions.Nevertheless, an industry source said Tokyo had shown a “remarkable” commitment to understanding the issues, with the goal of ensuring the best possible legislation. “There are plenty of examples of casino control acts that would act as great examples for Japan,” the source said. “The Cabinet Office has done very advanced work on the legislation, and appears ready to submit it to an extraordinary Diet session by November. ”Along with responsible gaming, measures to promote the development of MICE business and the further development of the hospitality and tourism industries are a priority for Tokyo, which is targeting 40 million inbound tourists by 2020 and 60 million by 2030. “They want to ensure there are ongoing reasons for tourists to keep coming back to Japan once the major sporting events are over,” the source added. Should the implementation bill be approved before year-end, industry observers expect Japan’s first IR to be launched in 2023 at the earliest—a development that its Asian rivals are closely monitoring. Sulkin expects Japan to have the advantage, though, with local customers likely to account for more than 50 percent of revenues. Significant non-gaming revenues are expected from new convention and shopping centers, as well as restaurants that attract both local and foreign tourists. “Japan is a lot larger country than Singapore, with much

Photos, from top to bottom: artist's impression of new resort in Osaka; another rendering of the proposed Yumeshima resort and Marina Bay Sands in Singapore.

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Takuma INOUE Born in Kyoto, educated in the USA, this young interior designer is making his mark with a design philosophy rooted in a deep respect for tradition and its value in modern society.

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TAKUMA INOUE DESIGNING SPACE INTERVIEW / ALFIE GOODRICH PHOTOS /SUZU, BEN, SHUNTARO, Mitsu NAKAJIMA, Yuna YAGI & PAGONG PORTRAIT OF TAKUMA INOUE / ALFIE GOODRICH

Takuma Inoue fuses Kyoto tradition with New York vibrancy in creating incredible retail and dining spaces. His work, made under his own company Everedge KK, can be found all over the world.

the finest Japanese restaurants in New York and several well-known retail outlets here in Tokyo. At that time, they were looking for someone who spoke English and could help them on a project for W Hotel in Hong Kong.

I moved to the US, when I was 16, I went by myself and first landed in high school in Kansas, obviously a complete shock when you are coming out of Kyoto. Kansas was very mono-cultural, with a rural tradition. It took me some time to adapt and during that time I was living in the school dorm. One thing I noticed when I was there was that I was really enjoying decorating that dull space and making it my own.

After that, I went from there to projects both in Japan and across the world. Within five years I'd worked in Dubai, Taiwan, China, Doha, Las Vegas and Miami. One thing that remained clear through all these experiences was that, as the old truism states, design is a universal language. That said, if you have a client who is paying one or two million Dollars to build a business, then they need to feel confident in what design can do for them. In many cases the success of a business comes down to the experience it provides. Trust between designer and client is vital if a project is going to reach its full potential, and make a difference to the client`s business.

After graduation I studied Liberal Arts in Manhattan and eventually got in to the Fashion Institute of Design - even though I was not a very good student and had to cut corners to get myself admitted. There was one thing though I couldn't cut corners on and that was design. I was given a blank piece paper and had to go from there. It forced me to create and to do that I drew from my experiences from the environment I came from and from the one that was all around me in New York. By looking, I learned, and there was a lot to learn from that diversity in NYC. The area where I lived for example was prodminantly African-American and that had its own set of cultural norms, quite different from what I had been used to in Kansas. After that I was able to land a job at Glamorous Co., working with one of the top five interior designers in Japan, who'd crafted Megu; one of

To build that trust you need to be able to talk. For me, that is something that separates art and design. Usually you will see these combined together, but for me, art and design are two very different things. There is a whole other side to design: the client. You need to listen to them when you`re working on a project and have to combine your perspective as a creator with what the client wants for their business. Another way to look at this is, thinking back to when I was an employee, I could focus on just making a great space. I had a salary every month and I could put everything into the art and not need to worry about the basics. I was working at an established company, the budgets were a

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1. The I&K Reisdence in Sakyoku, Kyoto. 2. Interactive destination showroom for knife-maker, Jikko, in Sakai-shi, Osaka, completed in 2014. 3. Store design for Pagong, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto. The shop was completed in 2012. 4. Inoue's work for the second store of SorrĂŠs in Kyoto, completed in 2016. 5. Part of the interior of the Jikko knife showroom in Osaka. 6. Cafe Habana in Shibuya, Tokyo, with the signature ceiling made from traditional Japanese materials with the brand's Cuban motif. 7. Nishiasa Gojyo fish specialist in Ukyoku, Kyoto.

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lot bigger, with fewer restrictions. You could turn almost anything on the page into a real thing because the money was there. As a designer, your job is to make people who are not interested in design, stand up and notice it. Most importantly now, though, as an interior designer who is no longer just an employee but whose running his own practice, it's about much more than just designing a great space. An artist will often push to do work just for their own gratification. But in interior design, if you make a restaurant, it has to be busy. If you make a retail outlet, it has to attract customers. It is easy to make a monument to yourself or your own ideas - that is art - people will of course notice it, but will they be interested? Probably not. I want to work in a way that has an impact on every type of person, makes them interested, every time. That is why art and design are two very different things and the differentiator is the client. As the owner of an interior design business and not just an employee of one, now I realise this more clearly than ever. I can also say that this is the Kyoto way and this philosophy has stayed with me through all of my travels and all of my work. In Kyoto, we make something to last, not just because it can make money quickly. You make something so that when you hand it over to your client, they know they are getting the best product possible. As an interior designer, it is my job to think of a space as the product. This can be a coffee shop, a restaurant or a hotel. You have to think about how people use those spaces and what they are looking to get out of it when they step inside. Today, there are a lot of luxury products out there, but conversely these things are becoming less meaningful to the people that buy them. What more and more of us are

seeking is an experience from the places in which we send our time. Enhancing some of our basic experiences, for example enjoying morning coffee in a nice cafe or just talking to friends within a pleasing environment, is where designers paying attention to the space can pay dividends for everyone: consumers and business owners alike. So, what are the unique features of a space? Perhaps the main thing is that it can not move: it's rooted in its location and in its community. Community, therefore, is something I need to consider very carefully, because from the community come the people that will define the success of my client`s business. Sometimes my clients are an existing part of a community. Sometimes they are moving in just to start their business. If I am working on a coffee shop then, as well as making my client happy with the space I've designed, I need to make sure that people from the area feel good about meeting there, resting there, talking there etc. They need to be proud that this new space is in their neighbourhood. To have that kind of impact,the space needs to be interesting, noticable and attractive for them to step inside and spend their valuable time, important personal time, with their friends or family. The business owner in turn needs these people to buy his coffee. So, in creating a space, I try to think about the local people, what type of lives are they leading. I need to think about my client, making the best space I can to enable their business to flourish. And through all of this, I too feel a sense of what I am giving to the community by making both my clients and their customers feel proud of the spaces I design." In Tokyo, you can see examples of Inouesan`s work at the Cafe Habana in Shibuya and at Shinanoya in Machida. See www.everedge.jp for more.

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Photo: Alfie GOODRICH

MOVIE TOURISM A BOOST FOR RURAL JAPAN

Tourism is one of the most visible success stories of the Abe government and places like Tokyo and Kyoto are reaping the rewards. TEXT / ROBIN SAKAI. PHOTOS / ALFIE GOODRICH

20 million visitors in 2016, 40 million planned for 2020. The numbers are big and they are getting bigger. A surge in inbound tourists last year is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes Japan taking advantage of its unique place in the world and transforming it`s economy for a better future. If targets are hit, then Tokyo will soon be up there with other international hotspots - London for example sees more than 36 million tourists per year. One thing that Tokyo, and Japan as a whole lack though, is brand. Many stop by London to take in its historic grandeur, others head for Paris to see if they can catch some romance. A brand helps build awareness, and if growth is going to continue in tourism, Japan will need to do something. Luckily, one thing that Japan does not lack are some incredible assets - rich culture, beautiful nature and an innovative arts - to name just a few. The challenge facing the country now is twofold; how to craft a clear and concise image in the imaginations of people around the world and, secondly, how to attract them away from the well-known cities and out into the regions. How the country`s tourism boards tap into local attractions and ensure that the economic benefits of tourism are spread beyond Tokyo and Kyoto will be key. If this challenge can be successfully met, then growth can once again come to smaller cities, making them much more viable for Japanese families to settle. Resorts, like Hakuba or Niseko are two rural centres that are benefitting due to their world-class skiing. Suwa, in Nagano Prefecture, has found another way. Movie tourism.

The biggest movie in Japan of 2016 was the animated, Your Name (Kimi No Na Wa in Japanese). It tells the tale of two teenagers; a boy struggling with hectic Tokyo and a girl looking for an escape from the countryside. Helped by some incredible artwork and animation, it has grossed more than $190 million in Japan alone, since debuting in August and has so far become the country`s second-highest grossing film of all time. Outside of Japan it has been a huge success as well. The biggest Japanese movie in South Korea, China (now the world`s biggest movie market) and a number of western countries, including the UK. Though given a fictional name, one of Your Name’s major backdrops is Lake Suwa and the nearby Suwa city. This link with the film has proved a major boon raising the profile of the area, both inside and outside of Japan. Worldwide this is nothing new. Even today people continue to visit Notting Hill in London or the mock Hobbiton village in New Zealand, inspired by their experiences in the movie theatre. Thats the power of cinema, to open us up to a world of possibilities and places that we might not have otherwise experienced. In the case of Suwa, it has lead to a constant stream of visitors - people seeking a physical connection with the film, fans of the art and others simply made aware of the area through its new-found fame. Initially coming from within Japan, as the movies success has spread around the world, so has the number of nationalities of those visitors. Fans of "Kimi No Na wa" are turning this into a pilgrimage, and businesses there are seizing the opportunity. Reports are that the city of Hida in Gifu Prefecture has taken in around ¼18.5 billion

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PICTURE: A foreign tourist looks out over Lake Suwa. Inspired by the movie, people visiting the area are seeking out all the various locations it featured. Photo: Goodrich.

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Shinjuku's NTT Docomo Tower in animated form and, at left, in real life.

A highway overpass in Shinanomachi seen in the movie 'Your Name' and, at right, in real life.

from tourists as of the end of last year. JNTO, the Japan National Tourism Organization has also played it`s part, creating an official Your Name Tour and opening it to an online competition to allow foreign visitors to be the amongst the first to participate. This is just one area that has benefited, but consider that this is all on the back of a film that was only released in the second half of 2016. The full scope for this sort of tourism is untapped, especially in Japan, a world leader in the cultural industries with movies, games, TV and music. In the case of Your Name, TOHO, the film`s distributor and owner of its marketing rights has so far refused to officially endorse any of the locations, a restriction that has served to curtail some of the promotional efforts by local governments. However, such has been the demand for this type of tourism that TOHO did add a notice, on the film`s official website, in Chinese, English and Japanese, saying “…while we love the enthusiasm for the movie, we would ask that fans act courteously and respect the privacy and property of those who live in those areas.” If parties can come together to overcome these challenges, then they stand every chance to make the most of an incredible opportunity. Destination branding is hugely important, and though Japan is a latecomer, it can power ahead. Tourism is here to stay and its effect could easily lead to a renaissance in the nature of the Japanese economy as a whole. For more information on Suwa, visit: http://visit-suwa.com/ Official movie website: www.kiminona.com

DID YOU KNOW? The story of Your Name draws from a number of Japanese themes, including the duality between rural and urban life, male and female gender roles, science and belief, past and future. All movie stills copyright YOUR NAME/Kimi No Wa/TOHO. Tokyo location stills, copyright Motion Imaging.

The steps near Shuga Shrine, in Tokyo's Shinjuku Ward, seen in real life and, at right, in one of the final scenes of the movie 'Your Name' 4. Housing Japan

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HOME SECURITY

Security and Peace of Mind Netatmo Presense and Welcome put you in control of your home, remotely. It’s never been easier to keep an eye on your property. Your smartphone puts in your hand a powerful link to your home. When tied to the Netatmo Presence outdoor security camera and the Netatmo Welcome indoor security camera, your phone can tell you what is happening on your property day and night, wherever you might be. OUTSIDE The Netatmo Presence is an elegantly designed, web-enabled combination HD security camera and floodlight that simply replaces any existing outdoor light fixture. Deep learning and a revolutionary algorithm inside the camera enables it to detect cars, people, and animals, and lets you choose which type of detection triggers a notification. Installation is straightforward, and a step-bystep guide is included in the box. If you prefer to see the installation in action, Netatmo has a detailed walkthrough video on its YouTube channel. Once the Presence has been installed, download the app to your smartphone or tablet and take control. From the app, you can control the Presence and keep tabs on activity on your property through live streaming video, captured at 1080p full-HD resolution. In addition to live streaming, you can watch footage of specific events that are within

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your pre-defined parameters. A list below the video player provides access to each event in a clean and clear manner. Tap the event, such as an animal entering your property, to watch the full footage. Rotating the phone provides full-screen playback, and you can easily skim through footage. INSIDE The outdoor monitoring provided by the Presence provides great peace of mind, but knowing what is happening inside your home is just as important. The Netatmo Welcome brings revolutionary face recognition to your home with an unobtrusive design that can be placed anywhere without upsetting the eye. Its clean, slender lines and fashionable shape make it a stylish addition to any home, be it a modern apartment or traditional house. Place the Welcome at the main entrance of your home to record real-time images of family members—or intruders—entering and leaving. As with the Presence, an app connects the device to your smartphone, providing immediate alerts about what is going on at home. Training the face recognition is simple. Using the settings, the name of each family member or regular visitor can be registered as “known faces.” Once this process is complete, the device’s smart software gets to work familiarizing itself with what those faces may look like in daylight and darkness, as well as when the person is wearing accessories.


Constantly learning, the Welcome can even recognize someone who has undergone an extreme haircut or grown, or shaved off, a beard. It also, of course, will remember people as they age. The settings for each person registered can be customized. For example, teenagers may delight in the fact that, once at home, their movements can be set not to be recorded, and parents can select not to be notified in the morning when children depart for school. An unlimited number of Welcome devices can be connected to the app, making it easy to monitor various areas of your home. And with 1080p full-HD resolution, night vision, and all the personal data stored in the device rather than on the cloud, you and your family can sleep soundly in the knowledge that you are secure—both in the real and virtual worlds. ALERTS Any time a Presence or Welcome event meets your pre-defined parameters, you can receive a notification on your smartphone. To help control the frequency of messages, you can decide which events you would like to know about. For example, with the Presence, if you are only concerned about people entering your property, and don’t need to know when animals come or go, you can choose not to be notified in such cases. You can also use the Alert Zones feature of the Presence to fine tune detection and notifications. Using the smartphone app, you can draw a box within a scene to limit the trigger area. If the camera’s field of view includes your driveway, deck, the street, and

neighbor’s driveway, for example, and you only want to know if someone tries to enter your car, you can limit the Alert Zone to just the car. With the Welcome, you will receive a notification when someone arrives, but not each time they pass by the camera. You can also choose not to be notified at all about certain people, and can fine-tune the privacy controls for each individual. NO HIDDEN COSTS Unlike some other security cameras, no subscription service is required to store and review footage. The Presence and Welcome both come with an 8GB microSD card in the box—enough capacity to store about three hours of HD video or 100 video sequences— and supports cards up to 32GB. The camera only records when something happens, preventing hours of empty footage, and when the SD card is full the oldest videos will be overwritten with the newest videos. Syncing to your Dropbox or private FTP network can be done at no additional cost, and Netatmo never has access to your data. Video captured by the Presence and Welcome is stored on the device, and only a screenshot of each video is stored in the Netatmo cloud. The Netatmo Presence and Welcome represent the next step in connectivity that puts you in control of your home and property—without you needing to be there. The sense of security and peace of mind these devices provide is priceless, and they’re fun to use to boot.

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FOR SALE The MountainSide is a new development of luxury alpine condominiums located in Hakuba, the home of skiing in Japan. Perfectly located at the base of the Kokusai lift, the center of Wadanomori, the property has unsurpassed access to the Olympic ski slopes of Mount Happo. Hakuba has long been the favourite resort among Japanese skiers and its popularity is growing for inbound visitors as well, thanks in no small part to its easier access from the Tokyo airports. This is the first hotel-condominium development of its type to come to Hakuba and it is set to become the benchmark for investment in the Valley. It has a total of eight ski-in/ski out condominiums, each built to high-levels of international design and situated to provide beautiful mountainside views. Each is 123 sqm in size and features open plan living and dining rooms, based around a three-bedroom configuration, with ensuite bathrooms. Together with sofa-beds they will comfortably sleep up to eight. Finishing includes richly textured hardwood flooring, a modern gas fireplace with stone hearth, centralised heating and insulating systems, high-grade appliances, an oversized island kitchen, corian countertops and home media installations. For those taking to their skiis, there is direct slope access, with the restaurants, bars, cafes, onsens, hotels, retail and ski facilities all just a few minutes away on foot. Tel: 03-3588-8861 Email: sales@housingjapan.com www.housingjapan.com

Property Portrait

THE MOUNTAIN SIDE Writer Robin Sakai

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THIS PAGE Yuki Hayashi in his restored, 1967 Jaguar E-Type.

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A DRIVEN MAN YUKI HAYASHI PHOTOGRAPHS / DEREK MAKISHIMA WRITER / ALFIE GOODRICH

We talk with Yuki Hayashi, president of the Osato Research Institute, about his love for classic British cars, his passion for motor-racing and his lifelong work in the prevention of cognitive disease. “Especially in Japan because of our ageing society, but in the world as a whole, there’s a risk of the country going bankrupt. The medical national insurance system is incapable of coping. So, because of this, more and more we have to think of prevention, of health education.” It was a curious start to a conversation that was largely based around my wanting to get to the bottom of his story about owning a classic E-Type Jaguar. But, Yuki Hayashi is a man of many interests, skills and talents and our conversation was to take many fascinating turns. I’d been introduced to Hayashi-san because of a car. A very special car, but ‘just a car’. On the way to our meeting I’d done a little homework on him by reading various articles and papers his office had sent me: a medical research institute, plant-based medicine, 12 years of sponsorship of the Aston-Martin Racing team, tests on endurance racing-drivers, a custombuilt cedar home, a 1940 Steinway piano and music recitals at his home in Karuizawa. To say that Hayashisan was a multi-faceted person seemed a significant understatement.

someone gets cancer, nowadays it’s fairly easy to estimate how long they will live. With cognitive disorders it’s very hard to say what the patient’s lifespan will be.’ Immun’age is made from fermented papaya. As such it is a sugar based preparation and how the brain absorbs and burns sugar is a vital part of dealing with preventative treatment for cognitive disorders. As a way of knitting together the two parts of Hayashi’s life I was aware of - cars and preventative cognitive treatment - we talked about the brain as an engine. Without fuel, there’s no movement of the car. With no oil in the engine, the motor will seize up and stop. It was clear within five minutes of speaking with him that his passion for educating people of all ages [the younger the better] about living healthily was very strong. Away from the applications of his work from the general population, I was keen to ask him more about the work he’d specifically done with racing-drivers. And, even more specifically, drivers of endurance-racing cars.

“At first,’ he said, ‘with my father-in-law’s papaya growing and the fermentation process, we thought it was all about digestion. That we had something that could help people’s digestion. As we went on, we realised it was very beneficial in many preventative ways. Over time we worked with many chronic disease and diabetic patients but recently I’ve concentrated my studies on cognition.’

“After racing at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the drivers are in a very similar state to jet-lag. They have very little opportunity to rest and after the race there’s no energy in the brain. After they used Immun’age, however, they became relaxed and the next day they slept well. In 2009, together with Aston-Martin, we worked with the three drivers of their '009' racing-car in a scientific way to find out how endurance drivers use their brain over the course of a long race. Endurance racing especially is a very cognitive exercise and there are long periods of intense concentration. The drivers had a very good experience with Immun’age and we’ve had a relationship with the team now for over 12 years.”

‘Cognitive disease is tough for the family of sufferers but also tough for the economy. It places a huge burden on the financial aspect of healthcare. If

Hayashi personally, though, prefers his motoring a little more relaxed. As we moved into discussing his cars, it became clear that as well as not really being a racing

We started talking about the span of his life and experience and first touched on how his company’s Immun’age product had originally come about.

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Fine Flavors in the Heart of Tokyo The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho, a Luxury Collection Hotel 1-2 Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8585 03-3234-1111 Sensational sake and seasonal Japanese dishes await you amid the crystal-and-ice interiors of Washoku Souten. Enjoy the best in luxury at The Prince Gallery Tokyo Kioicho, a Luxury Collection Hotel.

The Prince Park Tower Tokyo 4-8-1 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8563 03-5400-1111 Whether for afternoon tea or evening cocktails, drink in the city views from Stellar Garden, located on the 33rd floor. Find The Prince Park Tower Tokyo nestled in picturesque Shiba Park, with Tokyo Tower in sight.

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The Prince Sakura Tower Tokyo 3-13-1 Takanawa, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8612 03-5798-1111 Let our teppanyaki chefs prepare tantalizing Japanese beef, ďŹ sh, and vegetables for you at Steak House Katsura. Treat yourself and escape to The Prince Sakura Tower Tokyo, tucked away in the bustling Shinagawa area.

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fan before his work with Aston, he’d never really been much of a classic car fan either. "But when a friend of mine Dr. Bez, Aston-Martin CEO at the time, said they could find me what was essentially a brand-new classic, of course that was interesting to me. And the first car I had restored was a DB5 that Aston's classic restoration team at Newport­ Pagnell rebuilt for me. It was my first classic car and it's wonderful to drive. But, still, it's a car that needs some preparation, some tuning, it's beautiful but it's not really an everyday car. The everyday driving classic was still something I really was searching for.' Enter the E-Type. “I am the car’s third owner. It was bought in 1967 and owned for ten years. The next owner had the car for 40 years until I bought it recently. For me it’s the perfect car; comfortable, easy to drive, easy to maintain. Of course for the Japanese climate we had a couple of changes made: a new radiator, cooling, new exhaustsystem. All of these were installed by Jaguar and subsequently the car is looked after by Jaguar in Gifu, here in Japan.” As we talked more, I realised that Hayashi has a number of cars. Most of them new. His office and institute have a number of working vehicles, all of which are Range-Rover. “I love modern performance cars,’ he comments, ‘but with the older, classic car there is a character. For people like me, in their 50s, 60s or 70s, part of the attraction of the classic - seeing or driving - is that it reminds us of being young.”

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It’s at this point, and after much discussion of other topics around medicine, life, cars, classical music, his classic 1940 Steinway piano and the Lindall cedar home in Karuizawa that Hayashi-san’s wife, Toshihiko, designed and in which they live, that we got back to two core themes: restoration and education. Restoration not only of the classical objects he likes to enjoy, but restoration of brain function. Education not only for future generations in how to extend their life and usefulness, but education by way of preserving and celebrating classic components of our past. In closing Hayashi explains to me how Immun’age became a sponsor of the UK branch of the Concours d’Elegance, a celebration of pristine, classic automobiles that has roots dating back to the 17thcentury French aristocracy, who paraded horsedrawn carriages in the parks of Paris during Summer weekends and holidays, and I realise the perfection of the worlds Hayashi-san’s life comprises. As the automotive Concours d’Elegance his company sponsors in the UK, strives to celebrate the preservation of fine automobiles, so his work with Immun’age works to preserve and restore the cognition of people. I could have spent an entire day with Hayashi and still felt like I was scratching the surface of his life, passions and his work. But as quickly as we'd met, he was gone, with the stylish 'vroom' only a Coventry-built 4.2litre can make, off to deliver a seminar to doctors about his most recent work. Find out more about Immun’age, Yuki Hayashi, his cars and his work here: http://www.osatousa.com/


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1 & 2. On the road with Hayashi-san in the countryside of Karuizawa. 3 & 4. The 1967 Jaguar E-Type garaged in the Hayashi family villa in Karuizawa. The house is a Lindal Cedar home in English mansion style and was designed by Toshi Hayashi. The garage includes a riser so that the car, visible from the living-room behind a glass pane, can be raised and lowered. 5. Yuki Hayashi's modern Aston Marton Volante, parked at the front of the Karuizawa house. 6. The main living room/drawing room area of the villa, showing the couple's 1940 Steinway piano. From time to time, the Hayashi family hold music recitals and afternoon tea here for guests.

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FOR SALE Naka-Meguro Residence For Sale Designed by renowned architect Riccardo Tossani and built to the custom specifications of its current owner, this NakaMeguro Residence is founded on a concept of fusing house and garden, bringing artistic touches into surrounding community. Riccardo Tossani is the guiding hand behind several major projects around the world, including Gravitas Akasaka and several high-profile developments in Niseko. In this home, panoramic, floor-to-ceiling windows, sliding glass doors, deep verandas and a rich selection of materials, including stained oak flooring, combine into one stunning space. The property projects a sense of continuity between the rooms and out into the garden. At night, the blending of house and garden is particularly evident. Soft landscaping complements the interior lighting, that bounces off timber surfaces. Other unique elements include the designer dining and living room furniture, a custom fireplace with a concrete hearth, a white antico stucco portal defining the library as well as carefully chosen artworks. There are four bedrooms over three floors, as well as a den and study / library. With over 290 square meters of space, the living area is extensive. It`s location, close to the popular lifestyle centre of NakaMeguro is surrounded by boutique eateries and shopping outlets, gourmet coffee shops and the ever popular Meguro River, with its stunning cherry blossoms. Contact 03-3588-8861 sales@housingjapan.com housingjapan.com

Property Portrait

NAKA-MEGURO HOUSE Writer Robin Sakai

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Capturing Tokyo with an iPhone TEXT & PHOTOS / ALFIE GOODRICH PHOTO OF ALFIE / DHIMAN ROY all iphone shots made with iphone 6 s plus & free photo apps .

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processed

The latest, greatest photography gear might be something you lust after owning but our resident pro shows you how to get some great shots in the city using just your smartphone.... 50

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Alfie Goodrich [above, top-left] has been taking photos since he was around seven years old. He studied for three years at art school in the UK before spending ten years in the music business. After running his own company in the UK, between 2001 an 2007, Alfie and his family settled full-time in Tokyo and he now concentrates only on photography, shooting and teaching. He works for a variety of clients, across the automotive, entertainment, fashion and travel sectors. In 2015 he was official British Embassy photographer for the visit of HRH The Duke of Cambridge. He is an ambassador for Hasselblad cameras. "Despite having shelves full of cameras and lenses - everything from Nikon digital SLRs to my Hasselblad digital medum-format beast - I spend a lot of very happy hours shooting with my iPhone. Digital cameras alone weren't the revolution, it was a combination of digital camera, lights-on processing and the internet that revolutionised photography. And, hey-presto, the iPhone is all three in one: shoot, process and publish globally with just one device. The ease of instantly sharing my photos, whether it be via Instagram or on one of my websites, is definitely an attraction of the phone.

But, simply having a camera with me all the time - as I do with my iPhone - is enough to get me shooting and keep me shooting at all times. Soaking up the world around me with the phone is convenient, satisfying and helps me keep my eyes sharp. The phone also allows me to shoot in square format, something I grew up with when shooting certain old types of film camera. And the phone remembers where I took a photo too, very handy when I just want to know where I was and something that is super useful when I'm planning location shoots and need to give a client an idea of the exact spots we'll be working in. The biggest plus for me, though, is that I always have the phone in my pocket. With the quality of the iPhone 6S Plus, that means I have a high-megapixel digital camera capable of stills, video and timelapse photography in my back pocket the whole time. Even when I am carrying other cameras with me, I often resort to the phone to record behind-the-scenes shots at my photoshoots. It truly has become a modern-day digital 'Swiss Army Knife' and an invaluable tool for the photographer, both pro and hobbyist alike."

Here's a few of Alfie's tips for when you're shooting with your phone [see if you can guess which tip goes with which of the square photos shown above and below]: 1. Look up. 2. Look down. 3. Look for patterns and lines in the world around you. 4. Strong colours catch the eye. 5. Look for combinations of colours. 6. Shoot from low angles for more drama. 7. Hunt for reflections and put your phone against reflective surfaces to create some surreal 50/50 'real and reflected' world photos. 8. Collect things you see: signs, letters, colours, mailboxes, cars parked inside tiny buildings. 9. Pay attention to light and shade and learn what times of day are best for shooting. Most importantly, have fun and don't let anyone tell you that your phone is not a 'real camera'. It's your eyes, imagination and ability to spot a good moment that are the most crucial factors in any photograph. http://alfie.photography

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MONTHLY FURNISHED LEASING IN TOKYO STORY ADAM GERMAN   PHOTO YANCHU HAN

MFA Property Management is a new service from Housing Japan that allows you to rent out your property on a safe, short-term basis, so that your property can earn higher returns. By furnishing an apartment and targeting the short stay market, home owners are able to increase the value that their asset generates when compared with a standard lease contract. Housing Japan property management provides a turnkey solution to help realize this. It begins with preapring (furnishing) your property, and moves onto the marketing to and assisting tenants. All tenant leases made under the MFA Property Management program contracts are for a minimum of one month stays, the lease is completely legal and Home Owner Association friendly. This last point is important, as although a number of Tokyo home owners have been leasing out, utilizing services such as AirBnB, the practice until recently, existed in a legal grey zone. Essentially, anything rented for under one month was required to have a hotel license, which of course, the vast majority of homes could not get lacking as they were facilities such as fire-escapes and round-the-clock staff. In February, the Japanese government cleared things up to some extent by passing a law

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allowing for a maximum of 180 days per year of short-term leasing in the country. Using services like AirBnB can still be problematic however due to the aforemnetioned property associations and neighborhood committees. It also commits the home owner to servicing each enquiry made and each reservation that is confirmed. In this case, Housing Japan is removing all of the stress involved. There are rapidly growing number of business travelers seeking accommodation while in town on work projects, as well as growing contingents of exchange students and other visitors. Hotel spaces in Tokyo remain limited. With the upcoming Olympics and growing importance of inbound tourism, this situation will continue. For home owners, there is the potential to add a percentage point or more to the yield that their property can make. Or, put another way, to turn gross yields into net yields. As part of its service, Housing Japan will handle all aspects of the management, including furnishing (if required), meeting and greeting guests, sorting out any issues, processing payments and advertising your property in multiple languages. The added flexibility means that you can grow the


value of your asset and income while at the same time, have the ability to quickly adjust the usage of your property should you require. How it works 1. Furnishing your property to market standards 2. Marketing to tenants both foreign and domestic through a variety of services (including AirBnB) 3. Meeting and contracting with tenants, processing payments 4. Explanation of the ground rules for your property 5. Cleaning between tenants 6. Overseeing Maintenance and repairs of the property and the contents For more information, contact Housing Japan property management by email at: mfa@housingjapan.com Or call us on 03-3588-8863.

Size of the Market Total Tourists for 2016 [preliminary data from JNTO]:

24,039,000 Source – JTB Tourism Research & Consultancy Total Tourists who stayed 28 Days to 1 year:

1,033, 677 (4.3% of total tourists) Source – Ministry of Infrastructure, Land and Tourism

Total of this with Haneda or Narita as ports of entry:

413,470 (roughly 40% of 4.3%) Source – Ministry of Infrastructure, Land and Tourism

This is before we consider further targeting of inbound visitors through the 2019 Rugby World Cup, 2020 Olympic Games and the recent approval of Casino construction.

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the first and only bilingual video channel on Business in Japan

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To be featured on BIJ.TV, please contact: Anthony Head 54 Housing Japan Spring 2017

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NO VACANCY

Property Management in Tokyo by ADAM GERMAN

In property ownership and investing, a large cast of different characters flow through the entry and exit process. Lawyers, agents, bankers, sellers and buyers all make an appearance throughout the ownership experience. There is one group of people, however, that are so vital and important to the process that they can make or break your investment: the property managers. Ironically, property managers are the most unsung characters during your ownership. Out of all the participants, it is only the property managers who are tasked with protecting the only source of revenue you have — the rent. It is the property managers who source and screen your tenants, are the first responders to any emergencies that happen and are the ones who haul themselves out of bed at all hours of the night to make sure your tenants have a positive experience. Hiring a property manager in Japan also allows you to service your most important renter pool — Japanese people. In addition to the obvious language barriers that the property manager will break down, you'll be able to take advantage of Japan’s co-signer rules on all residential leases. It's a requirement when your tenant signs a lease agreement that they provide a guarantor, one who becomes legally responsible for the rent should the tenant disappear. In the past, the guarantor function was mainly provided by a family member of the renter but, increasingly, tenants are choosing to pay the extra cost for a third-party insurance company that will act in lieu of an actual guarantor. Owners like this service as well because the guarantor company not only covers missed rent, but also the cost of restoring the property back to it’s original condition. This is just a small example of why hiring a property manager is a make or break choice. Choosing the right one is paramount, but

to the uninitiated, it might look like all property managers are the same. They aren’t. Imagine this: you’ve purchased a property and are now looking for a property manager. You reach out to several firms who all present proposals. Everyone likes to put their best foot forward, but do you know how to choose the manager who best fits your property? As with everything else, you won’t really know the choice you’ve made until after you’ve committed to one firm. Pruning out the non-contenders is a fairly simple process. Demonstrating consistent reporting on upkeep, maintenance and repairs as well as knowledge of local rents is property management 101. The person pitching their firm's services to you is, at the end of the day, selling to you. The great will stand out from the merely good by not agreeing entirely with everything you say. Two good property managers are agreeing with your “research findings,” while the third is disagreeing with you. Before playing the odds of two versus one, dig deeper into why that one manager is recommending something different than what you feel is achievable — it might just make or break your investment. Originally published in "The Canadian" — a quarterly magazine of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Japan.

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TEXT & PHOTOS / ALFIE GOODRICH

In praise of Tokyo International Forum 2017 brings the 20th Anniversary of the iconic Tokyo International Forum. Photographer, Alfie Goodrich explains a little about his 18 year love-affair with the building.... 56

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Rafael Vinoly, the Forum's architect, has since created landmark buildings in a number of cities around the world, London's 'Walkie Talkie' perhaps most famous amongst them. For Alfie, though, the Tokyo International Forum remains Vinoly's crowning achievement. "My first visit to the Tokyo International Forum was in 1999. I was overawed with the building, as are most people when they first encounter it. Since moving to Tokyo full-time in 2007, the International Forum has been a regular, once-a-week excursion for me. It never ceases to amaze and I can still, after 18 years, find photographs there which I haven't taken before. Part of the charm of the Forum is that the building reminds me of a cathedral. I was brought up in the English city of Canterbury, home to one of the world's

most famous cathedrals and one of the biggest things I miss in Tokyo is the cavernous acoustic of cathedrals. The Forum has that. From its top floor walkways, one can experience a similar sense of scale, emptiness and the echoing sound of a large cathedal. The Forum is, in Tokyo, perhaps unique in this respect. Very few buildings have what I like to call 'such a beautiful waste of space' as the Forum's vast atrium. Aside from the size and the acoustics of the building, the International Forum plays with light throughout the day in a way that creates new spectacle on each visit. Morning soft light gives way to afternoon hard light and sharp-edged shadows. The evening brings more colour, with the lighting creating soft oranges and yellows to contrast and counter the colder tones of the sky, concrete and metal.

It's also a unique civic space, I think. People move through from one end to the other, plying their way between Tokyo and Yurakucho JR stations and the metro lines from Marunouchi to Hibiya. During lunchtimes the benches throughout the atrium floor fill with people, eating lunch from bento boxes and chatting with each other. From the 7th floor down, everything below - even at the busiest of times - appears quiet and serene. Noise floats up gently and the sharp edges of noisy city life are softened by the space. Two weekends in a month, antique and flea markets fill the outside space between the two main structures on the site. Tokyo Interational Forum 3 Chome-5-1 Marunouchi, Chiyoda, Tokyo 100-0005. http://www.t-i-forum.co.jp/

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1. Mari shooting near Tsukiji on a rainy day in 2016. Photo: Goodrich

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2. Studio shooting in Azabu, Tokyo. Photo: Goodrich

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3. Fashion shooting in Yutenji, Tokyo. Photo: Willie Willemse

4. Glamming-up the backstreets of Tsukiji. Photo: Paul Colton

5. Portfolio shooting in Kamakura. Photo: Goodrich


COVER GIRL Mari PHOTOS / ALFIE GOODRICH TEXT / ROBIN SAKAI

Cover girl for this year`s edition of the Housing Japan magazine is Mari. She's worked for a range of local fashion labels and in 2016, made her first appearance in British 'Vogue'. When we sat down to talk Tokyo, we ended up going through a whole range of topics, including her favorite places, both near and far, as well as what drives her life in the city when away from the camera. What is your favorite place in Tokyo? I`ve lots of places I like. Right now I am living close to Tokyo Tower and that`s a great area because you have a large temple grounds, which look beautiful during cherry blossom season, as well as Shiba park. I like the little streets and the kinds of places that you would not normally think about. That is where the real magic of Tokyo happens. The areas where nature pushes through in harmony with the city. Another thing I like about Tokyo backstreets are the cats you see roaming around. It takes the edge off the hustle and bustle of the city when you feel nature and animals around you. You like cats? Yes! I think every animal has the right to live and it is our responsibly to help provide it. I hope one day we can find a way to exist without the need to destroy our environment and the animals we share it with. One of the things that's very important to me is the work I do with Kobe Animal Link. They run a lot of education activities and are often on the look out for foster homes for animals in need.

The environment is also very important to you? It is absolutely vital to how I live my life. If I am not working, I`m heading to Kobe, my hometown, well-known for its beautiful coastline. When I can, I love to get out of Japan and go anywhere it is warm! Thailand is a favorite. I also love New Zealand, especially the Bay of Islands. But if I am in Tokyo then shorter day trips are fine. I did my photoshoot with Alfie in Kamakura, on the Hayama Peninsula. On the other side of Tokyo, Chiba Prefecture has some great places - work took me to Boso, where a lot of people from Tokyo have a second home. Driving there, across the aqualine is a great experience. What, if anything, has modeling in Tokyo taught you? Tokyo has taught me to embrace summer! A lot of people hate summer because of the humidity, but I love it. There is a creative energy and colour that Japanese people really bring out when the weather warms up. As someone who loves fine threads, tailoring and wool, summer always presents a fresh challenge. If you weren't modeling what would you be doing? Some sort of animal welfare work, I think. I find our relationship with animals good for the soul, so my ideal would be to help share this with other people in a creative way. You can see Mari's homepage here: https://mari-model.jimdo.com Find Kobe Animal Link at: http://kobeanimallink.com

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TOKYO’S PREMIER MULTIDISCIPLINARY REHABILITATION CENTER

• Assessments and treatments performed by a team of internationally trained, registered and experienced physiotherapists • Private treatment rooms • Large, fully equipped rehabilitation gym • Central location, just a 3-minute walk from Roppongi Hills • Consultations available in English and Japanese

Club 360 specializes in physiotherapy, sports massage, personal training, and group fitness classes.

✓ Sports injuries ✓ Musculoskeletal and spinal conditions (neck and back pain) ✓ Ergonomic and postural assessments ✓ Gait assessments ✓ Rehabilitation programmes

Address: B1 CMA3 Bldg. 3-1-35 Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Open seven days a week: Mon–Fri 6:30am–9:00pm; Sat–Sun 7:00am–6:00pm • Tel: 03-6434-9667

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FINANCING YOUR HOME PURCHASE STORY / ADAM GERMAN

For Foreigners, options for financing a Tokyo home purchase are increasing... Real estate financing options, foreign and Japanese alike, have been getting better and better as the year progresses. And it’s a trend that looks to continue at least until the Olympics. In January of this year, the Bank of Japan shocked economists worldwide by announcing a tiered negative interest rate policy compelling every bank operating in Japan to hold a certain amount of its cash reserves in the BoJ. Any capital held in excess of that will have a -0.01 per cent interest rate applied to it. This means that the value of this cash will dwindle if the banks continue doing what they have been doing for the past 20 years: which mainly is hoard cash in the Bank of Japan. Why do this? A core tenet of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s - financial plan — or “Abenomics” — holds that corporations will reinvest their artificial profits from last year’s weak yen into their employees in the form of raises. The thinking went that if employees were receiving regular raises, the average Japanese consumer would be more confident in planning their own future and thus would spend more of their savings. By extension, in addition to increased consumer spending, Mr. & Mrs. Tanaka would also be more apt to take on more debt in the form of loans — housing loans for example. Unfortunately, the reality is that corporations and labour unions alike have agreed on less wage increases this year compared to the previous one. A main reason often cited was the perceived worry about the sustainability of economic recovery under Abenomics. Abe, on the other hand, had basically done everything a government

can conventionally do to assist the economy and blames the mega banks for strangling the country. So when the Bank of Japan announced negative interest rates in January this year, it hit retail banks large and small right in the gut. The BoJ’s message — lend or lose money. The basic premise being: easier access to capital should spur large purchases and innovation, which in turn breeds sustained success and thus a maintainable economic recovery. Why does this matter to you as a foreign individual or corporate entity in Japan? Whether you are long on Abenomics or not, if you have a home or investment property loan taken out prior to January 2016, it’s time to call your bank and ask for an interest rate reduction. Lending institutions are now targeting their competitor’s clients and are approaching them with lower interest rates. What is happening now is basically a re-financing frenzy. If you don’t own property and are put off from purchasing by rising prices in Tokyo (or Japan in general), remember that even without a permanent resident visa, you are still able to get financing that wasn’t available to international residents before. Purchasing a million dollar property with only $200,000 down in equity makes the investment dynamic a lot different than what was available previously — and a lot more immediate. Originally published in "The Canadian" — a quarterly magazine of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Japan.

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YOYOGI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Curious, Confident, Compassionate International parents in Tokyo are faced with a number of choices when it comes to where to educate their children and how best to prepare them for a future in Japan or elsewhere in the world. Yoyogi International School is unique in its ability to meet the targets of the UK National Curriculum, the US Common Core State Standards and, in addition, implement the principles behind the International Baccalaureate. It’s a mix that ensures students reach high academic standards and develop the necessary life skills to succeed. But more than that, the school’s work is underpinned by three principles: curiosity, confidence and compassion. “We feel that curiosity is a key value to instil in all our students”, explained Joanna Magness, the school’s principal. “Having a desire to learn more and make connections in their learning is encouraged through all aspects of school life”. This is expressed in various ways. One is through building experiences into the core of the school’s education— primary classes go on monthly excursions around Tokyo and art lessons are often experiential in nature, for example.

are involved in peer, personal and teacher-led assessment and feedback. This results in students confidently sharing information about projects they are working on with their classmates and teachers. “Students at Yoyogi International School are encouraged to become confident and proud of themselves in all they do”, explained Magness. That sense of community runs throughout the school.

“These experiences provide the students with shared first-hand experiences to initiate or consolidate what they have been learning and give purpose to their studies in the classroom”, said Magness.

Class sizes are a big issue for parents all over the world. Yoyogi International School keeps its numbers small, with compassionate, individualised care for each student. It allows teachers to know each student as an individual and work with them to develop their strengths and address their challenges. In this environment, self-confidence can blossom.

At Yoyogi International School, students are encouraged to be self-confident. Through an interactive process, students

“Yoyogi International school is not just confined to the classrooms and building, it is a community we work together to

grow—past families still come to visit if they are back in Tokyo from overseas and graduate students often stop by to say hello to their teachers”, said Magness. A great deal of research has been conducted over the past few years into the real skills and knowledge children will need as they enter the 21st Century workforce. It has been proven that less of an emphasis should be placed on the memorising of information and facts, and more on actual skills; such as how to learn, question and apply knowledge that they hear and discover for themselves. Yoyogi International School has used this research to help shape their curriculum in a way that supports students to think critically and self-evaluate. Their core values also mirror these important skills— as well as a curiosity and confidence, it is also imperative for students to have a compassion and empathy for others, to use all that they learn in a positive manner. “We are proud of our close-knit community and nurturing atmosphere. Walking through the classrooms, students will confidently approach visitors, eager to introduce themselves and ask questions to appease their curiosity”.

Dedicated School Principal Joanna Magness greets students every morning at the Primary campus.

Preschool/Kindergarten Campus 1-15-12, Tomigaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0063 Primary Campus 5-67-5, Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053

Find out more about Yoyogi International School by contacting them for a school visit: Tel: (03)5478-6714 | info@yoyogiinternationalschool.com | www.yoyogiinternationalschool.com

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HOW TO BUY A HOME IN TOKYO. Housing Japan works with you throughout your Tokyo home search, providing their extensive experience of the Tokyo property market to help you find the perfect place. CONSULTING & FINANCIAL PLANNING - Whether you are buying a home, luxury residence or making an investment, Housing Japan will pare you with an expert agent who can help you get the most out a deal. We begin with consulting with you about what you needs, desires and intentions are, and move on to recommending a range of property within your budget and criteria. You will need to have a property in mind in order to discuss financing with a local bank, as they do not provide even a cursory approval for a mortgage before knowing what type of property you intend to purchase. In addition to this, you may wish to gain knowledge on wider tax issues.

EXPLANATION OF IMPORTANT MATTERS - Once the price is agreed your agent will start the contract process. The agent is required to investigate the details of the property and provide you with an “Explanation of Important Matters”.  This document defines all the important terms of the contract. 

SEARCH - Your agent will search for a list of property and once you have been presented with these options, they will then take you through the viewings, explaining anything you need to know about the property and its local area.

LOAN APPLICATION - Although you will probably have pre-approval from a lender, once the contract is complete you can make the formal loan application. It usually takes a month to six weeks for final approval after which the final closing date can be set. If you using finance, the contract will have a clause saying that you are applying for a mortgage from a particular bank with a proposed approval date.

You will need an experienced agent who has access to the best, and most up-to-date listed property in Tokyo as not apartments or real estate is listed openly in the market – much is listed privately or off-market. FINANCING - Housing Japan agents are in many cases able to advise in financing and tax issues due to our experience and in house expertise, but in cases where more specialised knowledge is required, we are also able to put you in touch with the appropriate experts. Specifically in terms of financing, we work closely with one of the mega-banks in Japan, as well as several smaller banking corporations and a number of international financiers who approve loans both from within Japan and in select locations overseas. APPLICATION - When you find the right property, submit an “application to purchase”.  This is a non-binding written expression of your interest to purchase the property at certain price. An application shows the seller you are serious and will start the negotiation process.

EXECUTING THE CONTRACT - The contract execution usually takes place at the agents offices and takes about 2 hours to complete. It is typical to pay the owner a deposit of 10% or JPY 10 million at the time of the contract.

FINAL SETTLEMENT - The final settlement usually takes place at the buyer’s bank and is handled by a judicial scrivener. The buyer will transfer the remaining balance to the sellers account and the title of the property will be transferred to the buyer. On completion the seller delivers all the keys to the property and the transfer of ownership is complete. SUMMARY OF COSTS - When purchasing a property in Japan, normally the taxes and fees will come to about 5 to 6% of the price of the property. CONTACT - Housing Japan agents are fully bilingual, we offer a world-class service combined with deep knowledge of the Tokyo property market. Contact them to start your search for a home in Tokyo you will love. Email. sales@housingjapan.com Call. 03-3588-8861

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TOKYO SLOW Tokyo is different things, to different people, but slow?

STORY / ROBIN SAKAI PHOTOS / ALFIE GOODRICH & ROBIN SAKAI.

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'Slow city' is a global movement that is about celebrating everything local, simple and natural: everything from food and people to places, traditions and experiences. It has yet to officially make its way to Tokyo, but that doesn't mean you can't partake. As it turns out, this is perhaps one of the best places in the world to enjoy the slow life. Here we look at just a few small changes to help you engage with local history, culture and communities this year. Enjoy the commute Everybody loves to complain about it and certainly Tokyo trains get packed, but compared to urban rail networks around the world, Tokyo is a class apart. If your journey involves taking the train to the office, try getting out a stop early and walk the rest of the way. Enjoy the surroundings and look at what makes up the local neighbourhood. These things won't be there forever, especially at the rate Tokyo redevelops. Taste the difference Tokyo has an incredible food culture, a statement we can back up with a couple

of facts - more restaurants per capita than anywhere else and more Michelin-Star restaurants than anywhere else. Instead of dropping into the nearest big brand eatery, support a local, one-of-akind outlet. Savour the unique service and atmosphere. Consider it an investment beyond mere convenience. Your tastebuds will thank you. Visit a museum Tokyo not only has hundreds of years of its incredible culture and history, but its museums also regularly attract the best exhibitions from around the world. Ueno and Roppongi are the two most popular destinations, with the former containing a number of impressive institutions around one all encompassing beautiful park. If art is more your thing, again, Japanese collectors have some impressive showcases. Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum in Marunouchi is another great highlight. Shop different Tokyo has a thriving scene in vintage clothing, but there are also a lot of other goods that are sourced and sold locally. It can be a lot of fun exploring areas like Shimo-Kitazawa, Kichijoji or Jimbocho just

to see what you might come across. Many of the jewellery, book, art or furniture stores reflect Tokyo culture, and even some of the big brand retailers offer something special in their local outlets. Savour the hunt: you never know when you might come across your next great treasure. There are a number of regular flea and antique markets across town, too. City events listings on the web will help you find out more and www.tokyoartbeat.com is an awesome source of exhibition and event information, searchable by area as well as type of event. Surround yourself with nature Tokyo is a huge city but there are great pockets of nature within its boundaries. You probably know Yoyogi Park but do you know the huge park out the back of Meiji Shrine? And from central Tokyo, it takes just a few hundred Yen and 60mins on the train to get to the Miura Peninsula, Takao, riverside parks along the Edogawa, Odaiba and many more. There is an incredibly rich tapestry waiting to be discovered. Give it a try.

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HOW TO RENT A HOME IN TOKYO. Housing Japan`s rental team has access to the best homes in the city and externsive experience at helping clients close a contract and move in quickly, cost-effectively and with minimal stress.

F

inding that perfect place in a city as expansive as Tokyo can seem overwhelming, so be prepared to spend some time house rest assured, however, that whether you are coming to Tokyo on an expat package with a housing budget or are paying out of pocket, there is bound to be an apartment well suited to you.

EXPAT APARTMENTS - Properties that cater

specially to expats are generally priced over 350,000 yen per month and include major appliances such as a washer, dryer, dishwasher, phone and phone line and refrigerator. They require four to six months’ rent as a security deposit, but no key money.

T Y P I C A L JA PA N E S E A PA RT M E N T S -

Apartments designed with Japanese renters in mind often cost under 350,000 yen per month in rent and do not come with any appliances or furnishings. They require between one and four another one to two months’ rent for key money. Most apartments in Japan are leased on twoyear contracts, and a contract renewal fee of one month’s rent is charged for each additional two years a tenant wishes to stay. Once you have found a suitable apartment or house, you will need to make the necessary contractual arrangements before moving in. Before signing any contracts, it is advisable to familiarize yourself with some of the rental regulations and customs in Japan. Understanding some of the differences that exist between your home country and planning ahead will help to prevent any problems that may arise in the future regarding your new home.

SECURITY DEPOSIT (SHIKIKIN) - Landlords will

often request two to four months’ rent in advance as a security deposit. When a tenant moves out or the lease expires, the cost of cleaning and any necessary repairs will be deducted from this security deposit.

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MONTHLY MAINTENANCE FEE (KANRIHI)

In some Japanese apartments, a monthly building maintenance fee will be added to the rent. In the case of expat apartments, maintenance fees are almost always included in the monthly rent.

RENEWAL FEE (KOSHINRYO) - In the case of typical Japanese apartments, a non-refundable renewal fee is often charged each time the twoyear lease is renewed. This fee is typically equal to one month’s rent and is paid to the landlord.

APPLICATION & CONTRACT SIGNING - Once

you have found a property that is right for you, your real estate agent will send an application on your behalf to the owner. The application, signed by the human resources department of your company in the case of a company contract, will include a bid for the rent, desired move-in date and any other requests you may have. There is a possibility that an application will be rejected by the landlord, in which case you’ll have to continue your search for another suitable apartment. After both parties have agreed on the rent and terms, the owner will send a draft of the contract to your real estate agent or company. Contracts are almost always in Japanese, so it is important to review them carefully with a Japanese person before signing.

CANCELLATION FEES - If a tenant cancels the lease after signing but before moving in, there will be a one-month penalty charged. In the case of cancellation of the contract after moving in but before the two-year lease has expired, tenants must give between one and two months’ advance notice, depending on the terms of the contract. If tenants move out suddenly and are not able to stay the one or two months required, the remaining rent for that period will still be charged.


UTILITIES - Generally speaking, the total cost

of water, gas and electricity bills in Japan is said to be about seven to 10 percent of the monthly rent. Utilities have a basic monthly starting fee and even in months when they are not used there will still be a small charge.

HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING - For most tenants in Japan, the most expensive utility bill will be electricity, depending on how often the air conditioning and heating is used. Tokyo summers are very hot and humid, and the winters are dry and cold. In many apartments there are individual heating and cooling units in each room, allowing for much better localized climate control, which is likely to be more economical than central airconditioning. Some larger family apartments and houses will have two electricity bills, one that is only for air conditioning and the other for all other electricity used that month. SECURITY DEPOSIT DEDUCTIONS - When

tenants vacate a property in Japan, they almost always have to pay a cleaning fee even if they have cleaned the apartment or house themselves before leaving. This fee is normally about 1,000 yen to 1,500 yen per square meter, so the bill for a 100m2 apartment would be between 100,000 yen and 150,000 yen.

DAMAGE - Each time a tenant moves out of a house or apartment, a damage inspection will be conducted. This is done with the owner and/or his representative, the real estate agent, and sometimes the tenant. The inspection is necessary to determine whether or not any damage has occurred. If there is damage, the cost of repairs will be invoiced to the tenant or his company and deducted from the original security deposit. INSPECTION CHECKLIST - Before signing a lease for an apartment or house, it is a good idea to do a thorough inspection of the property to ensure there are no surprises after moving in.

Be sure to check the following: 1. Is there cable TV and internet access in the building? 2. Is there satellite TV in the building? If not, check to see if the owner will either install a satellite dish for you, or allow you to install your own satellite dish. 3. Are the TV and phone jacks located in places where you would want to use a TV or phone? 4. Is there ample closet space for your belongings? 5. What is the condition of the paint, carpet and wallpaper? 6. Does the apartment have central air conditioning or separate wall units in the bedroom and living room? 7. Are the appliances provided in good working condition? 8. Have your real estate agent check to see if there are any construction sites nearby. There is a lot of construction in Tokyo with new buildings going up in every area, and this may be noisy or change the conditions around your building by blocking views. 9. Car owners should ensure their cars fit in the parking space provided, as some parking garages are very small, have a low ceiling or are the elevator type. Be especially careful if you plan to buy a large car or SUV. 10. Is there any bicycle parking?

CONTACT

Housing Japan agents are fully bilingual, we offer a world-class service combined with deep knowledge of the Tokyo property market. Contact them to start your search for a home in Tokyo you will love. Email. rent@housingjapan.com Call. 03-3588-8862

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SCHOOLS & EDUCATION IN TOKYO

AZABU INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 15 months to 5 years City Azabu Room 302 3-10-12 Azabu-Juban, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3451-8477 info@azabuis.com www.azabuis.com Admissions: Keith Jacobsen AYLA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 6 years 102 Shirokanedai Heights 5-13-28 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku,Tokyo. Tel: 03-3448-2585 aylaistokyo@yahoo.com http://aylais.com/ Admissions: Puteri Zailan THE AMERICAN SCHOOL IN JAPAN Early Learning Center. Nursery to Kindergarten 6-16-5 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5771-4344 jbeneventi@asij.ac.jp http://community.asij.ac.jp Admissions: Judy Beneventi CHATEAU DES BAMBINI MONTESSORI SCHOOL Ages: 1 to 6 years 2F, 2-8-18 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-6400-3328 eriko@montessori-cbms.com www.montessori-cbms.com/en/

INTERNATIONAL SECONDARY SCHOOL Ages: 6 to 13 years 4-17-26 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5730-1331 iss@isstokyo.com www.isstokyo.com Admissions: Shawn Hutchinson Annual Schedule: August to June J’S INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 1.5 to 6 years 2-12-14 Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3452-2078 www.js-international-school.com Admissions: Mrs. Yang K SPACE Ages: 16 months to 5 years 5-13-39 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5421-4186 enquiries@kspacetokyo.org www.kspace.tokyo.jp Admissions: Juliet Rogove MITSUI GARDENS INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 5 years 2-1-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3224-6796 ewapreschooldirector@gmail.com www.mitsuigardenspreschool.com Admissions: Pam Wasilewski THE MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF TOKYO Ages: 2 to 12 years 3-5-13 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5449-7067 admit@montessorijapan.com www.montessorijapan.com Admissions: Pete Juds

Nishimachi International School is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational K–9 day school founded in 1949 to educate students from around the world and Japan. Nishimachi’s educational philosophy is rooted in a spirit of internationalism and humanism that allows children to learn in a supportive, stimulating, and caring environment. The tradition has been to provide children with an education in English and one period of daily Japanese that seeks to develop international perspective and understanding. The school’s mission is to educate students to be communicators, thinkers, and motivated lifelong learners who thoughtfully contribute to a diverse and changing world.

The Montessori School of Tokyo enrolls 160 students aged two to fifteen from over 30 countries around the world. The only internationally accredited Montessori school in Japan, it is located in the midst of Tokyo’s international community. Our approach assumes that children are born intelligent, curious and creative and are ripe to develop a sense of wonder and imagination. We encourage students to think deeply, to think for themselves and to think about others.

Nishimachi International School 2-14-7 Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0046 Tel: 03-3451-5520 Admissions: Kiki Jiang-Yamaguchi admissions@nishimachi.ac.jp www.nishimachi.ac.jp

The Montessori School of Tokyo (MST) 3-5-13 Minami Azabu Minatoku, Tokyo 106-0047 Tel: 03 5449 7067 Fax: 03 5449 0087

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Our core values of Confidence, Respect and Compassion represent the characteristics we strive to instill and uphold in our administration, faculty and student body.

info@montessorijapan.com www.montessorijapan.com


NISHIMACHI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Kindergarten to grade 9 2-14-7 Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel/Fax: 03-3451-5520 admissions@nishimachi.ac.jp www.nishimachi.ac.jp Accreditations: WASC (Western Association of Schools Committee), CIS (Council of International Schools), recognized by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government OHANA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 5 years R-mind Motoazabu, 3-12-36 Motoazabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3408-8888 Ohana.International.Sch@gmail.com www.schoolintokyo.com Admissions: Maryna Artyushenko PAL INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 6 months to 6 years 3-8-18 Nishi-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5770-8166 info@pal-school.com www.pal-school.com Admissions: Ayako Kim RLC PLAYGROUP / PRESCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 4.5 years Roppongi Lutheran Church 3F 6-16- 44 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 080-2393-7788 info@rlcpreschool.com www.rlcpreschool.com Admissions: Aliy Lickfold

CHIYODA-KU

AU PAYS DES SAKURAS Ages: 2 to 6 years Koyo Biru 2F, 1-6-3 Iidabashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 090-8344-0270

www.aupaysdessakuras.com Admissions: Celine Guillery Accreditations: French kindergarten

EDOGAWA-KU

GLOBAL INDIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL JAPAN Kindergarten to grade 10 8-3-13 Nishikasai, Edogawa-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5696-7141. Fax: 03-5696-6050 admissions.tokyo@globalindianschool.org www.globalindianschool.org Annual Schedule: April to March

ITABASHI-KU

NEW HOPE INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 3 to 5 years 5-1-2 Narimasu, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5383-0421 www.newhopeclc.jp Admissions: Jeremy Seminoff

KITA-KU

LYCEE FRANCO-JAPONAIS (FUJIMI) Kindergarten to grade 5 5-57-37 Takinogawa, Kita-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-6823-6580 lycee@lfjt.or.jp www.lfjtokyo.org Accreditations: French curriculum

KOTO-KU

K. INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL TOKYO Pre-Kindergarten to grade 12 1-5-15 Shirakawa, Koto-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3642-9993 info@kist.ed.jp & www.kist.ed.jp Admissions: Craig Larsen Annual Schedule: August/September to June. Accreditations: IB World School International Baccalaureate (PYP, MYP, DP)

st alban's nursery Learning. Love. Laughter. St Alban’s Nursery, close to Tokyo Tower, offers a select program of learning and self-discovery for English-speaking preschoolers of all nationalities, based on the Montessori method. Now independent, but still located in the quiet, leafy surrounds of St Alban’s Anglican-Episcopal church, the nursery is open to children of all denominations and cultures, focusing on the individuality of each child in a caring, very personalized atmosphere, under the warm leadership of program director Gilma YamamotoCopeland and her staff. - large enclosed outdoor playground - parents welcome at all times

3-6-25 Shiba-Koen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0011 tel: 090-6480-4542 email: gilma.yam@gol.com www.saintalbans.jp

The British School in Tokyo (BST) provides quality education in central Tokyo to over 1000 international pupils. BST is unique in Japan as it follows the English national curriculum, preparing pupils for entry to universities worldwide. An independent inspection confirmed BST as "excellent" -the highest mark possible. Described as a dynamic, creative environment, the inspectors highlighted that the BST staff show true commitment to the welfare, health and safety of pupils. With a full range of extracurricular activities and an outstanding sports program, our pupils are well­rounded individuals, fully equipped for the challenges of the future. The British School in Tokyo [BST] 1-21-18 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0002 Tel; 03-6418-5351 Admissions: Shoko Unabara admissions@bst.ac.jp www.bst.ac.jp Housing Japan

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Saint Maur International School ● ●

● ● ● ● ●

F r om

Montessori Pre-School International Primary Curriculum (IPC) Gr.1-5 International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) Gr.9-10 International Baccalaureate (IB) Gr.11-12 Advanced Placement (AP) SAT Reasoning Test ON LY SAT Subject Tests PSAT/NMSQT Trinity International Music Examination

ok

yo

Quality Education within a Caring Family Environment since 1872 Pre-K (Age 2 1/2 ) to Grade 12 - Coeducational

Ce n a l T tr

Ecole française de Saint Maur Classes à effectifs réduits et pédagogie différenciée pour une scolarisation de la maternelle au CM2 ● ● ●

Programmes de l'Education nationale française Professeurs des écoles qualifiés et expérimentés Maternelle en anglais selon la méthode Montessori avec séance quotidienne de langage en français Elémentaire en français avec certaines disciplines et activités en anglais

office@stmaur.ac.jp www.stmaur.ac.jp Accredited by the Council of International Schools & New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Registered as Gakko-Hojin by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

83 Yamate-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa-ken 231-8654 70 Housing Japan Spring 2017 Tel: 045 641 5751 / Fax: 045 641 6688


SCHOOLS & EDUCATION IN TOKYO

TOKYO YMCA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Kindergarten to grade 6 GYMBOREE PLAY & MUSIC JAPAN Ages: 0 to 5 Moto-Azabu (Hiroo) Centre TEL: 03-5449-2311 Jiyugaoka Centre TEL: 03-3723-0651 Lalaport Yokohama Centre TEL: 045-414-2719

MEGURO-KU AOBA-JAPAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (MEGURO CAMPUS) Pre-kindergarten: Ages: 2 to 6 years. Kindergarten - K1-K4 2-11-5 Aobadai, Meguro-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5428-4488 www.aobajapan.jp admissions@aobajapan.jp GREGG INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 11 years 1-14-6 Jiyugaoka, Meguro-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3725-8000 balloon@gis-j.com www.gis-j.com Admissions: Reiko Matsuzawa Annual Schedule: August to June MONTESSORI FRIENDS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 6 years 3-8-8 Midorigaoka, Meguro-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3726-9386 info@montessorifriends.com www.montessorifriends.com Admissions: Jeanne Shimazaki

MINATO-KU AI INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 6 years 3F, 5-4-1 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3769-3372 info@aiinternationalschool.com www.aiinternationalschool.com Admissions: Eri Ohashi ABC INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (HIROO CAMPUS) Ages: 15 months to 5 years Katsu Court #101 2-7-25 Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo SUMMERHILL INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 15 months to 5.5 years 2-13-8 Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3453-0811 info@summerhill.jp www.summerhill.jp Admissions: Monique Keller STAR KIDS INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Mom & baby up to 7-12 years old. 2F Kogai Bldg. 2-8-2 Shibakoen, Minato Ward, Tokyo Tel: 03-6452-9470 Contact for free trial: info@starkids-japan.com ST. ALBAN’S NURSERY Ages: 3 to 5 years 3-6-25 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3431-8534 stalbans@stalbans.jp www.saintalbans.jp Admissions: Gilma Yamamoto

www.tokyois.com Admissions: Aya Suzuki Annual Schedule: Late August to mid June (summer school until beginning of July). Accreditations: CIS, NEASC Authorization: IB (PYP, MYP) WILLOWBROOK INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 15 months to 5 years 2-14-28, Moto-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3449-9030 wistokyo@gol.com www.willowbrookschool.com Admissions: Hiromi Ishikawa

SETAGAYA-KU AMERICAN WORLD INTERNATIONAL Ages: 2.5 to 6 years 4-30-5, Kaminoge, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 408-656-7959 admin@americanworld.jp www.americanworld.jp Admissions: Bobbie Buntin THE BRITISH SCHOOL IN TOKYO (SHOWA CAMPUS) Ages: 8 to 18 years 1-7-57 Taishido, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3411-4211 admissions@bst.ac.jp www.bst.ac.jp Admissions: Shoko Unabara GRACE INTERNATIONAL LEARNING CENTER Ages: 18 months to 6 years 2-13-11 Seta, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5716-3100 admin@GILC@gmail.com www.grace-learning.com Admissions: Cheryl Ann Cabusora KOMAZAWA PARK INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 6 years 2-12-16 Fukazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5707-0979 contact@kpischool.com http://kpischool.com Admissions: Itsuko Takeuchi KEIKI INTERCULTURAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 3 to 6 years 4-5-8 Nakamachi, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo . Tel: 03-3703-8778 admin@keikipreschool.com www.keikipreschool.com Admissions: Jeong La Dumas PTC PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 2.5 to 6 years 5-11-5 Shimouma, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5481-9425 ptc-school@ptc-school.net www.ptc-school.net/ Admissions: Yoko Takatsuka SETA INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 6 years 2-19-21 Seta, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5717-6769 sip@seta-inter.com www.seta-inter.com Admissions: Masako Misumi Accreditations: Well-balanced curriculum with Montessori and manipulatives ST. MARY’S INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Kindergarten to grade 12 1-6-19 Seta, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3709-3411 Admissions@smis.ac.jp www.smis.ac.jp Admissions: Bedos T. Santos Annual Schedule: August to June Boys/Girls: Boys Accreditations: Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), Council of International Schools (CIS)

TOKYO INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (TIS) Pre-kindergarten to grade 8 2-13-6 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5484-1160 admissions@tokyois.com Housing Japan

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SEISEN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Pre-school to kindergarten (co-ed) Grade 1 to grade 12 (all-girls) 1-12-15 Yoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3704-2661 www.seisen.com Admissions: Ninnette Trout / admissions@seisen.com Annual Schedule: August to June Accreditation: New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Council of International Schools TAMAGAWA INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 1.5 to 5 years 1-17-5 Tsurumaki, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3439-8685 info@tips-japan.com www.tips-japan.com

SHIBUYA-KU AOBA-JAPAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (SHOTO CAMPUS) Pre-kinder & kindergarten 2-2-1 Shoto, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5738-6556 shoto@aobajapan.jp www.aobajapan.jp Admissions: shoto.admissions@aobajapan.jp THE BRITISH SCHOOL IN TOKYO (SHIBUYA CAMPUS) Ages: Nursery to 7 years 1-21-18 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5467-4321 www.bst.ac.jp Admissions: Shoko Unabara admissions@bst.ac.jp INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF THE SACRED HEART (ISSH) Pre-kindergarten to grade 12 4-3-1 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3400-3951 admissions@issh.ac.jp www.issh.ac.jp Admissions: Hideko Hisamune Annual Schedule: Late August to early June Boys/Girls Accreditations: US Western Association of Schools and Colleges, European Council of International Schools INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF THE SACRED HEART (KINDERGARTEN) Ages: 3 to 5 years 4-3-1 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3400-3951 admissions@issh.ac.jp www.issh.ac.jp Admissions: Ms. Kawaguchi Annual Schedule: August to June JINGUMAE INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE SCHOOL Ages: 3 years to grade 6 4-20-12 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5413-6090 shibuya@jies.jp www.jies.jp Admissions: Keiko Mikawa Annual Schedule: September to June MARIA’S BABIES’ SOCIETY Ages: 18 months to 6 years Tomy’s House #101 3-36-20 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku,Tokyo Tel: 03-3404-3468 contact@mariasbabies.co.jp www.mariasbabies.co.jp Admissions: Maria Matsuoka POPPINS INTERNATIONAL PRE-SCHOOL (PIPS) Ages: 1 to 3 years Yebisu Garden Terrace Nibankan 4-20-2 Ebisu, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5791-2105 pips@poppins.co.jp www.poppins.co.jp/english

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SAINT ANNIE’S INTERNATIONAL KINDERGARTEN Ages: 1 to 5 years 1-5-3 Tomigaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-6407-9221 kids@saintannie.net http://saintannie.net Annual Schedule: September to June ST. MARIAN NURSERY SCHOOL Ages: 45 days to 8 years 1-16-12 Ebisu-Nishi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3461-1050 www.st-marian.co.jp SESAME INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 18 months to 6 years 1-5-14 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5485-1197 sesame@jap.co.jp http://sesame.jap.co.jp Admissions: Ms. Sachiko Nagasawa YOYOGI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 16 months to Primary 6. 1-15-12 Tomigaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 5-67-5 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5478-6714 Fax: 03-5478-6713 info@yoyogiinternationalschool.com www.yoyogiinternationalschool.com

SHINAGAWA-KU CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Pre-kindergarten to grade 12 5-8-20 Kita-Shinagawa, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5793-1392 Admissions: Noriko Akahane Annual schedule: September to June Accreditations: WASC and the Canadian province of PEI KAIS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Grade 6 to 12 2-7-16 Kami-Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5421-0127 contact@kaischool.com www.kaischool.com Admissions: Misako Horikawa. Annual Schedule:September to June

SUGINAMI-KU AOBA-JAPAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (SUGINAMI CAMPUS) Kindergarten to grade 9 2-10-7 Miyamae, Suginami-ku, Tokyo . Tel: 03-3335-6620 suginami@aobajapan.jp www.aobajapan.jp Admissions: suginami.admissions@aobajapan.jp Annual Schedule: September to June Accreditations: Complete English curriculum, integrated Japanese language program BUSY BEES INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 3 to 6 years B1F, 1-19-14 Izumi, Suginami-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-6413-1901 info@busybees-school.com www.busybees-school.com/en Admissions: Willie Hines

TOSHIMA-KU NEW INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Preschool age 3 to grade 12 3-18-32 Minami-Ikebukuro, Toshima- ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3980-1057 contact@newis.ed.jp http://newis.ed.jp/ Admissions: Steven Parr Annual Schedule: August to mid June


OTHER WARDS THE AMERICAN SCHOOL IN JAPAN Nursery to grade 12 1-1-1 Nomizu, Chofu, Tokyo Tel: 0422-34-5300 enroll@asij.ac.jp http://community.asij.ac.jp Admissions: Mary Margaret Mallat Annual Schedule: August to June. Accreditations: Western Association of Schools and Colleges CHRISTIAN ACADEMY IN JAPAN Kindergarten to grade 12 1-2-14 Shinkawacho, Higashi- Kurume, Tokyo Tel: 0424-71-0022 infodesk@caj.or.jp http://caj.or.jp Admissions: Carolyn Edams Annual Schedule: September to June Accreditations: Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Christian school TOKYO INTERNATIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY (TILC) For children with learning difficulties. 2-51-7 Tamacho, Fuchu, Tokyo Tel: 042-401-0585 Admissions: Dennis McKibben

YOKOHAMA DEUTSCHE SCHULE TOKYO YOKOHAMA Ages: 3 years to grade 12 2-4-1 Chigasaki-Minami, Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama Tel: 045-941-4841 dsty@dsty.ac.jp www.dsty.jp Admissions: Petra Wels Annual Schedule: September to June Accreditations: German curriculum, German Baccalaureate HORIZON JAPAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (YOKOHAMA) Ages: 3 years to grade 9 1-33-6 Higashi-Terao, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama Tel: 045-584-1948 hjis@horizon.ac.jp www.horizon.ac.jp Admissions: Yumiko Ozeki Annual Schedule: September to June SAINT MAUR INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 2.5 years to grade 12 83 Yamatecho, Naka-ku, Yokohama Tel: 045-641-5751 Admissions:@stmaur.ac.jp www.stmaur.ac.jp Annual Schedule: August to June TREE HOUSE MONTESSORI SCHOOL Ages: 1 to 6 years 16-5 Honmoku-Makado, Naka-ku, Yokohama Tel: 045-622-5804 jenny@tms-school.com www.tms-school.com Admissions: Jenny Vyvial Annual Schedule: September to June YOKOHAMA OVERSEAS CHINESE SCHOOL Pre-school to grade 12 142 Yamashitacho, Naka-ku, Yokohama . Tel: 045-681-3608 yocs@yocs.jp www.yocs.jp YOKOHAMA YAMATE CHINESE SCHOOL Pre-school to grade 9 2-66 Yoshihamacho, Naka-ku, Yokohama . Tel: 045-641-0393 bosyu@yokohamayamate-chineseschool.ed.jp www.yokohamayamate- chineseschool.ed.jp

YOKOHAMA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Ages: 3 years to grade 12 258 Yamatecho, Naka-ku, Yokohama Tel: 045-622-0084 yis@yis.ac.jp www.yis.ac.jp Admissions: Susan Chen. Annual Schedule: August to June YOKOHAMA UNION CHURCH INTERNATIONAL PRESCHOOL Ages: 2 to 4 years 66-2 Yamatecho, Naka-ku, Yokohama Tel: 045-651-5177 preschool@yokohamaunionchurch.org www.preschool. yokohamaunionchurch.org Admissions: Linda Schmidt

CHIBA MAKUHARI INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL Kindergarten to grade 6 3-2-9 Wakaba, Mihama-ku, Chiba Tel: 043-296-0277 info@mis.or.jp www.mis.ed.jp Admissions: Paul Rogers Annual Schedule: April to March

SAITAMA

COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 1-5-3 MatsugoTokorozawa, Saitama Tel: 04-2946-1911 holland@columbia-ca.co.jp www.columbia-ca.co.jp Contact: Christopher Holland

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MBA PROGRAMS & BUSINESS SCHOOLS

HITOTSUBASHI UNIVERSITY Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy (ICS), National Center of Sciences, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Fax: 03-4212-3006 ics-info@ics.hit-u.ac.jp www.ics.hit-u.ac.jp Programs: One-year full-time, two-year full time, dual degree Instruction in English RIKKYO UNIVERSITY Graduate School of Business 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3985-4288 Fax: 03-3985-4008 mib@rikkyo.ac.jp www.rikkyo.ac.jp/mib/ Programs: Two-year full-time, part-time MBA. Instruction in English, Japanese TEMPLE UNIVERSITY EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAM 4-1-27 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5441-9871 emba@tuj.temple.edu www.tuj.ac.jp/mba Programs: EMBA Instruction in English THE UNIVERSITY OF TSUKUBA Graduate School of Business Sciences, MBA Program in International Business 3-29-1 Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3942-6918 Fax: 03-3942-6835 www.mbaib.gsbs.tsukuba.ac.jp Programs: MBA-IB Instruction in English Housing Japan

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TOKYO BUSINESS SCHOOL (UIBS) Regus Business Center, Shinjuku Park Tower, 3-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5326-3477 info@tokyo.uibs.asia www.tokyo.uibs.asia/ index.php Programs: Full-time, part-time MBA, dual degree, EMBA Instruction in English DALE CARNEGIE TRAINING Akasaka 2 Chome Annex 5F, #501, 2-19-8 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-4520-5470 info@dale-carnegie.co.jp www.japan.dalecarnegie.com Programs: Courses, short seminars, online Instruction in English, Japanese

MBA PROGRAMS TOKYO ANAHEIM UNIVERSITY AKIO MORITA LEARNING CENTER Raykay Minami Aoyama Bldg. 5-4-29 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3498-1005 info@anaheim.edu www.anaheim.edu Programs: Online MBA Instruction in English GLOBIS Sumitomo Fudosan Kojimachi Bldg., 5-1 Nibancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 0120-153-981 Fax: 03-5275-3787 mba-tokyo@globis.ac.jp www.globis.co.jp/en Programs: One-year full-time, part- time MBA Instruction in English, Japanese

NIHON UNIVERSITY SURUGADAI HOSPITAL 1-8-13 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3293-1711 TOKYO TEISHIN HOSPITAL 2-14-23 Fujimi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5214-7111

CHUO-KU ST LUKE’S INTERNATIONAL HOSPITAL 9-1 Akashicho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3541-5151

MINATO-KU AIIKU HOSPITAL 5-6-8 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3473-8321 SAISEIKAI CENTRAL HOSPITAL 1-4-17 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3451-8211 SANNO HOSPITAL 8-10-16 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3402-3151

SETAGAYA-KU SHISEIKAI DAINI HOSPITAL 5-19-1 Kami-Soshigaya, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3300-0366

WASEDA BUSINESS SCHOOL (WBS) Bldg.11, 3F, 1-6-1 Nishi-Waseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-5286-8719 Fax: 03-5286-8720 wbs@list.waseda.jp http://wasedamba.jp Programs: Two-year full time, part- time, dual degree. Instruction in Japanese, English

SHIBUYA-KU

YOKOHAMA KEIO BUSINESS SCHOOL (KBS) 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama Tel: 04-5564-2441 gakukbs@info.keio.ac.jp www.kbs.keio.ac.jp/en/ Programs: Two-year full time Instruction in Japanese

TOKYO METROPOLITAN HIROO HOSPITAL 2-34-10 Ebisu, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3444-1181

MCGILL MBA JAPAN Hilton Tokyo, Room 2001, 6-6-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3342-3430 Fax: 03-3342-3431 inquiry@mcgillmbajapan.com www.mcgillmbajapan.com Programs: Part-time MBA Instruction in English

CLINICS & HOSPITALS

HOSPITALS CHIYODA-KU INOUE EYE HOSPITAL 4-3 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3295-0911

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JAPAN RED CROSS MEDICAL CENTER 4-1-22 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3400-1311 TOKAI UNIVERSITY TOKYO HOSPITAL 1-2-5 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3370-2321

NTT KANTO TEISHIN HOSPITAL 5-9-22 Higashi-Gotanda, Shinagawa- ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3448-6111

SHINJUKU-KU INTERNATIONAL CATHOLIC HOSPITAL (SEIBO HOSPITAL) 2-5-1 Naka-Ochiai, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3951-1111 KEIO UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3353-1211

SUGINAMI-KU TOKYO ADVENTIST HOSPITAL 3-17-3 Amanuma, Suginami-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3392-6151

CLINICS CHIYODA-KU HIBIYA CLINIC Toho Twin Tower B3F 1-5-2 Yurakucho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3582-2646 IMPERIAL CLINIC The Imperial Hotel 4F 1-1-1 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3503-8681


KAIJO CLINIC Tokyo Kaijo Building Shinkan 3F 1-2-1 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3212-7690

SHINJUKU-KU

KOTO-KU

MIZUMACHI CLINIC Odakyu Daiichi Seimei Bldg. 3F 2-7-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3348-2181

HIRANO KAMEIDO HIMAWARI CLINIC Z Bldg. 2F, 7-10-1 Kameido, Koto-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5609-1823

SAKAKIBARA KINEN CLINIC Shinjuku NS Bldg. 4F, 2-4-1 Nishi- Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3344-4817

TOHO WOMEN’S CLINIC 5-3-10 Kiba, Koto-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3630-0303

SHINJUKU MITSUI BLDG CLINIC 4 - 5F, 2-1-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3344-3311

MINATO-KU AKASAKA SEKIGUCHI CLINIC INTERNATIONAL OAG-Haus (German Cultural Center) 406 7-5-56 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3584-1727 AZABU OTOLARYNGOLOGY CLINIC Azabu-Yano Bldg. 2F 4-13-5 Minami Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo . Tel: 03-3448-0248 HELIOS ACUPUNCTURE CLINIC Room 1003, Calm Nogizaka Bldg. 9-6-27 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3403-3272 INTERNATIONAL CLINIC 1-5-9 Azabudai, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3583-7831 KAMIYACHO CLINIC Tokyu Reit Toranomon Bldg. 1F 3-17-1 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3433-0343 KANDA SECOND CLINIC Umeda Bldg. 2F 3-20-14 Nishi-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3402-0654 NATIONAL MEDICAL CLINIC #202 5-16-11 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3473-2057 TOKYO MEDICAL & SURGICAL CLINIC 32 Shiba Koen Bldg., 2F 3-4-30 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3436-3028

SHIBUYA-KU FERTILITY CLINIC TOKYO (ODAWARA WOMEN’S CLINIC) Frontier Ebisu Bldg. 1F 3-13-11 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3406-6868 THE KING CLINIC Iori Omotesando B1F 6-31-11 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3409-0764

TAKESHITA CLINIC 2-14-22 Takadanobaba, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3200-1281

SHINAGAWA-KU ENDO CLINIC 305 Meguro Nishiguchi Mansion 2-24-13 Kamio-Osaki, Shinagawaku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3492-6422 TOKYO WOMEN’S CLINIC Roppongi Denki Bldg. 2F 2-24-13 Kamio-Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3492-6422 KATO LADIES CLINIC West Gate Shinjuku Bldg. 7-20-3 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3366-3777 CHIROPRACTIC AKASAKA CHIROPRACTIC 3F 2-17-58 Akasaka, Minato-ku Tokyo Tel: 03-5561-0531 INTERNATIONAL PHARMACIES AMERICAN PHARMACY - MARUNOUCHI Marunouchi Bldg. B1F 2-4-1 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5220-7716 AMERICAN PHARMACY - SHIBUYA Hikarie Building B1F 2-21-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-6434-1775 NATIONAL AZABU - SUPERMARKET PHARMACY 4-5-2 MinamiAzabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3442-3181 THE MEDICAL DISPENSARY 32 Mori Bldg. 3-4-30 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo. Tel: 03-3434-5817

NOZAKI EYE CLINIC Kasuya Bldg., 2-9 Sakuragaoka, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3461-1671 ODAWARA WOMEN’S CLINIC Frontier Ebisu Bldg. 1F 3-13-11 Shibuya-ku higashi, Tokyo Tel: 03-3406-6868 TOKYO BRITISH CLINIC Daikanyama Y Bldg. 2F 2-13-7 Ebisu-Nishi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-5458-6099 TOKYO MATERNITY CLINIC 1-20-8 Sendagaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo Tel: 03-3403-1861

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HOUSING JAPAN When you can`t define how you feel, but you sense something pulling at your heart strings, then you know you’re onto a good thing. There is no easy way to define how life in Tokyo feels, but it touches you nonetheless. This is truly an amazing city and we hope that what we`ve captured, in these pages, communicates that in some small way. ROBIN SAKAI

Managing Editor Housing Japan Magazine

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Housing Japan Magazine: Vol11. Spring/Summer, 2017  
Housing Japan Magazine: Vol11. Spring/Summer, 2017  

Property and lifestyle magazing produced by Tokyo's leading real-estate company. This issue features interviews with: Interior designer,...

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