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2016 VNLA Officers & Directors OFFICERS

1 YR DIRECTORS

2 YR DIRECTORS

Educational Advisors

VT/HRAREC Ex-Officio non-voting

JEFFREY HOWE, Certification ‘16 Windridge Landscaping Co DR. JIM OWEN 7158 Rockfish Valley Rd HARAREC Afton, VA 22920-3182 1444 Diamond Springs Rd 434-361-1588 Virginia Beach, VA 23455 Christopher@lancasterfarms.com Cell: (434) 531-1919 (757) 363-3804 jhowe@windridgelandscapjim.owen@vt.edu JOSH ELLINGER, ing.com Vice President DR. LAURIE FOX VIRGINIA ROCKWELL ‘12 Environmental Affairs‘15 SCOTT PRICE, HRAREC, BILL GOULDIN ‘12 Design Waynesboro Nurseries Gentle Gardener Green PO Box 897 Education ‘16 1444 Diamond Springs Rd; PO Box 191 Waynesboro VA 22980-0987 David Scott Price Design VA Beach, VA 23455-3363 Montpelier, VA 22957-0191 540-946-3800 2772 Earleysville Rd (cell) 434-531-0467 757-363-3807 Cell: 540-836-6851 Earlysville, VA 22936-9665 gentlegardener@gmail.com Cell: 757-284-6139 Josh@wnurseries.com 434-466-5656 Cell: ljfox@vt.edu scott@dscottprice.com Secretary/ Treasurer BRENT HUNSINGER, AARON WILLIAMS ‘14 DR. ROGER HARRIS Legislation’15 THOMAS BUCKLEY Education Committee VA Tech Public Relations ‘16 Williams Landscape & Design Brent's Native Plantings Horticulture Dept. Head 10715 Hamilton's Crossing Dr Riverbend Nursery PO Box 7001 Saunders Hall (0327) 1295 Mt Elbert Rd Williamsburg VA 23188-7001 Fredericksburg, VA 22408 Blacksburg, VA 24061-0001 443-655-3410 Riner VA 24149-3611 757-564-7011 540-231-5451 brenthunsinger@gmail.com 800-638-3362 x102 aaron@wldgreen.com rharris@vt.edu Cell: 540-850-0420 DOUG RODES, thomas@riverbendnursery.com Past President Membership ‘15 MANTS’ Directors SONYA L. WESTERVELT James River Nurseries Director-At-Large Public Relations ‘10 13244 Ashland Rd Saunders Brothers Inc JOHN LANCASTER‘02 Ashland VA 23005-7504 2717 Tye Brook Highway Ex-Officio non-voting Bennett’s Creek Nursery (804) 798-2020 Piney River, VA 22964 3613 Bridge Road Cell: (804) 380-5259 (434) 277-5455 TOM THOMPSON, Suffolk, VA 23435-1807 drodes@jamesrivernursesonya@saundersbrothers.com Environmental Affairs ‘10 757-483-1425 ries.com Natural Art Landscaping john@bcnursery.com Executive Director 3540 S Belmont Rd Richmond VA 23234-2912 ROBIN RINACA - 15 (804) 674-5703 JEFFREY B. MILLER Eastern Shore Nursery of VA Naturalartlandscaping@yaHorticulture Management PO Box 400 hoo.com Associates LLC Melfa, VA 23410-0400 383 Coal Hollow Road 757-787-4732 Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721 rrinaca@esnursery.com 1-800-476-0055 Fax: 540-382-2716 DANNY SHRECKHISE info@vnla.org Shreckhise Nurseries ‘12 PO Box 428 Grottoes, VA 24441-0428 540-249-5761 Danny@shreckhise.com President BILL GOULDIN ‘12 Strange’s Florist/Garden Ctrs 12111 W. Broad St. Richmond, VA 23233 804-360-2800 wjg@stranges.com

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

CHRISTOPHER BROWN JR

Research Committee ‘13 Lancaster Farms 5800 Knotts Neck Rd Suffolk VA 23435-1353 757-484-4421

April/May/June 2016 April / May / June 2016

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Table of Contents Ad - Bennett’s Creek Nursery ...................................... 67 Ad - Bremo Trees......................................................... 68 Ad - Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia.......................47 Ad - Farm Credit .......................................................... 68 Ad - Goodson and Associates ...................................... 23 Ad - Gossett’s Landscape Nursery............................... 57 Ad - Guthrie Nursery ................................................... 49 Ad - Hanover Farms..................................................... 45 Ad - Hawksridge Farm................................................. 62 Ad - Johnston County Nursery Marketing Assoc ........ 51 Ad - Lancaster Farm .................................................... 55 Ad - Mid-Atlantic Solutions ........................................ 21 Ad - OHP - Segway ..................................................... 2 Ad - Pender Nursery .................................................... 53 Ad - Plantworks Nursery.............................................. 60 Ad - Shreckhise Nurseries............................................ 13 Ad - Sitelight Id ........................................................... 15 Ad - TD Watkins .......................................................... 5 Ad - Turtle Creek Nursery ........................................... 24 Ad - Waynesboro Nurseries ......................................... 9 Ad - Willow Springs Tree Farms ................................. 12 Editorial - Quotable: Are You Using Too Many Varieties? ......... 13 Events - Calendar ......................................................... 66 Events - Hydrangeas A-Z ............................................. 65 Events - MANTS 2017 ................................................ 64 Events - SEGreen ......................................................... 59 Events - SEGreen Plant Conference Speakers ............. 57 Events - VSLD Summer Garden Tour ......................... 14 Letters - NCSU College of Agriculture ....................... 7 Letters - Virginia Agribusiness Council ...................... 7 Letters - Virginia Horticultural Foundation ................. 8 News - 46th Annual MANTS Show a Success ........... 63 News - Alex Niemiera wins Award ............................. 16 News - Boxwood Blight infects Woodrow Wilson gardens ............................... 46 News - Dave Close wins VT Award ............................ 15 News - Elizabeth Wilson is 2016 Outstanding Senior 16 News - Green Industry in Richmond ........................... 8 News - National Collegiate Landscape Competition .. 20 News - Noxious Weeds? Q&A - Proposed noxious weed regulations ... 22 News - Pollinator Garden POP Materials ................... 47 News - RSG Expands to Richmond ............................. 9 News - VT Dining Services Horticulture Farm .......... 20 Obituary - Charles Vander Kooi .................................. 10 Obituary - Judith Knott Tyler, Pine Knot Farms.......... 11 Obituary - Roy Forehand, Foregreen Landscapes....... 10 Research - BMP: Constructed Wetlands ..................... 27 Research - BMP: Bioretention ..................................... 31 Research - Honey Bee Colony Health ......................... 48 VNLA Newsletter 4

Research - Modification of a Web-based Automatic Irrigation Program ....................... 53 Research - Plant Right ................................................. 54 Research - Rain Gardens .............................................. 55 Tips - A Synopsis of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide vs. Bee Controversy ..................... 50 Tips - Let’s Wave this Goodbye: An update on Wavyleaf Basketgrass ............. 45 Tips - Plant Profile: Calocedrus decurrens (California incense-cedar) .............................. 12 Tips - VSLD Membership ........................................... 14 VNLA - Board Meeting Summary 3/2/16 ................... 60 VNLA - Certification Quiz Article ............................. 27 VNLA - Certification Quiz # 76 .................................. 35 VNLA - Certification, What’s Happening Now? ....... 11 VNLA - Certified Horticulturist New 2016 ................. 36 VNLA - Workshop - Claudia West Charrette .............. 38 VNLA - Field Day - The Market at Grelen ................. 43 VNLA - Field Day Host: Grelen Nursery .................... 41 VNLA - Field Day Schedule........................................ 39 VNLA - Field Day Speakers ........................................ 40 VNLA - Member Profile: James River Nursery & Mike Hildebrand ....................................... 18 VNLA - New Members Congratulations! ................... 25 VNLA - Noxious Weeds Committee Meeting ............ 22 VNLA - Photo Contest Rules ..................................... 17 VNLA - Photo Contest Winner.................................... 17 VNLA - Save the Date! Field Day Grelen Nursery 5 VNLA - Summer Tour ................................................. 42 VNLA - Workshop, Field Day, Summer Tour ............ 7

VNLA Mobile-Friendly VNLA - MobileApp Friendly App Guide to Guide to Virginia Virginia Growers! Growers!

w

Look up plant Look upsources, plant sources, hotlinks to email, hotlinks to grower grower email, website, and phone! website and phone! www.vnla.org/Grower-Guide

www.vnla.org/Grower-Guide

April/May/June 2016 Arpil / May / June 2016

4 VNLA Newsletter


Up in Charlottesville VNLA Meet VNLA Mission, VNLA Mission,

Classified ClassifiedAds Ads Classified Ads

TheVision VNLA has heldObjectives three Happy Hour Up’s this past winter in Charlottesville in conjunction with the and for 2015 Vision and Objectives forMeet 2014 PLA Seminars, Richmond in conjunction with the CVNLA Short Course, and Virginia Beach for members and VNLA Mission, non-members to have a casual gathering for a couple of hours. If you are interested in helping host an event in Vision andToObjectives for and 2014 your area, contact Doug Rodes, drodes@jamesrivernurseries.com . Statement: enhance, promote, advoMission Statement: To Enhance and VirMission Statement: To Enhance and promote promote Vircate fornursery Virginia’s nursery and industry. landscape ginia’s landscape ginia’s nursery and and landscape industry. professionals. photos by Michele Fletcher Mission Statement: To Enhance and promote VirVision: leader andand resource for the Vision:totobecome becomethethe leader resource forVirthe ginia’s nursery and landscape industry. ginia nursery and and landscape industry. Virginia nursery landscape industry. Vision: to become the leader and resource for the VirObjectives Objectives ginia nursery and landscape industry. Educated, Available Educated, Available Skilled Skilled Labor Labor Force Force -- Goal: Goal: Objectives VNLA VNLA will will continue continue to to promote promote programs programs that that will will Educated, Available Skilled Labor Force - labor Goal: education, train and anan available skilled education, train andprovide provide available skilled laVNLA force. bor force.will continue to promote programs that will education, train and provide an available skilled labor Effective Effective Communication and and Advocacy Advocacy GOAL: GOAL: force. Communication VNLA VNLA will will effectively effepctivelycommunication communicationamong among staff, staff, Effective Communication and Advocacy GOAL: board, members, partners board, members, partners and and the the community. community. VNLA will effepctively communication among staff, Maximizing and Allocation Resources -- GOAL: Maximizing and partners Allocation Resources GOAL: board, members, and the community. VNLA VNLA will will secure secure increased increased funding funding from from diverse diverse Maximizing and Allocation Resources - GOAL: sources thethe necessary staff,staff, boardboard and comsourcesand andsecure secure necessary and VNLA will secure increased funding from diverse mittee members to runtoarun dynamic organization. committee members a dynamic organization. sources and secure the necessary staff, board and committee members run a dynamic organization. Expand Membership and -- GOAL: Membership andtoOutreach Outreach GOAL: Expand and and communicate the value of membership. communicate the value of membership. Membership and Outreach - GOAL: Expand and

communicate-- GOAL: the valueVNLA of membership. Stewardship will Stewardship GOAL: VNLA will promote promote adoption adoption of Best Practices. ofStewardship Best Management Management Practices. - GOAL: VNLA will promote adoption of Best Management Strategic Marketing Strategic Marketing -Practices. - GOAL: GOAL: VNLA VNLA will will promote promote itself as the itself as the the leader leader and and resource resource ofVNLA thegreen green industry. Strategic Marketing - GOAL:of willindustry. promote itself asWhat the leader and resource of the green industry. What are are members members problems? problems?

Support VNLA Member Growers! Online at www.VNLA.org New Native Plant Section!

How are to them What aregoing members problems? How are we we going to help help them become become more successful? How are we going to help them become more successful? more successful?

VNLA ForSupport a print copy

Support VNLA call 1-800-476-0055 Member Growers! Support VNLA email info@vnla.org Member Member Growers! Online at Growers! www.VNLA.org

Online at www.VNLA.org Online at Plant www.VNLA.org New Native Section! New New Native Plant Section! Native Plant For a print copySection! calla For 1-800-476-0055 For print copycopy a print Fall Review Class and Test for email info@vnla.org call 1-800-476-0055 call 1-800-476-0055 info@vnla.org email email info@vnla.org Virginia Certified Horticulturist

Crozet, VA Monday’s, 5:30-8:30 p.m. We Want to Hear From You! October 20 – December 8 Send you comments and suggestions to Exam, Saturday,1-800-476-0055 December 13 info@vnla.org Location TBA VNLA Newsletter VNLA VNLANewsletter Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

VNLA Newsletter

April / May / June 2016

October / November / December July /August / September 2014 20152014 October/November/December July/August/September 2014

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5 5 5 5


asset to the industry. VNLA has an aggressive agenda for 2016. It starts with a By-Laws update for the first time Vol. 86, No.2; Apr/May/Jun 2016  in nearly twenty years, to bring Vol. 86, No.2; Apr/May/Jun 2016  our By-Laws into agreement with current practice and the Editor: Jeff Miller  advice of legal counselEditor: Jeff Miller  and industry consultants. Copies of our By-Laws will be mailed to every member of record. If you have any questions please contact me, Jeff Miller, or Sonya Westervelt,

Bill Gouldin, Gouldin,,VNLA VNLA President President 2016 2016 wjg@stranges.com 804-360-2800 wjg@stranges.com

INSERT THE SAVE THE DATE BLOCK FROM INSERT DATE BLOCK FROM PAGE 6 INTHE LASTSAVE ISSUETHE HERE PAGE 6 IN LAST ISSUE HERE

  This year we are going to update our Board Policy Manuel     to modernize our board policies and procedures.   We have been and will continue to be involved in the devel-   383 Coal Hollow Road; Christiansburg, VA 24073‐6721  383 Coal Hollow Road; Christiansburg, VA 24073‐6721  opment of policy on Noxious Weeds and Pollinators, as well     Internet E‐mail Address: info@vnla.org   as any legislation that we identify that may have an impact   Internet E‐mail Address: info@vnla.org    www.vnla.org (Association Info)  Save the Date! Thursday, August 11, on our members. Any issues that you identify should be re-    www.vnla.org (Association Info)    ferred to Jeff Miller. VNLA Field Day, Grelen Nursery        https://www.facebook.c om/VNLA1932  Don’t forget to mark your calendar for Landscape      https://www.facebook.c om/VNLA1932  Don’t forget to mark your calendar Landscape Workshop, Tourfor August 10-12 6 January/February/March 2016Field Day and SummerVNLA Newsletter 6 January / February / March 2016 VNLA Newsletter Twitter: @vnla1932   Workshop, Field Day and Summer Tour August 10-12 at Grelen Nursery. The planning is going great and we exTwitter: @vnla1932   at Grelen Nursery. The planning is going great and we pect a large turnout this year! (see details on page 39). exTelephone: 540‐382‐0943 or 1‐800‐476‐0055   pect a large turnout this year! (see details on page 39). Telephone: 540‐382‐0943 or 1‐800‐476‐0055   Fax: 540‐382‐2716  With the leadership of the VNLA’s Legislative Chair, Fax: 540‐382‐2716  With Hunsinger, the leadership of the VNLA’s Chair, Disclaimer: Published for your information,   Brent in partnership with theLegislative Virginia AgribusiDisclaimer: Published for your information,   Brent Hunsinger, in partnership with the Virginia Agribusithis newsletter is not an endorsement   ness Council, was very effective in having positive impacts this newsletter is not an endorsement   nessseveral Council, was veryissues effective havingimpact positiveyou impacts for individual products or editorial comments.  on legislative thatin could as a for individual products or editorial comments.  on several legislative member of the VNLA. issues that could impact you as a member of the VNLA. Noxious weeds. HB 734 introduced by Patrick Hope and Noxious weeds. HB 734establishes introducedanbyadvisory Patrickcommittee Hope and supported by the VNLA, President’s Message supported VNLA, anthereof advisory committee to evaluateby thetherisks of a establishes plant or part that is being President’s Message to evaluate the risks of a plant or part thereof that isbill being considered for designation as a noxious weed. The reI trust that everyone is busy takconsidered for designation as a noxious weed. The bill reIing trust that everyone is busy takquires the advisory committee to assess the plant's (i) impact care of business between the quires the advisory committee to assess the plant's (i) impact ing care of between on water bodies, other plants, livestock, land, public health, showers. Webusiness got an early startthe to on water bodies, other plants, livestock, land, publicand health, showers.with We got an early start in to the environment, and the economy and (ii) current pospring warm weather the environment, and the economy and (ii) current and pospring That with advantage warm weather in tential in-state commercial viability. The bill exempts from March. soon was tential in-stateofcommercial viability. Thethat billisexempts March. That advantage was the definition noxious weed any plant in-state from proovershadowed by cool soon weather the definition of noxious weed any plant that is in-state proovershadowed by cool weather duction is commercially viable. for the first two weeks in April. duction is commercially viable. for the first two weeks in April. Then the showers and cloudy HB 356 - Virginia Pollinator Protection Strategy. IntroThen the showers cloudy weather in May have and not been an HB 356 Virginia Pollinator Protection Strategy. Introduced by- Creigh Deeds, who has worked with the VNLA weather in May have not been an advantage. It is humbling to unduced Deeds, who worked with the VNLA for the by lastCreigh 2 years, directs thehas Department of Agriculture advantage.the It isweather humbling to understand controls for the last 2 years, directs the Department of aAgriculture and Consumer Services to develop and maintain pollinator derstand the weather controls our sales. There is still hope that the second half of May and and Consumer Services to develop and maintain a pollinator protection strategy to promote the health of and mitigate the our first sales.half There is still hope second and the of June will notthat get the as hot as ithalf has of forMay the last protection strategy to promote the health of and mitigate the risks to pollinator species and ensure a robust apiary industhe firstofhalf of June get asthe hot as it has the last couple years, so wewill cannot extend season intofor June. risks to pollinator species and ensure a robust apiary industry. The Strategy shall include a protection plan for mancouple of years, so we can extend the season into June. try. The Strategythat shall includevoluntary a protection for managed pollinators provides bestplan management The Board of Directors had a productive meeting in Richnd aged pollinators that provides voluntary best management The Board of Directors had a productive meeting in Richpractices and supports efforts to reduce risks from pestimond on March 2 . Our next Board meeting is scheduled nd th practices and supports efforts to reduce risks from pestimond on March 2 . Our next Board meeting is scheduled cides, increase habitat, and take other steps to protect pollifor June 11 in Blacksburg. The Garden Gala will be that th cides, increase habitat, and take other steps to protect pollifor Junein11theinHahn Blacksburg. Garden Gala willcampus. be that nators. VNLA Director and Environmental Affairs Chair evening Gardens The on the Virginia Tech nators. VNLA Director and Environmental Affairs Chair evening in the Hahn Gardens the Virginia Tech campus. has been appointed to represent the VNLA. This is the garden’s primaryonfund raising event and the has been appointed to represent the VNLA. This is isthe garden’s fund raising event and the VNLA a sponsor of primary this event. If there are any topics that you want the VNLA board to VNLA is a sponsor of this event. If therelet areme any topics that you want the VNLA board to discuss know. The Bylaw changes were overwhelmingly approved with discuss let me know. The one Bylaw changes were overwhelmingly approved with only declining vote. only one declining vote. The Succession Planning Committee met with our conBill Gouldin,, The Succession Planning Committee met with our conBill Gouldin,, sultant and completed the first phase of planning. BillPresident Gouldin 2016 VNLA sultant and completed the first phase of planning. VNLA VNLA President President 2016 2016 VNLA Newsletter April/May/June 2016 6 6 Arpil / May / June 2016 VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter April/May/June 2016 6

 


Your Roots Are In Virginia! Letters - NCSU College of Agriculture

SAVE THE DATES

OnCoal behalf 383 Hollowof Rd the College Christiansburg, 24073-6721 please VA accept my sincere

Letters - Virginia Agribusiness Council

ofAugust Agriculture Lifeth,Sciences, 10thand- 12 2016 appreciation for your recent gift Workshop, CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED ($8,500) to the HorticulturalVNLA Science Enrichment Fund in Field support of Dr. Brian Jackson's research program. I am pleased to thank you personally and share with you how much it means to have you as a part of383 the Coal CALSWest community. Claudia Hollow Rd.

Landscape Christiansburg, 24073-6721 Your partnership allows usDesign to honorCharrette and VA strengthen our core values and mission of teaching, research and extension. The learning, discovery experiences Fieldand Dayoutreach At Grelen Nurseryprovided to our students and faculty both in and out of the classroom would not be possible without the steadfast support of our alumni and Summer friends who share in these values.Tour On behalf of all who benefit from such gifts, pleasePrivate accept Gardens my gratitude for your support.

More details www.vnla.org Thank you again for at your dedication to the College of Agriculture andinfo@vnla.org Life Sciences. 800-476-0055 I hope you take great pride in knowing that your commitment plays a vital role in the future of agriculture and life sciences in the state of North Carolina and beyond. Your steadfast support is humbling.

A receipt has already been mailed to the address on your donation check, but I wanted to add my personal thanks to you. With appreciation and warm regards, Sonia H. Murphy Director of Development

Prsrt. Std U.S. Postage PAID Blacksburg, VA Permit No. 107

Thank you again for your support of the VirDay and Summer Tour ginia 2016 Agribusiness Council's 45th Annual Legislative Appreciation Banquet. We have heard outstanding feedback from our guests this year and are thankful for all those whose efforts made it possible. Legislators continue to value the interaction and VNLA Table at Virginia Agribusiness Banquet discussions with our agribusiness industry, and we know that could not have happened without your support.

After 45 years, support and participation from our agribusiness industry continues to grow and evolve. We are pleased that you continue to value this event and the importance of promoting a positive image of agribusiness to our elected decision makers. Each year, we hear from both our elected officials and industry representatives how enjoyable the

VNLA - Workshop, Field Day, Summer Tour Save the Dates!

Growing a Healthy Business EcoSystem

SAVE THE DATES Thursday, August 11

Wednesday, August 10

Keep growing. Claudia West Field Day tours, exhibitors, networking Workshop business enhancement speakers

OneCommunities day you may outgrow your current operation. Farm Credit Designing Plant will be there help you expand. That Stand the Test oftoTime Whether you need to purchase real estate, build new houses, (hands-on Charrette) buy more equipment or need a revolving line of credit for plant

Market at Grelen Grelen Nursery stock, we have the financing youat need. Every business has growing pains. Give us a call and we’ll be sure Orange County your financing isn’t one of those.

Friday, August 12

Summer Tour Glendale Farm Contemporary Meditation Garden Italian 434-842-8733 Inspired Villa Phone: EarlyFax: Mountain Vineyard 434-842-3823 (wine tasting) email: info@bremotrees.com The Hill - Hardscaping www.Bremotrees.com Woodberry Forest School Bremo Bluff, VA

800-919-FARM Lending support to rural America™

VNLA Newsletter

farmcredit.com

April/May/June 2016 Photo: Jen Fariello Photography

More details at www.vnla.org | info@vnla.org | 800-476-0055

7


evening was and how they look forward to it. You help make this possible.

News - Green Industry in Richmond

At this year's banquet, we welcomed a sold out crowd, joined by over 650 agribusiness community members and nearly 200 elected officials and their guests! We were honored to have Governor and First Lady McAuliffe in attendance, as well as our Distinguished Friend of Agriculture award recipient, Senator Lynwood Lewis. Banquet sponsorships were also at an alltime high this year. Because of this, the Council was able to make many improvements to the quality of the program. Two large screens flanking the stage and several monitors spaced throughout the banquet hall allowed all of our guests to get a front-seat view of the Governor and other special speakers. In addition, these added features allowed us to show our appreciation for the generosity of our donors.

Local Members Quoted in the Times Dispatch After an industry-wide slump tied to the recession, the home mortgage crisis, a shift in consumer preferences and demographic changes, horticulture sales have been on the rebound.

Your participation allows the Council to host these important guests and provide the opportunity for meaningful interaction with industry members. Building these relationships is beneficial as they make policy decisions affecting your business during this 2016 General Assembly session and throughout the year. Thank you again for your support of the Virginia Agribusiness Council. Please mark your calendars for the 46th Annual Legislative Appreciation Banquet on January 12, 2017! Katie Frazier, President, Virginia Agribusiness Council

Letters - Virginia Horticultural Foundation

"The economy is not booming by any stretch of the imagination, but it is steadily improving," said Bill Gouldin, president of Strange's Florists, Greenhouses & Garden Centers and president of the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association. "It's improving a little bit better than the supply of nursery stock. Nurserymen have not been able to keep up with the demand. There are spotty shortages of certain kinds of trees and shrubs. That's not unusual coming out of a recession." To stay competitive with the mass merchandisers, which can often sell plants cheaper than the independents can, local garden center operators say they focus on providing stellar customer service and employing workers who know plants. Most offer educational seminars and special events to draw in customers. "We are holding our own," said Mark Landa of Boulevard Flower Gardens, a family owned and operated garden center in southern Chesterfield County that started in 1955.

Thank you for your $500 sponsorship of the 2016 Mid-Atlantic Horticulture Short Course. Your sponsorship helps procure knowledgeable speakers to present outstanding educational programs that offer attendees necessary continuing education units. Your presence gives credence towards the professional support given to the MAHSC. Bruce Leuthold, President, VHF

VNLA Newsletter 8

"As for what we are doing, of course, offering the cutting edge new varieties that are out there and some of the more unusual plants that the box stores are not going to have," Landa said. "Another thing that we are finding that is important, that we are trying right now, is on all of our edibles - like herbs and vegetables - not only are we going to a lot of varieties, but we are actually growing all of those pesticide-free.... We are trying to give the consumer who wants to know where their food source is coming from what they really want."

April/May/June 2016 Arpil / May / June 2016

8 VNLA Newsletter


“For the gardening industry, the recession that started in 2007 or 2008 didn't really end until last year”, said David Seward, head of the horticulture program at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, which has campuses in the Richmond area. "During that time there was a fairly large shift in the product line that people wanted," Seward said. "It wasn't as much decorating your landscape. It was more sustainability and food production. Sales of those kinds of crops in the retail centers went through the roof If you were able to adapt and get those plants available to your customers, you did fine."

News - RSG Expands to Richmond April 7, 2016. Due to explosive growth in the Metro Richmond area in our maintenance, landscaping, and irrigation divisions, we have opened a new branch to serve our current clients and develop new, long-term relationships with new clients as their one-resource partner for their outdoor needs.

“One sign that the demand for plants is growing is the need for trained workers”. Gouldin said there is a shortage of horticulture program graduates.

Kevin Foster, Director of Business Development for RSG said, “Due to our existing partnerships with our Richmondarea clients, as well as earning the trust of several new clients in the second half of 2015, it was vital that we join the community to help serve them more efficiently. This also creates a hub for further expansion into the area and we cannot wait to meet more businesses in the area that we can bring value to with our services.”

"The industry is crying for good trained people," Seward said. "There are not nearly enough. There are tons of jobs all through it - greenhouse growers, retail sales people," he said.

The branch will be managed by Chris McClaning, who brings over 20 years of leadership in the green industry. The office is located at 730 Grove Road in Midlothian and can be reached at (804) 893-4732.

Excerpts By Tammie Smith in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, posted: Sunday, April 24, 2016

RSG Landscaping & Lawn Care is a full service, commercial landscaping firm with a presence throughout the MidAtlantic with headquarters in Concord, VA with branches in Charleston, WV, Roanoke, VA, and Richmond, VA. They specialize in grounds maintenance, landscaping, irrigation, hardscaping and design/build projects for multiple

Ad - Waynesboro Nurseries

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

April/May/June 2016 April / May / June 2016

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segments of business, including: municipalities, professional centers, private schools & public school systems, homeowner’s associations, apartment communities, health care organizations, higher education, retail centers, office suites, and hospitality. RSG Landscaping and Lawn Care, Inc., Lynchburg, VA

Obituary - Industry leader Charles Vander Kooi

“Chuck inspired and influenced all through his outgoing personality, wit and intense wisdom,” Cohen says. “Chuck’s systems and process for estimating have saved, improved and brought great success to many if not all of his students. We are deeply saddened by his passing, but know his legacy will live on forever. My condolences to the Vander Kooi family.” Vander Kooi frequently spoke at green industry events like the Ohio Landscape Association's annual meeting and iLandscape. “He will be missed by many,” Bass says. “Charles often remarked in his seminars that he already worked out a plan for two words to be etched upon his tombstone: Overhead Recovery. Those of us who knew him personally will make sure this happens. Our industry has lost a legend. But his teaching and training will not be forgotten." Reprinted from http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/article/ll031516-charles-vander-kooi-death

Obituary - Roy Forehand, Foregreen Landscapes

The speaker, author and consultant will be missed by many. He was one of the speakers at the MAHSC in January 2016. Industry leader Charles Vander Kooi, president of consulting firm Vander Kooi & Associates, has died. The author, consultant and founder of HardScape Magazine spent decades as an estimator and helped more than 1,500 companies in their estimating and bidding systems. The family is holding a private burial and there will be a memorial service sometime in April. Check back for updates. “Charles Vander Kooi has been my mentor, my teacher and my business adviser,” says Tony Bass, owner of Tony Bass Consulting, a landscape business consulting firm. “A friend I already miss. A confidant like no other. A walking calculator with an ability to use comedy to teach in the most memorable ways." Bass met Vander Kooi at a seminar in Atlanta back in 1997. “It was clear from the first hour that he could help me improve the profits in my landscape company. So I made a commitment to become one of his best students. I'm glad I made that decision." Vander Kooi spoke at an average of 80 trade shows, conventions, and associations each year, teaching his philosophy across the U.S., Canada, Latin America, England and Australia. He consulted with an average of 50 clients annually, assisting in and improving their performance. Steven Cohen, chief innovation officer at GreenMark Consulting Group, calls Vander Kooi a one-of-a-kind trailblazer and a landscape industry visionary. VNLA Newsletter 10

Ernest Roy Forehand of Copper Hill, Va., passed away, on Wednesday, March 16, 2016, after a long battle with melanoma. He was the owner of Foregreen Landscapes, a Virginia Certified Horticulturist and worked in the Roanoke area for over 30 years as a landscape contractor. He was an avid outdoorsman and enjoyed hunting and fishing. His passion was archery. He was an active member of Sherwood Archers for many years: Roy graduated from Great Bridge High School and Wayne Community College with a degree in Wildlife Management. He is the son of Louise Edwards Forehand and the late James Ralph Forehand. He is survived by his wife of 41 years, Amanda Robbins Forehand; his daughter, Amanda Kay Chattin of Mesa, Ariz.; his son, Benjamin Roy Forehand of Sanford, N.C.; and his five grandsons, Camden James Forehand, Brenden Kyle Forehand, Damien Michael Chattin, Bruce Benjamin Chaffin, and Dominic Adam Chattin. He will be missed. A Memorial Service was held at 4 p.m. on Friday, March 18, 2016, at Oakey's South Chapel on Brambleton Ave. Pastor Warren Brown officiated. The family received friends immediately following the service at the funeral home: Online condolences may be expressed to the family at www.oakeys.com.

April/May/June 2016 Arpil / May / June 2016

From: The Roanoke Times

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VNLA - Certification, What’s Happening Now?

Obituary - Judith Knott Tyler

The Spring certification classes were held throughout the state. Thank you to all the instructors and proctors who put in the time and effort and Jeff Miller for all the organization. We had over 83 students sign up for the review classes and 46 purchased manuals. The classes were held over a 7-week period and gave VCH candidates a chance to learn and refresh knowledge prior to the exam. We had 135 sign up for the exam including retakes. Congratulations to the 72 new VCH. We want you all to wear your badges proudly and promote your expertise. When asked please explain what it means to you and show someone how you can teach them a little horticulture. Encourage your place of work to display the placards and use the new stickers and magnets on their vehicles and spread your achievement on social media. It is the proper use of this professionalism that benefits us all in untold ways.

It is with great sadness that we send you this note about the passing of Judith Knott Tyler, co-owner of Pine Knott Farms - the Hellebore Experts. Judith and Dick worked with the VNLA’s Plant Introduction Program, Beautiful Gardens™ for many years, promoting developing tissue culture protocols for Hellebores. Earlier, Judith was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer. It was impossible to treat, and earlier (March 24, 2016) Judy passed away. We know this will come as a shock to many people since most did not even know she was sick. What started two weeks ago as a case of pneumonia has led to a place none of us could have imagined. Judy first went to the hospital for the pneumonia, and that's when we learned of the existence of growths in her lungs. She came home to finish recovering before further tests would be done. Last weekend we had to take her back to the hospital for breathing difficulties. As she was being treated, she had a number of scans performed. It was Wednesday evening when we learned the nature of her cancer and that she only had days left. During the entire last week in the hospital, Judy was sedated. She felt no pain. Even amidst the chaos of the past few days, Judy died peacefully surrounded by family. Judy touched many lives and her loss is felt by many. We are all joined in grieving for such a wonderful person but also in celebrating the life of one loved so much. Thank you for all of the kind thoughts and outpouring of sympathy. The family would also like to ask that to honor the life of Judy that, in lieu of flowers, a donation be made do one of Judy's passions - the Lake Country SPCA. http://www.lakecountryspca.org/Home.html

We have received some good feedback about the program from testing issues and errors to the aged manual and the review classes. The consensus is the manual is a great source of information but not a textbook for the certification exam. The review classes are helpful and should be more consistent with a visual teaching aid presentation. We think this presentation and text can be incorporated to on online review and testing and we are exploring the cost involved with developing this work. We have distributed both the VA Master Gardeners new manual and the Maryland Certified Horticulturist manual to be reviewed by members of the certification committee and some VCH advisors in the Education Field as we move forward with revamping our manual. We will have a survey coming out over the summer to better understand the current status of our certified members and get some more feedback on this 78 year old program with a total of 614 certified members I did a webinar with NALP about 3 weeks ago on marketing their Landscape Industry certification. Three leaders, two of maintenance companies and one garden center told how it set them apart and how they pasted the branding on everything print and promoted it on radio social media. I think we need magnets for company trucks or ones that employees can move from vehicle to vehicle like the arborist and pesticide applicators have. I like the stamp and need one. I am of the mindset that VNLA should provide all certified members with promotional stuff for no charge but I know that is a tough sell. I spent a couple of days on a technical advisory committee with the CBCLP program, which is in it infancy as you know. It is going to be interesting to see how this regional certification program develops. Jeff Howe, VNLA Certification Chair, jhowe@windridgelandscaping.com

The Family of Judith Knott Tyler

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Tips - Plant Profile: Calocedrus decurrens (California incense-cedar) Calocedrus decurrens (California incense-cedar), literally translating to “beautiful cedar,” is a plant worthy of its name. What makes this plant beautiful? It has graceful, feathery plumes of aromatic foliage within its symmetrical, narrow-columnar habit; this symmetrical, narrow form lends it use to a variety of landscapes, particularly formal gardens. In addition, it is drought tolerant, resistant to disease and insect-pests and hardy in USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 5a to 8b. Whether you realize it or not, you most likely have some incense-cedar lying around the office-as most standard pencils are made from its wood. Yet despite its accolades, we rarely see this west coast native produced and employed in our east coast nurseries and landscapes. Utilization of this tough evergreen conifer can increase the diversity of our Virginia landscapes and may serve as an alternative to the oft used Thuja ‘Green Giant’ (‘Green Giant’ arborvitae).

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Unlike some of our “bread-and-butter” arborvitae cultivars and hybrids that take on an off-putting bronze to yellowish-green color in the winter, this California relative maintains its lustrous, dark-green foliage year-round. A noteworthy attribute of this species is its resistance to deer browsing compared to popular upright conifers planted in Virginia landscapes [e.g., Thuja occidentalis (Eastern arborvitae) and ×Cupressocyparis leylandii (Leyland cypress)]. California incense-cedar is also more resistant to arthropod-pests (e.g., leaf miner, spider mites, and bag worms). While not quite a fast-growing as other popular conifers used for privacy screens, in ideal conditions, California incense-cedar can grow up to 1 to 2 ft. in a single growing season. Wild stands in mountainous regions of Oregon and California are known to reach over 150 ft. tall, but this uncommon in the landscape. At maturity, you can expect a 30 to 50 ft. tall by 8 to 10 ft. wide specimen with the same symmetrical form and evenly dense canopy it had when you planted it. However, unlike many arborvitae species, California incense-cedar tends to lose its lowest branches as it ages, leaving a gap between the ground and the dense mantle of foliage. This should be taken into consideration when using California incense-cedar as a privacy barrier. Aside from its use as a screen, this species can also be utilized as a specimen plant, given its fine-textured foliage and formal presence. Clearly, California incense-cedar would be a handsome and noble addition to any Virginia landscape. There are a few, infrequently used cultivars of Calocedrus decurrens in the trade such as ‘Berrima Gold’, which has yellowgreen summer foliage that turns golden-orange in the winter. Other cultivars selected for their yellow variegation include ‘Aureovariegata’ and ‘Maupin Glow’. The primary method of propagation for the species is via seed since this plant does not readily root from cuttings.

References: Dirr, Michael A. 2009. Manual of Woody Landscape Plants Their Identification, Ornamental Characteristics, Culture, Propagation and Uses, 6th Ed. Stipes. Champaign, IL. MacMillan, P. 2008. “Deer-Resistant Plants for Central Oregon.” Oregon State University Extension Service. http://extension.oregonstate.edu/deschutes/sites/default/files/deer_resistant_plants_ec.pdf By Jake Shreckhise, PhD Student in Horticulture at Virginia Tech

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Editorial - Quotable: - Quotable: Are YouEditorial Using Too Many Varieties? Are You Using Too Many Varieties?

"Personally, I am more impressed by traditions which use "Personally, am more to impressed by traditions whichTrause commonplaceI elements create something stunning. commonplace elements to create Traditional Japanese gardens use asomething minimal stunning. vocabulary of ditional Japanese gardens use avery minimal vocabulary of fairly ordinary plants to achieve powerful effects. The fairly ordinary plants Renaissance to achieve very effects. gardens of the Italian usedpowerful little more than The box gardens the Italian usedwater, little more and hollyofoak hedges,Renaissance cypresses, turf, and than stonebox to and holly oak hedges, cypresses, turf, water, and500 stone to create landscapes that still take your breath away years create landscapes that still take your breath away 500 years

fairly ordinary plants to achieve very powerful effects. The gardens of the Italian Renaissance used little more than box and holly oak hedges, cypresses, turf, water, and stone to later. [Luciano Giubbilei] works in breath that Italian tradition, create landscapes that still take your away 500 years later. works in that Italian tradition, finding[Luciano beauty inGiubbilei] the inspired arrangement of simple elefinding the inspired arrangement of Plantsmansimple elements." beauty Thomasin Christopher, "The Perils of Adof-PlantsmanShreckhise ments." "The Perils ship," Thomas Garden Christopher, Rant blog, 4/4/16 http://garship," Garden Rant blog, 4/4/16 http://gardenrant.com/2016/04/perils-of-plantsmanship.html. denrant.com/2016/04/perils-of-plantsmanship.html. Call to arms! Thomas Christopher is suggesting that, inCall Thomas Christopher suggesting that, instead toofarms! dozens of various speciesismixed meadow-like stead dozens we of designers various species mixed across of a design, might do bettermeadow-like to limit our across we designers might do better to limit palette atodesign, only a few species, and to place them with careour to palette onlyout a few species, placewe them care to get the to most of the spaceand in to which arewith designing. get the most of the in which we are designing. Where's the out respect forspace a plantsman's collecting skills? Where's theunderstand respect for plantsman's skills? Doesn't he thata variety is the collecting spice of life? Or Doesn't understand that variety is the spice of life? perhaps he what Mr. Christopher is observing is that, withOra perhaps what Mr. observing is that, with a limited palette, the Christopher design itselfisbecomes more of a player. limited palette, the design itself of a player. Our skill as designers gets thebecomes attentionmore it deserves, no Our skill as designers gets the it deserves, no longer hidden behind waves of attention varicolored and textured longer plants. hidden behind waves of varicolored and textured plants.

What do you think? Would you rather be What do you think? youpalette, rather be designing withWould a limited designing with a limited palette, or in plantsman style? Discuss! or in plantsman style? Discuss! From Chris Coen, VSLD, Natures Palette, Glen Allen, VA, From Chris Coen, VSLD, Natures Palette,, Glen Allen, VA, clarentine@gmail.com clarentine@gmail.com,

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April/May/June 2

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Tips - VSLD Membership

Events - VSLD Summer Garden Tour

Mark your calendars for the VSLD summer garden tour. Tuesday, July 26 and Wednesday, July 27 we will visit a Baker's Dozen Residential gardens and one country club in the Richmond, Virginia West End. Our theme is the importance of hardscape and maintenance. Each designer will be present to explain the client's goals as well as the property's challenges. Be ready with your questions. Several gardens were open for Garden Week in past years. Two are open this year. One garden by Janet Baruch was featured in April's issue of R Homes magazine.

Have you, or your designer employees, considered becoming a VSLD certified designer, but been discouraged? Have you had questions about becoming a certified designer?

VSLD is actively engaged in developing additional membership! We'd love to add your name and photos to our website gallery for potential clients to drool over! Please contact our Recruitment and Mentorship coordinators, Kathy Brooks(gardendens203@comcast.net) and Tim Hess (timhess.lhn@gmail.com).

The cost ($110.00 for VSLD and VNLA members; $125.00 for guests) will cover transportation from the Hampton Inn (Glenside) to all the gardens, lunch at the Country Club of Virginia (Westhampton), dinner at Mosaic restaurant, and a Richmond tradition of a Sally Bell boxed lunch. Menu choices will be sent out at a later date. At the close of the tour Wednesday, July 27, we will be close to the Kuba Kuba Dos restaurant on Ridge Road North, where those who wish may gather for a meal before heading home or back to the hotel. The Hampton Inn at the intersection of Route 64, Broad Street, and Glenside is reserving rooms for $119.00 per night (includes a hot cooked breakfast) until July 1. Keep in mind that the vans will leave the hotel at 8:45 am each morning. We encourage you to use the vans since parking in residential areas is often difficult. To make reservations:    

VNLA Newsletter 14

Go to www.richmondglensideswuites.hamptoninn.com Select your arrival and departure dates, then click "add special rate codes" In the box labeled "group code," enter VSL Select from the available room types at the negotiated group rate.

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Additional discounts such as AAA or AARP are not available for rooms already discounted within group blocks. After cut-off date, the hotel will honor the rate as available, but can't guarantee the rate or room types available.

outstanding contributions to the land-grant mission of the university. One award goes to an Extension specialist and the other is given to an Extension agent. Each award winner receives $2,000.

VSLD member Anna Best has a short list of members in the Richmond area who are offering guest rooms.

Since assuming the position in 2004, Close has developed several resources to improve the work the Extension master gardener can accomplish.

Mail non-refundable checks for the tour to Jane Abbott, 16 Willway Avenue, Richmond, VA 23226 before July 1, 2016.

He worked directly with the Virginia Master Gardener Association and the College of Agriculture and LIfe Sciences development office to establish the State Master Gardener Coordinator’s Endowment as a means to solve the persistent lack of stable funding for the state master gardener coordinator position. The endowment has a goal of $1 million and is currently at more than $500,000.

News - Dave Close wins VT Award David Close receives Alumni Award for Excellence in Extension David Close, consumer horticulture specialist and Virginia Cooperative Extension state master gardener coordinator, has received the 2016 Alumni Award for Excellence in Extension.

In addition to the endowment, Close created the Master Gardener College Advisory Team and used it to increase attendance at Master Gardener College, an annual state conference, without having to increase staff. The advisory team helped with registration, logistics, and event planning, while still acting as advisors to the attendees.

Sponsored by the Virginia Tech Alumni Association, the Alumni Award for Excellence in Extension is presented annually to two Virginia Cooperative Extension faculty members who have made

“The advisory team has made a positive impact on the college program in spite of dwindling financial resources,” wrote George Graine, a Fairfax master gardener. “The improved attendance at the annual state conference is testament to Mr. Close's innovation and creativity.”

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“Dave’s commitment to the Master Gardener Program and the mission of VCE is evidenced by his participation and leadership,” wrote Christy Brennan, president of the Virginia Master Gardener Association, in a letter of nomination.

News - Alex Niemiera wins Award Alexander X. Niemiera, professor for the Department of Horticulture and assistant dean of student programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, has received the university's 2016 William E. Wine Award.

Close received his bachelor’s degree from Cumberland College, master’s degree from Southern Illinois University, and is working toward his Ph.D. from Virginia Tech.

News - Elizabeth Wilson is 2016 Outstanding Senior in the Virginia Tech Department of Horticulture! Wilson is graduating with a degree in Environmental Horticulture and minors in Entomology and Civic Agriculture and Food Systems. Her dedication to horticulture is clear through her involvement in Sigma Alpha Professional Agricultural Sorority, Pi Alpha Xi, a National Horticulture Honor Society, as president of the Horticulture Club, and through her recognition as the American Society for Horticultural Science Outstanding Undergraduate Horticulture Student. She has conducted extensive research in several labs, which includes her work in a tissue culture lab and research in agroecology. Outside of the university, she has interned in micro-propagation at Dan River Plants and 4-H extension, as well as implemented a pollinator garden to promote ecosystem services at Hale Y Community Garden. Upon graduation, Wilson will pursue a masters in Career and Technical Education at Virginia Tech with emphasis on Agricultural Education. Elizabeth Wilson took 3rd place in the VT Engage Poster Session yesterday for her CAFS capstone entitled “Buzzing about pollinator gardens: Promotion of Ecosystem Services”. This capstone project was a real-world hands-on collaboration with a community partner, and in this case the Hale Y Community Garden. Along with the poster, Elizabeth shared K - 12 curriculum and material for adult learning all about pollinators! She made a video about her project which can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luzSlzqg6Uw. From VT Horticulture Newsletter May 2016

If you don’t see your ad here, neither does anyone else! Call 800-476-0055 or email info@vnla.org for advertising information, today!

The William E. Wine Award was established in 1957 by the Virginia Tech Alumni Association in memory of William E. Wine, Class of 1904, who was a former rector of the Board of Visitors and Alumni Association president. Following a college-level selection process of candidates nominated by students, faculty, and alumni, each college may put forth one nominee. From this group, three faculty members are selected annually. Each Wine Award winner receives $2,000 and automatic induction into the Academy of Teaching Excellence. In addition to teaching five routine courses per year, Niemiera has taught seven other courses for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. He consistently receives above average SPOT evaluation scores from students who often describe his dedication to his students and the material. Each semester he trains two to three graduate teaching assistants to conduct weekly woody plant identification labs for HORT 3325 and 3326. "Although Dr. Niemiera has many advisees, teaches various classes, and has research responsibilities, he always makes every student feel as if they are deserving of his full attention," wrote Jacob Shreckhise, Department of Horticulture graduate student, in a letter of nomination. "Not only does he make all of his students and GTAs feel welcome at all times, he always greets each with a smile and a comment tailored to the student." In 2014, Niemiera developed instructional materials to teach woody plant identification to Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association personnel. The project received funding through grants, totaling more than $20,000. Other funded projects include his Citizen Gardner Teaching Projects in which Niemiera established four edible landscape demonstration gardens to educate citizens about edible landscape species. He also developed and delivered six plant breeding workshops to to teach citizens how to breed new horticultural varieties. These projects received more than $60,000 in grants. He developed HORT 2184 Plants, Places, Cultures Globally in 2010 and completely revamped HORT 2234 Environmental Factors in Horticulture in 2014. Niemiera was the recipient of the 2014 Virginia Tech Award for Excellence in Career Advising. Virginia Tech Department of Horticulture, niemiera@vt.edu

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Winner of the Photo Contest

VNLA - Photo Contest Rules The contest is open to any photographer (amateur and professional) except members of Board of Directors of VNLA and their families. Entries are limited to VNLA members and their staff. Each photographer may enter up to three (3) digital images per Newsletter deadline (see #6). Email images to info@vnla.org . Include your name, phone number, company, and email. One winning entry per photographer per year. You may re-enter non-winning entries. Please e-mail images separately. Feel free to elaborate on any story surrounding the photograph. Photos should be 300 dpi high resolution. All photographs must be related to the Green Industry. The subject can be located in a nursery, back yard, or in a landscape--just so it is obviously related to the green industry profession. Deadline for submission is 5:00 p.m. on the Newsletter Copy Deadline, which is the 15th of January, April, July, and October. All submissions become the property of the VNLA.

Entrance garden of a farm in Round Hill designed by Magee Design and using only plants native to Virginia Photo Winner: John C Magee Owner of Magee Design, Middleburg, VA Camera: Canon EOS M Win $50, submit your photos! Good Luck and Happy Photographing!

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Model Release forms are required with each photograph which contains a clearly identifiable person. Release forms are available from the VNLA office, on request, and are also available for download from the VNLA website at Model release in MS Word format or Adobe PDF format. Judging is done by the VNLA   Communication Committee.   All decisions are final 

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VNLA Member Profile: James River Nursery & Mike Hildebrand was Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Design. However, his interest in horticulture was cultivated in advance of attending Virginia Tech. His grandmother was his first Horticulture instructor. Mike graduated from James Wood High School! He did have several Horticulture classes while attending high school. Also while in high school, and even during his college years, he worked at DeHaven Nursery in his home town of Winchester, Virginia. After graduating from Virginia Tech, he worked for Lairds Nursery in Richmond as a landscape foreman; Mike quickly moved up to the landscape designer and salesman positions. Mike Hildebrand and Al Jones founded James River Nurseries in 1983 with only two other employees and a pair of trucks. Hildebrand’s kitchen functioned as the original office. Today, James River Nurseries is comprised of more than 200 acres of farmland in Ashland and Montpelier where they cultivate growing fields and landscape materials, as well as maintain year-round greenhouses.

Beginnings

Many things have changed since the early years of James River Nurseries, but our philosophy remains as steadfast today as it was when we began. Simply put, we adhere to three primary commitments:   

A commitment to 100% customer satisfaction. A commitment to offering quality plant material at a fair price. A commitment to always providing courteous and dependable service.

From the largest developers to individual homeowners, these commitments have been the foundation for our company. Through the years, we have been chosen as the landscape provider for some of the area’s most successful builders, general contractors and developers. At the same time, we have had the pleasure of helping thousands of individual homeowners with their landscaping needs. Education Mike Hildebrand earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Virginia Tech in 1974. His horticulture concentration 18

VNLA Newsletter

In 1983 he founded James River Nurseries with his business partner Al Jones in Hanover County. Several years later, Mike co-founded James River Irrigation and James River Grounds Management which was sold 12 years ago. These are premier landscape-related companies that are highly regarded in the trade. Mike takes pride in the fact that these companies have employed and still employ many Virginia Tech Horticulture and Landscape Architecture graduates. Mike’s other business ventures included Glen Allen Nurseries and James River Cellars. Mike’s contributions to the landscape industry go well beyond his business; he is involved in industry organizations such as the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association, the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET), and Agriculture in the Classroom. Family On a personal note, Mike and his wife Susie have been married for 36 years; she’s a graduate of the University of Virginia but their enduring love overcomes any intercollegiate rivalry. They have two sons who are both employed at James River Nurseries. Brian is a Radford University graduate with a Business degree and Dan is a Virginia Tech graduate who upheld his Dad’s tradition and earned a B.S. in Horticulture in 2007.

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Mike’s hobbies include coaching/attending sports activities; he has a special interest in Virginia Tech athletics and attends all the events that his schedule will allow.

Best business practice (if you don't have $ don't spend it) It has kept us out of trouble for 34 years! Hire the best employees you can! They keep you out of trouble! Surround yourself and business with associates that can point you in the right direction. He also says that if I were entering TECH RIGHT NOW; I would take as many business classes as possible. Mike’s favorite Plant: Black Gum Tree - Fall Color Native His best Habit: Setting the Alarm Clock! Best part of Workday: Discussions and problem solving with customers and personnel. Establishing relationships with vendors of the nursery industry.

When asked what advice he would give to horticulture students entering the horticultural job market, Mike notes “Horticulture students have many opportunities and challenges ahead. The green sustainable movement will be a catalyst for many job opportunities in our industry. Challenges do lie ahead with more government regulations and a changing economy. Continuation of education will be needed to face these challenges. Employers will need educated employees to face these new opportunities and challenges.” Mike is a true Hokie. He is an avid supporter of the Virginia Tech Horticulture Department and the Hahn Horticulture Garden. He and his wife are members of the Virginia Tech Capital Campaign and members of the Agricultural and Life Sciences Steering Committee. The Department of Horticulture is very proud of Mike’s professional and personal achievements. His generous support of the Department of Horticulture and Virginia Tech are much appreciated. Mike was Alumni of the year VT Agriculture 2014 For over 30 years, they have had the privilege of serving the Central Virginia region. We love being a part of this community. Whether we’re involved in landscaping a new development or beautifying a local home, we consider it an honor to provide quality landscaping services to our community. It is in that vein; we are proud to announce our sponsorship of this year's “Rockin' on the Avenue” event. The event, which is designed to raise money and awareness for the Evelyn D. Reinhart Guest House, will take place May 19th. “The Evelyn D. Reinhart Guest House is designed to be a home away from home for caregivers of patients at Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital. More Information Mike says that the best Advice from my Father, was the good old Golden Rule (Do unto others as you would have them do unto you) VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

How or Why Your Company Managed to Stay in Business So Long: Employee Retainage, Establishing lasting customer relationships. Biggest Challenge, Obstacle or Disaster in Business History: Recession '08 + finding qualified labor during growth. Who is your most significant mentor and why: Laird’s Nursery, George Stockner, The entire VT Horticulture Department Future Plans: Continue sustainable growth and to meet the demands of the landscape industry through education and advocacy. How has the industry changed? Regulatory demands & advocacy. Industry trends (plant preferences, stylistic trends, Production practices and regulations). Keeping up with educational requirements. “Mike is indeed a humble and down-to-earth man. This is what makes him so special to me for he has accomplished and given so much to our industry and to Virginia Tech. Mike is a true Hokie and a proud alumnus of our department. He is a treasured member of our department’s industry advisory board and he and Suzie have enthusiastically supported the development of our Hahn Horticulture Garden. They are also members of the Virginia Tech Capital Campaign and members of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Steering Committee. The Department of Horticulture is very proud of Mike’s professional and personal achievements. His generous support of the Department of Horticulture and Virginia Tech are very much appreciated.” said Roger Harris, Virginia Tech Horticulture Department head.

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News - National Collegiate Landscape Competition Virginia Tech placed 14th out of 62 schools at the 2016 National Collegiate Landscape Competition at Mississippi State in Starkville, Mississippi. Twenty-one students from Horticulture and Agricultural Technology competed in 24 out of 28 events. We are proud of our Hokies! The top 15 placements: 

Justice Schlemmer and Patrick Riley - 1st place, HardNews - National Collegiate scape Install

Landscape Competition

Mike feels that certainly serving on the VNLA Board several times has been a huge influence in many business decisions, as well as having Virginia Tech and the many other Green Business owners within the State have been generous with their counsel. Edited by Sandy Miller

News - VT Dining Services Horticulture Farm Update Mike feels that certainly serving Students on the VNLA sevin theBoard Sustainaeral times has been a huge influence in many business decible Agriculture Practicum sions, as well as having Virginiacourse Tech and the many helped make other 2015 Green Business owners within thethe State have been generous most productive seawith their counsel. son at the Dining Services Farm yet, Edited by SandyHorticulture Miller Together, they harvested roughly 48,000 News - VT Dining Services pounds of fresh produce, all served to students, staff, Horticulture Farm Update and faculty at Virginia Tech's award-winning dining halls. A 2015 crop highlight: more thanin600 of Students thepounds Sustainabasil harvested and processed into pesto! Changes and imble Agriculture Practicum provements to the farm should make 2016helped an exciting course makelearn2015 ing experience for students in thethe Practicum. most productive seaat the Dining Services This spring, they will propagateson thousands of rosemary, Horticulture Farm yet,herb thyme, oregano, and sage plants for a new perennial installation. New varieties of purple and yellow fingerling Together, they harpotatoes will go in the ground mid-April. Students help vested roughly will 48,000 upgrade the vegetable washing soon include astaff, new pounds of fresh produce, all shed, served to to students, walk-in cooler, our effort to adopt GAP (Good Agriculand faculty at inVirginia Tech's award-winning dining ture Practice) that foster food-safety the farm. halls. A 2015standards crop highlight: more than 600onpounds of Horticulture graduates with hands-on experience on susbasil harvested and processed into pesto! Changes and imtainable farms willfarm serve valuable in provements to the should makeroles 2016asanprofessionals exciting learnthe growing sustainable food and agriculture movement. ing experience for students in the Practicum.

Virginia Tech placed 14th out of 62 schools at the 2016 National Collegiate Landscape Competition at Mississippi State in Starkville, Mississippi. Twenty-one students from Horticulture and Agricultural Technology competed in 24 out of 28 events. We are proud of our Hokies! The top 15 placements:                    

Justice Schlemmer and Patrick Riley - 1st place, Hardscape Install Christa Bush - 2nd place, Turf and Weed ID, and 7th place, SuperStar Brandon Goodrich and Steven Lamb - 2nd place, Truck and Trailer Op Trevor Rudisill - 3rd place, Small Engine Repair Alan Lynch - 5th place, Tractor Loader Backhoe Op, and 14th place, Compact Excavator Elizabeth Wilson and Alysha Lawless - 7th place, Employee Development Justice Schlemmer - 8th place, Skid Steer Loader Op Elizabeth Wilson - 8th place, Plant Diagnosis Christa Bush - 2nd place, Turf andProblem Weed ID, and 7th Christa Bush, Patrick Riley, Joseph Mills 8th place, place, SuperStar Landscape Plant Install Brandon Goodrich and Steven Lamb - 2nd place, Truck Patrick Riley 9th place, Exterior Landscape Design and Trailer Op Christa Bush and Trevor Rudisill 13th place, Irrigation Trevor Rudisill - 3rd place, Small- Engine Repair Assembly Alan Lynch - 5th place, Tractor Loader Backhoe Op, Alicia Nester - 15th place,Excavator Annual Perennial ID and 14th place, Compact Marshall Jones 15th, 3D Exterior Landscape Design Elizabeth Wilson and Alysha Lawless - 7th place, Employee Development Justice Schlemmer - 8th place, Skid Steer Loader Op Elizabeth Wilson - 8th place, Plant Problem Diagnosis Christa Bush, Patrick Riley, Joseph Mills - 8th place, Landscape Plant Install Patrick Riley - 9th place, Exterior Landscape Design Christa Bush and Trevor Rudisill - 13th place, Irrigation Assembly Alicia Nester - 15th place, Annual Perennial ID Marshall Jones - 15th, 3D Exterior Landscape Design

Virginia they Tech Department Newsletter (March This spring, will propagate thousands of2016) rosemary,  thyme, oregano, and sage plants for a new perennial herb  installation. New varieties of purple and yellow fingerling potatoes will go in the ground mid-April. Students will help 20 / May / June 2016 upgrade the vegetable washing shed, soon to includeArpil a new VNLA Newsletter April/May/June 2016 walk-in cooler, in our effort to adopt GAP (Good Agriculture Practice) standards that foster food-safety on the farm. Horticulture graduates with hands-on experience on sus-

VNLA Newsletter

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website containing a document that outlines how candidate species should be submitted. Also we spent time beginning the conversation on what the proposal process would look like and contain. There are many varying opinions on this issue and so will take time to establish.

Patrick and Justice won an all-expense paid trip for themselves and a faculty member to travel to Louisville, KY in October to compete in the Hardscape North America -HNA Installer Championship. Christa was also awarded a $2500.00 scholarship from John Deere. The students came back ready and excited to compete in next year’s competition which will be held at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. Again we would like to thank all our sponsors who made this trip possible. [Note: The VNLA contributes $1,000 this year to the VA Tech Horticulture Department to support the student travel expenses to this competition each year.] Barbara Kraft, Tom Martin and John James, VA Tech Department of Horticulture

VNLA - Noxious Weeds Committee Meeting March 13, 2016 in Charlottesville There had been a question at the first meeting in December about whether potential weed species could be listed while the process to change regulatory definitions took place. Larry Nichols reported that the Committee can go ahead on both fronts. Because the statute was changed the process the change the regulations must start from the beginning. This involves 3 steps: 1. Notice of Intent to change the regulations presented to VDACS Board at the December 2016 meeting 2. Present proposed language of amended regulations to Board for approval. Also present a list of proposed candidate species. 3. Public Comment period

Finally, because the definition of a noxious weed was changed in the statute the definitions of what is a Tier 1 and Tier 2 noxious weed must change. We began the process of changing these definitions and added a Tier 3. I won’t go into specifics as it is all draft and will change many times in the next few months. Brent Hunsinger, VNLA Legislative Chair, brenthunsinger@gmail.com

News - Noxious Weeds? Q&A Proposed noxious weed regulations [NOTE: These are questions and answers to questions that were asked by the Noxious Weed Committee and the answers were provided by Deb Martin, VDACS. Noxious Weed Regulation changes were approved by the General Assembly in Tier 1 & Tier 2 designations and could change depending upon the results of the Noxious Weed Advisory Committee’s evaluation of plants that may be declared noxious..] (Question) Granny Grower is a licensed nursery stock producer and is growing plant noxious plant X ??? and it's on the list. She has orders for it and ships it - both within and outside VA. What happens next? What happens to the rest of the load of plants? (Answer) If VDACS becomes aware of a nursery operation or dealer that is selling any listed noxious weed, a VDACS inspector would contact the nursery to inform them of requirements of the Noxious Weed Regulation. The first contact is almost always one where voluntary compliance is encouraged. If the noxious weeds are Tier 1, they would be placed under stop sale and movement of those plants would be prohibited. However, VDACS could issue a permit which would allow movement of the plant with certain restrictions to prevent spread of the noxious weed. If the nursery continues to sell listed noxious weeds or if it was determined that the nursery knowingly sold listed noxious weeds, the state code provides for injunctive relief (See § 3.2-808 of the Code of Virginia). (Question) Freddy Forage producer is growing hay and harvests some noxious plant Y on the list along with his load of hay. What happens next?

(Answer) If VDACS was made aware of the presence of a listed noxious weed in hay, we would inform the producer that the hay contained a listed noxious weed, therefore the hay cannot be moved. The producer would also be informed that feeding hay which contains noxious weeds could result in the spread of the noxious weed and increased difficulty and costs The process to change the regulations could take 2 years. for eradication. VDACS would add a detailed noxious weeds page to their VNLA Newsletter April/May/June 2016 22 22 Arpil / May / June 2016 VNLA Newsletter


If VDACS can determine that only a portion of the hay contains plant Y, then the remaining (uncontaminated) hay could be certified for movement. In addition, for the future movement of hay, the producer could enter into a compliance agreement with VDACS which would allow for the self-certification and movement of hay which is not at risk of spread of plant Y. (Question) Nan the Native Plant Nut is hiking in the Shenandoah and comes across wavy leaf basket grass. Who does she call? Does she hike out with some of it as proof? Where does she take it? (Answer) Individuals who come across a listed noxious weed should contact VDACS' Office of Plant Industry Services at (804) 786-3515 and provide an address or coordinates of the location where the plant was found. OPIS staff will investigate to determine if the suspect plants are listed noxious weeds. Individuals should not remove the plants since this poses a risk of spread of the noxious weed. (VDACS has investigated numerous reports of Giant Hogweed during June - July of this year; all reports were investigated by OPIS staff and found negative). (Question) Tom's Tremendous Turf & Landscape care notices every plant on the list (Tier 1, 2 and more) on the Universityowned properties he cares for. What should he do? If he pulls it by hand, where does he take it? Landfill? Burn pile? compost? If he puts it in his truck and it drops seed or viable roots there, what is his risk? If he calls in the gummint (VDACS)

does he lose his client? He sees these plants on his commercial clients too, and just keeps his mouth shut and sprays them with RoundUp. Is that what he is supposed to do? Or, does he call in the guys in the white Tyvek suits? (Answer) Individuals/companies who come across a listed noxious weed should contact VDACS' Office of Plant Industry Services at (804) 786-3515. OPIS staff will investigate to determine if the suspect plants are listed noxious weeds. Individuals/companies (including lawn care/landscaping companies) should not remove noxious weeds as this poses a risk of spread of the noxious weed. OPIS will work with individuals/companies in eradication efforts to ensure that the removal of Tier 1 noxious weeds poses no risk of spread. OPIS will work with individuals/companies for the removal of Tier 2 noxious weeds. Tier 2 noxious weeds should be removed or suppressed to prevent their spread, but removal of Tier 2 is not required. Companies can enter into a compliance agreement with VDACS which will provide authority for the future removal of noxious weeds. VDACS does not need to be contacted for the destruction, movement, etc. of plants classified as "more" in the scenario above. (Question) Henry Hauler contract hauls for growers of both forage and nursery crops. Seed and root contamination by his trucks (too busy to clean between runs) of a few of the invasives happen on his trucks and are traced to them. Now what?

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(Answer) Note: There are numerous plants exhibiting invasive characteristics which are established and widespread in Virginia (Johnsongrass, bamboo, etc.), however movement of these "invasive" plants is not restricted under the Noxious Weed Regulation. The movement of plants that are specifically listed as noxious weeds is prohibited under the Noxious Weed Regulation. Transportation companies that are found to have moved listed noxious weeds would be informed of the Noxious Weed Regulation by OPIS staff. Whenever future shipments of potentially contaminated plant material is to occur, the shipper would be required to obtain a permit from VDACS; this permit would be issued once VDACS staff had inspected the shipment to ensure noxious weeds were not present. The shipper could also enter into a compliance agreement with VDACS to continue moving forage and nursery crops. The compliance agreement would stipulate the sanitation procedures (i.e., cleaning truck and destroying all residual plant material between loads) which the shipper must follow to prevent the movement of plant parts of noxious weeds. If it is determined that the movement of noxious weeds was intentional, the state code provides for injunctive relief (See ยง 3.2-808 of the Code of Virginia). (Question) Hortense the student Horticulturalist is studying for the new updated VNLA certified horticulturalist exam. She is given 4 plant i.d. lists to study for the exam:

1. Common woody and herbaceous plants used in Virginia landscapes, 2. The DCR list of highly, usually and occasionally invasive non-native plants for her region, the coastal plain, 3. The VDACS list of noxious weeds, both Tier 1 and Tier 2 4. The US Fish and Wildlife Service Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. (Question) Hortense decides to study for the exam, passes it; then, throws out all the lists and decides to specify only Dr. Doug Tallamy's top twenty woody and top twenty herbaceous plants for increasing native habitat (that is, native species of lepidoptera crucial to supporting native birds while nesting). Her last load of native plants, however, was contaminated with weed seed from plants on VDAC's list. What does she do? Individuals/companies who come across a plant or plant parts of listed noxious weed should contact VDACS' Office of Plant Industry Services at (804) 786-3515. OPIS staff will investigate to determine if the suspect plants (or plant parts) are listed noxious weeds. Depending upon their ranking, Tier 1 or Tier 2, refer to D. Debra Martin, Program Manager, Virginia Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services, Office of Plant Industry Services, Richmond, VA, 804-786-3515,

Debra.Martin@vdacs.virginia.gov

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VNLA Newsletter 24

April/May/June 2016 Arpil / May / June 2016

24 VNLA Newsletter


Contact Nick Bush Grace Bascetta James Henderson Jr Dustin Bowman Scott Brandt Michele D. Duhon Susan Eggerton Richard Gropper Justin Keeley Lorraine Klepace Richard Lehman David Lisowski Jim Pender Mithat Percinel Benjamin Pitman James Poyer Wayne Rose Emily Rothrock Tom Stabel Dr. Milan Sturgis Lynn Tertychny Ferenc Kiss Johanna G Deak Scot Morrow James R Viars Brandon Baker Glen Jedlicka Philip Beethoven‐Wilson Melinda Shiflett Brian Simmons Jeff Miller David Love  Scott Brady Mike Hackley Richard Lindsay Jason Davis Gilbert Alimanestiano Victoria Vacher Chad Guevara Jay Austin Katherine Carline VNLA NewsletterNewMember.5.5.16.xlsx

Welcome to these New  VNLA Members!

Company 3B Consulting Services, LLC Amore Commercial Enterprises LLC A‐Plus Lawn Care LLC Associate ‐ Bowman Associate ‐ Brandt Associate ‐ Duhon Associate ‐ Eggerton Associate ‐ Gropper Associate ‐ Keely Associate ‐ Klepace Associate ‐ Lehman Associate ‐ Lisowski Associate ‐ Pender Associate ‐ Percinel Associate ‐ Pitman Associate ‐ Poyer Associate ‐ Rose Associate ‐ Rothrock Associate ‐ Stabel Associate ‐ Sturgis Associate ‐ Tertychny Cavano's Perennials Inc Coastal Landscapes and Nursery Frederick Landscaping Inc. Gloucester County Public Schools Green Alternatives Gro‐Getters Inc Integrity Landscaping Solutions Kings Dominion LandCare Landworks Unlimited Longwood University Manakin Grounds Management Mike's Lawn and Landscape, LLC Mowcow Lawn and Landscape Native Forest Nursery New Foliage Landscaping North End Landscapes Inc Plantbid RVAScapes LLC Student ‐ Carline April / May / June 2016 1 of 2

City Lebanon Williamsburg Evington Harrisonburg Williamsburg Hampton Alexandria Richmond Fredericksburg Ashland Richmond Midlothian Rockville Herndon Vienna Mechanicsville Colonial Beach Virginia Beach Knotts Island Springfield Yorktown Kingsville Virginia Beach New Market Gloucester Norfolk Annandale Ashland Chester Ashland Chesapeake Farmville Richmond Hopewell Fairfax Station Calhoun Nokesville Virginia Beach Madisonville Midlothian Richmond

ST VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA NC VA VA MD VA MD VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA GA VA VA LA VA VA

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Contact Company Ben Casteel Student ‐ Casteel Nick Bush 3B Consulting Services, LLC Karen (K.C.) Cataldi Student ‐ Cataldi Grace Bascetta Karin Stretchko Student ‐ Stretchko Claudia 383 CoalWest Hollow Rd. Amore Commercial Enterprises LLC James Henderson Jr A‐Plus Lawn Care LLC Brett Weiss Student ‐ Weis Landscape Design Charrette Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721 Dustin Bowman Associate ‐ Bowman Jerry Zsoldos Student ‐ Zsoldos Scott Brandt Associate ‐ Brandt Rhea Talley Field Day At Grelen Nursery The Garden Nanny LLC Michele D. Duhon Associate ‐ Duhon  Michael Jay Nemeyer The Greenbrier Resort Summer Tour Susan Eggerton Associate ‐ Eggerton Amy Chaffman The Pampered Garden LLC Private Gardens Richard Gropper Associate ‐ Gropper Yue Zhu Tranlin Inc Justin Keeley Associate ‐ Keely Alan Carter Ventures Management Inc More details at www.vnla.org info@vnla.org 800-476-0055 Lorraine Klepace Associate ‐ Klepace Charles Crawford Virginia Roots Landscaping Richard Lehman Associate ‐ Lehman Alicia Nester VT Senior David Lisowski Associate ‐ Lisowski Elizabeth Lucas VT Senior Jim Pender Associate ‐ Pender Christa Bush VT Student ‐ Bush Mithat Percinel Associate ‐ Percinel Emma Gremillion Westwood Country Club Benjamin Pitman Associate ‐ Pitman Ellen Colodney Wetlands Plants Inc James Poyer Associate ‐ Poyer Wayne Rose Associate ‐ Rose Emily Rothrock Associate ‐ Rothrock Tom Stabel Associate ‐ Stabel Dr. Milan Sturgis Associate ‐ Sturgis Lynn Tertychny Associate ‐ Tertychny Ferenc Kiss Cavano's Perennials Inc Johanna G Deak Coastal Landscapes and Nursery Scot Morrow Frederick Landscaping Inc. James R Viars Gloucester County Public Schools Brandon Baker Green Alternatives Glen Jedlicka Gro‐Getters Inc Philip Beethoven‐Wilson Integrity Landscaping Solutions Melinda Shiflett Kings Dominion Brian Simmons LandCare tours, exhibitors, networking Jeff Miller Landworks Unlimited business enhancement speakers OneCommunities day you may outgrow your current operation. Farm Credit Designing Plant David Love Longwood University will be there help you expand. That Stand the Test oftoTime  Scott Brady Whether you need to purchase realManakin Grounds Management estate, build new houses, (hands-on Charrette) Mike Hackley Mike's Lawn and Landscape, LLC buy more equipment or need a revolving line of credit for plant stock, we have the financing you need. Richard Lindsay Mowcow Lawn and Landscape Every business has growing pains. Native Forest Nursery Give us a call and we’ll be sure Jason Davis Orange County your financing isn’t one of those. Gilbert Alimanestiano New Foliage Landscaping Victoria Vacher North End Landscapes Inc Chad Guevara Plantbid 800-919-FARM Jay Austin RVAScapes LLC Katherine Carline Student ‐ Carline Lending support to rural America™

City ST Abingdon VA Lebanon Midlothian VA Williamsburg Richmond VA Evington Richmond VA Harrisonburg Grafton VA Williamsburg Louisa VA Hampton Earlysville VA Alexandria Woodbridge VA Richmond Charlottesville VA Fredericksburg Staunton VA Ashland Richmond VA Richmond Meadows Of Dan VA Midlothian Louisa VA Rockville Broad Run VA Herndon Sterling VA Vienna VA Edenton NC Mechanicsville VA Colonial Beach VA Virginia Beach VA Knotts Island NC Springfield VA Yorktown VA Kingsville MD Virginia Beach VA New Market MD Gloucester VA Norfolk VA Annandale VA Ashland VA Chester VA Ashland VA Glendale Farm Chesapeake VAMeditation Garden Contemporary Farmville VA Italian 434-842-8733 Inspired Villa Richmond Phone: VA EarlyFax: Mountain Vineyard 434-842-3823 Hopewell VA (wine tasting) email: info@bremotrees.com Fairfax Station VA The Hill - Hardscaping www.Bremotrees.com Calhoun GA NokesvilleWoodberry VA Forest School

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1 of 2 Photo: Jen Fariello Photography

More details at www.vnla.org | info@vnla.org | 800-476-0055

Bremo Bluff, VA VA LA VA VA

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Publication 426-128

Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 9:

Bioretention

David J. Sample, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech Jia Liu, Ph.D. Student, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech This fact sheet is one of a 15-part series on urban stormwater management practices. Please refer to definitions in the glossary at the end of this fact sheet. Glossary terms are italicized on first mention in the text. For a comprehensive list, see “Urban Stormwater: Terms and Definitions,” Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) publication 426-119.

What Is Bioretention? A bioretention cell, or rain garden, is a best management practice (BMP) designed to treat stormwater runoff from roofs, driveways, walkways, or lawns. They are a shallow, landscaped depression that receives and treats polluted stormwater with the goal of discharging water of a quality and quantity similar to that of a forested watershed (figure 1).

Where Can Bioretention Be Used? Bioretention can be used in commercial areas, parking lots, and highways to treat roof and road runoff. Bioretention can also be used in residential landscapes or parks; however, steps should be taken to minimize sediment. Bioretention cells that receive sediment loading tend to clog and hold water rather than infiltrate it.

Figure 1. A sample bioretention cell or rain garden. Photo courtesy of WSSI Inc.

Figure 2. Note how the cell’s vertical profile is exaggerated.

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2013

VNLAVirginia Newsletter April / May / June 2016 Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, genetic information, marital, family, or veteran

status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Jewel E. Hairston, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. VT/0813/BSE-92P

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What Does Bioretention Do?

a 900-square-foot bioretention cell is likely needed.

The practice of bioretention was developed to reduce pollution within runoff from urban impervious surfaces during moderate storms. A typical bioretention cell consists of a depression with a vegetated layer, a mulch layer, several layers of sand, soil, an organic media filter bed, an overflow, and an optional underdrain (figure 2). A small pretreatment basin known as a forebay is created with river rock to trap sediment prior to entering the bioretention cell. Within a cell, runoff is treated by a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes.

• Minimum media depth of 1.5 feet is required; however, increasing to up to 3 feet improves performance. • At least 2 to 4 feet of elevation drop from the top of the cell to groundwater and/or the outlet should be available. • Plants must tolerate dry periods and potential submerged roots for as long as 24 hours. Specific plant lists are available from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (VA-DCR; 2011) and Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE; Andmczyk, Swanson, Fox, et al. 2009).

Bioretention provides both quantity and quality control benefits. It enhances biodiversity by providing natural habitat and can be a beautiful addition to the urban landscape.

Maintenance • Maintenance is similar to garden work.

How Does Bioretention Work?

• Inspect the forebay and mulch/media surfaces in the treatment area to avoid clogging and repair if necessary.

Stormwater storage is provided when water ponds in the cell. The collected stormwater is filtered through different layers of mulch, media, and compost inside the cell. Media, plants, and microorganisms in the soil treat the pollutants carried by the runoff through physical processes like filtration, infiltration, or adsorption and biological processes like biological uptake or microbial decomposition.

• Replace dead plants and replenish mulch layer — recommended annually.

Performance

An underdrain consists of perforated pipe in a gravel layer installed along the bottom of the media filter bed. An upturned outlet promotes periodic anaerobic conditions within a fluctuating water table and facilitates removal of nitrogen. In soils with high infiltration rates, the underdrain can be omitted, thus increasing runoff reduction. Bioretention cells without underdrains should be avoided in commercial and industrial areas to prevent groundwater contamination.

Bioretention can be very effective at reducing runoff and removing pollutants such as excess nutrients from incoming water flow. A typical bioretention cell has a media depth of 1.5 to 2 feet. An annual reduction of 25 percent for total phosphorus, 40 percent for total nitrogen, and 40 percent for runoff can be expected. Improving the media and its depth to 2 to 3 feet and providing a gravel underdrain and other enhancements can improve the estimated annual reductions to 50 percent for total phosphorus, 60 percent for total nitrogen, and 80 percent for runoff (VA-DCR 2011).

Limitations

Expected Cost The installation cost of a bioretention cell is approximately $10,000 for a 900-square-foot cell. The annual maintenance cost is approximately $600 — $350 for mulch and debris removal and $250 for vegetation replacement (Low Impact Development Center 2005).

• Adequate sunlight and irrigation may be required. • Because of the potential of bioretention cells to clog from sediment, installation of bioretention should always wait until upstream areas are stabilized. • Typically limited to 5 percent of a small drainage area (2 acres). For example, for an 18,000-square-foot lot,

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VNLA Newsletter www.ext.vt.edu


Additional Information

Companion Virginia Cooperative Extension Publications

The Virginia departments of Conservation and Recreation (VA-DCR) and Environmental Quality (VADEQ) are the two state agencies that address nonpoint source pollution. The VA-DCR oversees agricultural conservation; VA-DEQ regulates stormwater through the Virginia Stormwater Management Program.

Andruczyk, M., L. Swanson, L. Fox, S. French, and T. Gilland. 2009. Urban Water Quality Management: Rain Garden Plants. VCE Publication 426-043. Daniels, W., G. Evanylo, L. Fox, K. Haering, S. Hodges, R. Maguire, D. Sample, et al. 2011. Urban Nutrient Management Handbook. Edited by J. M. Goatley. VCE Publication 430-350.

Additional information on best management practices can be found at the Virginia Stormwater BMP Clearinghouse website at http://vwrrc.vt.edu/swc. The BMP Clearinghouse is jointly administered by the VA-DEQ and the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, which has an oversight committee called the Virginia Stormwater BMP Clearinghouse Committee. Committee members represent various stakeholder groups involved with stormwater management.

Gilland, T., Fox, L., Andruczyk, M., French, S., and Swanson, L. 2009. Urban Water Quality Management: What Is a Watershed? VCE Publication 426-041.

Acknowledgements The authors would like to express appreciation for the review and comments provided by the following individuals: Brian Benham, associate professor, Virginia Tech; Jon Hathaway, water resources engineer, Biohabitats Inc.; Thomas Bolles, environmental educator, Virginia Tech; and Adria Bordas, Extension agent, Virginia Tech.

Online Resources Chesapeake Stormwater Network – http://chesapeakestormwater.net/all-things-stormwater/ bioretention-design-specification.html King County (Washington) Road Services – http://kingcounty.gov/transportation/kcdot/Roads/ Environment/LowImpactDevelopment_MilitaryRd/ BioRetentionFacilityRainGarden.aspx

References Andruczyk, M., L. Swanson, L. Fox, S. French, and T. Gilland. 2009. Urban Water Quality Management: Rain Garden Plants. VCE Publication 426-043. http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/426/426-043/426-043.html.

Low Impact Development Center – http://lid-stormwater. net/index.html and http://lowimpactdevelopment.org/ ffxcty/1-1_bioretentionbasin_draft.pdf North Carolina State University, Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Stormwater Group – http://bae.ncsu.edu/topic/bioretention/design. html

Low Impact Development Center. 2005. LID BMP Fact Sheet: Fairfax County (Virginia) Bioretention Basins. http://lid-stormwater.net/index.html; http://lowimpactdevelopment.org/ffxcty/1-1_bioretentionbasin_draft.pdf.

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection – http://dep.state.pa.us/dep/DEPUTATE/Watermgt/wsm/ WSM_TAO/reuse/V-B-2-Zeigler/Rain_Garden.html

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (VA-DCR). 2011. Virginia DCR Stormwater Design Specification No. 9: Bioretention, Version 1.9. http://vwrrc.vt.edu/swc/nonPBMPSpecsMarch11/ DCR%20BMP%20Spec%20No%209_BIORETENTION_FinalDraft_v1-9_03012011.pdf

Prince George’s County (Maryland) – http://princegeorgescountymd.gov/der/esg/bioretention/ bioretention.asp U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – http://epa.gov/owm/mtb/biortn.pdf and http://cfpub. epa.gov/npdes/stormwater/menuofbmps/index. cfm?action=factsheet_results&view=specific&bmp=72

Virginia Department of Forestry. 2008. Rain Gardens Technical Guide: A Landscape Tool to Improve Water Quality. http://dof.virginia. gov/mgt/resources/pub-Rain-Garden-TechGuide_2008-05.pdf.

Virginia Stormwater BMP Clearinghouse – http://vwrrc.vt.edu/swc/

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Glossary of Terms

Habitat – The environment where organisms, like plants, normally live.

Adsorption – A process by which dissolved compounds separate from the liquid phase and become physically or chemically bound to solid materials and are removed via treatment.

Impervious surface – A hard surface that does not allow infiltration of rainfall into it; not pervious. Infiltration – The process by which water (surface water, rainfall, or runoff) enters the soil.

Anaerobic – Chemical reactions that proceed without the presence of oxygen.

Media, media filter bed, filter bed – The topsoil that supports plant growth. Bioretention media typically has a high sand and low clay content and a low phosphorus content.

Baseflow – The portion of flow in a stream that continues even during extended dry periods. Best management practice – Any treatment practice for urban lands that reduces pollution from stormwater. A BMP can be either a physical structure or a management practice. A similar but different set of BMPs is used to mitigate agricultural runoff.

Microbial decomposition – The breakdown of compounds or organic matters into smaller one with the aid of microorganisms. Mulch – An organic material applied on the surface above the media to protect vegetation and underlying media.

Biodiversity – The number of different species and a measure of the health of the observed system. Biological uptake – The process by which plants absorb nutrients for nourishment and growth.

Nutrients – Substances that are required for growth of all biological organisms. When considering water quality, the nutrients of most concern in stormwater are nitrogen and phosphorus. Excessive amounts of these substances are pollution and can cause algal blooms and dead zones to occur in streams and estuaries.

Bioretention, bioretention cells – A best management practice that is a shallow, landscaped depression that receives and treats stormwater with the goal of discharging water of a quality and quantity similar to that of a forested watershed. Bioretention cells typically consist of vegetation, soils, an optional underdrain, and an outlet.

Outlet – The point of exit of water from a downspout or other BMP.

Compost – Vegetative or organic matter that has been allowed to fully decompose, leaving a rich, organic medium that can be mixed with soils.

Pervious – A ground surface that is porous and allows infiltration. Sediment – Soil, rock, or biological material particles that are formed by weathering, decomposition, and erosion. In water environments, sediment is transported across a watershed via streams.

Erosion – the movement of soils and rock through weathering from water and wind Filtration – A process by which solids are separated from fluids by use of media.

Stormwater – Water that originates from impervious surfaces during rain events, often associated with urban areas; also called “runoff.”

Forebay – A small basin within a best management practice that removes sediment by settling prior to other treatment processes, thus protecting those processes from excess sediment and potential clogging.

Stormwater treatment practice – A type of best management practice that is structural and reduces pollution in the water that runs through it.

Groundwater contamination – The presence of unwanted chemical compounds in groundwater. In this case, we would normally be referring to dissolved nitrogen compounds, such as nitrates.

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Underdrain – A perforated pipe in the bottom of a bioretention cell designed to collect water that does not infiltrate native soils.

Arpil / May / June 2016

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VNLA Newsletter www.ext.vt.edu


Publication 426-132

Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 13:

Constructed Wetlands

David J. Sample, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech Chih-Yu Wang, Ph.D. Student, Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech This fact sheet is one of a 15-part series on urban stormwater management practices. Please refer to definitions in the glossary at the end of this fact sheet. Glossary terms are italicized on first mention in the text. For a comprehensive list, see “Urban Stormwater: Terms and Definitions,” Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) publication 426-119.

What Is a Constructed Wetland? A constructed wetland (CW) is a low-cost and sustainable, engineered, best management practice (BMP) designed to reduce stormwater pollution. Constructed wetlands are considered to be one of the most reliable stormwater treatment practices. They are designed to function similarly to a self-sustaining natural wetland, and should require only moderate maintenance to function (figure 1).

Where Can Constructed Wetlands Be Used? An adequate, consistent water supply and the soil texture are two primary considerations when determining where CWs can be located. A constant baseflow from an upstream source is necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for wetland plant growth. Sandy soils should be avoided if possible; otherwise, the wetland may not hold water. Soils in a wetland must be saturated for certain periods during a year. If the soil where the CW is needed is too coarse (i.e., too much sand), an impermeable liner can be used to help it hold water and minimize seepage losses.

How Do Constructed Wetlands Work?

Figure 1. Typical Constructed Wetland.

Photo courtesy of Cully Hession, biological systems engineering, Virginia Tech.

“Water quantity control” is provided by constructed wetlands in the form of storage. This storage is the space that begins at the normal water surface elevation and ends at the top of the dam or control elevation. CWs effectively reduce and retard peak stream flows by acting like a buffer or shock absorber for flows in the stream. “Water quality improvement” in CWs is provided by natural processes, including biological uptake, microbial decomposition, and settling. CWs are most effective at removing excess nutrients and sediment.

Management of stormwater focuses on two objectives: water quantity control and water quality improvement. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2013

VNLAVirginia Newsletter April / May / June 2016 Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, genetic information, marital, family, or veteran

status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Jewel E. Hairston, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. VT/0813/BSE-91P

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Limitations

Nonroutine maintenance (as needed)

• Constructed wetlands are large — about 3 to 5 percent of the watershed that drains to the CW. If land is expensive, this can mean a high treatment cost.

• Remove excess accumulated sediment (see above). • Control invasive species and thin woody growth to keep vegetation manageable.

• A minimum of 4 inches of hydric soils are needed to support plant growth.

Performance

• May export nutrients when vegetation is not actively growing or is dying back.

Constructed wetlands are effective at removing multiple pollutants from incoming water flow. A typical CW is expected to reduce total phosphorus by 50 percent and total nitrogen by 25 percent.

• Must maintain water levels to limit dry periods to a maximum of 30 days to maintain vegetation. • May raise water temperatures due to long standing time.

In a more advanced design, the constructed wetland is much larger (figure 2). The larger size helps provide a longer residence time. Advanced designs also provide for variable bottom topography, which promotes dense and diverse vegetation and enhances treatment. Advanced CW designs can improve the expected reduction of total phosphorus to 75 percent and of total nitrogen to 55 percent.

• Must consider mosquito control. • Increased infiltration may result in groundwater contamination.

Maintenance

Expected Cost

Routine maintenance (annual)

The use of constructed wetlands is a relatively inexpensive stormwater treatment practice when compared to other alternatives. A very preliminary estimate of the cost of a CW that would provide treatment of 20 to 30 acres is $60,000 to $70,000. This is based on similar projects in the mid-Atlantic region. Annual maintenance cost is estimated to be 3 to 5 percent of the construction cost, or $1,800 to $3,500. The value of land is not included in this analysis.

• Monitor sediment levels. Excess sediment can fill in the CW, harming vegetation and reducing wetland performance. • Monitor and replace wetland plants as needed. • Inspect the CW regularly (e.g., are the inlet and outlet structures functioning and clear of debris?) and repair as needed. • Remove trash and debris.

Figure 2. Sample constructed wetlands plan by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (VA-DCR; 2011).

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Arpil / May / June 2016

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VNLA Newsletter www.ext.vt.edu


Additional Information

cfm and http://epa.gov/owow/wetlands/pdf/Design_ Manual2000.pdf

The Virginia departments of Conservation and Recreation (VA-DCR) and Environmental Quality (VADEQ) are the two state agencies that address nonpoint source pollution. The VA-DCR oversees agricultural conservation; VA-DEQ regulates stormwater through the Virginia Stormwater Management Program.

Virginia Stormwater BMP Clearinghouse – http://vwrrc.vt.edu/swc/

Companion Virginia Cooperative Extension Publications

Additional information on best management practices can be found at the Virginia Stormwater BMP Clearinghouse website at http://vwrrc.vt.edu/swc. The BMP Clearinghouse is jointly administered by the VA-DEQ and the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, which has an oversight committee called the Virginia Stormwater BMP Clearinghouse Committee. Committee members represent various stakeholder groups involved with stormwater management.

Daniels, W., G. Evanylo, L. Fox, K. Haering, S. Hodges, R. Maguire, D. Sample, et al. 2011. Urban Nutrient Management Handbook. Edited by J. M. Goatley. VCE Publication 430-350. Gilland, T., Fox, L., Andruczyk, M., French, S., and Swanson, L. 2009. Urban Water Quality Management: What Is a Watershed? VCE Publication 426-041.

Acknowledgements

Online Resources

The authors would like to express appreciation for the review and comments provided by the following individuals: Brian Benham, associate professor, biological systems engineering, Virginia Tech; Jon Hathaway, Biohabitats Inc.; Thomas Bolles, Extension agent, Virginia Tech; and Adria Bordas, Extension agent, Virginia Tech.

Charles River Watershed Association – www.crwa. org/projects/stormwater/stormwaterBMPs.html ConstructedWetlands.org – www.constructedwetlands. org/cw/index.cfm Metrocouncil.org (Metropolitan Council of Minneapolis) – http://metrocouncil.org/environment/Water/ BMP/CH3_STConstWLSwWetland.pdf

References

National Environmental Services Center – http://nesc. wvu.edu/nsfc/Articles/SFQ/SFQ_f04_PDF/Wetland_ f04.pdf

Stormwater Manager’s Resource Center. 2010. Stormwater Management Fact Sheet: Stormwater Wetland. www.stormwatercenter.net.

Natural Systems International – www.natsys-inc.com/ resources/about-constructed-wetlands/

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (VA-DCR). 2011. Virginia DCR Stormwater Design Specification No.13: Constructed Wetlands, Version 1.9. http://vwrrc.vt.edu/swc/ NonPBMPSpecsMarch11/VASWMBMPSpec13CONSTRUCTEDWETLAND.html.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection – http://state.nj.us/dep/stormwater/bmp_manual2.htm North Carolina State University – http://soil.ncsu.edu/ lockers/Broome_S/vmmiller/stormwater.html

Glossary of Terms

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality – http://deq.state.or.us/wq/stormwater/nwrinfo.htm

Anaerobic – Chemical reactions that proceed without the presence of oxygen.

University of Minnesota Extension – http://extension. umn.edu/distribution/naturalresources/DD7671.html

Baseflow – The portion of flow in a stream that continues even during extended dry periods.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – http://water.epa.gov/type/wetlands/restore/cwetlands.

Best management practice – Any treatment practice for urban lands that reduces pollution from stormwater.

VNLA Newsletter

April / May / June 2016

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www.ext.vt.edu

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Peak stream flows – The highest water flows within a stream during a storm event.

A BMP can be either a physical structure or a management practice. A similar but different set of BMPs is used to mitigate agricultural runoff.

Pervious – A ground surface that is porous and allows infiltration.

Biological uptake – The process by which plants absorb nutrients for nourishment and growth.

Residence time – The average time it takes water to travel through a treatment system such as a CW. Residence time can also be called “detention time.”

Constructed wetland – A wetland that is designed to provide water quality treatment of stormwater. CWs have been used to treat domestic wastewater.

Sediment – Soil, rock, or biological material particles formed by weathering, decomposition, and erosion. In water environments, sediment is transported across a watershed via streams.

Erosion – the movement of soils and rock through weathering from water and wind. Groundwater contamination – The presence of unwanted chemical compounds in groundwater. In this case, we would normally be referring to dissolved nitrogen compounds, such as nitrates.

Seepage – Water that is lost through the bottom of a lake or wetland.

Habitat – The environment where organisms, like plants, normally live.

Settling – The process by which particles that are heavier than water fall to the bottom under the influence of gravity.

Hydric soils – Soils that form under saturated conditions. When saturated conditions exist, anaerobic chemical processes dominate and unique chemical properties develop. A common characteristic of hydric soils is the presence of a rotten-egg-smelling odor, indicating the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas.

Soil texture – Describes the composition of soil based on its particle sizes. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s classification, soils are classified as sands (larger than 0.05 millimeter, or mm), silts (0.002 to 0.05 mm), and clays (smaller than 0.002 mm).

Impervious surface – A hard surface that does not allow infiltration of rainfall into it; not pervious.

Stormwater – Water that originates from impervious surfaces during rain events, often associated with urban areas; also called “runoff.”

Impermeable liner – A material designed to retard seepage from ponds and wetlands. Infiltration – The process by which water (surface water, rainfall, or runoff) enters the soil.

Stormwater treatment practice – A type of BMP that is structural and reduces pollution in the water that runs through it.

Invasive species – Nonnative species that can cause adverse economic or ecological impacts to the environment, usually due to the tendency of these introduced species to dominate local habitats and replace native ecological communities.

Sustainable – The ability of the system to endure and remain productive over a long time. Sustaining – The act of enduring (see “sustainable”).

Microbial decomposition – The breakdown of compounds or organic matters into smaller one with the aid of microorganisms.

Watershed – A unit of land that drains to a single “pour point.” Boundaries are determined by water flowing from higher elevations to the pour point. A pour point is the point of exit from the watershed, or where the water would flow out of the watershed if it were turned on end.

Nutrients – Substances that are required for growth of all biological organisms. When considering water quality, the nutrients of most concern in stormwater are nitrogen and phosphorus. Excessive amounts of these substances are pollution and can cause algal blooms and dead zones to occur in streams and estuaries.

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Wetland – Land that has hydric soil and wetland vegetation and is periodically saturated with water.

Arpil / May / June 2016

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VNLA Newsletter www.ext.vt.edu


VNLA ‐ Certification Quiz # 76  If you are a Virginia Certified Horticulturist, answer the  following questions from the previous article, mark your  answers on the card insert and mail, scan or fax back to  the VNLA office towards your recertification CEU’s for  your Virginia Certified Horticulturist. 

6. A unit of land that drains to a single ‘pour point’ is called a: a. Watershed b. Wetland c. Habitat 7. Once created, a CW needs no maintenance. a. True b. False 8. Another name for a rain garden is: a. Controlled wetland b. Stormwater keep c. Bioretention cell d. All of the above

BMP ‐ Constructed Wetlands &   BMP ‐ Bioretention  Apr/May/June 2016  Prepared by: Nanette R. Whitt  1. A constructed wetland (CW) is: a. Low cost b. Sustainable c. Engineered d. All of the above 2. The movement of soils and rock through weathering from water and wind is called: a. Groundwater contamination b. Settling c. Infiltration d. Erosion 3. The estimated cost of a constructed wetland for 20 to 30 acres is: a. $40,000 - $50,000 b. $50,000 - $60,000 c. $60,000 - $70,000 4. A constant _______ from an upstream source is necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for wetland plant growth a. Base flow b. Sandy soil c. Infiltration 5. Soils that form under saturated conditions are known as: a. Impervious surface soils b. Hydric soils c. Sustainable soils d. None of the above

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

9. Bioretention can only be used in commercial areas. a. True b. False 10. The process by which plants absorb nutrients for nourishment and growth is: a. Filtration b. Absorption c. Infiltration d. None of the above 11. Using swales and berms to manage stormwater helps by: a. Filtering water. b. Allowing infiltration of water. c. None of the above. d. All of the above 12. Bioretention cells may require irrigation. a. True b. False 13. Chemical reactions that proceed without the presence of oxygen is called: a. Microbial decomposition b. Anaerobic c. Biological uptake. 14. A process by which dissolved compounds separate from the liquid phase and become physically or chemically bound to solid materials and are removed via treatment is: a. Infiltration b. Filtration c. Adsorption d. None of the above

April/May/June 2016 April / May / June 2016

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Congratulations to these new Virginia Certified Horticulturist! FullName Keith Shanklin Ms Marcia k Atkins Michele D. Duhon Richard Lehman Gary McNutt Sr Clayton Painter Benjamin Pitman James Poyer Emily Rothrock Tom Stabel Lynn Tertychny Jesse Schwertner Corey Black Jill Pinner Matthew Coughlin Casey Landa Ray Mann Sara Rutherford Josh Barbe Kyle Johnston Samuel Gaddy Casin Whitehead Wayne George Michelle Albert Matt Ray Melanie Kearney Ben Duke Zeke Galvin Darren Marsh Brian Montgomery Avery Ellis Cory Hash Jeffrey C Miller Kathryn Hume Brian S Simmons Jeff Miller Jordan Miller Elise Benhase Chris Brown

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CompanyName Arborscapes LLC Associate - Atkins Associate - Duhon Associate - Lehman Associate - McNutt Associate - Painter Associate - Pitman Associate - Poyer Associate - Rothrock Associate - Stabel Associate - Tertychny Barrett's Horticultural Services Bennett's Creek Nursery Bennett's Creek Nursery Blake Landscapes Co Boulevard Flower Gardens Boulevard Flower Gardens Boulevard Flower Gardens BWS Landscaping BWS Landscaping Colesville Nursery Inc Colesville Nursery Inc Custom Gardens Inc Enchanted Forest Nursery Enchanted Forest Nursery Gentle Gardener Green Design Glen Allen Nursery & Garden Center Grelen Nursery Inc Grelen Nursery Inc Grelen Nursery Inc JW Townsend Inc JW Townsend Inc JW Townsend Inc KHL Landscape Design Landcare Landworks Unlimited Landworks Unlimited Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

Arpil / May / June 2016

City Powhatan Mechanicsville Hampton Richmond Gum Spring Ashburn Vienna Mechanicsville Virginia Beach Knotts Island Yorktown Front Royal Smithfield Smithfield Leesburg Colonial Heights Colonial Heights Colonial Heights Richmond Richmond Ashland Ashland Gloucester Chesapeake Chesapeake Ruckersville Richmond Nasons Nasons Nasons Charlottesville Schuyler Scottsville Fredericksburg Ashland Chesapeake Chesapeake Richmond Richmond

State VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA NC VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA

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Chelsea Mahaffey Michael Partusch Kelyn Holcomb Susan Rhodes Cynthia Bates Andrew Johnson Heather Wilson Edward DuVarney Alexandra Cantwell Joelle Miller Clarke Hume Danny Good Steven Sippert Robert Whitton Javier Amaya Jennifer Chadwick Rusty Branch Miles Shifflett Alysha Lawless Elizabeth Wilson Emily White John Bransford Eddie Kimball Anne Lacey Ben Casteel Scott Ryan Sistrunk Mr. Jerry Zsoldos Brett Weiss Margaret Miley Jim Licklider Scott Turner Elizabeth Lucas Alicia Nester Christa Bush Leigh M. Pickering

VNLA Newsletter

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Manchester Gardening LLC McDonald Garden Center Inc McDonald Garden Center Inc Merrifield - Gainesville Merrifield - Gainesville Merrifield - Gainesville Merrifield Garden Center Corp Norfolk Botanical Garden Norfolk Botanical Garden Persnickity Gardens Providence Lawn & Landscape Inc Providence Lawn & Landscape Inc Providence Lawn & Landscape Inc Robbins Landscaping Inc Robbins Landscaping Inc. RSG Landscaping & Lawn Care Inc RSG Landscaping & Lawn Care Inc Scholarship Scholarship Winner Shipp & Wilson Inc Strange's Strange's Strange's Student - Casteel Student - Tidewater Community College Student - Tidewater Community College Student - Weis Surrounds Inc Truetimber Tree Svc. Inc Truetimber Tree Svc. Inc VT Senior VT Senior VT Student - Bush Washington Golf & Country Club

April / May / June 2016

Richmond Richmond Virginia Beach Norfolk Montclair Gainesville Gainesville Merrifield Norfolk Norfolk Virginia Beach Manassas Manassas Manassas Colonial Heights Colonial Heights Concord Concord Martinsville Axton Mechanicsville Richmond Richmond Richmond Abingdon Norfolk Grafton Richmond Sterling Richmond Richmond Louisa Meadows Of Dan Broad Run Arlington

VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA VA

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Workshop: Designing Plant Communities that Workshop: Designing Plant Communities that Stand the Test of Time Stand of Time by Claudiathe West Test with hands-on design by Claudia West with hands-on design

Wednesday, August 10, 1-5 pm

Wednesday, August 10, 1-5 pm

Location: Spotswood Lodge, Orange, VA near Grelen Nursery Location: Spotswood Lodge, Orange, VA near Grelen Nursery Description: Join us as we dig deeper into the art and science of successful planting design. This Description: Join ustoastraditional we dig deeper intoand thewill art and of successful planting This interactive workshop teaches an alternative planting takescience the mystery out of good plantdesign. combination. interactive workshop an alternative to traditional planting andfor will take the mystery needs. out of good plant combination. You will learn how toteaches create beautiful and lasting plant communities modern landscape Several hands-on design You will learn howyou to create beautiful and lastingnewly plant acquired communities for modern landscape needs. skills Several exercises will give the opportunity to refine planting design and management so hands-on you can design exercises willapply give them you the opportunityprojects. to refine newly acquired planting design and management skills so you can successfully to upcoming successfully apply them to upcoming projects. Learning objectives: Learning objectives:

     

Understand scientific foundation of stable plant communities and learn how species fill ecological and Understand scientific foundation of stable plant communities and learn how species fill ecological and spatial niches in successful planting spatial niches in successful planting Learn how to translate the principles of wild plant communities into designed planting, visualize complex Learn how to translate the principles of wild plantfor communities into designed planting, visualize complex planting schemes, and prepare installation guides landscape crews planting schemes, and prepare installation guides for landscape crews Create adaptive management plans for designed plant communities based on common maintenance Create plans for designed plant communities based on common maintenance budgetsadaptive and skillmanagement levels budgets and skill levels

The 4-hour workshop will give everyone an opportunity to draw designs, sort plants into categories, and discuss results with The workshop will give everyone an opportunity to draw designs, sort plants into categories, and discuss results with other4-hour attendees. other attendees. Attendance will be limited to no more than 25 people to make sure everyone gets the opportunity to draw designs and the Attendance will be limited no more than 25 people to all make sure everyone opportunity to draw designs and the workshop is as interactive asto possible. Claudia will supply drawing materialsgets and the simply ask attendees to bring their workshop is asand interactive as possible. Claudia will VNLA supply all simply to bring their favorite pens markers for the design exercises. anddrawing VSLD materials membersand $149 ($249ask forattendees non-members) favorite pens and markers for the design exercises. VNLA and VSLD members $149 ($249 for non-members)

Growing aa Healthy Healthy Business Business EcoSystem EcoSystem Growing GrowinG a HealtHy Business ecosystem VNLA 2016 FieldDay Day VNLA2016 2016Field Field Day VNLA

At the Market at Grelen At The MarketNursery at Grelen on Grelen on Grelen Nursery At The Market at Grelen on Grelen Nursery 4 CEUs 4 CEUWorkshop W s

orkshop

4 CEUs 4 CEUsField FiEld Day day 2 CEUs 2 CEUsTour ToUr

(Schedule subject to change)

Thursday, August 11 Thursday, August 11 Thursday, August 11

8:30 am - 4 pm - Registration Open 8:30 am - 4 pm - Registration Open 9:00 am-3:00 pm -Plant ID Quiz & Earn CEU’s! 9:00 am-3:00 pm -Plant ID Quiz Choose Speaker & EarnSessions CEU’s! or Tours 9Choose am-10:00Speaker –Tour Grelen Nursery Sessions or Choose Speaker Sessions orTours Tours OR “Are You OSHA Legal?” 9 am-10:00 –Tour Grelen Nursery (Brandon Takacs) OR “Are OSHA Legal?” 10:00-10:30 am – You Network with Exhibitors (Brandon Takacs) 10:30-11:30 am – Tour Grelen Nursery 10:00-10:30 am – Network with Exhibitors OR – “Industry Panel – State of the Bay: 10:30-11:30 am – Tour Grelen Nursery Views from the Hills” - Dr. Jim Owen, moderator ORpm – “Industry State of the Bay: 11:30-12:00 - NetworkPanel with –Exhibitors Views from the Hills” - Dr. Jim Owen, moderator 12:00-1:30 pm - Box Lunch under the Tent 11:30-12:00 pm - Network with Exhibitors 1:30–2:30 pm - Tour Grelen Nursery 12:00-1:30 pm - Nutrient Box Lunch under the Tent OR Urban Management – 1:30–2:30 pmin - Tour Grelen Nursery Are you Compliance?” (Derik Cataldi, OR – DCRUrban UrbanNutrient Nutrient Management Management Specialist) Are you in Compliance?” (Derik Cataldi, 2:30-3:30 pm - “How to get Your Client to DCR Urban Nutrient Management Specialist) Commit!” 2:30-3:30 pm - “How to get Your Client toand Commit!” - (David Marciniak, DescribeIT - (David Marciniak, DescribeIT and Revolutionary Garden

p3_fd_schedule_claudiawest_datecentered.docxp3_FD_Schedule_ClaudiaWest_DateCentered.docx p3_fd_schedule_claudiawest.docxp3_FD_Schedule_ClaudiaWest.docx

(schedule subject to change)


Field day speaker inFo Field Day Speaker Info

Urban Nutrient Management - Are You in Compliance?

Are You OSHA Are OSHALegal? Legal?

(Derik Cataldi, DCR Urban Nutrient Management Specialist) A quick review of the current regulations, points of contacts for participants and how DCR’s Nutrient Management Program and the thoughts behind verifying nutrient management as a practice.

In DCR’s Nutrient Management Program there are two categories; agricultural and urban, centered around using proper nutrient management techniques to minimize nutrient loss to the environment, while still maintaining or establishing quality turfgrass and landscape plants. He is responsible for conducting training and developing exams Virginia certified nutriPhoto by Virginia Rockwell, ent management plan writers, Glendale Farm as well as being responsible for tracking and expanding the amount of planned urban nutrient management acreage that will be entered into the Chesapeake Bay Model to help meet Virginia’s Watershed Implementation Plan goals.

How to get Your Client to Commit!

Why won’t they say yes? Understanding what your buyers are looking for! (David Marciniak, DescribeIT and Revolutionary Gardens

Isn’t it frustrating when you know that you’re the best fit for what a prospect wants to do and you just can’t seem to get traction in the sales process? We’re here to act as trusted consultants to our clients – landscape Sherpas, if you will. I’ll talk about some of the most common psychological principles that drive buyer behavior and how we can use them for good (not evil). We’ll then talk about understanding our market through creating detailed buyer personas. For the last portion of the talk, we’ll open the floor to questions as well as some fun sales role playing.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has identified the landscape industry as a "high hazard industry" based on injury, illness, and fatality data. The OSHTAC program includes “Hazard Identification and Control Training for Landscape and Horticultural Service Workers” and provides face-to-face, worker and employer training. The VNLA has provided letters of support for OSHA Susan Harwood Training Grant applications to fund programs on Landscaper Safety

State of the Bay: Views from the Hills

Industry Panel – Dr. Jim Owen, moderator Leaders from the Nursery, Landscape, Education, Policy, and Best Practices will be Photo by Michele Fletcher discussing how the industry is rePhoto by Michele Fletcher sponding to efforts for improving the Bay. What are the opportunities for the Green Industry? Where is the industry headed when it comes to issues related to protecting the Bay? There is a growing demand in the industry for companies that can cater to clients that are concerned about the Bay. This will be a great discussion and shouldn’t be missed!


About the Nursery Grelen tHe GGrelen relen n ursery & & The tHe Market marketatat Grelen aBout

“The Must-See” Integrated Industry Business!” Grelen Nursery is a 600-acre tree nursery with tens of thousands of trees and shrubs. They sell plant material (retail and wholesale) and offer landscaping, hardscaping and tree care services. On the property there is a retail Garden shop, called The Market at Grelen, which also offers a casual cafe, an event venue, PYO and 3.9 miles of walking trails! With seven crews, two large tree spade trucks to transplant mature trees and a team of master stonemasons, craftsmen and gardeners, Grelen Nursery caters to clients who demand, and receive, the highest quality products and services.

In 1990, Dan Gregg founded Grelen Nursery, Inc. on a corner of a cattle farm owned by his family for three generations. The operation commenced as a wholesale field nursery; however, over the years, local demand grew to such a great extent that Gregg shifted the focus to retail sales and landscape installation and in 1997, hired Zeke Galvin as a partner to manage the landscaping business. As the demand for Grelen’s trees and services grew, Gregg and Galvin realized a need to expand its operation, and in 2003, purchased a 200-acre farm located in Somerset, Virginia. Approximately four years later, the operations of the nursery were moved to the Somerset farm, which provided the much-needed space for the growing business. During the past five years, Grelen has acquired two adjoining properties. Today, Grelen Nursery is one of the largest agricultural businesses in Orange County and one of the largest tree nurseries in the state of Virginia. The farm is almost 600 acres in size offering hundreds of types of trees, shrubs and plants and a full range of landscaping, hardscaping and maintenance services.

In 2013, Grelen added The Market at Grelen. Dan believes that "This is a wonderful community, full of beauty, history and opportunity. The local economy has changed, and manufacturing type industries are no longer the bedrock, or the future, of our economy. I believe agriculture and tourism will play a much more vital role in Virginia’s economic battle to be sustainable. With Grelen Nursery, I want to combine the two into a potent local economic engine. I want to do my part as a citizen and business owner to bring as much to the community’s economic table as possible. I want to keep my land agricultural and protect its open space. I want to prove that agribusinesses can be sustainable and economically viable, and that agriculture can actually stimulate tourism and, in turn, stimulate the local economy.” Up for a hike, The Market at Grelen even boasts an extensive trail!


Thursday Evening, August 11 Dinner and Concert at The Market at Grelen A seasonal, grilled dinner buffet using Grelen grown $30, includes one free drink ticket Live music by local bluegrass musicians Alex Caton and Pat Egan Virginia Beer, Wine, and Hard Cider available for purchase Transportation to and from the Market at Grelen on your own

VNLA Summer Tour –Friday, August 12 7:45 am Bus Departs for Tours 4:00 pm Arrive Back at the Hotel SPECIAL NOTE: The Summer Tour will start Friday morning with the bus leaving from the Holiday Inn Express, Orange, VA

Glendale Farms Contemporary Meditation Garden at 20 Owner: Glendale Farms LLC, LLC, Virginia Rockwell; Timber and Timber and Beef Cattle Farm Beef CattlebyFarm conserved by conserved easement donated easement donated to Virginia to Virginia Outdoors Foundation; Outdoors Foundation; Landscape Design: Virginia Landscape Design: Virginia Rockwell, VSLD, VSLD, VCH, VCH, RI•CH, RI•CH, Rockwell, Gentle Gardener Green Design, Gentle Gardener Green 19961996 Design,

Inspired by a ‘cosmic tree’ 80’ canopy Nyssa sylvatica, and clients who wanted a home and garden that complemented, rather than dominated, the Piedmont landscape, Roger Birle, AIA drew the curves of the home’s walls from Glendale’s topography. Virginia Rockwell, VSLD, VCH united the home and trees with a meditation walk that echoes the gum tree’s size, and placed a small compass garden where an 1850’s frame home once stood amid rows of boxwood and outbuildings. A meditation bench made from an old stone chimney gives a place to pause on your journey through the garden. At

20,

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garden

p6+7_SummerTour.docxx

If you are staying at another location or driving in for the day, you will be required to ride the bus Friday as all tour stops have limited access. You may park at the Holiday Inn Express during the tour. evolves toward Piedmont nativePiedmont plants tonative reAt 20, the gardenmore evolves toward more place nonnative (and in some invasive) plantsmature to replace mature nonnative (and cases in some cases inshrubs trees, including blueberries, figs and vasive) and shrubs andedibles trees, edibles including blueberries, figs straw bale gardens, native/naturalized low input and straw bale gardens, native/naturalized low fine inputfesfine cue turfgrass, andand a mown labyrinth forfor more meditative fescue turfgrass, a mown labyrinth more meditative journeys through the the landscape. landscape. The garden on on tourstours including the in-the gardenhas hasbeen beenfeatured featured including ternational conference and tour of the Association international conference and tour of the Associationforfor Professional Designers (APLD.org), The DelProfessionalLandscape Landscape Designers (APLD.org), The aware Center for Horticulture, and The Society Delaware Center for Horticulture, andVirginia the Virginia Soof Landscape Designers (VSLD.org). ciety of Landscape Designers (VSLD.org).

“The Hill”

Tim Hess – designer and Chad Lohr- installation manager, Lee Highway Nursery. The Hill is a rustic mountain top log cabin residence that added on a large guest house and garage last summer. The garden opens up to magnificent views of the blue ridge mountains. The site had many challenges including removal of a large monolith of limestone to accommodate the engineered retaining wall and parking pad. The garden and guest house provide a tranquil space for the homeowners and guests to sit in the evenings and enjoy sunsets and the peaceful mountain top setting. The incorporation of both natural and man-made materials help to soften the engineered aspect of building on a very challenging site. Turf stone permeable pavement paths and techo bloc walks and steps provide hardscape contrast to the rustic landscape plantings.


Traditional home – Italian Inspired Villa

Scott Price Design; Residence of Bill and Pat Price.

A transitional house with a pool house garden shed and greenhouse in the owners’ complex situated on a working Madison county farm. The gardens include a formal boxwood garden, a large vegetable garden using straw bale growing techniques, a pergola to divide gardens, extensive stone walls and paving. Recently the dated pool was removed and is being replaced with a water feature for the dogs to cool off in (they were the primary users of the old pool), a sunken entertaining space with seating walls. A fire pit level and a barbecue shack with build in kitchen. The owner also uses extensive container gardens to create venues and garden rooms. The farm name of the villa in Madison is Monte Ventoso (windy mountain) It is the home of Jennifer Price.

The adjoining farm is Arrowhead Farm. The home of Bill and Pat Price, the landscape is now under construction, but the job will be completed by July 4.

Early Mountain Vineyards – Madison Vineyard, event spaces - design by Jessica Primm and installation by Lee Highway Nursery In 2011, when new owners acquired what is now Early Mountain Vineyard, planning was begun to create a landscape that would unify and soften the buildings and site. Plantings were chosen to create a welcoming and relaxed feel that speak to the beauty of the surrounding landscape. By spring of 2012, the installation of a 5,300 square foot flower meadow was begun at the Tasting Facility entrance using 1000 plugs of native and non-native perennials and

several thousand spring blooming bulbs. Baptisia, Allium, Catmint, Beebalm, Coneflowers, Butterfly Weed, Switchgrass, Phlox, Asters and Goldenrods provide interest 12 months out the year as dormant foliage is allowed to remain throughout the winter months until Daffodils emerge in late February. Stone columns, black fencing, and an apple orchard were added later that year to bring much needed attention to the entrance and drive. The wedding terrace to the right of the tasting facility was completed in spring of 2014. Bulb s, perennials, and shrubs that bloom in hues of white and purple surround a 10,000 square foot elliptical lawn that takes advantage of the fantastic views of the surrounding vineyards, Madison County countryside and Early Mountain. Smaller gardens located at the Upper Barn and Cottage incorporate the romantic and relaxed feel of their grander counterparts located at the winery proper.

Woodberry Forest School

Woodberry Forest School, near our hotel just north of the Rapidan River, and along the route of the “Journey through Hallowed Ground” was founded in 1889 on a central Virginia farm originally owned by the family of President James Madison. Today the stunning 1200-acre campus attracts students from all over the nation and around the world. The scope of grounds management goes beyond the many immaculate turf sports fields to include care of trees in the park-like setting, a golf course, grounds for academic buildings, both classic and state-of-the-art, hardscapes, commons and gardens near faculty residences.


Directions to Holiday Inn Express Orange

Directions to Grelen Nursery from Holiday Inn Express Orange

450 Round Hill Dr, Orange, VA 22960

Hotel Accommodations Boasting serene views of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains, the hotel provides you with gorgeous surroundings Business center, outdoor pool, Free Wi-Fi Internet access, available throughout the hotel.

Ask for the “Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association” special rate of $77.36/room

Make your own reservations at: 1-540-672-6691 http://bit.ly/1osa6lQ Code:EG2 RESERVATION CUTOFF: July 22

15 minutes – 8 miles from Holiday Inn Orange

Additional directions, details and updated information available on the VNLA website at http://www.vnla.org

(As available after this date)

The Market At Grelen The Market at Grelen is a unique destination that offers a wide variety of services, including: a casual cafe, garden shop, workshops & events, pick-your-own fruit, and much more. Our Garden Shop has a wonderful selection of plants and is fully equipped with the materials you need to handle your next gardening project. Make a day of it and enjoy a delicious lunch in Grelen's Casual Cafe Grelen Trails - Now designated a Virginia Treasure, Grelen has over 3.9 miles of trails to discover! Whether you're looking for a full day excursion, or a light stroll after lunch, we highly recommend you save time for a hike. A View From Above https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wC9l5fpUNLI

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2016 Field Day

2016 Field Day and Summer Tour

and

Summer Tour

Pre-Registration Pre-Registration for All Events for All Events

Company Name: Address: City:

State:

Cell Phone:

Zip code:

Email: Wednesday August 10

(VSLD members get VNLA Member rates)

(page 3)

Thursday August 11

Enter fees for each event you are registering for in the appropriate box(s)

Designing Plant Communities Workshop 1-5 pm

Casual Networking Reception Local Restaurant 5:30-7 pm

Qualifying CEUs

4 CEU

Networking

4 CEU

Print Name(s) of Person(s) Registering

$149 Members non-Members $249

On Your Own ďƒž check if participating

$60 Members Non-Member $85



Copy form for additional persons registering

(Pages 3,4,5)

Field Day at Grelen Nursery

Friday August 12

Buffet Dinner and Music on the patio at The Market at Grelen

(page 6)

Tour of Private Gardens

Vineyard Lunch

& wine tasting 2 CEU

$30 (includes buffet dinner and 1 drink ticket and entertainment)

**Does NOT include overnight accommodations, make reservations at the Holiday Inn Express Hotel at 1-540-672-6691 ; $77.36/night

$97 Members Non-Member $117

Total $$ Due

Total Due

__ I have special food, lodging or transportation requirements: Make check payable to: VNLA Field Day

Check #

Charge to Credit Card #: ____ VISA

Expires: _____ MasterCard

_____ Am Express

Save Time and $$$ Pre-Register TODAY!

Signature: Mail to: VNLA Field Day

383 Coal Hollow Rd Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721

Questions? Call 1-800-476-0055

Security # on back:

Or Email:

fieldday@vnla.org

By July 22 On-site Registration is $10 more per person per event


it is a distinct species as determined from genetic testing. Its name has been some source of debate that has now been settled. As of January 13, 2016 it is Oplismenus undulatifolius (Ard.) P. Beauv.

Tips - Let’s Wave this Goodbye: An update on Wavyleaf Basketgrass

Wavyleaf Basketgrass, photo credit: http://www.mdinvasivesp.org/

An article in the Virginia Forest Landowner Update newsletter (Spring 2014. V. 28 No.2) exposed this plant to Virginia landowners. Since then we’ve learned a few things. It is not, as previously thought, an escaped plant from a living basket arrangement. While there are some similarities,

Seed & dispersal methods: 1. It makes lots of seed…. Upwards of 6000 seed/m2. 2. Germination rates range from 15 to nearly 90%. 3. Humans disperse the sticky seed, more so with fleece and denim than nylon or twill. 4. Deer and dogs also disperse the sticky seed that can stay stuck for hours or days. 5. Seed viability is not known at this time. Basically nothing eats it and a few insects such as cockroaches, rove beetles and ground beetles, live amongst it. It is very competitive in shade and partial‐shade environments.

Control options: While more data is needed, preliminary results suggest the following recommendations from the DCR: 

Before seed‐set, control small patches by hand pulling.

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  

Before seed‐set, control larger areas with either glyphosate, a broad‐spectrum herbicide that affects all plant species, or clethodim, a grass‐specific herbicide. Do not apply control treatments to wavyleaf grass on property you do not own or are not legally authorized to manage. Care should be taken to avoid contact with plants that have set seed. If this is unavoidable, use duct tape to remove all seed that sticks to clothing, shoes or gloves. Keep pets away from the sticky seeds.

Several years of control will be required to deplete the seed bank. There are currently 42 known locations of this nasty thing in the following counties: 

Albemarle, Clarke, Fairfax, Fauquier, Greene, Madison, Page, Rockingham and Warren. Most of these have been found on public lands where resource professionals are intentionally looking. Recent finds by private landowners suggest the presence may be significantly greater. FOR THIS REASON, we are asking every landowner to look and we hope you don't find it. To learn how to identify this plant, visit Towson University's website: heron.towson.edu/wavyleaf. Report findings of this species directly to Kevin Heffernan. Thanks for your help! By: Adam Downing, Virginia Cooperative Extension, adowning@vt.edu , and Kevin Heffernan, Department of Conservation & Recreation, kevin.heffernan@dcr.virginia.gov

News - Boxwood Blight infects Woodrow Wilson gardens STAUNTON - Boxwood blight, a fungal disease that wreaks havoc on the shrub, has closed a portion of the historic Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library gardens as officials prepare for the removal of the 83-year-old plants. “They were planted in 1933 and they are all over the back of our site,” said Robin von Seldeneck, CEO for the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Foundation. “It’s one of those heartbreaking things -this is Staunton’s garden.” Long before Wilson’s birthplace became a foundation, the boxwoods which weave an intricate looking maze on the grounds, were featured as backdrops to garden parties and weddings.

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Landscape architect Charles F. Gillette designed the gardens in 1933 as a Victorian restoration project by The Garden Club of Virginia. The garden is one of 13 historic gardens designated and maintained by club. In the next few weeks, the foundation hopes to have the plants in the lower garden area wrapped in plastic, dug up, taken to a landfill and burned. Then the ground where the boxwood grew will have to be torched. The disease spreads through the movement of contaminated material including containers, pruning tools, clothing and even a leaf blowing off a boxwood being hauled to the dump for disposal according to the Virginia Cooperative Extension. The boxwood in the lower garden area are of an English variety, Von Seldeneck said, and are more susceptible to the disease, but a few of the American varieties in the upper garden area have been spared - for now. “A lot of people have the disease and they don’t know it,” Von Seldeneck said. “They pull it out and take it to the landfill, not knowing they are spreading it.” Von Seldeneck said the foundation hopes to raise awareness about the disease to help stop the blight. “We are always trying to find the good in the bad, and we thought this would be a great way to educate our community about this disease,” she said. A sign marks the gardens closed at Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Museum on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. The gardens have been closed until the boxwood shrubs, infected with boxwood blight, can be carefully and safely removed. (Photo: Mike Tripp/The News Leader) The lower gardens where hundreds of the shrubs grow has been closed to the public since late October, Von Seldeneck said. Because specialized procedures are required to remove the boxwood, Von Seldeneck said the cost of the project is estimated at more than $50, 0. Some operating funds will be used to cover the cost, but the foundation is planning to have fundraisers to help offset the cost of the project. Landscape architect William Rieley, of Charlottesville, will then be tasked to with the new garden’s design. “We will be looking to him for the planning and the garden’s future,” Von Seldeneck said. “If people are seeing anything going on with their boxwood, they need to get it checked out immediately. They need to know that you have to take proper precautions to help stop the disease from spreading.” Mike Tripp/The News Leader, Traci Moyer, tmoyer@newsleader.com February 4, 2016

Note: Boxwood Blight has been confirmed in multiple commercial and residential landscapes in Georgia as of 5/17/16.

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News - Pollinator Garden Point-of-Purchase Materials Communicator Toolkit Provides Additional Industry Resources

tor P.O.P. materials can be an effective addition to industry retailers’ promotions toolkit, while simultaneously promoting an important and global cause.” Signs, bench cards, and plant tags are all available as printon-demand items through a special partnership developed between the Challenge’s founders and Garden Center Marketing, a company owned and operated by Timothy Howard.

WASHINGTON and COLUMBUS, OH March 2, 2016 - The Horticultural Research Institute, the research affiliate of AmericanHort, is pleased to announce the creation of new ESN-117 10:21of AMVirginia Page 1 AdBiggestNur/4.5x7.25 - Eastern Shore8/30/04 Nursery point-of-purchase materials designed for garden retail display. The signage promotes the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, a national movement to plant more forage habitat for pollinators throughout North America. The materials carry a simple message for consumers: plant something to support pollinators, and register your garden at www.MillionPollinatorGardens.org. Making customers feel good about their purchases has a powerful effect on buying decisions. Research shows that cause marketing not only catches the attention of shoppers, it encourages purchasing and turns customers into advocates for your business. Pollinator health is an increasingly important cause for consumers in all demographics. Garden retailers have been looking for ways to create awareness and showcase the important role horticulture plays in pollinator health. The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge does the work to drive engagement with customers and inspire them to take action. The pollinator point-of-purchase materials open doors to meaningful conversations with the gardening public. By encouraging consumers to “help us reach one million gardens” by planting and then registering their gardens, retailers have the opportunity to influence purchasing habits and connect their customers to a movement that benefits the environment-something the horticultural community has long strived to do. “Information and signage addressing horticulture’s role in supporting pollinator health solutions are important,” says Craig Regelbrugge, senior vice president of industry advocacy and research for AmericanHort. “It’s for this reason that we developed point-of-purchase materials to communicate with, educate, and motivate retail customers. These pollinaVNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

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“It’s great to work with AmericanHort, HRI and the other partners of the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge project,” states Howard. “We know good signage sells more plants. Combining great signs and a great program can only help garden centers sell more pollinator friendly plants.” The pollinator P.O.P. materials may be viewed and ordered directly through the Garden Center Marketing website at www.gardencentermarketing.com/page/Pollinator-GardenChallenge-Signage. Additional marketing materials, including a communications toolkit and social media graphics to further support retailer efforts are available via HRI’s pollinator research website: www.growwise.org/ChallengeToolkit . About the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge (MPGC), millionpollinatorgardens.org, is a nationwide call to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. We are encouraging millions of individuals, kids and families outdoors and make a connection between flowering plants, pollinators, and the healthy food people eat. The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge was launched by The National Pollinator Garden Network, a collaboration of stakeholders from horticulture business, garden, pollinator, and conservation communities working together to support the health of pollinating animals.

About Clarity Connect and GardenCenterMarkeing.com For 15 years Clarity Connect has provided marketing services and products for the horticulture industry. In 2012 the www.GardenCenterMarketing.com division was created to help garden centers sell more plants. Now garden centers have a full range of signage solutions including customizable bench cards, pot labels and hang tags. Hundreds of large signs for plant groupings like Sun Loving, Deer Resistant, Perennials and more are complemented by sign holders, custom signage and websites with plant libraries. Learn more at www.GardenCenterMarketing.com .

About Horticultural Research Institute The Horticultural Research Institute (HRI), founded in 1962, has provided more than $7 million in funds to research projects. visit www.hriresearch.org. Jennifer Gray, Research Programs Administrator, Horticultural Research Institute, Columbus, OH, 614-884-1155,

JenniferG@AmericanHort.org

VNLA Newsletter 48

Research - Honey Bee Colony Health Survey Developed as Part of National Pollinator Research Action Plan Gives New Insight into Losses of Managed Bee Colonies WASHINGTON, May 12, 2016 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) released the results of its first ever Honey Bee Colony Loss survey today. The survey queried more than 20,000 honey beekeepers about the number of colonies, colonies lost, colonies added, and colonies affected by certain stressors and gleans state-level estimates on key honey bee health topics. The survey was developed as part of the " National Strategy to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators" released last summer, and gleans state-level estimates on key pollinator health topics. Results from the survey will provide statistically strong baseline information about honey bee losses and can help guide honey bee management decisions in the United States. NASS created the survey questions with input from beekeepers and researchers, and other stakeholders. The results will allow USDA and other federal departments and agencies to create a more unified and complementary approach to implementing the National Strategy, which was unveiled in May 2015. "Pollinators are essential to the production of food, and in the United States, honey bees pollinate an estimated $15 billion of crops each year, ranging from almonds to zucchinis," said Dr. Ann Bartuska, USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics. "This new data will add to USDA's robust scientific body of knowledge on the inventory, movement and death loss of honeybees in the United States." For this report, NASS surveyed 3,300 beekeeping operations with five or more colonies on a quarterly basis, following their operations throughout the year. In addition, NASS surveyed a sample of 20,000 beekeepers who have less than five colonies annually. Data collected covers the state in which colonies are located, movement of colonies between states, newly added or replaced colonies, number of colonies lost, colonies renovated, and presence of colony stressors and specific signs of illness. The responses allow USDA for the first time to differentiate patterns between small-scale and commercial beekeepers, analyze data on a state-by-state basis, and compare more specific quarterly losses, additions and renovations for larger scale beekeepers.

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According to the survey released today, there were 2.59 million or 8% fewer honey bee colonies on January 1, 2016 than the 2.82 million present a year earlier on January 1, 2015 for operations with five or more colonies. New quarterly colony data allow new levels of analysis. For example, there was an 18% loss of colonies in the January-March quarter in 2015 and a 17% loss in the same quarter in 2016. Honey beekeepers with five or more colonies reported Varroa mites as the leading stressor affecting colonies. They also reported more colonies with symptoms of Colony Collapse Disorder lost in the first quarter of 2016 with 113,930 than the 92,250 lost in the same quarter in 2015. This research complements other information USDA and partners have been collecting for years. For example, in March NASS released its annual report on honey production. This is an external link or third-party site outside of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) website. and prices for 2015. This report, which is used by USDA, producers, economists, agribusiness and others, found that U.S. honey production in 2015 from producers with five or more colonies totaled 157 million pounds, down 12 percent from 2014. There were 2.66 million colonies from which honey was harvested in 2015, down 3 percent from 2014. Honey prices were 209.0 cents per pound, down 4 percent from a record high of 217.3 cents per pound in 2014.

In addition, for the past 10 years USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture has helped fund collaboration between the Bee Informed Partnership and the Apiary Inspectors of America to produce an annual survey that asks both commercial and small-scale beekeepers to track the health and survival rates of their honey bee colonies. This year's survey results, which were released May 10, were gleaned from the responses of 5,700 beekeepers from 48 states who are responsible for about 15 percent of the nation's managed honey bee colonies. The data being released by NASS today adds to these two efforts by providing a baseline federal statistical resource to track change of reported numbers and death loss in colonies managed by small hobbyists up to the largest commercial producers. The National Strategy, developed under the leadership of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and USDA) set three overarching goals: 1) reduce honey bee colony losses to economically sustainable levels; 2) increase monarch butterfly numbers to protect the annual migration; and 3) restore or enhance millions of acres of land for pollinators through combined public and private action. The plan was accompanied by a science-based Pollinator Research Action Plan. In addition to the surveys mentioned

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above, a number of research activities within USDA's Research, Education and Economics mission area have been initiated since the action plan was released; for example:  

 

NIFA is currently seeking applications for a total of $16.8 million in grant funding for research projects with an emphasis on pollinator health; The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is organizing a national bee genebank as part of the agency's response to ongoing problems facing the country's beekeepers. The genebank, which will be located in Fort Collins, Colorado, will help preserve the genetic diversity of honey bees, especially for traits such as resistance to pests or diseases and pollination efficiency; ARS has launched a research project aimed at determining the effects of seasonal pollens on brood rearing, on bees' immune response to pathogen stress, and on whether geographic location influences such effects; ARS has launched a study to determine whether hyperspectral imaging can be used as a non-invasive method of monitoring bee colony health; and ARS has launched a project to determine colony survival, population size, cost and the return on investment of two overwintering strategies for controlling Varroa mites.

This summary is by the GREENHOUSE, GIE Media; Full Report Released May 12, 2016, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) http://www.usda.gov/nass/PUBS/TODAYRPT/hcny0516.pdf

Tips - A Synopsis of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide vs. Bee Controversy What are neonicotinoid insecticides, and why are they important? Synthetic systemic insecticides having the same mode of action at nerve synapses as nicotine are classified as neonicotinoids. These (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) have become an extraordinarily important class of insecticides because: 1. They are exceptionally selectively toxic to insects vs. vertebrates, making them relatively safe to humans (applicators, consumers, and most non-target vertebrates) when compared with the insecticides that would otherwise be used. 2. Their systemic nature means that, once absorbed by a plant’s roots, they can reach hidden areas throughout the plant to affect insects feeding on the plant. By being presented on the inside of the plant, sysVNLA Newsletter 50

temic insecticides are inherently safer for most beneficial predators and parasitoids of pests than many contact-acting insecticides, allowing integration of chemical and biological control. 3. Most neonicotinoids break down quickly when exposed to sunlight. Low-rate foliar sprays can be of such short residual nature that they may minimally impact beneficial insects. When absorbed into plants, these insecticides are protected from the effects of lights by the plants’ photosynthetic pigments, meaning that they have relatively long residual properties in leaves. This, in turn, means that they are applied less frequently to manage pests than many alternative insecticides. What is the evidence for and against a role for neonicotinoids causing problems with bees?

The systemic nature of neonicotinoids implies that they may be presented through nectar and pollen to bees and other pollinators, which are extremely sensitive to exposure. One of the most controversial scientific problems of our day is whether problems in bee health (honey bees, bumble bees, and native solitary bees) can be blamed on their unintentional chronic poisoning by exposure to this class of insecticide. Two general hypotheses (not mutually exclusive) could explain, for instance, the phenomenon of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), in which honey bee workers abandon their hives, the queen, and developing young (brood) in sufficient numbers that the colony can no longer function, and subsequently dies. Hypothesis 1: Neonicotinoids are to blame. This hypothesis proposes that exposure to low concentrations of neonicotinoids will cause worker bees to lose their ability to return back to the colony - hence the loss of worker bees from the colony. Furthermore, it also proposes that neonicotinoids may increase susceptibility of bees to diseases, disrupt the social organization of honey bees, and interfere with reproduction of bumble bees and solitary bees. Although honey bees metabolize imidacloprid very quickly, those molecules that have bound to nerve receptors would be unavailable to be metabolized, and so the toxic effects may accumulate and be greater than what pharmacological

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models would predict. In addition, the combination of exposure to neonicotinoids and other pesticides could present synergistic effects that imply greater toxicity than predicted from laboratory tests, in which neonicotinoids are presented in isolation from these other pesticides. Hypothesis 2: Diseases are to blame. This hypothesis is based on the established knowledge that when honey bees are very sick, they leave the colony to die, a phenomenon called altruistic suicide. When enough worker bees become sick, altruistic suicide could lead to Colony Collapse Disorder. An important parasitic mite of honey bees was first discovered in the U.S. in 1987, a few years before neonicotinoids were first introduced into agricultural use. Varroa mites (a) directly parasitize bees, weakening them, (b) are efficient vectors of viral diseases in bees, and (c) suppress the immune system of bees, making them more susceptible to infections. There is no controversy that the introduction and spread of varroa mites has made keeping bees very difficult in the U.S. and the rest of the world. Along with the spread of varroa mites, concomitant introduction or spread of new viral diseases (Israeli acute paralysis virus, Kashmir virus, and tobacco ringspot virus) and one fungal disease, Nosema ceranae, are clearly linked to poor colony performance and increased overwintering mortality of hives. In addition, to combat both varroa mites and the small hive

beetle (first detected in the U.S. in 1998), certain specifically registered pesticides are now used directly in hives. When comparing the explanatory value of these hypotheses, the disease hypothesis is very strongly supported by evidence, whereas data supporting the neonicotinoid hypothesis is very weak (with respect to honey bee health and involvement with CCD), but more strongly supported with respect to their potential to cause harm to bumble bees and solitary bees. The chief problems with blaming neonicotinoids for problems with honey bees are: 1. Although Colony Collapse Disorder was named in 2006, literature review revealed that this phenomenon has a long history, with incidents in 1906, 1961 62, and 1979, renamed as a new problem on each occasion. Clearly, this phenomenon cannot be uniquely attributed to the introduction of neonicotinoids. Modern biological methods to detect and identify new viral diseases were not available until the occurrence of CCD. 2. CCD occurs wherever varroa mites are found, and is not correlated with the use of neonicotinoids. For example, CCD has not been reported Australia, which allows neonicotinoid use but does not have varroa mite infestation of honey bees. Also, European countries that banned neonicotinoids continued to have problems with heavy losses of bees.

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3. The involvement of a disease was directly implicated in 2007 through experiments introducing healthy honey bees into contaminated hive equipment that was either sterilized or not. Bees introduced into non-sterile hives (from which a previous colony had collapsed) themselves collapsed, whereas those introduced into irradiated hives (which would kill pathogens but not remove pesticides) thrived. 4. In order for neonicotinoids to be responsible for deleterious effects on bees, there has to be a combination of presence in pollen at toxic concentrations and over a sufficient length of time to affect bee biology. The latest information as assessed by U.S. EPA toxicologists indicates a clear threshold of a concentration of 25 parts per billion (ppb) in nectar to influence honey bee health [concentrations affecting other species of bees may be lower]. A statewide survey for contamination of pollen collected by honey bees throughout one season in Massachusetts indicates that the average concentration and exposure of honey bees through pollen is approximately 2 ppb. Samples rarely may approach or exceed the 25 ppb threshold required for chronic exposure to affect honey bee health. There are specific instances when use of neonicotinoids can be expected to lead to adverse effects, including use of these products in citrus and cotton crops, and on linden trees. Use was specifically withdrawn for linden trees in 2015 by the U. S. EPA as is now specified on the insecticide labels. What are appropriate responses to minimize risks for pollinators from the use of neonicotinoids? Legislative actions related to the perceived risks to bees from use of these insecticides have ranged from bans of their use (e.g., the two-year ban in Europe, action in some areas in Canada and the U.S.) to acceptance of this class of insecticides as being less damaging to bees than the insecticide alternatives that they largely replace (Australia). The range of options and their consequences from adoption of these options are highlighted here. 1. Total ban on their use within Connecticut. - This would constitute an immediate hardship for the ornamental nursery industry within the state, which would immediately have to find insecticide alternatives to manage certain pests of significance. Many of the alternative insecticides may be as or more toxic to bees than neonicotinoids. Nurseries have to pass phytosanitary inspection in order to ship plants that are free of pests to other states. For example, rhododendron leaf miner is native to southern New England and not in other parts of the country. Shipments of rhododendrons from Connecticut (a multimillion dollar crop) could be made very difficult, as alternative effective treatment methods are not known. VNLA Newsletter 52

Management of exotic pests of trees in the state would become much more difficult. A single imidacloprid treatment provides seven years of protection for a hemlock tree from damage by hemlock woolly adelgid. Treatment with either imidacloprid or dinotefuran protects ash trees from infestation by emerald ash borer. If Asian longhorned borer were found in Connecticut, without the approved use of imidacloprid, trees in infested areas would automatically have to be removed, as there is no alternative approved quarantine treatment alternative. 2. Ban specific uses within Connecticut. - The state could target particular uses or formulations of these insecticides for which the benefit for their use is outweighed by the environmental cost. A controversial use of these products is seed treatments for corn, soybean, and sunflower crops. At the time of planting, liberation of the insecticide into the air as dust from treated seed has been identified as particularly hazardous to bees. Manufacturers of seeding equipment and chemical companies have been working to resolve this problem. The specific prohibition against use of neonicotinoids on linden trees is now stated on the product labels, and is a federal extension of a ban initiated by Oregon following bee poisonings. It is possible that there are other flowering plants, like lindens, for which treatment would be hazardous to bees. If these were identified, or the conditions of their use leading to hazard to bees, then these uses may be curtailed at the state level. 3. Make neonicotinoids “restricted use� pesticides. Restricted use pesticides require possession of a pesticide applicator’s license in order to purchase a pesticide for use in the state where it is restricted. For instance, Safari (dinotefuran) is a restricted use product in Massachusetts, due to concerns regarding its potential mobility in ground water. Such an action would prevent most applications by homeowners, and would limit application to holders of a pesticide applicator license. Licensed applicators, by law, have to complete courses that will mean that they are better informed than the general public on safe practices regarding pesticide use. 4. Promote better use of this class of insecticides. There clearly are concerns regarding the potential for these insecticides to be present at high enough concentrations in pollen or nectar to affect the biology of all pollinators. The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station is a leader within the U. S. regarding research regarding exposure of bees, and the dynamics of contamination of pollen or nectar through the use of these systemic insecticides. Our work, combined with similar efforts from land grant universities, can be used to provide evidence-based best management guidelines for nurseries, groundskeepers, and homeowners to get the

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VNLA Pender ad half page_VNLA pender half page ad 1/15/14 11:21 AM Page

greatest benefit from these insecticides, identify alter-

News – Virginia Agribusiness  natives to their use, and minimize their environmental impacts. Mitigation of these risks has already been takBanquet & Town Hall Meeting  ing place for several years through educational programs to arborists, and over time may reduce risks to become environmentally insignificant.

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What else could be done to improve the plight of our bees? Our (CT) state should embrace the efforts presented in the NEW AD Presidential task force report to protect bee health, presented at: (https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/Pollinator%20Health%20Strategy%202015.pdf ). These efforts could include strategic changes to improve bee forage along the state’s highways, and educational programs for the general public on the importance of bees and landscape design to benefit bees.

Via Green Industry Council members install plants and flowers  Summary

for the Virginia Agribusiness Council Banquet.   Unless carefully crafted, increased state regulation for (front) Lorene Blackwood,  (l‐r) Bill Bonwell, Gwynn Hubbard,    the use ofPeggy Seay, Cary Gouldin  neonicotinoids is unlikely to improve the

health of honey bees but could have many negative consequences. Richard S. Cowles, Ph. D., Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Richard.Cowles@ct.gov

Research - Modification of a Webbased Automatic Irrigation Program for Large Container Plants Summary With programming support from this grant, we improved CIrrig by expanding its irrigation scheduling capabilities to large Jameson River Nurseries installing plants James River Nurseries installing plans   containers micro-irrigation. For large containers, routine and sod from Brookmeade Sod and sod from Brookmeade Sod Farm  leaching fraction testing (e.g. 1X everyFarm 3 weeks) provides the best assessment of irrigation efficiency. As such, we added an option that allows the grower to enter leaching fraction test results for each irrigation zone from which C-Irrig automatically calculates daily irrigation run times that achieve a desired LF% based on daily weather, including rain. Although the LF option is particularly useful for large containers, it can also be used for small containers on sprinkler irrigation. Therefore, we now have an ET-based irrigation scheduling program that is flexible enough to output irrigation amounts for both small and large containers produced with wither sprinkler or micro-irrigation. Because the Program is web-based, the technology will be readily available to the container nursery industry.

[NOTE: The VNLA awarded a research grant to help

Town Hall meeting at Grelen Nurseries, Orange, VA  fund this research. For details contact the VNLA office.

540-382-0943.]

Research by Tome Yeager and Jeff Million, University of Florida, IFAS

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

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Research - Plant Right A Science-Based Protocol to Assess Plant Invasiveness Invasive plants frequently make headlines in communities throughout the United States. As more municipalities consider restrictions on what plant materials should be planted, nurseries need better tools to identify and qualify whether plants they introduce, produce, and distribute have the potential to become invasive. To better understand the potential for a nursery plant to become invasive, the Horticultural Research Institute recently provided funding for a project to test an evaluation tool for the industry. The “PlantRight Plant Risk Evaluation (PRE) Tool” could provide the nursery and landscape industry with an accessible, practical protocol for determining invasiveness of new or existing ornamental plants and make this information available to the public. The research project, titled “Grower-led development of PlantRight invasive-free certification program for ornamental plants,” has been very successful in meeting research objectives. With generous support from a Horticultural Research Institute grant, plant scientists at the University of California (Davis) have taken the PlantRight Plant Risk Evaluation (PRE) tool on the road to 22 states, screening 300 popular landscaping plants - half of which are ornamental invasive plants. The goal of this study, led by Ph.D. student Christiana Conser, is to test the accuracy of the PlantRight weed risk assessment model for use within the nursery and landscape industry nationwide, as a method to proactively prevent invasive landscape plant introductions. The PRE model was first developed in 2008, for Sustainable Conservation, by the University of Washington’s Lizbeth Seebacher, a former doctoral student of UW Professor and Botanic Garden Director, Sarah Reichard. Since 2011, Conser has led PRE tool research at UC Davis, for Sustainable Conservation. In California, the PRE tool has already demonstrated a 98 percent and 95 percent accuracy rating for predicting invasive and noninvasive behavior, respectively. PRE can also screen at the species and cultivar levels (no plant material required, just the name. By screening in the Midwest, Northeast, and Deep South, Conser hopes to replicate this accuracy rating nationwide. Conser is working with two nursery owners and a nursery and landscape trade association to cull the list of 300 popular regional plants. By testing PRE tool findings against the results of known invasive plants, the tool’s accuracy throughout the United States can be determined.

VNLA Newsletter 54

Why is it important to the green industry? Historically, less than one percent of new plant introductions results in invasive problems. That’s the good news. However, that 1Arrundo donax and ivy one percent can wreak havoc on biodiversity, local economies, recreational options, business reputations, and land management budgets. In California, 48 percent of the all known invasive plants were introduced via the nursery supply chain, not with malicious intent but simply due to lack of information and knowledge. Many state and regional industry associations and industry professionals are proactively addressing the invasive plant issue. Industry leaders throughout the United States are working in partnership with regulators and the nursery industry. For example, the New England Nursery Association recently volunteered to phase out plants with invasive traits in that region. The creation of a science-based tool can assist the horticultural industry in assessing plants, preventing invasive ornamental plant introductions, and educating and collaborating with local stakeholders and regulatory groups. The PRE tool is expected to provide the industry with multiple potential benefits, including: Giving plant developers the ability to identify problem plant behavior early in the evaluation process before making a significant economic investment;  Avoiding lengthy import delays (the PRE process takes two hours, on average, for a trained user of the tool to complete a screen);  Providing a voluntary process for certifying noninvasive plants. In addition to helping the industry prevent invasive introductions and develop more non-invasive ornamentals, the PRE tool provides a variety of information on taxonomy, reproductive characteristics, medicinal uses, patent information and more.

If you are a propagator or breeder of ornamental plants interested in beta testing the PlantRight PRE, please email PlantRight@suscon.org . Jennifer Gray, HRI Research Programs Administrator, jenniferg@americanhort.org Contributors: Christiana Conser, PhD student at University of California-Davis, Department of Plant Sciences; Jan Merryweather, Senior Project Manager, Sustainable Conservation. Photos courtesy PlantRight. © Horticultural Research Institute, www.hriresearch.org

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Kraus said regardless of how much rainfall a region receives, rain gardens are designed to intercept the water runoff generated from rainfall and remove the pollutants in that water.

Research - Rain Gardens The “Natural” Way to Remove Storm Water Pollution

“The purpose of the rain garden is to have that water filter down through the rain garden into underground water reserves in a clean state after the pollution has been removed from it,” she said. Better rain garden substrates Kraus said when a rain garden is being constructed the existing native soil is removed creating a depression or pit in the landscape. The depression, which is typically about 4 feet deep, is filled with an engineered substrate that is designed to have quick water infiltration. “During a rain event, large volumes, literally hundreds of thousands of gallons of water, can enter the substrate,” she said. “The substrate is designed to slow the rate of percolation or movement down through the rain garden.”

North Carolina State University horticulture professor Helen Kraus said in order for rain gardens to be accepted by consumers in their home landscapes, the plants have to beautify and add value to the landscape.

Horticultural Research Institute is funding research to identify alternative substrate components and additional plants for use in rain gardens.

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The U.S. Geological Survey reports that only 2.5 percent of all Earth’s water is fresh water. Almost all fresh water is locked up in ice (68.7 percent) and in the ground (30.1 percent). Just over 1.2 percent of all fresh water is surface water. With concerns about the availability and quality of water, more municipalities are looking to protect this limited natural resource. Government officials are increasingly passing legislation and regulations to protect fresh water sources. With funding from the Horticultural Research Institute, North Carolina State University horticulture professor Helen Kraus is studying how rain gardens can be used to protect fresh water sources from storm water runoff. She said all segments of the horticulture industry, from growers to end users, face the same problems with water. “We all have to have water to grow plants well and it has to be good quality water,” Kraus said. “Rain gardens are a device that can help to remove pollutants from storm water runoff. As rainfall runs across the hardscapes of the urban environment it picks up nutrient pollution, including nitrogen, phosphorus and metals like iron, manganese and copper. It also picks up soil sediment that carries nutrients with it. Storm water usually goes into a storm drain which carries that water directly into an open water source and pollutes that water source.” VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

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upper New York and westward until the environment becomes real dry. There might be a problem with some of these plants tolerating the drought conditions occurring in the Midwest.” Kraus said many of the plants produced by the nursery industry are going to be found to be very effective rain garden plants.

As rainfall runs across the hardscapes of the urban environment it picks up nutrient pollution and soil sediment that carries nutrients with it. Storm water usually goes into a storm drain which carries that water directly into an open water source.

Kraus said the substrate should be biologically-rich containing a wide array of beneficial fungi, bacteria and other micro-organisms that break down the pollutants in the water. She said some rain garden substrates contain pine bark as their organic matter component. “Pine bark does not bring a lot of this microflora to the substrate,” she said. “The water slowly inoculates the substrate with microflora over time.” Kraus said the nursery industry needs pine bark as a growing media component. Her research seeks to identify a better source of organic matter to replace pine bark. “Compost, such as yard waste, naturally brings the microflora with it,” she said. “Microflora develop during the composting process. Compost is a better source of organic matter for the chemical reactions that have to occur in order to break down storm water pollutants.

“Just as we have been able to promote plants that attract pollinators, many of North Carolina State University those plants were already horticulture professor Helen Kraus said she expects many being grown by the nursery industry,” she said. “We of the plants currently produced by the nursery industry are only had to identify them going to be found to be very as good pollinator plants. I effective rain garden plants. think a similar situation exists for rain garden plants. The ones that will work well, the industry is already growing.” Although Kraus said some nurseries may specialize in producing rain garden plants, the biggest issue is identifying the plants. “Nurseries want to know that kind of information because they have landscapers asking them all of the time, “What is this plant and where and how can it be used?” Unfortunately, the nurseries don’t have the answers yet for those questions. In some cases, the landscapers may be ahead of the growers because they are the ones installing the rain gardens.” Kraus said in order for rain gardens to be accepted by consumers in their home landscape, the plants are going to have to look good.

“Every municipality creates yard waste and many compost it. Yard waste compost could be a more effective substrate component and it will help to diminish the demand for pine bark that currently exists.”

“The plants are going to have to beautify and add value to the landscape,” she said. “The only way that can happen is if there is a diverse collection of plant material so there is interest to meet garden customers’ needs. That is what I am hoping to develop.”

Expanding rain garden plant choices

Increasing the demand for rain gardens

For the HRI-funded rain garden research project Kraus is studying four plant species: Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’, Monarda fistulosa, Itea virginica and Betula nigra ‘Dura Heat’.

Kraus said government agencies are currently driving the demand for rain gardens.

“Over a combination of research projects I have looked at about 25 species,” Kraus said. “We are looking at a combination of trees, shrubs, ornamental grasses and herbaceous flowering perennials. The plants that we are studying would grow anywhere from northern Florida all the way up into VNLA Newsletter 56

“The demand is not necessarily generated because people want rain gardens as much as having to comply with some kind of enforcement such as a government ordinance,” she said. “What we have to work on is educating home consumers of the potential danger to water sources from home landscapes so they want to build rain gardens regardless of some government requirement. Rain gardens are most effective when everybody does a little bit of the process and there are

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a lot of rain gardens instead of having one rain garden in a 50-square-mile radius.” Kraus said more consumer education about rain gardens needs to be occurring at the retail level.

Events - SEGreen Plant Conference Speakers

“Consumers need to know that by putting in a rain garden, they can have a drought-tolerant garden and they can remove water pollution from the environment,” she said. Kraus said there is a fair amount of training going on around the country in regards to the installation of rain gardens. She said the extension service is a very good resource for rain garden information. Another informational source is a state’s water quality division. “You can’t build a rain garden like you build a normal garden. It’s a different concept,” she said. “You have to learn about rain garden components to really make them work.” For more: Helen Kraus, North Carolina State University, Department of Horticultural Science; helen_kraus@ncsu.edu . Horticultural Research Institute, (202) 789-2900; www.hriresearch.org . Author: David Kuack, HRI Freelance Author, dkuack@gmail.com, © Horticultural Research Institute, www.hriresearch.org Photos courtesy of North Carolina State University horticulture professor Helen Kraus

A Lineup of Visionary Authors, Breeders, Geneticists, Horticulturalists, Professors and World Travelers Will Provide a Glimpse of New Plants Coming to Market at the SEGreen Plant Conference Atlanta, Ga., April 20, 2016 - The Southern Nursery Association (SNA) has announced details of the SEGreen Plant Conference, scheduled for August 31- September 1, 2016. The conference will be held in conjunction with SEGreen at The Classic Center in Athens, Georgia. Ten of the industry's top plant experts will share their knowledge and expertise during this two-day conference. Internationally recognized plantsmen, Don Shadow, SNA

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past president, and Dr. Michael Dirr, author and retired professor of horticulture at the University of Georgia, will moderate the sessions featuring an impressive list of authors, botanical garden directors, breeders, geneticist, horticulturists, professors, and world travelers.

The Don Shadow Award of Excellence will be presented at the conclusion of the conference followed by the SEGreen New Plant Auction. In addition, a UGA Campus Landscape Walk & Talk with Dr. Michael Dirr is scheduled following the conference.

The SEGreen Plant Conference provides the perfect platform for the grower, landscaper and retailer to come together for a glimpse of exciting new plants coming to market, with focus on new and superior cultivars, the most resistant, prolific blooming, superior shape or habit, and the most interesting flower or foliage.

Registration for the conference is $90 for a 1-Day Access Pass (Wednesday or Thursday), and $150 for an All Access Pass (Wednesday and Thursday), with the option of attending any Plant Conference or Landscape Conference sessions. A SEGreen Name Badge is included with registration for access to the SEGreen Marketplace. Speaker bios, session titles and description, schedule and registration information can be found on the SEGreen website at www.segreen.org.

The speaker lineup and sessions include: Dr. David Creech, Regent's Professor and Professor Emeritus, Stephen F. Austin State University Climate Change Friendly Trees and Shrubs for the South Dr. Michael Dirr, Retired Professor, University of Georgia, Author, Cofounder Plant Introductions The Best of the Plant Conference Natalia Hamill, Brand & Business Development Manager, Bailey Nurseries; So We've Got all These New Genetics, Now What? Dr. Thomas Molnar, Associate Professor, Rutgers University; The Rutgers Woody Ornamental and Nut Tree Breeding Program: New Plants and Future Directions Dr. Richard Olsen, Director, US National Arboretum; National Arboretum 2.0: Creating New Legacies for an lmpactful Future Dr. Allen Owings, Professor and Research Coordinator, Louisiana State University AgCenter; Herbaceous Lagniappe from the Louisiana Landscape Dr. Tom Ranney, Professor, NC State University Mt. Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center; Breeding Breakthrough Plants: The Newest introductions from NCSU Dr. Tim Rinehart, Research Plant Molecular Geneticist, USDA Agricultural Research Service; Sequencing the Genome: Hydrangea Macrophylla's Genetic Secrets Finally Revealed David Roberts, General Manager and Plant Breeder, Plant Introductions/Bailey Nurseries; From Idea to Introduction: Using Breeding Innovations and Understanding Limitations to Improve Ornamental Characteristics and Environmental Tolerance Panel Discussion: Bringing New Plants to Market and Creating Winners Dr. Dennis Werner, Professor Emeritus, NC State Department of Horticulture Science; Designer Genes - Designer Redbuds: Twenty Years of Cercis Breeding VNLA Newsletter 58

SEGreen, scheduled for August 30 - September 1, 2016, will offer vision for Southeast grower, landscaper, and retailer through a regional marketplace, education, and garden, nursery and retail tours. A host of the region's top experts will participate, sharing their expertise and perspectives on the road ahead. The event will kick off with garden, nursery and retail tours on Tuesday, August 30. Included on the agenda is the SEGreen Marketplace, SEGreen Plant Conference and the SEGreen Landscape Conference (August 31 and September 1). SNA will be conducting annual business as well during SEGreen with the 61st SNA Research Conference (August 30 - August 31), the 118th Annual SNA Business Meeting (September 1), and the SNA State Officer's Conference (September 2). The Classic Center, located in downtown Athens, Georgia, offers state-of-the-art technology in modern spaces perfectly paired with restored historical structures. Numerous hotels, restaurants and pubs are within walking distance. Connected by five major highways and convenient to two interstates that link Athens to the Atlanta and the Greenville-Spartanburg International airports, The Classic Center is the perfect fit for this new event. Founded in 1899, the Southern Nursery Association is a non-profit trade association representing the horticultural industry in the southeastern U.S. SNA provides member services to wholesale growers, brokers, retailers, landscape contractors, landscape architects, grounds maintenance contractors, interiorscapers and allied suppliers. The SNA strives to unite and advance the horticulture industry through educational, research and marketing efforts. Southern Nursery Association, Inc., Acworth, GA 30101 Tel 678.809.9992 Fax 678.809.9993 mail@sna.org www.sna.org, Karen Summers, 678.809.9992, ksummers@sna.org

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Tomorrow’s Vision | Today’s Opportunity

SEGreen is the roadmap to the future for Southeast growers, landscapers, and retailers. New plants, education, tours, and marketplace. Industry experts share vision and direction for the industry, near and long-term. See, hear, and make more green. Chart your course at www.segreen.org

Aug. 30 - Sept. 1 | The Classic Center | Athens, GA Produced by the Southern Nursery Association


VNLA - Board Meeting Summary March 2, 2016, Charlottesville, VA President’s Report – Bill Gouldin reported on a conference call the Executive Committee had on February 22, 2016 to clarify certification policies: All users of the Virginia Certified Horticulturist Study Manual will be reminded by a cover page noting that the material is copyrighted, some by the Virginia Tech Master Gardener Program and some by the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association, and users should follow all copyright regulations. VNLA members can conduct their own private instruction with their employees in preparation for the Virginia Certified Horticulturist Exam. Any member, or their staff, qualifies for access to the VNLA Online Study Guide if they have purchased a VCH Study Manual, or they have registered for a VCH Exam, or they have registered for a VCH Review Class. A motion was made to approve the above decisions by the VNLA Executive Committee, seconded and passed.

Certification – The committee held a conference call in February and discussed the review of the current Virginia Certified Horticulturist Review Manual and options to update or for a total re-write. Members are reviewing other sources of information and a new chapter is being written to cover Conservation Landscaping Best Practices for Water Quality”. All phases of the Certification program are being reviewed from promotional publications, signage, tests and testing, review classes, better collaboration with VA Tech Horticulture Department and students, and ways to grow the program. Virginia Tech Horticulture Seniors are given the option to take the VCH exam before graduation. The committee will be doing a comprehensive planning session late summer/early fall. Jeff Howe has attended two meetings for the Chesapeake Bay Certified Landscape Professional and is on the technical advisor groups along with other VNLA members, Virginia Rockwell and Leslie Sewell, to develop resources and to guide this new multistate certification initiative. A survey is being put together to get additional feedback from members. Succession Committee - Sonya Westervelt reported that she had been in active communication with committee members to keep them apprised of what she been working on. She had been gathering information in an attempt to prepare a succession plan. Those conversations have included Vanessa Finney (MANTS, MNLGA), Corey Connors (NCNLA), and Darren Macfee (Consultant, Bob Fitch’s replacement). In speaking with these individuals, and following her own intuition, she

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recommends to the board that we proceed in hiring Darren Macfee for Phase 1 of the proposal. She would then ask the board to authorize the committee to proceed with Phase 2 (or some form thereof) if the committee deems it appropriate upon completion of Phase 1. We will meet again before Phase 3 or 4 would come into question, so no action is requested at this time. Phase 1 is to “assist the succession planning committee by facilitating a strategy meeting whose goal is achieving consensus on the direction, timeline, and budget for the search and transition. The deliverable for this phase is a written document with benchmark dates and protected budgetary impact.” A third party to help us work through questions and identify direction would be invaluable, and at $1500 + lodging/food, a reasonable request. She is still waiting for full committee feedback, but of 3 responses so far, 2 were positive and 1 was negative. The committee was authorized to begin Phase I and II.

Research – Christopher Brown Jr reported that the Research Committee had agreed that the name of the “Virginia Nurserymen’s Association Horticulture Research Foundation, Inc.” (VNAHRF) should be changed to the “Virginia Nursery & Landscape Horticulture Research Foundation, Inc.” (VNLAHRF). A motion was made to accept this name change, seconded and passed. The Research Committee had also agreed that the VNLA SunTrust Scholarship Investment Funds could be transferred to the VNLAHRF Inc 501(c)3 corporation which would be handled by the CPA on the 990 tax return for the VNLAHRF. Options on alternative fund raising activities were discussed and are being reviewed by the VNLA CPA and Attorney to be sure they are setup correctly for the VNLA. Policy Manual Update – Sonya Westervelt and Virginia Rockwell reported that they had started reviewing the VNLA Policy Manual and were working to update, simplify it, coordinate it with the new Bylaws, Code of Ethics, procedures and to separate out a calendar with routine procedures and will have a draft available at the June 11 VNLA Board Meeting. Virginia Society of Landscape Designers Update – Tom Thompson – Past President As of February 20th, 2016 the VSLD has a new set of officers and directors as follows: Yulita Ellis – President Meg French – Vice President Chris Coen – Secretary Virginia Rockwell – Treasurer Leslie Sewell – One Year Directors Denise Hargraves Shelly Arthur – Two Year Directors Anna Best

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

The VSLD held its annual business meeting in Charlottesville on Saturday, February 20th at which time the new officers and directors were elected. There was also a discussion and vote about some revisions to the society’s bylaws; some general revisions to bring the wording up to date as well as a provision that would have allowed a new category of membership. Housekeeping passed; membership category was tabled for further discussion. At the last meeting of the Board of Directors, the VSLD voted in favor of sponsoring the speakers for the upcoming VNLA Field Day to the amount of $500. In the past year the VSLD has participated in several regional nursery and landscape association short courses and a well-attended scholarship fair at Tidewater Community College where we managed to find several qualified applicants for our scholarship. Membership levels have remained stable for the past five years. Environmental Affairs submitted by: Josh Ellinger On January 14, 2016 Tom Thompson and Josh Ellinger attended the Noxious Weed Advisory Committee meeting in Richmond. The purpose of this meeting was to evaluate the processes that are used to list weeds as noxious and determine the process that will be used in Virginia in the future. We did not determine the process at this meeting. Another meeting will be held on March 17, 2016 to continue to develop the process. Brent Hunsinger and Josh Ellinger will attend this meeting. VNLA representatives have attended multiple VDACS Listening Sessions for the Voluntary Pollinator Protection Plan. In compliance with EPA guidance, VDACS is developing a Pollinator Protection Plan (PPP). The sessions were open to landowners, producers, applicators, retailers, beekeepers and anyone interested in having input into the PPP Virginia plan as it is being developed by VDACS. Particularly, items that have been discussed include, but not limited to: Pesticides included in the Plan     

Period of Notification Distance from the bee hives will notification have to occur by the landowner/producer/applicator Who is responsible for notifying beekeepers and how will that notification be administered Beekeeper responsibility in letting landowner/producer know where their bee hives are located It is anticipated that a PPP law will take effect July 1, 2016. Provided by Jeff Miller, Exec. Dir.

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Arpil / May / June 2016

VNLA Newsletter


News - 46th Annual MANTS Show a Success Largest Green Industry Trade Show in Country Brings Blooms to Baltimore in January See more about the Young Nursery Professionals/Emergent group and their thoughts on the future of the horticulture industry here: https://youtu.be/yWtuveCBqBY. Baltimore, Md. - Springtime came to Baltimore in January again this year as the 46th annual Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show (MANTS) covered the Baltimore Convention Center's 300,000+ square feet of contiguous exhibit space with greenery and blooms. MANTS, the premier green industry marketplace for businesses, took place on January 68. This year, MANTS welcomed 11,039 paid registrants (including exhibitors) who gathered to do business, network and learn about the hottest horticultural trends for 2016. 966 exhibiting companies filled over 1,536 booths displaying everything from flowers, trees and plants to decks, fountains, pots and innovative technological solutions for the gardening and landscape industries. In addition to exhibitors, 3,379 non-exhibiting/'buying' companies were in attendance. MANTS 2016 also successfully gathered green industry professionals from across the country, and across the world, welcoming businesses from 44 states and 11 countries outside of the U.S. These countries included Italy, India, Israel, Netherlands, Turkey, Australia and China, some of which were debuting new products at the show. "Another great year in the books!" said Vanessa Finney, Executive Vice President of MANTS. "MANTS 2016 not only brought innovative and exciting new products and exhibitors from around the world, but also an influx of young, enthusiastic horticultural leaders! We have always known that MANTS means business, and this year truly proved that MANTS is the place where all generations gather to do commerce." Among the thousands of buyers, shoppers, and horticultural industry leaders and businesses converging on the show floor this year were special groups of green industry up-andcomers spanning Generation X and Y - the Young Nursery Professionals and Emergent Group. These groups work to connect young horticultural professionals online and in person at shows like MANTS for educational, networking and mentoring opportunities.

"The presence of groups like the Young Nursery Professionals and Emergent Group highlights how valuable MANTS continues to be as a trade show for our industry," said Finney. "Younger professionals taking over the family business are being introduced to the show's business and networking opportunities by their families, and young entrepreneurs are attending because they know this is the marketplace to get your products in front of buyers." While attending MANTS, the Young Nursery Professionals/Emergent group not only hosted booths of their own for their respective companies, but also gathered at a networking event bringing together the next generation of green industry innovators and professionals. "This is our second year at MANTS. Landscaping is a pretty fragmented industry and there are a lot of shows around the country...but MANTS seems to be the only show that's brought a number of states together," said Ryan Yanchuleff, CEO of Describeit.com - a new sales and proposal software for the landscape industry. "[MANTS] is an opportunity to get in front of a lot of people with one show and it has been pretty successful for us so far." "I think groups like the Young Nursery Professionals and Emergent, and their associated events at MANTS, are great because it is all about community... anything that can bring those people together and allow them to learn about things, to network, to share what's working for them and to voice their frustrations about what's missing is critical to allow the industry to move forward and to get the solutions that we need to be successful." To see more about the Young Nursery Professionals/Emergent group and their thoughts on the future of the horticulture industry here: https://youtu.be/yWtuveCBqBY. In 2017, MANTS will take place from January 11 -13 at the Baltimore Convention Center. Check www.mants.com or www.Twitter.com/MANTSBaltimore for updates and news on the show. The Mid-Atlantic Nursery Trade Show, MANTS, is known as the Masterpiece of Trade ShowsTM and is sponsored by the State Nursery and Landscape Associations of Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. MANTS is the place horticulture industry leaders gather every January because MANTS means business. The show covers over 300,000 square feet of contiguous exhibit space at the Baltimore Convention Center and draws exhibiting companies and attendees from throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Asia. MANTS 2017 is scheduled for January 11-13 at the Baltimore Convention Center. For the latest information visit our website or call us at (410) 296-6959 www.mants.com https://twitter.com/MANTSBal-

timore

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

April/May/June 2016 April / May / June 2016

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MANTS

®

The Masterpiece of Trade Shows ™

JANUARY 11-13, 2017 BALTIMORE CONVENTION CENTER

There are plenty of trade shows, but there’s only one MANTS. It’s the show where buyers know that they can find all the products their business needs. And sellers can count on meeting plenty of customers eager for their wares. For 47 years now, it has been all business at MANTS. That’s why over 11,000 attendees, representing over 3,600 buying companies and nearly 1,000 exhibiting companies, attended our most recent show. But when the work day is over, and it’s time to unwind and relax, Baltimore’s Inner Harbor offers an incomparable array of fine restaurants and attractions. MANTS means business. In fact, some people say we were inspired.

www.mants.com

On-line Registration is available 24/7 beginning October 1.

P.O. Box 818 Brooklandville, MD 21022 410-296-6959 800-431-0066 fax 410-296-8288

@mantsbaltimore #mants


Hydrangeas A to Z Producing Excellent Hydrangeas

July 21

August 2

August 4

McMinnville, TN

Virginia Beach, VA

Smithfield, NC

Workshop at a Glance

Speakers

- Potting Substrate, Fertilizers, and Blueing

Matthew Chappell, University of Georgia

- Controlling Growth with Pruning and PGRs

Amy Fulcher, University of Tennessee

- Propagation and Breeding Hydrangeas

Anthony LeBude, North Carolina State University

- New Releases

Jim Owen, Virginia Tech

- Disease Management

Alan Windham, University of Tennessee

Afternoon Demonstrations

Industry Representatives

Registration

Hands-on demonstrations with hydrangea crops grown for this workshop. Effect of lime and aluminum on pH and flower color. Controlling growth and flowering with fertilizer, plant growth regulators, pruning techniques, and irrigation scheduling. Container substrates: bark sources, amendments and a nursery-friendly procedure for testing physical properties. Hands-on disease ID and management session. Q&A with speakers and industry representatives focusing on fertilizer, plant production, and insect and disease management.

Registration closes July 15 for Tennessee event and July 28 for Virginia and North Carolina events. Space is limited. No on-site registration will be available. Register at tiny.utk.edu/producinghydrangeas

Cost $35 per person if registered by May 31 $50 if registered after that date

Sponsors


Upcoming Events June 20-26, 2016, National Pollinator Week, Celebration of the pollinators that are vital to our ecosystem. http://pollinator.org/ July 9-12, 2016, AmericanHort “Cultivate ’16 - The New Now”, Greater Columbus Convention Center, OH www.americanhort.org 614-487-1117 July 12-13, 2016, JoCo Plants Show 2016, Kerry Scott Bldg., NC State Fairgrounds, Raleigh, NC, by the Johnston County Nursery Marketing Association http://jocoplants.com/ July 21, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “5 Questions to Ask Your Social Media Manager” by Dr. Cheryl Boyer & Mr. Scott Stebnere, Kansas State University noon - 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 July 26-28, 2016, VSLD Summer Tour, Richmond, VA (open to VNLA members), www.vsld.org August 1-5, 2016, Perennial Plant Symposium, Minneapolis, MN http://www.perennialplant.org/ August 2, 2016, Hydrangeas A to Z: Producing Excellent Hydrangeas Workshop, A workshop flyer can be viewed or downloaded @ http://tinyurl.com/jk2nz65

August 30 - September 1, 2016, Southern Nursery Association Trade Show, Southern Plant Conference, SNA Research Conference, the SNA Annual Business Meeting, and SNA State Officer’s Conference, Athens, GA, www.sna.org September 9-11, 2016, Virginia Native Plant Society 2016 Annual Meeting, Blacksburg, VA www.vnps.org September 15, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “Urban Nutrient Management - Where We Are & Where We Are Headed” noon - 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 November 17, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “Tried and True IPM Techniques that Improve your Nursery’s Bottom Line:” noon - 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 November 3-4, 2016, Making Beauty Sustainable: The Charles F. Gillette Forum on Landscape Design, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, Richmond, www.lewisginter.org January 11-13, 2017, MANTS Trade Show, Baltimore, MD http://www.mants.com/

August 2-4, 2016, IGC Show East, Valley Forge Casino Resort/Philadelphia Metro, www.IGCshow.com 203-682-1664 August 4-6, 2016 Virginia Christmas Tree Growers Association Annual Conference and Farm Tour, Staunton, VA www.VirginiaChristmasTrees.org 540-382-7310 secretary@VirginiaChristmasTreeGrowers.org

VNLA Workshop, Field Day, Summer Tour

For a Current Calendar of all Green Industry Events, go: http://www.vnla.org/Calendar

NEW Interactive Calendar!

August 10, 2016, VNLA LANDSCAPE DESIGN WORKSHOP, Claudia West Design Charrette, Spotswood Lodge, Somerset, VA www.vnla.org August 11, 2016, VNLA ANNUAL FIELD DAY at Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA (near Charlottesville) www.vnla.org August 12, 2016, VNLA SUMMER TOUR, Orange area, www.vnla.org August 25-27, 2016, Farwest Trade Show, Portland, OR www.farwestshow.com/ August 30-September 2, 2016, Southern Nursery Association’s SEGreen, “Vision for the Future of the Southeast Green Industry”, at The Classic Center, Athens GA, www.segreen.org 678-809-9992, mail@sna.org see page 57)

VNLA Newsletter 66

All of these events qualify for VNLA VCH CEUs

April/May/June 2016 Arpil / May / June 2016

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VNLA Newsletter

April / May / June 2016

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