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INSECTICIDES FUNGICIDES MITICIDES PGRS HERBICIDES


2016 VNLA Officers & Directors OFFICERS

1 YR DIRECTORS

2 YR DIRECTORS

Educational Advisors

VT/HRAREC Ex-Officio non-voting

JEFFREY HOWE, Certification ‘16 Windridge Landscaping Co DR. JIM OWEN 7158 Rockfish Valley Rd HARAREC Afton, VA 22920-3182 1444 Diamond Springs Rd 434-361-1588 Virginia Beach, VA 23455 Christopher@lancasterfarms.com Cell: (434) 531-1919 (757) 363-3804 jhowe@windridgelandscapjim.owen@vt.edu JOSH ELLINGER, ing.com Vice President DR. LAURIE FOX VIRGINIA ROCKWELL ‘12 Environmental Affairs‘15 SCOTT PRICE, HRAREC, BILL GOULDIN ‘12 Design Waynesboro Nurseries Gentle Gardener Green PO Box 897 Education ‘16 1444 Diamond Springs Rd; PO Box 191 Waynesboro VA 22980-0987 David Scott Price Design VA Beach, VA 23455-3363 Montpelier, VA 22957-0191 540-946-3800 2772 Earleysville Rd (cell) 434-531-0467 757-363-3807 Cell: 540-836-6851 Earlysville, VA 22936-9665 gentlegardener@gmail.com Cell: 757-284-6139 Josh@wnurseries.com 434-466-5656 Cell: ljfox@vt.edu scott@dscottprice.com Secretary/ Treasurer BRENT HUNSINGER, AARON WILLIAMS ‘14 DR. ROGER HARRIS Legislation’15 THOMAS BUCKLEY Education Committee VA Tech Public Relations ‘16 Williams Landscape & Design Brent's Native Plantings Horticulture Dept. Head 10715 Hamilton's Crossing Dr Riverbend Nursery PO Box 7001 Saunders Hall (0327) 1295 Mt Elbert Rd Williamsburg VA 23188-7001 Fredericksburg, VA 22408 Blacksburg, VA 24061-0001 443-655-3410 Riner VA 24149-3611 757-564-7011 540-231-5451 brenthunsinger@gmail.com 800-638-3362 x102 aaron@wldgreen.com rharris@vt.edu Cell: 540-850-0420 DOUG RODES, thomas@riverbendnursery.com Past President MANTS’ Directors Membership ‘15 SONYA L. WESTERVELT James River Nurseries Director-At-Large Public Relations ‘10 13244 Ashland Rd Saunders Brothers Inc JOHN LANCASTER‘02 Ashland VA 23005-7504 2717 Tye Brook Highway Ex-Officio non-voting Bennett’s Creek Nursery (804) 798-2020 Piney River, VA 22964 3613 Bridge Road Cell: (804) 380-5259 (434) 277-5455 TOM THOMPSON, Suffolk, VA 23435-1807 drodes@jamesrivernursesonya@saundersbrothers.com Environmental Affairs ‘10 757-483-1425 ries.com Natural Art Landscaping john@bcnursery.com Executive Director 3540 S Belmont Rd Richmond VA 23234-2912 ROBIN RINACA - 15 (804) 674-5703 JEFFREY B. MILLER Eastern Shore Nursery of VA Naturalartlandscaping@yaHorticulture Management PO Box 400 hoo.com Associates LLC Melfa, VA 23410-0400 383 Coal Hollow Road 757-787-4732 Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721 rrinaca@esnursery.com 1-800-476-0055 Fax: 540-382-2716 DANNY SHRECKHISE info@vnla.org Shreckhise Nurseries ‘12 PO Box 428 Grottoes, VA 24441-0428 540-249-5761 Danny@shreckhise.com President BILL GOULDIN ‘12 Strange’s Florist/Garden Ctrs 12111 W. Broad St. Richmond, VA 23233 804-360-2800 wjg@stranges.com

VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

CHRISTOPHER BROWN ‘13

Research Committee Lancaster Farms 5800 Knotts Neck Rd Suffolk VA 23435-1353 757-484-4421

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Table of Contents Ad - Bennett’s Creek Nursery ...................................... 63 Ad - Bremo Trees......................................................... 64 Ad - Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia....................... 35 Ad - Farm Credit .......................................................... 64 Ad - Goodson and Associates ...................................... 25 Ad - Gossett’s Landscape Nursery............................... 49 Ad - Guthrie Nursery ................................................... 41 Ad - Hanover Farms..................................................... 7 Ad - Hawksridge Farm................................................. 57 Ad - Johnston County Nursery Marketing Assoc ........ 43 Ad - Lancaster Farms ................................................... 46 Ad - Mid-Atlantic Solutions ........................................ 21 Ad - OHP - Segway ..................................................... 2 Ad - Pender Nursery .................................................... 45 Ad - Plantworks Nursery.............................................. 50 Ad - Shreckhise Nurseries............................................ 15 Ad - SiteLight Id .......................................................... 23 Ad - Spring Meadow Nursery ...................................... 47 Ad - Turtle Creek Nursery ........................................... 37 Ad - Waynesboro Nurseries ......................................... 11 Ad - Willow Springs Tree Farms ................................. 13 Events - Calendar ......................................................... 62 Legislation - H2B Worker Prevailing Wage Rate Changes .................................................. 16 Letters - HRI Horticultural Research Institute ............. 7 Letters - Journey Through Hallowed Grounds Partnership........................................ 12 Letters - Shoosmith Scholarship Recipient ................. 8 Letters - VAC Roundtables .......................................... 8 Letters - VAC State Policy Development Meeting ..... 7 News - American Beauties Native Plants Welcomes New Grower ................................... 19 News - AmericanHort Releases SHIFT Insights ........ 23 News - AmericanHort, Advocacy and Research, Hello, 2016! .................................................... 22 News - Fuel Cost Stability and Predictability .............. 24 News - Maryland Motor Truck Association New Jersey Holding Out of State Trucks ........ 15 News - Robinson Retirement from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden............................................ 13 News - The University of Maryland Commercial Greenhouse IPM Manual updated/expanded ... 26 News - This plant could lure millions into gardening Hint: It's only kind of legal ............................. 20 News - VDOT Landscape Projects Requirements for News - Virginia Native Plant Marketing News .......... 25 News - VSU's Cooperative Extension Associate Wins ISA Award .......................... 12 Research - Compacted Urban Soils Rebuilt ................ 45 Research - Coreopsis Trials ......................................... 47 Research - Weed Management in Ornamental Grasses .................................. 43 4 4

Tips - Finish the Year Strong ....................................... 40 Tips - Garden Trends Research Report Oct 2012 ........ 35 Tips - Garden Trends Research Report: Oct 2013 ...... 36 Tips - Garden Trends Research Report: Oct 2014 ...... 36 Tips - How Salt Affects Plants..................................... 38 Tips - Mowing: Best Practices for Monarchs .............. 54 Tips - Plant profile: Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ .................. 14 Tips - Wild for Monarchs ............................................ 56 VNLA - Award: Environmental: Gunderson ............... 9 VNLA - Award: Professional of Year: Singlemann .... 9 VNLA - Breakfast Meeting Sponsor Thanks! ............. 5 VNLA - Certification Quiz # 75 .................................. 33 VNLA - Certification Test Schedule 2016 .................. 62 VNLA - Decreasing Runoff and Increasing Stormwater Infiltration .................. 27 VNLA - Field Day – Save The Date!.....................34. 60 VNLA - Lunch & Learn Webinars .............................. 61 VNLA - Member Profile: Strange’s Florists, Greenhouses, Garden Centers .. 18 VNLA - Photo Contest Rules ..................................... 17 VNLA - Research Grant Requests & Awards 2016 .... 42 VNLA - Volume Pricing Discounts ............................. 58 VNLA - Watkins Recognized for Service in the Virginia General Assembly ................ 10 VNLA - Formation of Permanent Research Fund ...... 42 VNLA - Winter Board Meeting Notes......................... 48 VNLA – Membership Annual Meeting Notes ............. 50

Save the Date! Thursday, August 11, 2016 VNLA Field Day Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA

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THANKS

to these Breakfast Meeting Sponsors! $500 Gold Sponsors

$250 Silver Sponsors Eastern Shore Nursery of VA

Merrifield Garden Center

Farm Credit

RSG Landscaping

Ingleside Plantation Nurseries

Saunders Brothers Inc.

Nursery Supplies

Waynesboro Nurseries


Vol. 86, No.1; January/February/March 2016 Editor: Jeff Miller

We had two Happy Hours in February planned for Richmond and Charlottesville to facilitate member communications and fellowship. We had a board meeting in Richmond March 2. Planning is under way for Field Day and Summer Tour at Grelen Nursery. Reserve August 10-12, 2016. We are planning for an agenda of great speakers and fellowship and one of the best attended in years.

383 Coal Hollow Road; Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721 Internet E-mail Address: info@vnla.org www.vnla.org (Association Info) https://www.facebook.c om/VNLA1932

We are continuing to update the instruction and testing for the Virginia Certified Horticulturalist program. We are ever mindful of our responsibility to create a smooth transition for VNLA and its members as we plan for Jeff’s retirement in 2 ½ years. The By-Laws update and Board Policy Manuel update are part of that effort. We have formed a search committee as well.

www.VirginiaGardening.com (Consumer Info) Telephone: 540-382-0943 or 1-800-476-0055 Fax: 540-382-2716

We are always looking for better ways to serve VNLA members, their staff and customers. The new online webinars by Jim Owens, professor at Virginia Tech, have been well received. Any suggestions for more improvements and services are invited.

Disclaimer: Published for your information, this newsletter is not an endorsement for individual products or editorial comments.

We are blessed with an ever changing and active Board of Directors and Volunteer committees. Any suggestions on future volunteer leadership is always invited and needed.

Twitter: @vnla1932

President’s Message First I would like thank Sonya Lepper Westervelt for her service as President last year and her continued service as Past President this year. She is a true asset to the industry. VNLA has an aggressive agenda for 2016. It starts with a By-Laws update for the first time in nearly twenty years, to bring our By-Laws into agreement with current practice and the advice of legal counsel and industry consultants. Copies of our By-Laws will be mailed to every member of record. If you have any questions please contact me, Jeff Miller, or Sonya Westervelt,

It should be a good Spring Season with a warmer than normal March providing the potential for an early start due to El Nino. The Weather Service is predicting El Nino neutral conditions by June. Best of luck to all for a profitable Spring Season. Please contact me with any suggestions on how we can better serve you, our members! Bill Gouldin, Gouldin,,VNLA VNLA President President 2016 2016 wjg@stranges.com 804-360-2800 wjg@stranges.com

This year we are going to update our Board Policy Manuel to modernize our board policies and procedures. We have been and will continue to be involved in the development of policy on Noxious Weeds and Pollinators, as well as any legislation that we identify that may have an impact on our members. Any issues that you identify should be referred to Jeff Miller. 66

Save the Date! Thursday, August 11, VNLA Field Day, Grelen Nursery

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Letters – HRI Horticultural Research Institute On behalf of the Horticultural Research Institute Board of Trustees, thank you for your contribution in the amount of $500 on. Donations are vital to the success of HRI and our ability to fund research projects and to meet operational needs. Your donation was directed to the Annual Fund. With donors like you, we are able to protect advancements in technology, practices, and products for the green industry. Research matters; your continued financial support is critical. Again, thank you for your support! Jennifer Gray, Research Programs Administrator, Horticultural Research Institute

Letters – VAC State Policy Development Meeting On behalf of the Virginia Agribusiness Council (VAC), we want to thank you again for your support of our State Policy Development Meeting. Thanks in large part to the outstanding support of members like you, the Council has continued

to excel in representing our industry's interest with the legislature. Our State Policy Development Meeting is an important opportunity for our members to collectively discuss priority issues and prepare for the coming year. Our members are our stakeholders and each perspective is critical to our mission — to represent Virginia Agribusiness with a unified voice. At the 2016 State Policy Development Meeting, representatives from different agribusiness industry sectors across Virginia discussed the upcoming General Assembly session and proposed changes to the Council's policy on state issues. The topics of discussion included upcoming budget issues, such as funding for agricultural best management practices, and other issues such as biosolids, food safety and labeling, pollinator health, and animal welfare. This meeting, one of the Council's most important of the entire year, helps us prepare for a busy winter in Richmond working with the General Assembly. Thank you for contributing to our State Policy Development Meeting. Your sponsorship supports our efforts to promote and defend the business interests of our members and it is greatly appreciated. Katie K. Frazier President

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Letters – VAC Roundtables On behalf of the Virginia Agribusiness Council, we want to thank you again for your support of our Agribusiness Roundtable events throughout the year. It is through the enduring support of outstanding members like you that the Council is able to continue to excel in representing our industry's interest with the legislature. Our Agribusiness Roundtables provide a forum for our members to express their concerns in the presence of important lawmakers and individuals such as the Secretary of Natural Resources and the Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry. While we were disappointed that we had to cancel our final Roundtable due to flooding, we will return to Central Virginia during our next group of meetings. We look forward to hosting these important events again in the Spring of 2016, but will do so in a new format in certain regions. It is our hope that a more casual atmosphere will increase participation from our attendees and facilitate a more natural flow of conversation. Providing ample opportunities for individuals to speak to the legislators in their district and inform them of their needs remains a priority, and we look forward to hosting these special guests again this year. Thank you again for sponsoring our Agribusiness Roundtables. Your contribution supports our efforts to promote and defend the business interests of our members and it is greatly appreciated.4 Katie K. Frazier President, Virginia Agribusiness Council

Letters – Shoosmith Scholarship Recipient Dear Supporters of the Albert James (Bert) Shoosmith Scholarship, I would first of all like to say thank you again for your support of my education at Virginia Tech. I was honored and very grateful to be awarded the VNLA Albert James (Bert) Shoosmith Scholarship in 2014. I wanted to update you all on how things have been going. This past summer I worked with Fitzgerald Farms and assisted with irrigation and worked on safety certifications. I also had the opportunity to work at FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) Youth camp in Black Mountain, NC. I started my fall semester at Virginia Tech inAugust living off campus to cut living costs. This past semester I really enjoyed my classes and professors. I took 16 credit hours including Soils, Marketing Ag Commodities, Agronomic Crops, and Survey of Organic Chemistry. These classes were more focused on my major and so I really enjoyed these courses. After meeting with my advisor and working out my schedule I realized that I will be able to graduate inthe spring of 2017. This is due to credit I came in with and although I am in no rush to finish, this will cut costs since I can go ahead and start working instead of paying for an additional year of rent and tuition. Over the fall semester I got involved with Agriculture Future of America (AFA), an organization whose mission is to create partnerships that identify, encourage and support outstanding college men and women preparing for careers in the agriculture and food industry. I attended Leaders Conference in Kansas City where I met with professionals and leaders in the agriculture industry, met other college students from around the nation, and participated in sessions and other networking events. I continued my involvement with the Block and Bridle club at Virginia Tech, the College of Agriculture and Life Science Ambassador Program, and New Life Christian Fellowship. This past year at Virginia Tech has presented me with many opportunities. I have learned much already in and out of the classroom. My success would not have been possible without your generous support. Let me know if you have any questions. Sincerely,

Lydia Fitzgerald, 4695 Tye Brook Hwy Arrington, VA 22922, January 2016

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VNLA – Award: Environmental: Gunderson

Environmental Award - To be eligible to receive this award, the recipient must be a current individual or company VNLA member in good standing with the organization. One award will be presented each year based upon adequately fulfilling, or exceeding the criteria, otherwise, the award will be skipped that year. Participants are encouraged to maintain due diligence in practicing and utilizing best management principles (BMP) resulting in the least negative impact on our environment. Each individual or company will promote and show that our horticultural industry has a more positive than negative impact on our environment by how we operate on a day-to-day basis. On behalf of the VNLA, it is my pleasure to present the 2015 Environmental Award. This member’s passion for educating the public on the living practices of sustainable landscape is apparent on a day to day basis. This member frequently works with non-profits including Lynnhaven River Now, the Elizabeth River Project and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. In addition to their non-profit activities this member has developed Hampton Roads premiere native plant nursery, providing a local resource for affordable native plants. This member has been featured many times for his living shoreline work and other stormwater BMP's including rain gardens, buffer gardens, bio-swales, permeable pavers and pollinator gardens. It is my pleasure to present to 2015 Environmental Award to Eric Gunderson of Southern Branch Nursery. Presented by Josh Ellinger, VNLA Director, Environmental Affairs

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VNLA – Award: Professional of the Year: Singlemann

The 2015 Distinguished Virginia Professional of the Year. This award is given annually by the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association to honor a member of our green industry. The selection criteria are based equally on a candidate who has spent their career promoting and advancing the green industry. This individual is selected on the basis of long term contributions to the local and/or state organizations of Nursery and Landscape Associations. A committee of the previous three recipients of this award, along with the approval of the Executive Director of VNLA, will make the final selection. The winner will be introduced at our Annual Membership Meeting at MANTS in January. The person you nominate must be a VNLA member or work for a firm that is a member of VNLA. A previous recipient of the prestigious award is eligible again after five years. Ms. Peggy M. Singlemann graduated from the State University of New York at Cobleskill with a degree in Horticulture and is a Certified Nurseryman through the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association. She earned her North American Certificate in Horticulture through the American Public Garden Association, of which she is a member. Through the International Society of Arboriculture she is a Certified Arborist as well as a member. She is a member of the Central Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association, the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association, the Virginia Society of Landscape Designers, the Southern Garden History Society and the Virginia Native Plant Society. She is a past board member of the Virginia Urban Forestry Council and the Central Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association.

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Since 1984 Ms. Singlemann has been the Director of Horticulture at the Maymont Foundation in Richmond, Virginia. Since 2013 she has co-hosted Central Virginia’s monthly gardening show, Virginia Home Grown, on WCVE PBS. Maymont is a 100-acre Victorian estate, gifted to the City of Richmond by Major and Mrs. James H. Dooley in 1925 as a museum and park for everyone to enjoy. As Director of Horticulture Ms. Singlemann is responsible for the design, implementation and maintenance of Maymont’s formal Italian Garden, 4-acre Japanese Stroll Garden, numerous themed gardens, as well as the Arboretum that encompasses Maymont’s 100 acres. In addition, she is responsible for horticulture education and horticulture volunteer programs.

VNLA – Watkins VNLA WatkinsRecognized Recognizedfor forSerService the Industry the vice to the to Industry in the in Virginia Virginia General Assembly General Assembly

Ms. Singlemann lectures throughout the mid-Atlantic region and has been published in local and national periodicals such American Nurseryman, Horticulture, and Virginia Gardener. In 1988 she was featured in Working Mother magazine. Peggy has judged the Christmas Decorations at Colonial Williamsburg and presented at the Colonial Williamsburg 69th Garden Symposium. In 2013 she was recognized by the Central Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association with a scholarship named in her honor. Through the show, the magazine articles, the workshops, tours and formal lectures she has shared her enthusiasm for a career that was started in kindergarten when she planted her first beet seeds in her father’s vegetable garden. Little did he know the spark he ignited that day! She has embraced the past 31 years as Maymont’s Director of Horticulture as a lifetime of continual learning and growing while doing the same to Maymont’ s landscape and Arboretum. She truly considers this process as a collaborative effort supported by the professionals of the Green Industry, the avid gardeners and especially the volunteers and staff. Being a professional and promoting the professionalism of the Green Industry is important. VNLA Professional of the Year 2015 Presented to Peggy Singlemann For Outstanding Service & Dedication To The Nursery and Landscape Industry by the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association Presented by Tom Saunders on behalf of Paul Saunders at the VNLA Annual Breakfast Meeting on January 7, 2016

Note: there were not any nominations for the Young Professional of the Year and Honorary Members

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John C. Watkins, Chairman of the Board of Watkins Nurseries, served in the Virginia General Assembly for 34 years, 18 as a Senator and 16 as a Delegate. As Chairman, he has received the Distinguished Friend of Agriculture Award from the Virginia Agribusiness Council, the Virginia Farm Bureau Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award, and was the Virginia Nurserymen’s Association Nurseryman of the Year in 1987. Watkins Nurseries, founded in 1876, is a landscape/build firm and wholesale grower of large field-grown plant material on 750 acres. They provide quality plant material to the Mid-Atlantic region. Senator Watkins is a 1969 graduate of Virginia Tech in horticulture and agriculture. He continues to serve on a number of committees and boards, and over the years has been a model for community engagement, both as a General Assembly member and nursery owner. In 2015, Senator Watkins retired from the Virginia General Assembly. On behalf of the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association, I would like to thank Senator Watkins for his service to the Commonwealth of Virginia and his dedication to the nursery and landscape industry. We would like to present you with a framed certificate from Journey through Hallowed Ground, which we will plant a native tree in your honor at a ceremony this spring. “I am pleased to acknowledge the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association's $100 donation to the Journey

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Through Hallowed Ground Partnership's Living Legacy Tree Planting Project. We cannot be more proud to have a tree dedicated to honor A Fallen Civil War Soldier in tribute to The Honorable John C. Watkins. This tree will serve as a lasting tribute to the American Civil War fallen for generations to come.� William W. Sellers, President and CEO of Journey Through Hallowed Grounds Partnership.

Ancestry.com, through their ownership of Fold3 and their collective support of the Living Legacy Program, created a means for each soldier's story to be shared with others. Brent Hunsinger, VNLA Legislative Chair

Mobile-Friendly App of the Guide to Virginia Growers!

The Living Legacy Tree Planting Project is a bold initiative to honor and remember the 620,000 Civil War Soldiers who died during the most defining moment in our American history. By planting or designating one tree for each of the fallen soldiers, we are creating an unparalleled National Memorial of trees planted along the 180-mile National Scenic Byway that spans from Gettysburg to Monticello in the Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area.

Look up plant sources, hotlinks to grower email, website and phone!

You will find an interactive map of the planted trees at www.HallowedGroundTrees.org where you can search by the soldier's last name or by the donor's name once the tree is planted. Trees are generally planted during a dormant season and therefore may not be planted immediately. However, be assured we will invite you to the dedication ceremony when it occurs. In addition, thanks to the support of Ancestry .com, each Living Legacy soldier will have a Fold3 Memorial Page.

www.vnla.org/Grower-Guide

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Letters – Journey through Hallowed Grounds Partnership

News - VSU's Cooperative Extension Associate Wins ISA Award

I am pleased to acknowledge the Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association's $100 donation to the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership's Living Legacy Tree Planting Project. We cannot be more proud to have a tree dedicated to honor A Fallen Civil War Soldier in tribute to The Honorable John C. Watkins. This tree will serve as a lasting tribute to the American Civil War fallen for generations to come.

Joel Koci, Virginia Cooperative Extension Associate for Urban Forestry at Virginia State University (VSU), was recently awarded the 2015 Volunteer of the Year Award by the Mid Atlantic Chapter of the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). He received the award based on his involvement with the ISA annual chapter meeting in Annapolis, as well as for organizing the ISA Day of Safety at VSU, hosting the test for Tree Worker Certification at VSU and for his work in getting VSU the prestigious Tree Campus USA designation.

A bond certificate has been prepared and sent to Brent Hunsinger for presentation to Senator Watkins. I have enclosed a copy of the certificate in recognition of association's $100 donation, which is fully tax deductible. The Living Legacy Tree Planting Project is a bold initiative to honor and remember the 620,000 Civil War Soldiers who died during the most defining moment in our American history. By planting or designating one tree for each of the fallen soldiers, we are creating an unparalleled National Memorial of trees planted along the 180-mile National Scenic Byway that spans from Gettysburg to Monticello in the Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area. You will find an interactive map of the planted trees at www.HallowedGroundTrees.org, where you can search by the soldier's last name or by the donor's name once the tree is planted. Trees are generally planted during a dormant season and therefore may not be planted immediately. However, be assured we will invite you to the dedication ceremony when it occurs. In addition, thanks to the support of Ancestry.com, each Living Legacy soldier will have a Fold3 Memorial Page. Ancestry.com, through their ownership of Fold3 and their collective support of the Living Legacy Program, created a means for each soldier's story to be shared with others.

Tree Campus USA is a program that recognizes college and university campuses that effectively manage their urban/community forestry and develop connectivity with the community beyond campus borders to foster healthy, urban forests. The program also strives to engage students through service learning opportunities on campus. Koci has been an active member of ISA since 1980. Through research, technology, and education, the ISA promotes the professional practice of arboriculture and fosters a greater worldwide awareness of the benefits of trees. In his role as VSU's Cooperative Extension Associate for Urban Forestry, Koci focuses on providing education to the public in three primary areas: Small Woodlot Management, Urban Forest Management and Alternative Forest Production Systems. He is also charged with engaging youth and adults in environmental education. For more information on VSU's Urban Forestry Cooperative Extension program, contact Koci at 804-524-5758 or jkoci@vsu.edu

I want to thank you, again, for supporting this initiative. We could not be more grateful. William W. Sellers President and CEO

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News - Robinson Retirement from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

Lewis Ginter Nature Reserve. It’s the result of over five years of discussion between the Garden’s leadership and the family, and we see it as part of an on-going and deliberate process in the evolution of the Garden,” says Reed. “Our immediate goal is to work alongside the family and learn from them as much as possible, so that their vision to benefit the Garden and the community informs our long-term planning.” This major gift comes as the Garden is celebrating its 30th anniversary and there are several interesting parallels to the botanical garden’s history. The Hanover County acreage is approximately the same as Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s site in Henrico County, the azalea collection on the Hanover property was started 30 years ago, and both gifts are the result of generous individuals known for their love of nature and philanthropy. Additional Information on Shane Tippett

RICHMOND, VA -- Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s Board of Directors has announced President and CEO Frank Robinson (photo right) retired on March 31, 2015, after 23 years of leadership at the Garden. Robinson started in 1992 as Executive Director and was promoted to President and CEO in October of 2011. During his tenure, the Garden was transformed from a little known drive-through attraction to one of the mid-Atlantic’s most highly respected nonprofit organizations and an internationally recognized botanical garden and cultural institution. In appreciation of Robinson’s many accomplishments, the Board has established and is raising funds for the Frank L. Robinson Endowed Horticulture Chair. “We are deeply grateful to Frank for his creative and inspiring leadership over the past two decades,” says Board President John Reed. “It seems fitting to honor Frank by nurturing the exceptional garden he envisioned and realized through his unparalleled dedication and breathtaking vision.”

Prior to Lewis Ginter, Tippett worked a dozen years in other non-profit organizations. He was the Assistant Head for Finance and Operations at St. Catherine’s School, an Episcopal girl’s school in Richmond. Before that he served as the Manager of the Virginian Diocesan Center at Roslyn, a year-round full service church conference and retreat center. Tippett attended the U. S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. He has 11 years on active duty in the U.S. Marine Corps, and 10 years as a Reservist during his time at Roslyn. Contact: Beth Monroe, Director, Public Relations & Marketing, (804) 262-9887, ext. 316;

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The Garden’s Executive Director Shane Tippett (photo left) will transitioned into the Garden’s top leadership role effective January 1, 2015, keeping his current title as Robinson assumed the role of President Emeritus. Tippett has served the Garden for 10 years, first as Assistant Executive Director and then as Executive Director. “Shane’s promotion in October 2011 to Executive Director helped the Board of Directors set up this smooth transition of leadership upon Frank’s planned retirement,” explains Board President John Reed. “We are well-positioned with strong leadership in place to move forward and embrace exciting new opportunities.” The most recent of these opportunities is a planned gift of an 80-acre estate in Hanover County to Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden by a local family. The property includes a significant azalea collection as well as resources to ensure the preservation of the land for generations to come. “We are grateful for this transformative gift, which we are calling the

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VNLA Plant profile – Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’

What an excellent plant! The yellow to orange-red winter stems of Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ glow in the landscape for five months, even in the gloomiest winter day. Shrubby dogwoods with colored stems are a staple element in the shrub or mixed border when it comes to providing winter interest to our landscapes. In Virginia, red-stemmed Tatarian dogwood (Cornus alba ‘Sibirica’) and yellowstemmed red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea ‘Flaviramea’) are still, however, the main choice when it comes to providing a colorful winter bark display. Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ is extremely popular in Europe but, unfortunately, it is quite uncommon in the Mid-Atlantic USA. The lack of interest for this plant could be both a consequence of the less attractive appearance of the regular sanguinea species and the resulting bad press from several authors. Cornus sanguinea may not be as garden worthy as C. sericea or C. alba, especially when left unpruned. However, its cultivar ‘Midwinter Fire’ is in a different league. It has a compact habit, brighter winter colored stems and lighter green summer foliage. It is also smaller than ‘Sibirica’ and ‘Flaviramea’ and has a less coarse texture, being better suited for smaller landscapes. Also, the latter cultivars often only look their best when the lighting is right, but ‘Midwinter Fire’ is striking regardless of the light conditions. I have several colonies of this cultivar in my garden, some in full sun and some in light shade. In full sun they grow more vigorously and have darker orange winter stems. They are planted right in front of a Colorado blue spruce for a yearround display: the glowing stems set a bold contrast against the blue of the conifer in winter, while the light green summer foliage and the butter yellow fall color also combine 14 14

beautifully in the landscape. In light shade, although they do not grow as fast, they remain more true to their cultivar name, resembling a flame: a lighter yellow color at the base of the stems gradually darkens to orange towards the tip. They are stunning in a rainy day and among the snow. These are under planted with Bergenia cordifolia and against a background of Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ to create a fantastic winter garden. ‘Winter Beauty’ and ‘Winter Flame’ are said to be other cultivars of C. sanguinea, less vigorous and less suckering than ‘Midwinter Fire’, although they can be indistinguishable from it. Artic Fire™ is a hybrid selection with an even more compact habit and a more intense yellow coloration at the base of the stems. Latin name: Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ (pronunciation: sun-GWEE-neh-ah). Common name: ‘Midwinter Fire’ bloodtwig dogwood. Origin: Europe. Habit: Upright, suckering. Forms colonies. Height & spread: 8’x8’ if left unpruned, ca. 5’x5’ if pruned annually or biannually. Leaves: Entire, oblong-oval, opposite, 2-2.5” long and 1.5-2” wide. Can develop a good yellow in fall. Bark: Yellow to orange-red in fall and winter. Lime green in summer. Loses its color after 2 years. Flowers: small white flowers in clusters at the end of spring or early summer. Can be showy in some years.

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Fruit: Small berries, black, seldom abundant. Enjoyed readily by birds.

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Soil and pH: Any soil type. Tolerates a very broad range of pH but has a preference for lime. Moisture: Prefers moist soils, but can tolerate dry soils once established. Light: Full sun to part shade. Growth rate: Can be slow to establish. Later on, medium to fast growth. Pruning: Prune back to 8� every year (or every 2 years) in late winter or early spring to maximize stem coloration. Pests and diseases: Fairly pest and disease free. Leaf sunscald may appear in full sun in the warmer areas of its range. Seasons of interest: Spring (if with flowers)-fall-winter. USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 8 (9). References: Cultivars of Woody Plants, Volume I, Subvolume Cornus. Lawrence C. Hatch. TCR Press. 2015. By Francisco Javier de la Mota, PhD student in Horticulture at Virginia Tech

Over 10 years ago, MMTA first reported on efforts by the state of New Jersey to force carriers who travel in the state to pay corporate taxes. Several members recently reported that New Jersey has resumed its efforts, which may result in your trucks being held hostage at roadside. All companies that make a single drop-off or pick-up at any New Jersey location are required to register with the Division of Taxation for payment of corporate taxes. Carriers who are not properly registered and paying the taxes are having their trucks held until payment is made. When a company has not registered, the Division often issues an assessment that is significantly greater than the actual amount of money the carrier owes. In some cases, those assessments have exceeded $10,000. Select here to learn more about registering with the NJ Division of Taxation and an overview of the tax. New Jersey also has a voluntary disclosure program, which limits the look-back period and penalties for those that have not been paying, but have been delivering in the state. More Information. You should also consult your tax advisor to discuss amending your Maryland tax returns because payments made to New Jersey may lower Maryland tax liability.

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Legislation - H2B Worker Prevailing Wage Rate Changes January 5, 2016. OMB Approval of Revisions to Appendix B of Form ETA-9142B and Form ETA-9165 in order to Implement Provisions of 2016 DOL Appropriations Act The 2016 Department of Labor Appropriations Act (Division H, Title I of Public Law 114-113) (2016 DOL Appropriations Act), which was enacted on December 18, 2015, contained several provisions requiring non-substantive modifications to (1) the Form ETA-9165, Employer-Provided Survey Attestations to Accompany H-2B Prevailing Wage Determination Request Based on a Non-OES Survey and (2) Appendix B of the Form ETA-9142B, H-2B Application for Temporary Employment Certification. In order to comply with the 2016 DOL Appropriations Act, the Office of Foreign Labor Certification (OFLC) submitted these non-substantive modifications to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. The OMB has now approved the non-substantive modifications. Therefore, the OFLC Certifying Officers (COs) may issue H-2B prevailing wage determinations based on the submission of a private survey, and may now certify H-2B applications for temporary labor certification, so long as all applicable program requirements are met.

will issue a Notice of Deficiency requesting that the employer provide a signed and dated copy of the revised Appendix B. To obtain a copy of the Emergency Guidance (updated January 5) reflecting these changes, please click here. https://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/Emergency_Guidance_2016_DOL_Appropriations_Act.pdf To obtain a copy of the revised Form ETA-9165 and general instructions, please click here https://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/Form_ETA-9165_Instructions_rev_DOL_Appropriations_Act.pdf . To obtain a copy of the revised Appendix B, Form ETA-9142B, please click here https://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/ETA_Form_9142B_Appendix_B_rev_DOL_Appropriations_Act.pdf . To obtain a copy of the Department's latest Frequently Asked Question concerning corresponding employment, please click here https://www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/H-2B_2015_IFR_FAQ_Corresponding-Employment_2016_DOL_Appropriations_Act.pdf .

IMPORTANT NOTICES Employers Requests for Prevailing Wage Determination Based on Survey

Davi Horta Bowen, Government Relations & Grassroots Representative, AmericanHort速

Employer requests for a prevailing wage determination based on a private wage survey submitted on or after December 19, 2015, must be accompanied by the revised Form ETA-9165. The CO will issue a Request for Information requiring the employer submit the revised Form ETA-9165 for any survey-based requests for a prevailing wage determination submitted without the revised Form ETA-9165. Employers Requests for H-2B Temporary Labor Certification Prior to February 1, 2016, employers with either a pending H-2B application or those who file a new H-2B application containing the previous Appendix B will be provided with a copy of the revised Appendix B at the time the CO issues a certification decision. They will also receive instructions in the Final Determination Letter regarding how to complete the revised Appendix B for submission to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. On or after February 1, 2016, employers or their authorized representatives filing a new H-2B application must submit a signed and dated copy of the revised Appendix B containing the program assurances and obligations that comply with the 2016 DOL Appropriations Act. Otherwise, the CO 16 16

Save the Date! Thursday, August 11, 2016 VNLA Field Day Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA

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Winner of the Photo Contest

VNLA - Photo Contest Rules The contest is open to any photographer (amateur and professional) except members of Board of Directors of VNLA and their families. Entries are limited to VNLA members and their staff. Each photographer may enter up to three (3) digital images per Newsletter deadline (see #6). Email images to info@vnla.org . Include your name, phone number, company, and email. One winning entry per photographer per year. You may re-enter non-winning entries.

In the mood for Spring! Photo Winner: Amy Chaffman Owner of The Pampered Garden, Woodbridge, VA LG Android camera Win $50, submit your photos! Good Luck and Happy Photographing!

If you don’t see your ad here, neither does anyone else! Call 800-476-0055 or email info@vnla.org for advertising information, today!

Do You Need extra CEU’s for your Re-Certification? Write a short article about a Program you have attended this Winter get 1 CEU! 1-800-476-0055

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Please e-mail images separately. Feel free to elaborate on any story surrounding the photograph. Photos should be 300 dpi high resolution. All photographs must be related to the Green Industry. The subject can be located in a nursery, back yard, or in a landscape--just so it is obviously related to the green industry profession. Deadline for submission is 5:00 p.m. on the Newsletter Copy Deadline, which is the 15th of January, April, July, and October. All submissions become the property of the VNLA. Model Release forms are required with each photograph which contains a clearly identifiable person. Release forms are available from the VNLA office, on request, and are also available for download from the VNLA website at Model release in MS Word format or Adobe PDF format. Judging is done by the VNLA Communication Committee. All decisions are final

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VNLA – Member Profile: Strange’s Florists, Greenhouses, Garden Centers In August 1979, Strange’s purchased 12111 W Broad St; which is now the largest garden center location. The original location had approximately 50,000 square feet of greenhouse along with 6500 square feet of buildings. Strange’s moved forward with the purchase of the 8010 Midlothian Turnpike store in October 1982 and one year later, the 6710 Hull St store. Leadership understood the need for improvements and began the remodeling and expansion of both the Creighton road and Mechanicsville locations in 1984.

Bill Gouldin, President and CEO of Strange’s Florists, Greenhouses and Garden Centers, has over forty years of experience in the retail florist and garden center industry. Before starting with Strange’s, Gouldin was a Brigade S-4 Sergeant in the US Army in 1968-1971. Strange's is a full service florist and garden center with 4 retail floral shops, 2 retail garden centers, and 1 wholesale greenhouse range, all within the Richmond, VA area. Strange’s is now in the fourth generation of family ownership since its inception in the early 1930’s. With Bill Gouldin included, a total of 6 family members currently hold positions within the company; Cary Gouldin as wholesale division Vice President, Craig Gouldin as floral division Vice President, Brenda Gouldin as Director of Human Resources/Payroll, William Gouldin III as Treasurer, and Meg Gouldin as Human Resources Assistant.

The Short Pump area continues to grow into one of the most progressive retail areas in the state. In March of 2004 the W Broad St location was expanded to include more than 9,000 additional square feet of greenhouses, a new warehouse, a new two story retail facility, and new parking facilities of 300+ parking spaces.

Although family members are mixed within several leadership positions, Strange’s owes its growth and success over the years to the incredibly dedicated and knowledgeable staff. Strange’s has over 150 employees that have a unique passion for people and plants. On December 15, 1974, Strange’s opened its doors at the 3313 Mechanicsville Turnpike location, which at the time had over 6,000 square feet of florist space and 4,000 square feet of greenhouse space. Nearly two years later on January 1, 1976, Strange’s purchased Mosmiller Greenhouses on Creighton Road, consisting of approximately 46,000 square feet of production greenhouse. With Cary Gouldin’s leadership, the Creighton Road location was designated as the Strange’s wholesale range. In 1977, both the Creighton Road and Mechanicsville locations were expanded. 18

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Bill Gouldin earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Longwood University in 2006 and went on to complete the mini MBA program at the University of Richmond in 2008. Gouldin has held several board and chairman positions to include, President of the Central VA Florist Association, Chairman of the Retail Merchants Association of Greater Richmond, Chairman of the Business and Economic Trends Committee for Society of American Florists, Board of Trustees and several management committees of FTDA, Chairman of the AFE Consumer

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Tracking Study, President of Southern Retail Florists, and Chairman of the American Floral Endowment.

News - American Beauties Native Plants Welcomes New Grower Carolina Native Nursery Joins the American Beauties Family of Growers

Gouldin continues to hold his board and committee positions with the Dean’s Advisory Council for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech and the Corporate Advisory Board for the College of Business and Economics at Longwood University, because he has a true passion for sharing his knowledge with both experts and young minds in the business and agriculture industries.

Gouldin is a Richmond, Virginia native with a special appreciation for farm land and good groundhog hunting. He has been happily married to the former Brenda Bowles for 44 years and has a thirty-three year old son, William, and a twenty-seven year old daughter, Meg. Gouldin looks forward to watching the continued growth of Strange’s with both of his children in leadership. A piece of wisdom Gouldin often shares with college students and green industry entrepreneurs is to “stay curious”. There is always more to learn and learning never ends. Bill Gouldin is serving as the 2016 President of the Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association.

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HOCKESSIN, DE, February, 2016 – Carolina Native Nursery, located near Ashville, North Carolina, was established in 2003. They specialize in growing native plants of the Southern Appalachian region. The demand for native plants is growing quickly and the American Beauties brand will help solve the problems consumers are having in locating them. “Most garden centers have a limited selection of native plants; their staff is often unfamiliar with the product. This brand will help take the guess work out of shopping for natives.” - Peggy Anne Montgomery, Brand Manager of American Beauties Native Plants. "Carolina Native Nursery is thrilled to become part of the American Beauties family. As the regional leader in promotion and production of native plants, we think this association will allow us to better position Carolina Native Nursery with independent garden centers. We have seen the demand for native plants increase dramatically recently because of the public's recognition of the vital roll these plants play in songbird, pollinator, and butterfly health. And, we look forward to a longer term relationship with American Beauties and it's fantastic program." - Bill Jones, Owner Carolina Native Nursery “I am very happy and excited to have Carolina Native Nursery join the American Beauties family of growers. Carolina has 13 years of experience growing and selling native plants. Our partnership with them is a natural fit and we welcome their experience and enthusiasm. Carolina is coming out of the gate with more than 100 plants in the brand and will expand our reach into the Ashville, Atlanta, Raleigh, and Charlotte, markets that are clamoring for landscape worthy native plants. We couldn’t be more proud to have a quality grower like Carolina Native Nursery on board and are looking forward to their launch this summer.” - Steve Castorani, Co-owner of American Beauties Native Plants. For more information, please contact: Peggy Anne Montgomery at: peggyanne@abnativeplants.com, www.abnativeplants.com or Sarah Murphy at: sarah@carolinanativenursery.com, www.carolinanativenursery.com

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News - This plant could lure millions into gardening. Hint: It's only kind of legal (Burlington, VT) Newly released results from nationwide survey suggests as many as an estimated 24.5 million Americans would like to try growing marijuana for personal use - if growing it was legal - and Millennials (18-34 years old) are 55% more likely than people 35 years and older to grow marijuana for personal use if it was legal in their state (14% of those 18-34 compared to 9% of those aged 35+). The survey, conducted earlier this year, also finds 70 percent of Americans sure of their response are in favor of seeing marijuana laws liberalized - and 63 percent agree with the statement that "medical use of marijuana should be legalized." The survey findings are a benchmark, according to Bruce Butterfield, Research Director for the National Gardening Association. "There were no glaring surprises here but this is the very first time we took a look at marijuana from a gardening perspective. I don't believe anyone's done that before." The online survey was conducted by Harris Poll and commissioned by Green State Gardener, a new e-commerce company that seeks to help indoor and outdoor growers of medicinal herbs by selling virtually all the equipment needed to succeed. The Green State Gardener website has just been launched with the slogan, 'grow your own health revolution.'

District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for recreational use, including some cases of growing it at home. *Based on the Census USA QuickFacts 2014 estimate of 245.5 million Americans 18 years of age , and older (318,857,056 total population estimate x 77% adults 18+), among whom 10% would try growing marijuana for personal use - if growing it was legal Methodology This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Green State Gardener from January 26-28, 2015 among 2,058 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Claudia Marshall (802) 660-3524. Detailed survey results can be found at: http://vvww.greenstategardener.com/survey-says About Green State Gardener: Green State Gardener is a small, web-based start-up based in Burlington, Vermont offering organic solutions to a broad range of growing challenges for small-space and urban gardeners. We empower our customers to grow, process and use their own plant-based Contact: Claudia Marshall, claudiam@qardeners.com , 802-660-3524

Will Raap, founder of Gardener's Supply Company, is also weighing in on the survey findings: "I have spent my entire career trying to boost people's interest in and connection to growing plants that have value to them. This new way to attract millions of new gardeners is an opening that is as bigor bigger than- the opening Michelle Obama created when she started a vegetable garden on the White House lawn." The survey further found that among people who would grow marijuana for personal use (if legal), Baby Boomers aged 55 and over (29 percent) and millennials ages 18-34 (38 percent) are most likely to do so, says Butterfield, suggesting the possibility of backyard bonding between generations. Will Raap says - that's just one of a number of potential benefits: "Gardening is fundamentally healthful because it gets people to put their hands in the soil and relate to nature whether it's on their window sill or in their yard."

Save the Date! Thursday, August 11, 2016 VNLA Field Day Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA

Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have currently legalized marijuana in some form; four states and the 20

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News - AmericanHort, Advocacy & Research, Hello, 2016! The new year is upon us. And like most presidential election years, no one expects much federal legislation to make it to President Obama's desk to be signed into law. For sure, there will be at least a few pitched legislative battles, including a fight over Congressional approval of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement. November means elections (they can't come soon enough!), and we may see some shifts in the political landscape that AmericanHort must navigate to represent our industry. Most eyes are on the U.S. Senate. Of the 34 seats up for reelection this year, Republicans are fighting to hold 24 of them. Democrats need to pick up five seats to claim the majority. Republicans, meanwhile, are virtually assured to retain control of the House. AmericanHort expects a year where much of the "action" will be in the regulatory, technical, and legal arenas. Bear in mind that AmericanHort is not a partisan organization. Our work representing the industry is about policy, not politics or political party. Our task is to cultivate political champions on both sides of the aisle who are willing to advance favorable policies for our industry. Congress Adopts H-2B Fixes, But DOL Is Foot-Dragging On December 18, President Obama signed into law an omnibus spending bill to keep the government operating through September 30, 2016. Policy riders adopted as part of the omnibus include important tax provisions and H-2B visa program relief. These provisions will expire on September 30, 2016, but AmericanHort will continue to fight in Washington for long-term relief. We are also closely monitoring the implementation of the new law; early signs are that the DOL is foot-dragging. Meanwhile, a recent blog post by the libertarian Cato Institute explains why the modest Congressional improvements to H-2B will contribute to border security efforts. Long story short: if you support secure borders, you should support well-regulated, functioning legal visa programs.

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Increased Section 179 direct expensing deduction limits (which would be indexed for inflation and expanded to eliminate the $250k cap on expensing real property and allow for the expensing of air conditioning and heating units). The five year built-in gains period for S-Corporations converted from C-Corporations. The Research and Development (R&D) Credit.

Bonus depreciation did not make the list for permanence. However, the package extended 50 percent bonus depreciation through the end of 2017. Thereafter, the bill provides for 40 percent depreciation in 2018 and 30 percent depreciation in 2019. In addition to bonus depreciation, the vast majority of other so-called tax extender items that were not made permanent were extended through either 2016 or 2019. Overall, the deal is favorable for small businesses and provides certainty in a number of areas where the uncertainty of the tax extender process had dominated.

Affordable Care Act Reporting deadlines extended The U.S. Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service have announced an extension of some Affordable Care Act reporting deadlines to help companies meet the requirements. Basically, employers will have 2 extra months beyond February 1, until March 31, 2016, to provide individual employees forms for reporting on offers of health coverage and the coverage provided. The deadline to report this information to the IRS is extended by 3 months past the previous February 29 due date for paper filings (now May 31) and the March 31 date for electronic returns (now June 30). By Craig Regelbrugge, American Hort

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They are mutually reinforcing. Learn how this impacts your business and the industry. On Taxes, Omnibus Brings Measure of Certainty The spending bill approved by Congress and signed by the President just before Christmas included several tax policy stocking stuffers. Though not perfect, the tax package does include a number of provisions sure to be welcomed by horticulture businesses and their owners. Most importantly, the package made 22 of the extender items permanent, including:

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Within the 70 pages, readers will be encouraged to see both business and industry in a new light; that is, from the eyes of consumers. Furthermore, the resulting insights and recommendations present inspiration, ideas and tangible applications for businesses at all stages of all sizes.

News - AmericanHort Releases SHIFT Insights

AmericanHort recently released "An Introduction to SHIFT," a downloadable PDF containing the nearly 30 insights and recommendations from its SHIFT initiative. These insights and recommendations present all businesses in the horticulture industry with insightful and tangible takeaways to prepare businesses for future and current consumers. In the fall of 2014, AmericanHort launched a research initiative known then as "The Future of Garden Retail." It became immediately apparent, however, that this project went far beyond the scope of retail alone — it touches each and every part of our industry. It was also clear that the results of this research would challenge us to "shift" our thinking, our approach to business and our mindsets about consumers. SiteLight .5 pg bw 3ads 10-04.qxd

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Over the course of the coming year, AmericanHort will focus strongly on three of the insights — Customer Profiles (Insight "Customers have distinct buying motivations"), Language (Insight "Garden retail language isn't consumer facing") and Reasons to Buy (Insight "Opportunities for Impulse Buys Should Be Strategically Incorporated into a Retail Layout"). Through webinars, whitepapers, educational sessions, articles and more, AmericanHort will lead businesses through the depths of these insights, helping them to develop strategies tailored to individual businesses and their specific customers. These in-depth learning opportunities will be made exclusively available to AmericanHort members. For more information on SHIFT please visit www.americanhort.org/shift Source: Greenhouse Product News

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News - Give Four Fuel Cost Stability and Predictability

As we enter 2016, every business impacted by the price of energy – i.e. everyone you know – is enjoying what can be looked at as the equivalent of a tax cut or rebate. Gasoline costs less. Diesel fuel costs less. Natural Gas costs less. Heating oil costs less. You get the point. Not to say that my heart doesn’t go out to those who risked everything to move to North Dakota to work for the “it” industry of the early part of the decade, but crude oil, shale, fracking, and other top “places to be” took a sharp hit to the gut when Saudi Arabia’s leadership decided that they would rather protect market share than protect the price for a barrel of oil. Since that time, there has been a free-fall in the price of oil, yielding some very tangible benefits and some very tangible pain depending upon whether you are primarily a consumer or a producer or oil. In our country, we have a combination of the two, but for the most part individuals and companies are true beneficiaries of the price decline. But for how long? Risk management companies have been helping companies manage risk in the energy industry for the past 25 years. Explaining what Angus Energy and other companies like us does might best start with what we DON’T do. We don’t pretend to know where prices will go in the future. We don’t TELL anyone what they must do to protect against an adverse price movement. We also don’t think that anyone has a good crystal ball. If they really did, why would they share it with you? We work with companies to help to educate about the various ways that they might be able to protect against a change in prices that might impact their bottom line. Our clients include heating oil and propane distributors, farmers, hotels, and transportation companies. Our approach is always the same: find out what a company does presently, and then showing some other ways for them to consider. 24 24

Over the past year, a common refrain from some of our transportation (bus companies, ambulance companies, as well as others with fleets) has been, “prices are so low, but what happens when they go back up?”. We don’t know that they will go back up – who is to say that they won’t fall further? – but we do believe that if you are not hedging (defined as “transference of risk”), you are speculating. If the price of fuel is something that is material to your operations budget, you have an obligation – to yourself, your employer, your shareholders – to assess your risk, and then to determine if you want to do something about it. This article is not the proper venue for the specifics, but the ways to manage risk are varied – some easy (simply contract with a supplier to sell you fuel at a fixed price), some more complex (swaps or options – akin to insurance policies). The age of “this is too confusing” or “it’s too risky” has mostly gone away. We are witnessing small and medium sized companies starting to understand the impact that a proper hedge can have on their business (and, in fairness, it is likely that the drop in prices has enticed people to wonder if they can “keep the prices low” for a while). Pretty much anyone who is in the “energy space” can rattle off 10 reasons why prices will spike over the next year, while in the next breath list the 10 reasons why prices will NOT rise at all. All of the facts that are being used to predict what will happen tomorrow, next month and next year are all very valid – today. They don’t, however, enable for good predictions. The average analyst is only right about half of the time. We prefer the approach that recognizes that uncertainty has to be the starting point. If you recognize that you don’t know where prices will go, and recognize that there are numerous factors – weather, OPEC, value of the Dollar, geopolitics, war, terrorism, etc. – that can and will impact prices, then the only decisions you have left to make are whether it is worth your time and effort to learn what tools are available to protect against the unknown. Daniel Silverman, Angus Energy Daniel Silverman joined Angus Energy in 2006 and has since been an integral member of the Angus Hedging. Prior to joining Angus Energy, Mr. Silverman was a partner in a mortgage banking firm where he specialized in trading and hedging mortgage securities. Mr. Silverman now represents Angus Energy to clients in the north-eastern states. Mr. Silverman has 18 years of trading experience and holds a BS in Operations Research from Columbia University as well as an MBA in Marketing from Baruch College. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, Angus Energy has  extensive knowledge in a wide array of industries  including energy, transportation, farming, manu‐ facturing, and commercial real estate with proven  tools and strategies designed to improve business performance and profits. Spe‐ cifically, our wide‐ranging expertise includes managing risk from fuel price vola‐ tility  to  weather  and  precipitation  uncertainty,  as  well  as  business  intelligence  and data analysis, financial management and a host of products and services de‐ signed to maximize – and protect ‐your company’s growth. 

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News - Virginia Native Plant Marketing News New Campaigns/Initiatives: The George Washington Regional Commission's FY15 Coastal Technical Assistance grant from Virginia CZM Program will fund development of a Plant GW Natives regional social marketing campaign. The grant started on October 1, and the first step will be pre-campaign research. For more information, contact Tim Ware, GWRC (or Beth Polak, VA CZM). Updates on all current regional native plant campaigns can be found in a fact sheet downloadable from Virginia CZM's Native Plant page. If you have not visited yet, check out the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay's Reduce Your Stormwater website. The ACB was awarded a Small Watershed Grant by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to build upon this website. Read more. This project includes conducting a communitybased social marketing campaign - Runoff Busters - in the Middle James Watershed to engage residents in implementing rain gardens and BayScapes on private property, as well as technical assistance workshops for local partners in winter 2015 - spring 2016. Contact Anna Mathis for more information.

There have been a series of meetings this year in Virginia and Maryland to collect partner input on development of a Chesapeake Bay Landscape Professional (CBLP) Certification Program, which will be piloted in the two states. Work on a new native plant module will start soon. Read more. For more information, contact Shereen Hughes, Virginia CBLP Coordinator and Virginia Native Plant Marketing Partnership Steering Team member lead on the project. New Publications: A new regional native plant guide is available! Partners in the Plant Piedmont Natives initiative have produced a new guide - Piedmont Native Plants - A Guide for Landscapes and Gardens (covers the counties of Fauquier, Rappahannock, Culpeper, Madison, Orange, Greene, Louisa, Albermarle, Fluvanna, Nelson and Buckingham). The guide is not yet on-line, but will be in future. Contact Repp Glaetti about obtaining copies (minimal charge being collected to offset reprint.) Production of a Hampton Roads regional native plant guide is underway. For more information, contact Virginia Witmer, Virginia CZM Program. New/Revised On-line Tools: DCR-Natural Heritage Program's Virginia Native Plant Finder has a new feature. The Virginia Native Plant Finder

Ad – Goodson and Associates

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lets users create their own custom native plant lists by selecting from a few dropdown menus. Bees, butterflies and hummingbirds are now among the choices, and there's a special category for monarch butterflies. Users also can search plants by common or scientific name to learn which plants benefit a particular pollinator. Input Needed: The Chesapeake Bay Native Plant Center (on-line version of USFWS) Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping: Chesapeake Bay Watershed) is being redesigned. Read more. (Virginia Witmer submitted a suggestion that the new site include a state resource page.) New Native Plant Demonstration Landscapes: In October, at the Captain Sinclair's Recreational Area on the Severn River in Gloucester County, the Middle Peninsula Planning District Commission installed the first phase of an approximately 3 acre native plant landscape with funding from the Virginia CZM Program. The completed landscape will incorporate water conservation and stormwater management methods such as rain gardens, rain chains, and rain barrels. Contact Beth Johnson, MMPDC, for more information. In September, VDOT installed native plant landscaping 8,000 plants - at the Dale City North Rest Area as part of the agency's Pollinator Habitat Program. A great number of volunteers participated. Read more. A fact sheet overview of the Virginia Native Plant Marketing Partnership and its activities, including a list of the current members of the Steering Team, can be downloaded from http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Programs/CoastalZoneManagement/CZMIssuesInitiatives/NativePlants.aspx Questions? Contact Virginia Witmer at (804) 698-4320 or Virginia.Witmer@deq.virginia.gov

News - The University of Maryland Commercial Greenhouse IPM Manual has been updated and expanded! What's New  Over 100 more pages of information  48 new digital images  Updated pesticide charts At the IR-4 meetings in Chicago we discussed new products coming onto the market. One is BASF 703 – 06 F that is shooting for the market place in March of 2016. The combination fungicide will be labeled for nursery and greenhouse and works well on rust at 6 – 8 oz./100 gallon rates and botrytis at 5 -7 oz./100 gallon rates. It also appears to work well on Fusarium. Another fungicide called Mycotrol WPO, sold by Bioworks, has been approved for organic operations and the shelf life of the product has been extended to 18 – 24 months. OxiPhos, from BioSafe Systems, is a relatively new bactericide/fungicide that is labeled for foliar and soil drench applications. It has proven effective as foliar spray for downy mildew. Bioworks has released a product called GC-Pro which is a granule formulation of hydrogen peroxide with sodium percarbonate. It has a label for foliar applications to control bacterial leafspot diseases. $30.00 each* *MGGA, now part of MNLGA, provided funding to help revise this publication; Recent MGGA member businesses who are now MNLGA members can purchase one print copy for their business at a cost of $25. Copies also will be available for purchase at various winter conferences including the January 21, 2016 FALCAN Conference in Frederick and the Chesapeake Green Conference on February 18 and 19, 2016 in Linthicum. By: Stanton Gill, University of Maryland Extension

Do You Need extra CEU’s for your Re-Certification? Write a short article about a Program you have attended this Winter and get an extra CEU! Contact the VNLA Office for details 1-800-476-0055 26 26

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Publication 426-046

Urban Water Quality Management

Residential Stormwater: Put It in Its Place

Decreasing Runoff and Increasing Stormwater Infiltration

Reviewed by John Freeborn, Assistant Master Gardener Coordinator, Horticulture, Virginia Tech

Introduction Humans and plants depend on an adequate supply of clean water for a number of reasons, from producingfood to sustaining life. The average Virginia resident uses 826 gallons of fresh water daily (Virginia Department of Environmental Quality [VADEQ] 2008). In the Commonwealth alone, there are more than one million households that depend on well water, withdrawing more than 50 billion gallons annually (Virginia Department of Health 2008). For groundwater replenishment, we depend largely on recharge (water moving from the surface to groundwater) from infiltration of precipitation through permeable surfaces in the environment — an important part of the natural water cycle (VADEQ 2010). However, due to urbanization, forested areas and grasslands are increasingly converted to commercial, residential, or industrial uses. This conversion creates a significant increase in impermeable surfaces such as concrete, asphalt, building roofs, and even compacted vegetated sites (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] 2003). Impermeable surfaces decrease infiltration and groundwater recharge. They also generate increases in stormwater runoff, defined as any precipitation from a rain or snow event that flows off of impervious surfaces. This runoff often enters surface waters, such as creeks and rivers, without treatment and frequently contains sediment, oils, debris, nutrients, chemicals, and bacteria (EPA 2003; Paul and Meyer 2001). It is also typically warmer than the existing stream water and may flow faster, causing stream bank erosion. These multiple impacts degrade water quality, alter the aquatic habitat, and affect aquatic organisms that depend on clean water (Meyer, Paul, and Taulbee 2005).

Finally, due to the interconnected nature of watersheds, the impaired water travels downstream into the next watershed area. The combined effects of development are increased stormwater runoff into surface waters and decreased infiltration for groundwater recharge. The responsibility for stormwater management is often handled on a large scale and can be fragmented between state, local, and municipal government (Roy et al. 2008). While the focus is typically on large developments and the storm sewers systems, small areas can also contribute significant volumes of stormwater during rain events. By making changes at the residential lot level, much greater infiltration over the watershed area can be attained. Each homeowner can significantly reduce the stormwater load that leaves his or her property, thereby improving surface water quality and helping to recharge groundwater reserves.

Just How Much Runoff Does My House Create? Making a few simple assumptions, we are able to easily calculate the number of gallons that fall in a single rainfall event or over the course of a year. The assumptions we are making are that all precipitation that falls on an impermeable surface (roof, driveway, or walkway) will run off and that all runoff is leaving the site. These assumptions will allow an understanding of how much runoff water a single-family residential site can produce. Average annual precipitation for Virginia residential lots is 42.7 inches (Hayden and Michaels 2000). If the roof area of the house is 1,600 square feet and the area of the driveway and all sidewalks totals 750 square feet (this includes a 12-foot by 50-foot driveway and 50 feet of 3-foot-wide walkways around the house), it would total 2,350 square feet of impervious surface.

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2015

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation,

VNLAgenetic Newsletter January / February / March 2016 information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Jewel E. Hairston, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg. VT/0315/HORT-160P

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A single, half-inch rain generates 732 gallons of runoff from this site, which could fill nearly 15 average bathtubs. Over the course of a year, this impervious area contributes 62,552 gallons of runoff into the local watershed, which is enough to fill seven tractor-trailer tankers with water. Reducing even a small percentage of this runoff by encouraging infiltration will significantly decrease the amount of stormwater leaving this residential site, increase groundwater recharge, and ultimately improve water quality throughout the entire watershed.

Permeable Pavement Permeable pavement incorporates the use of permeable asphalt or concrete, plastic grid systems, or pavers to form a durable and attractive surface that water can infiltrate (figure 1). These applications are designed to allow water infiltration and produce almost no runoff. In fact, permeable pavement areas can be receiving areas (sinks) for runoff from other areas of the home; by directing water to these areas, significant amounts of runoff can be captured. These permeable surfaces can be incorporated into existing driveways and walkways or can be installed in new applications. As water flows through the pavement, it is then filtered by the sub-base gravel and soil under the pavement and infiltrates into the ground.

Practices to Minimize Runoff or Improve Infiltration Stormwater on residential sites can be dealt with in a number of ways. The following techniques, which can be integrated into new construction and existing residential settings, help to manage stormwater:

Disconnecting Downspouts From Drains Often downspouts from home gutters connect into underground pipes that run directly into stormwater drains. Simply unhooking your downspouts from the storm drain system can significantly reduce the amount of runoff from your site. When possible, it is best to redirect these downspouts away from the house and toward grassy areas or other areas with high permeability, allowing water infiltration (figure 2).

• Increasing permeability. • Directing water to more permeable areas. • Detaining water to allow infiltration. • Intercepting and holding rainwater. • Utilizing water on-site as it is needed.

Figure 1. Examples of permeable pavement applications. 28

Source: N.C. State University.

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Rain Harvesting (Bulk or Rain Barrels)

Green Roof Applications

Capturing rainwater for reuse can significantly reduce runoff, and it also provides an alternative source of water for irrigation and other household uses. Collection can be in smaller containers, such as a rain barrel (figure 3), or on a larger scale, capturing thousands of gallons of rainwater in large storage tanks. These tanks can be above-ground or below, and are often equipped with a pump to enable the homeowner to water the home’s turf, landscape, and garden areas. Watering a lawn and landscape this way allows water to be applied as needed, utilizing stored rainwater in a controlled fashion, boosting infiltration.

Green roofs, much like permeable pavement, convert an impermeable or nonporous surface into one that can accept and retain precipitation, reducing runoff from the site (figure 4). When rain falls on a green roof, it is held by the substrate (growing media) and then utilized by the plants as needed. During peak growing times, green roofs can retain up to 75 percent of the precipitation that falls on them; 20 to 40 percent is retained during the winter. The website www.greenroofs.org estimates that “a grass roof with a 4 to 20 cm (1.6 to 7.9 inches) layer of growing medium can hold 10 to 15 cm (3.9 to 5.9 inches) of water.”

Figure 2. Disconnecting a downspout from underground pipes leading to storm sewers. Source: Mid-America Regional Council (MARC); www.marc.org/Environment/Water/downspout.htm.

Figure 4. A green roof application.

Figure 3. A rain barrel system for rainwater harvesting.

Source: Susan Day.

Source: Vision Design Collaborative.

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Overall, the EPA estimates that 50 percent of annual precipitation that would otherwise be runoff can be retained via green roof applications (Berghage et al. 2009). This can significantly reduce the stormwater leaving an otherwise impermeable surface. The water that does leave the green roof has been detained, is cooler, and may be cleaner due to substrate filtration, producing cleaner water leaving the site. There are additional benefits to green roofs, including longer lifespan of roofing materials, sound reduction, and less expensive heating and cooling costs. When retrofitting an existing structure for a green roof application, it is important to follow all building codes to compensate for the additional weight of the media.

Figure 5. An example of urban trees.

Urban Forestry Applications

of absorbing 30 percent more rainfall compared to the same size turf area.

Incorporating trees into residential settings provides a number of benefits for managing stormwater runoff (Nowak and Dwyer 2007). A mature deciduous tree has the potential to intercept 500 to 700 gallons of water per year, mainly via retention on leaves. Additionally, evergreen trees can intercept more than 4,000 gallons per year (Seitz and Escobedo 2008).

During the infiltration process, water is filtered by the soil and contaminants are removed. Specific information on rain gardens and plants that are well-suited for our area can be found on the websites of Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE publication 426-043, http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/426/426-043/426-043.html) and the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF publication P00127, www.dof.virginia.gov/mgt/rfb/rain-gardens. htm).

The rainfall intercepted by trees is often precipitation that would have fallen on an impermeable surface, contributing to runoff. Surface runoff is reduced when precipitation is held on foliage until it evaporates into the atmosphere. Water also moves through the tree canopy via stem flow (water following twigs, and then branches, then the main trunk to the ground) to permeable areas near the trunk, increasing infiltration.

Grass Swales and Berms Grass swales and berms (also known as bioswales) serve to route water to desired areas or to retain water on the property. These features can be attractively planted and serve to slow water movement and filter out contaminants (figure 7). Swales detain and control water flow and can hold several inches of water. This detained water is filtered and then it infiltrates, as opposed to running off the site. When compared to open ditches, which mainly channel runoff and contribute to erosion, both swales and berms are improved methods of managing stormwater.

Other benefits of urban trees include decreased cooling costs, shading, aesthetics, wildlife habitat, and increased real estate value. Tree species vary widely, ranging from deciduous to evergreen trees and are easily integrated into a residential landscape (figure 5).

Rain Garden Rain gardens are depressions planted with annual and perennial plants that serve to collect rainwater from nearby impervious surfaces, allowing infiltration of water that would otherwise be runoff (figure 6). These areas provide an attractive area to detain a significant volume of rainfall and allow that water to infiltrate slowly into the ground. Often, downspouts can be directed into rain gardens, and these areas are capable

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Source: Susan Day.

Improving Turf Density and Permeability Improving soil permeability leads to reduced runoff and greater infiltration. The majority of residential homes have a large percentage of ground area in turf.

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Figure 6. Cross-section of a rain garden with descriptions of each component. Source: Rain Gardens Technical Guide. www.dof.virginia.gov/mgt/resources/pub-Rain-Garden-Tech-Guide_2008-05.pdf.

Turfgrass is very effective at filtering out sediment and increasing infiltration, but two issues affect the ability of turf to perform these functions. First, high traffic on turf areas can increase compaction, making infiltration slow and allowing for more runoff. Second, when turf is not managed properly, it can become thin and sediment erosion can occur. In order to reduce compaction and keep turf density high, annual core aeration of the turf areas is recommended. Furthermore, following a fertilization program such as suggested by “Lawn Fertilization in Virginia,� VCE publication 430-011, can promote healthy turf that will allow maximum infiltration of precipitation.

Mulched Areas

Figure 7. An example of a grass swale in a residential application. Source: Kara Bonsack, University of Connecticut.

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The application of organic mulches generates a number of benefits for both plants and soils in mulched areas. Mulch contributes to soil moisture retention, provides organic matter, and moderates the root-zone temperature (Relf 2009). In addition to these benefits, mulches also significantly reduce compaction and erosion and improve the infiltration of water as they

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Ecosystems. Chapter 2 of Urban and Community Forestry in the Northeast. Springer: New York.

increase the organic-matter content of soils. By incorporating well-designed mulch beds around landscape areas and trees and as border areas, water that falls on the area or arrives via stem flow from plants in the mulch areas has more opportunity to infiltrate the soil.

Paul, M. J., and J. L. Meyer. 2001. Streams in the urban landscape. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 32:333-65.

Summary

Relf, D. 2009. Mulching for a Healthy Landscape. Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication 426-724. http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/426/426-724/426-724.htm.

Land development activities convert highly permeable surfaces into impermeable ones. This conversion often causes an increase in stormwater runoff and a decrease in both surface water quality and infiltration to groundwater. On residential lots, these negative effects can often be minimized by incorporating some of the techniques described in this publication. By making small changes at the local level, water quality in the watershed can be greatly improved.

Roy, A. H., S. J. Wenger, T. D. Fletcher, C. J. Walsh, A. R. Ladson, W. D. Shuster, H. W. Thurston, and R. R. Brown. 2008. Impediments and solutions to sustainable, watershed-scale urban stormwater management: Lessons from Australia and the United States. Environmental Management 42(2): 344-59. Seitz, J., and F. Escobedo. 2008. Urban Forests in Florida: Trees Control Stormwater Runoff and Improve Water Quality. University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. IFAS Extension Publication FOR184.

Acknowledgements Special thanks for editorial contributions go to Joyce Latimer, professor, horticulture, Virginia Tech; Susan Day, assistant professor, forestry/horticulture, Virginia Tech; Laurie Fox, horticulture associate, Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Extension Center; Susan French, Extension agent, VCE Virginia Beach Office; Paige Thacker, Extension agent, VCE Prince William County Office; and Paul Thomas, professor, University of Georgia.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 2003. Protecting Water Quality from Urban Runoff. EPA Publication No. EPA 841-F-03-003. Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VADEQ). 2008. Virginia’s Water Resources. Chapter 10 of Virginia’s Natural Resources Education Guide. www.deq.state.va.us/vanaturally/ guide/water.html.

References Berghage, R. D., D. Beattie, A. R. Jarrett, C. Thuring, F. Razaei, and T. P. O’Connor. 2009. Green Roofs for Stormwater Runoff Control. Environmental Protection Agency Publication EPA/600/R-09/026. Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory. Cincinnati: EPA. www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs/600r09026/600r09026.pdf.

VADEQ. 2010. Groundwater Protection Steering Committee. www.deq.virginia.gov/gwpsc. Virginia Department of Health. 2008. Private Well Water Information. www.vdh.state.va.us/EnvironmentalHealth/ONSITE/regulations/PrivateWellInfo/index.htm?mode=printable.

Hayden, B. P., and P. J. Michaels. 2000. Virginia’s Climate. University of Virginia Climatology Office. http://climate.virginia.edu/description.htm. Meyer, J. L., M. J. Paul, and K. J. Taulbee. 2005. Stream ecosystem function in urbanizing landscapes. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 24(3): 602-12. Nowak, D. J., and J. F. Dwyer, eds. 2007. Understanding the Benefits and Costs of Urban Forest

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VNLA - Certification Quiz # 75 If you are a Virginia Certified Horticulturist, answer the following questions from the previous article, mark your answers on the card insert and mail, scan or fax back to the VNLA office towards your recertification CEU’s for your Virginia Certified Horticulturist.

Urban Storm Water Run Off Quiz Jan/Feb/March 2016 Prepared by: Nanette R. Whitt 1. The average Virginia resident uses how many gallons of fresh water daily? a. 626 b. 726 c. 826 d. None of the above 2. How many Commonwealth residents rely on well water? a. <1,000,000 b. >1,000.000 3. Water moving from the surface to groundwater is called a. Discharge b. Recharge 4. Impermeable surfaces decrease infiltration and groundwater recharge. a. True b. False 5. Redirecting stormwater runoff from an impervious area to an area where the water can infiltrate will: a. Decrease the amount of stormwater leaving the site. b. Increase groundwater recharge. c. Improve water quality throughout the entire watershed d. All of the above. 6. Homeowners can significantly reduce the stormwater load that leave his property and help recharge groundwater reserves. a. True b. False. VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

7. How much precipitation can a green roof retain during peak growing times? a. 25 % b. 50% c. 75% d. 100% 8. Which is a benefit for utilizing green roofs? a. Less expensive heating costs. b. Less expensive cooling costs. c. Longer lifespan of roofing materials. d. All of the above 9. Deciduous trees intercept more water than evergreen trees. a. True b. False 10. Depressions in the ground which serve to collect rainwater from impervious surfaces while providing a habitat for annual and perennial plants are called: a. Bio gardens b. Natural gardens c. Rain gardens 11. Using swales and berms to manage stormwater helps by: a. Filtering water. b. Allowing infiltration of water. c. None of the above. d. All of the above 12. Turfgrass is not effective at filtering out sediment and increasing infiltration. a. True b. False 13. Annual core aeration of turf is recommended to help: a. Increase runoff infiltration. b. Decrease amount of fertilizer needed. c. Reduce gas emission from lawn mowers. 14. A good way to contribute to soil moisture retention is to: a. Water only in the morning b. Use mulch. c. Water only in the evening. d. Use pavers around border areas

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SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Field Day 2016 Grelen Nursery Somerset, VA

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Educational Workshop Wednesday, August 10

Summer Tour Friday, August 12


Tips - Garden Trends Research Report October 2012 Executive Summary The majority of American consumers (52%) have some form of a lawn or garden.  (Please note that from this point forward the term “household” and “consumer” will refer toESN-117 house- 45 holds and consumers with a lawn or garden.) Conserving Water When it comes to conserving water, 27% used more mulch, 15% used drip irrigation, and 12% used rain barrels and another 16% used drought-tolerant plants.  Almost a third (31%) say they don’t water while another 23% haven’t made any plans to conserve water. Planned Expenditures on Yard/Garden 

The majority of consumers (68%) spent less than $500 on their yards and gardens this year.  All told, on average, consumers are planning to spend about $600 on their yards and gardens this year, where expenditures include making improvements and doing maintenance. Plan to Spend the Most Money

Vegetable Growing A large number of Americans – over one half (54%) – grow vegetables in their gardens, while 46% do not. Interest Levels 

Lawn and Garden Incidence 

remained in second place at 37% for the second year in a row.

We asked consumers who have a lawn or garden to rate their interest level in organic gardening:

Years/4.5x7.25

8/30/04

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Ad - Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia

Consumers spent the most money on their lawns and grass (40%), followed by fruit and vegetables (39%) and annual flowers (28%). 

Using Smartphone Apps for Gardening Nearly one in five (17%) use Smartphone applications for their gardening activities. Garden Plan Purchase Destinations 

Mass Merchants continue to be the #1 purchase destination at 42%. Garden centers have

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WH O C A R E S T H AT W E ’ V E KEPT OUR NAME GROWING FOR OVER 45 YEARS? Maybe you should care. Chances are, you can think of many businesses that have come and gone over the past four decades. We’ve been here through it all—putting down strong roots and branching out to provide our customers with quality plants year after year. And cultivating the expertise that can help Eastern your bottom line grow today and tomorrow. Shore Call Eastern Shore Nursery of Virginia Nursery Of and order plants from a company with a Virginia long history of excellence. Keller, Virginia • 1-800-323-3008 • www.esnursery.com

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Earth friendly gardening, native plants, web-based gardening information, food gardening, and garden blogs. Shown below are how consumers ranked each item:  Food Gardening (61%)  Earth Friendly Gardening (44%)  Native plants (42%)  Organic Gardening (42%)  Web-based gardening information (28%)  Garden Blogs (12%) Factors Impacting Gardening Activities 

Hot or dry weather was the greatest factor impacting gardening activities at 36%, followed by available time (29%) and the economy (16%).

Tips - Garden Trends Research Report: October 2013 Survey Executive Summary Lawn and Garden Incidence 

Garden Plan Purchase Destinations Garden centers were the most preferred purchase destination for consumers, as 39% reported buying there. Mass Merchants came in at a close second, with a share of 37%. 

Vegetable Growing A majority of consumers (54%) grow vegetables in their gardens, while 46% do not. Interest Levels 

We asked consumers who have a lawn or garden to rate their interest level in organic gardening: Earth friendly gardening, native plants, web-based gardening information, food gardening, and garden blogs. Shown below are how consumers ranked each item:      

Over two-thirds of American consumers (68%) have some form of a lawn or garden. (Please note that from this point forward the term “household” and “consumer” will refer to households and consumers with a lawn or garden.)

Conserving Water When it comes to conserving water, 28% used more mulch, 17% used drought-tolerant plants, and another 15% used drip irrigation. Consumers who used rain barrels registered at 12%. 

Thirty percent of consumers say they don’t water, while slightly over one-quarter (28%) haven’t made any plans to conserve water. Planned Expenditures on Yard/Garden

Tips - Garden Trends Research Report: October 2014 Survey Executive Summary Lawn and Garden Incidence 

The majority of consumers (66%) spent less than $500 on their yards and gardens this year.  All told, on average, consumers are planning to spend about $615 on their yards and gardens this year, where expenditures include making improvements and doing maintenance. Plan to Spend the Most Money 

Consumers spent the most money on their lawns and grass (41%), followed by fruit and vegetables (39%) and perennial flowers (29%).

Using Smartphone Apps for Gardening 

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About one in ten (10%) use Smartphone applications for their gardening activities.

Food Gardening (60%) Earth Friendly Gardening (43%) Organic Gardening (42%) Native plants (39%) Web-based gardening information (27%) Garden Blogs (7%)

Two-thirds of American consumers (66%) either have a lawn or garden, or grow plants in containers or pots. (Please note that from this point forward the term “household” and “consumer” will refer to households and consumers with a lawn or garden.)

Edible Plant Gardening Methods 

Since 2009, more than three-quarters of consumers (83%) have grown edible plants. More than onethird of consumers (37%) grew plants in the ground, with nearly one in ten (9%) using containers or pots. Meanwhile, 37% reported using both approaches. This year, more than two in five consumers (44%) said that they grew edible plants in the ground, while 15% used containers. Almost one-third (32%) grew plants both in the ground and in containers.

[continued on page 36] [continued from page 28 – Garden Trends]

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Reasons for Ceasing Edible Gardening 

Among respondents who did not grow edible plants this year, one-quarter indicated that they simply lost interest in the activity, followed by 18% who said a lack of success was the reason. “Too much work” was chosen by 17% of respondents, with “took too much &me” (14%) and “too expensive” (7%) rounding out the top five

Edible Gardening Plans for 2015 

A majority of consumers (58%) plan to grow edible plants next year. One-quarter of consumers plan to grow edible plants in the ground, while just under one in ten (9%) expect to use containers for growing plants. Those who plan on using both methods registered at 24%. Of those not planning to grow edible plants in 2015, over one-third (37%) said it is because they do not have a garden. Nearly one in five Americans (17%) reported that they will not grow plants because they moved to a home where gardening is not possible, while 9% said it is too much work. Regarding the expected frequency of edible gardening activities in 2015, most consumers (61%) plan to do the same amount of gardening as they

did this year, while one-third (33%) plan to garden more. Main Challenges to Edible Gardening According to consumers, insect and disease control (39%) and &me (38%) are the greatest challenges to edible gardening.  Wildlife control was considered to be the greatest challenge by 28% of respondents, with one-quarter selecting irrigation. Rounding out the top five was cost, chosen by one in ten respondents (10%). Destinations for Gardening Information 

A majority of consumers (51%) reported obtaining plant and gardening information from friends and neighbors, followed by garden centers, nurseries, and classes, at 44%. Meanwhile, nearly one-third of consumers get their information from books (32%) and gardening websites or blogs (31%). Online audio and podcasts are sources of information for 17% of respondents, while television registers at 15%. Around one in ten reported that YouTube (11%) and Facebook (10%) were their destinations for gardening information. Provided by Grower Talks

Ad – Turtle Creek Nursery

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Tips – How Salt Affects Plants The Impact of Salts on Plants and How to Reduce Plant Injury from Winter Salt Applications Across the country, more than 22 million tons of road salt is used every year. In Massachusetts, the Department of Transportation (MassDOT) recommends one or more applications of salt at 240 lbs per lane mile after every snow fall to ensure the safety of those using the roadways.

concentrations, can displace other mineral nutrients in the soil. Plants then absorb the chlorine and sodium instead of needed plant nutrients such as potassium and phosphorus, leading to deficiencies. The chloride ions can be transported to the leaves where they interfere with photosynthesis and chlorophyll production. Chloride accumulation can reach toxic levels, causing leaf burn and die-back. Rock salt also causes damage when salt laden snow is plowed or shoveled onto lawns and garden beds. Salts in the soil can absorb water. This results in less water being available for uptake by the plants, increasing water stress and root dehydration. This is referred to as physiological drought, which, if not corrected, can lead to reduced plant growth. The displacement of other mineral nutrients by sodium ions can also affect soil quality. Compaction can increase while drainage and aeration decrease, generally resulting in reduced plant growth. Damage from salt in the soil can be delayed, with plant symptoms not appearing until summer or even years later. Symptoms may also become evident during periods of hot, dry weather.

Photo by Bruce Watt, University of Maine, Bugwood.org

The most commonly used salt for deicing roads is sodium chloride (rock salt) because it is inexpensive, effective and readily available. Despite the benefits of improving safety on roads, streets, sidewalks, driveways and parking lots, deicing salt can cause damage to landscape plants. Deicing salts can cause injury and contribute to the decline and death of landscape plants. However, an understanding of the impacts salts have on plants and salt application management strategies can help to protect plants or reduce plant injury due to salt.

How Salt Affects Plants Salt damage occurs on plants when salt is deposited by spray from passing cars on stems and buds of deciduous woody plants and on stems, buds, leaves and needles of evergreen plants. Salt spray can cause salt burn on buds, leaves and small twigs. Salt spray can also cause damage by desiccating the bud scales, exposing tender tissues of the developing leaves and flowers. The unprotected developing leaves and flower buds dry out and are often killed by the cold winter wind. Many times, the damage is not evident until late winter or spring. Needle or leaf browning, bud death, and branch dieback on the side of the plant facing the road or sidewalk is a common sign of salt spray damage. Damage to deciduous plants is not seen until growth resumes in the spring.

Plants are also affected by dissolved salts in runoff water. Sodium and chloride ions separate when salts are dissolved in water. The dissolved sodium and chloride ions, in high 38 38

The extent of damage can vary with plant type, type of salt, fresh water availability and volume, movement of runoff, and when salts are applied. De-icing salts without sodium are safer for plants than sodium chloride. Salts applied in late winter generally result in more damage than salts applied in early winter because there is a better chance the salt is leached away before active root growth in spring. The volume of fresh water applied to soils also impacts the amount of salts leached away, while rainfall can wash salt from leaves. Common Symptoms of Salt Injury               

Damage mostly on the side of the plant facing the road or sidewalk Browning or discoloration of needles beginning at tips Bud damage or death Twig and stem dieback Delayed bud break Reduced or distorted leaf or stem growth Witches’ broom development (tufted and stunted appearance) Wilting during hot, dry conditions Reduced plant vigor Flower and fruit development delayed and/or smaller than normal Fewer and/or smaller leaves than normal Needle tip burn and marginal leaf burn Discolored foliage Nutrient deficiencies Early leaf drop or premature fall color

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Management Strategies for Mitigating Salt Injury Reduce salt use. Combine salt with other materials such as sand, sawdust, or cinders that can provide grittiness for traction. De-icing materials that use salts other than sodium chloride, including calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, potassium chloride, or calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) are more expensive but can reduce injury to plants. Make applications carefully. Applications should be targeted at walkways and roadways, not landscape beds or lawns. The flow of salt-laden runoff water should be considered for when snow melts. Avoid planting in areas where runoff naturally flows. Leaching soils by watering heavily can help remove salts from well-drained soils. This is not possible with poorly draining soils. Improve drainage of poorly drained soils by adding organic matter. Protect plants with physical barriers such as burlap, plastic, or wood. Use salt tolerant plants in areas near roads, driveways, and sidewalks. Remember that salt tolerant does not mean injury free. The following is a table of the reported salt tolerance of selected trees and shrubs. It is important to keep in mind when choosing plants considered “salt tolerant” that the degree of tolerance and extent of damage are dependent on many factors, with tolerance varying in plants within the same species. Tolerance can also vary depending on method of salt exposure (spray vs. soil). There are conflicting reports for salt tolerance of many species. Soil type and climate variability can result in differences in plant response between areas. Tolerant – Intermediate Tolerance

Type of Salt Tolerance

Deciduous Trees and Shrubs Acer campestre

hedge maple

Spray

Aesculus hippocastanum

horsechestnut

Spray and soil

Betula papyrifera

paper birch

Spray

Gleditsia triacanthos var. thornless honeylocust inermis

Spray and soil

Larix spp.

larch

Spray

Quercus alba

white oak

Soil

Quercus rubra

Northern oak

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red

Spray and soil

Rhus spp.

sumac

Spray and soil

Rosa rugosa

rugosa rose

Spray and soil

Ulmus hybrids

elm hybrids

Spray and soil

Evergreen Trees and Shrubs Juniper spp.

juniper

Spray and soil

Picea glauca

white spruce

Spray and soil

Picea pungens/ Picea pungens ‘Glauca’

Colorado spruce/ Colorado blue spruce

Spray and soil

Pinus mugo

Mugo pine

Spray and soil

Sensitive Plants Acer rubrum

red maple

Acer saccharum

sugar maple

Amelanchier spp.

serviceberry

Buxus sempervirens

common boxwood

Cornus sericea

red twig dogwood

Juglans nigra

black walnut

Picea abies

Norway spruce

Pinus strobus

Eastern white pine

Pseudotsuga menziesii Douglas fir Quercus palustris

pin oak

Tilia cordata

littleleaf linden

Tsuga canadensis

Eastern hemlock

Viburnum spp.

viburnum

The following sources also have lists of reported salt tolerance of some common landscape plants: http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/woodies/pdfs/saltinjury.pdf https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/id/id-412w.pdf http://plant-pest-advisory.rutgers.edu/impact-of-road-salton-adjacent-vegetation/

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Literature Cited:

Breakeven date:

Beckerman, J. and B.R. Lerner. 2009. Salt Damage in Landscape Plants. Purdue Extension. Factsheet ID-412-W

Once you hit your breakeven date all the profit you then make from every sale goes straight to your bottom line. Not only the net profit, but also the operational profit (that previously went to pay for overhead) now goes straight to the bottom line. This date is generally hit right before or in the 4th quarter.

Gould, Ann. 2013. Impact of Road Salt on Adjacent Vegetation. Rutgers Cooperative Extension. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station. Hunter, G. 1980. Salt Injury to Roadside Plants. Cornell University Bulletin 169. Johnson, G.R. and E. Sucoff. 1999. Minimizing de-icing salt injury to trees. University of Minnesota Extension. MassDOT Highway Division. 2015. Winter Road treatment and snow removal Missouri Botanical Garden. Salt Injury. http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/help-for-the-home-gardener/advice-tips-resources/pests-and-problems/environmental/salt.aspx Smithsonian.com. January 6, 2014. What happens to all the salt we dump on the roads? Author: Mandy Bayer and Geoffrey Njue, Last Updated: Jan 15, 2016

My high performing clients are able to achieve an Operational Profit Margin in the upper 30's up to 45% depending on the type of business they are in (and how long they have been working with me.) If your operational margin is, for example, 40%, then after you hit break even, every dollar that gets produced will put approximately 40 cents towards your bottom line! To this end, the more sales that your team can produce and bill in this final quarter (called: Weekly Throughput), the more net profit you will ultimately earn. Conversely, if you have too many hiccups in the fourth quarter, you put your net profit at risk. Here are 14 ways to increase your Weekly Throughput.

https://ag.umass.edu/fact-sheets/impact-of-salts-on-plantshow-to-reduce-plant-injury-from-winter-salt-applications

Tips - Finish the Year Strong Having a profitable year is ultimately determined by how much in sales you produce and bill out in the 4th quarter. Succeeding at business is akin to winning a long distance sprint. You have to get a quick jump off the starter -blocks, accelerate quickly to your top speed, and sprint through the finish line. It is the final sprint that wins the race. Here are 14 ways to sprint through the finish line and end on a profitable note. Weekly Throughput: The main driver of net profit it in the fourth quarter is measured by your company's Weekly Throughput i.e. the amount of billable production work your company can produce ("put through") each week. Here is why this is so important: Even though you estimate for net profit with each and every sale, starting with your first sale in January, the fact is that all the profit from those sales goes towards covering your overhead (OH), until all your overhead is paid for. Once your overhead is covered, you have reached what accountants call y our breakeven date.

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Operational Margin:

1. Keep salespeople motivated to continue selling strong up through December. Use incentives to keep up the selling momentum. Having an increased backlog puts positive pressure on the crews, so they have more than enough work to chew through. 2. Decrease the non-billable time (morning, travel, deli and gas stops, evening) so more time is spent on billable work. 3. Decrease (eliminate) the unnecessary go-backs needed to complete a job by ensuring crews are properly equipped and dispatched, with trucks and tools operating smoothly. 4. Ask crews to be flexible in bad weather, so you can hit your Weekly Throughput goals. 5. Use overtime (OT) to get your extra backlogged work done; the incremental cost of OT will be more than offset by additional operational profit that will drop straight to your bottom line. Do the math! 6. Sell more fall and winter add-on services. Remember, enhancement sales can be sold at a higher margin than your standard work anyhow, so it is a double win. 7. Take lower margin install work if you can be guaranteed that doing it will not displace other high margin work. 8. Walk every maintenance property and sell them pruning services to be done ASAP. 9. Find extra work that can be performed by crews already on maintenance properties.

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10. Sell holiday decor to be done now. For example, how about selling front door arrangements like you see in the magazine Southern Living? 11. Sell fireplaces and hardscapes to be done now (and during the milder winter.) 12. Raise your 2016 hourly rate right now in 2015, and apply it to your fall work. Who says you have to wait till January to raise rates? 13. Deliver your Xmas presents to clients early; and they will likely give you more work to take care of. 14. Incentivize your crews to increase their Weekly Throughput. Make crews accountable for their weekly production goals, and motivate them to be as efficient as possible. Share the winnings when they sprint through the finish line. Connect the dots: Many employees may not immediately grasp how sprinting through the finish, and ensuring a healthy net profit, will benefit them and their family. Take the time to explain it to them by connecting the dots on how it benefits the company and how it benefits them directly. Using an incentive plan helps see directly how it bene fits them.

BREAKTHROUGH IDEA Speeding up in the fourth quarter and sprinting through the finish line will greatly impact and increase your net profits. TAKE ACTION 

Pull everyone together and explain to them which day in your calendar you hit break even and how the production during the 4th quarter will help the company hit and beat its yearend profit goals, thus benefiting everyone. If you want to learn more about how to use Metrics to improve your business; reach out to me and we can discuss how to implement them in your business. The earlier in the year you hit your break even, the better your chances are of making extra ordinary profits. To this end, develop an incentive system for next year that moves up your break even date, and increases your Weekly Throughput in the Spring, Summer and Fall.

Jeffrey Scott, MBA, author, coach and Hall of Fame Consultant – is the expert in growth and profit maximization in the landscape industry http://jeffreyscott.biz/index.html

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Professor

College

Requested Amount Amount Awarded

Title IPM tactics for control of flea beetles in Virginia nurseries Phosphorus Fate in Container Substrate The Transparent Container: Virtually Observing Water Dynamics during Production of Containerized Ornamental Crops

Schultz, Pete

Virginia Tech

Owen, Jim

Virginia Tech

Owen, Jim

Virginia Tech

Yeager, Tom / Million, Jeff

University of Florida Irrigation Uniformity and Rate Smartphone App

Kraus, Helen

North Carolina State

Derr, Jeff Lucas, Tyree

Jackson, Brian

Fox, Laurie

Development of Weed Management Strategies for Rain Gardens Virginia Tech Selective Control of Liverwort in Nursery Crops Creating Breakthrough Fertilization & Nutrients Yale Process for Plants Applied on Leaves with Tremendous Yield and Savings Potential Pine Bark Aging: Assessing the Changes in North Carolina State Chemical and Physical Properties that Effect Substrate Usability Acquisition of Thermal Printer for Research, Virginia Tech Demonstration Gardens, and Tidewater Arboretum Labeling

VNLA - Research Grant Requests and Awards for 2016 These grants were funded by the Virginia Nurserymen’s Association Horticulture Research Foundation 501(c)(3) awards $25-35,000 each year in grants, which are funded from income on the VNA Trust Fund. The VNA Horticultural Research Foundation has assets of over $650,000, which helps to fund these research projects.

VNLA _-Formation of Permanent Research Fund In 1983, John Machen, Sr., Chairman VNA Research Committee, proudly announced the formation of a permanent Research Fund. In response to an appeal from the Research Committee, individual members of the VNA Board have generously donated $200 each for a total of $1,000 to begin the permanent Research Fund. • Ennion Williams - Cherotuck Nurseries • Jeff Miller - Laurel Creek Nursery • Michael Ferrara - Campbell & Ferrara Nursery • Bob Papetti - Bobtown Nursery • John Machen - Mobjack Nurseries

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$5,160 $ 3,000 $7,389 $ 4,500 $7,754 $ $5,000 $ $4,890 $ $4,263 $ 4,263 $3,332 $ -

$8,500 $ 8,500

$3,831 $ -

The fund will be managed by the Executive Director, as directed by the VNA Board. Funds, generated from investment of the capital funds, will be allocated for research by the VNA Research Committee. To supplement this additional "seed' money the Research Committee intends to:

1. Petition the Penn Allied Nursery Trade Show Board to annually make a be-quest of approximately $400 per year to the research fund. This bequest would equal the average cost of one booth at the Hershey Show. In return, the VNA would encourage its members who exhibit to contribute their booths to the PANTS auction. Also, the VNA would promote attendance and support of the PANTS Show in our Newsletter to our membership (approximately $300 per annum). 2. Request the allocation of the average cost of one exhibit, booth (approximately $300) at the MidAtlantic Trade Show to be added annually to the permanent fund. 3. Conduct a plant auction at the Virginia Truck and Ornamental Research Station at Virginia Beach each summer during the annual Open House / Field Day. Plants for sale will be donated by VNA members and restricted to those nurserymen who attend the Field Day. The auction will be conducted by the Research Committee with assistance from the Truck Station personnel. (Anticipated net gain of $1,000 per annum.) 4. Encourage VNA members to contribute to this, the inception of our research fund. A letter asking for donations will be sent out to all members. Our research monies are beginning to produce some tangible results, which will benefit the whole nursery industry. Now is the time to get behind this effort and support it with a research donation in 1983!

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5. Announce that any of our members who desire to name this fund in memory of a deceased family member or friend or in appreciation of a family or friend still living can in effect so name this permanent on-going fund by pledging to contribute $10,000. This can be done in one payment, or in integrals of $2,000 spread over a five year period.

Research - Weed Management in Ornamental Grasses

On behalf of the VNA we wish to thank the following VNA Board members for their contribution of $200 each to start the beginning of our concerted effort to continue to endorse and support research in Virginia which will be of direct benefit to our members and to our industry at large. John Machen, Sr., Mobjack Nurseries, January 1983, VNA News

Photo by Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

Through research supported by the Virginia Nurserymen's Horticultural Research Foundation, I have been evaluating tolerance of newly-planted ornamental grasses to preemergence herbicides. There has been considerable interest in ornamental grasses for use in home and commercial landscapes. Nurseries commonly produce ornamental

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grasses in containers, where weed control is an important production concern. Weed control is most important at planting time. As ornamental grasses grow and fill in containers, there is less opportunity for weeds to invade. Weeds are commonly controlled in container production through the use of preemergence herbicides, supplemented by hand weeding. After a review of the label for common preemergence herbicides used in container production, it was found that many commonly-grown grasses have few to no preemergence herbicides registered for use.

10% reduction in Schizachyrium regrowth weight. Dimension at 2 lb ai/A (4X rate) appeared to reduce regrowth shoot weight of Calamagrostis. Pendulum AquaCap plus Gallery reduced shoot weight in Chasmanthium, although all herbicide treatments appeared to cause a decrease in shoot weight of this species. When compared to untreated plants, no herbicide treatment reduced seed head production in Schizachyrium, Panicum, Pennisetum, or Chasmanthium. Eragrostis and Calamagrostis did not produce seed heads during the trial.

I obtained well-rooted liners of Chinense pennisetum (Pennisetum alopecuroides), feather reed grass (Calamagrostis acutiflora), little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), switch grass (Panicum virgatum), weeping lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula), and northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) and planted them into one gallon containers of pine bark.

Weed control increased as the herbicide rate increased. At the lowest rate tested (1X rate), Gallery, Dimension, and Pendulum all provided similar control of mulberry weed (69-80%). At the lowest rate tested, Dimension provided the best spotted spurge control.

The preemergence herbicide I evaluated were Pendulum 2G (pendimethalin) at 3, 6, and 12 poundsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; active ingredient (ai) per acre, Gallery (isoxaben) at 1.0. 2.0, and 4.0 lb. ai/A, and Dimension 2EW (dithiopyr) at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 lb. ai/A. These rates represent the anticipated use rate (1X), twice the use rate (2X) and four times the use rate (4X). Ideally we would like to see a 4X tolerance in a crop for an herbicide registration. In such a case, an accidental overlap in spray, resulting in a 2X application rate, should not result in adverse effects to the plant. The three herbicides were chosen based on the expected tolerance by ornamental grasses. I also evaluated combinations of Gallery plus Dimension and Gallery plus Pendulum AquaCap as these combinations would result in broader spectrum weed control. Herbicides were applied four days after planting and all treatments were repeated 6 weeks later. Overhead irrigation was applied immediately after application. At the time of the first herbicide application, plant height in inches was: Panicum 12.5", Schizachyrium 9.5", Calamagrostis 18", Eragrostis 18.5", Pennisetum 16", and Chasmanthium 14". We took shoot fresh weight of each ornamental grass at one month after each application. No injury was seen in the foliage of any of the 6 ornamental grasses when evaluated visually. At one month after the first application, no herbicide treatment reduced shoot fresh weight of Schizachyrium, Panicum, Eragrostis, Pennisetum, or Chasmanthium, although there appeared to be a slight decrease in Panicum shoot weight at the highest rate of Gallery. Dimension at 2 lb ai/A (4X rate) reduced shoot weight of Calamagrostis compared to untreated plants, and the two lower rates of Dimension appeared to reduce shoot weight in this species. After the second herbicide application, no treatment reduced regrowth shoot weight of Schizachyrium, Panicum, Eragrostis, or Pennisetum, although Pendulumcontaining treatments appeared to cause approximately a 44 44

In general, Pennisetum alopecuroides, Calamagrostis acutora, Schizachyrium scoparium, Panicum virgatum, Chasmanthium latifolium, and Eragrostis curvula appear to have acceptable tolerance to Pendulum 2G, Gallery SC, and Dimension 2EW, although some reduction in growth could occur, especially at above-labeled rates following 2 applications. For broader spectrum control, Gallery plus either Pendulum AquaCap or Dimension 2EW appear to be promising treatments for the ornamental grasses evaluated. I hope to continue my research on weed control in ornamental grasses. One area that I would like to explore is controlling emerged annual grass and broadleaf weeds in ornamental grasses using available postemergence herbicides. Jeffrey Derr, a professor of weed science with Virginia Tech, is located at the Hampton Roads Ag. Research and Extension Center in Virginia Beach. jderr@vt.edu

Save the Date! Thursday, August 11, 2016 VNLA Field Day Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA

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VNLA Pender ad half page_VNLA pender half page ad 1/15/14 11:21 AM Page

News – Virginia Agribusiness  Research – Compacted Urban Soils Banquet & Town Hall Meeting  Rebuilt

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Virginia Tech researchers find compacted urban soils can be rebuilt to help urban trees thrive

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Via Green Industry Council members install plants and flowers 

for the Virginia Agribusiness Council Banquet.   (front) Lorene Blackwood,  (l‐r) Bill Bonwell, Gwynn Hubbard,    Peggy Seay, Cary Gouldin  At a street tree planting site in Arlington County, Virginia, David Mitchell uses a specialized probe to extract a column of soil one meter deep. Soil carbon was analyzed at sites with and without re-mediation.

BLACKSBURG, Va., Feb. 16, 2016 – Virginia Tech researchers have developed a soil rehabilitation method that can help fix the compacted, rock-hard soils left behind after land development and building construction. Trees planted in rehabilitated soil have as much as 84 percent greater canopy than those in untreated soil, according to Susan Day, associate professor of urban forestry in the College of Natural Resources and Environment. The James installing plantsonline ahead of James River Nurseries installing plans   research byRiver Day Nurseries and colleagues appears and sod from Brookmeade Sod Farm printand sod from Brookmeade Sod Farm  in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. Past work showed that their method, named “Soil Profile Rebuilding,” decreases soil compaction, increases carbon sequestration, and increases the rate at which water moves through the soil, thereby improving storm-water capture. “City soils are much maligned, and with good reason,” said Day, who has a joint appointment in horticulture in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. “City soils are stripped and compacted and mixed and layered until they have little in common with their less-disturbed cousins in agricultural and forested lands.” The Soil Profile Rebuilding method uses compost and a special subsoiling technique adapted for tight urban spaces to Town Hall meeting at Grelen Nurseries, Orange, VA  create pathways through the soil for root and water penetration. A backhoe with a tined bucket is used to break up the compacted soil and incorporate compost to a depth of two feet. Then four inches of topsoil are applied and rototilled VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

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to a depth of six to eight inches, followed by planting trees or shrubs whose roots help the soil continue to develop. Unlike many previous approaches to alleviating soil compaction, the effects of Soil Profile Rebuilding persist “because the technique doesn’t just break up the soil physically; it also affects biological activity in the soil,” Day explained. It is a useful tool for designers seeking SITES® (Sustainable Sites Initiative) accreditation from the U.S. Green Building Council. The rehabilitation process was developed by Day, faculty colleagues, and graduate students in both colleges over the course of seven years of research at Virginia Tech and in Arlington County, Virginia, in partnership with Vincent Verweij, Arlington County’s urban forester. The researchers evaluated five tree species — red maple, swamp white oak, bur oak, elm, and cherry — over six years in response to Soil Profile Rebuilding in comparison with typical development practices and undisturbed agricultural soil at a long-term experimental plot area. They measured tree growth and mortality of three additional tree species — ginkgo, scarlet oak, and katsura — one year after planting with and without Soil Profile Rebuilding in 25 plots along major thoroughfares in Arlington. Soil rebuilding resulted in 77 percent greater trunk cross-section area growth after one year. “Municipalities and developers are often faced with a choice between wholesale replacement of existing soil or leaving soil untreated, resulting in frequent plant replacements, decreased biodiversity, and limited ability of the landscape to handle rainfall and reduce runoff,” Day said.

“Soil Profile Rebuilding gives them another option that is considerably more cost effective and sustainable than soil replacement.” Faculty co-authors on the research are W. Lee Daniels, the Thomas B. Hutcheson Jr. Professor of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, and J. Roger Harris, professor of horticulture, both in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The three students authors have since graduated from Virginia Tech: Rachel Layman (lead author) earned a master’s in horticulture in 2012, Yujuan Chen earned a doctorate in forestry in 2013, and David Mitchell earned a master’s in forestry in 2014. This research is funded in part by Virginia Tech’s Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science, the Tree Research and Education Endowment Fund, and the McIntireStennis Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. The College of Natural Resources and Environment at Virginia Tech, which is ranked the top program of its kind in the nation, advances the science of sustainability. Programs prepare the future generation of leaders to address the complex natural resources issues facing the planet. World-class faculty lead transformational research that complements the student learning experience and impacts citizens and communities across the globe on sustainability issues, especially as they pertain to water, climate, fisheries, wildlife, forestry, sustainable biomaterials, ecosystems, and geography. Virginia Tech, the most comprehensive university in Virginia, is dedicated to quality, innovation, and results to the commonwealth, the nation, and the world.

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Related Links  Urban forestry professor instrumental in establishment of new national rating program for sustainable landscapes (http://www.vtnews.vt.edu/articles/2015/06/061115-cnre-sitesratingprogram.html)  University leads multistate research project to advance the urban forestry profession (http://www.vtnews.vt.edu/articles/2014/07/070214-cnre-urbanforestryprofession.html)

This story can be found on the Virginia Tech News website: http://www.vtnews.vt.edu/articles/2016/02/021616-cnre-soilrehabilitation.html

5800 Knotts Neck Road, Suffolk, VA 23435 | www.lancasterfarms.com

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Research – Coreopsis Trials Mt. Cuba Center's coreopsis trial evaluated the performance of both annual and perennial tickseed. The best performing perennial species (those marketed as hardy to Zone 6) were C. palustris 'Summer Sunshine', C. tripteris 'Flower Tower', C. tripteris 'Gold Standard', C. verticillata 'Zagreb', C. integrifolia 'Last Dance', C. verticillata, C. 'Gilded Lace', and C. verticillata 'Golden Gain'. Among the cultivars sold as annuals, 'Salsa', 'Jive', 'Golden Dream', 'RP #1' (Little Penny), and 'Pineapple Pie' stood above the rest for their superior garden performance. Evaluating so many coreopsis was a challenge due to the diversity of species involved and the fact that the garden's clay-based soil is not ideal for growing every type of tickseed. However, these adversities turned out to be advantages. Among the many perennial species, we uncovered hidden gems that deserve more prominence in horticulture. In addition, the difficult site conditions allowed us to determine which coreopsis are the most reliably perennial, even in stressful environments. The five annual cultivars that excelled in our trial also proved that coreopsis can provide long-lasting seasonal color equally as well as more commonly used annuals. Additionally, ongoing pollinator research has demonstrated the diverse insect communities they support. Even though core-

opsis may have had a troubled past, our evaluation showcases their incredible beauty and ecological value, while proving that many selections are worthy additions to the mid-Atlantic garden. Mt. Cuba Center is a botanical garden that inspires an appreciation for the beauty and value of native plants and a commitment to protect the habitats that sustain them. Over the past 70 years the landscape at Mt. Cuba Center has been transformed from fallow cornfields into thriving, ecologically functional gardens, thanks to the initiative of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lammot du Pont Copeland.

About Trial Garden Research Mt. Cuba Center's Trial Garden, managed by George Coombs, evaluates native plants and their related cultivars for their horticultural and ecological value. The goal of this research is to provide gardeners and the horticulture industry with information about superior plants for the mid-Atlantic region as well as highlight the important ecosystem services native plants provide. Mt. Cuba Center has conducted trial garden research since 2002, including previously completed evaluations of asters, coneflowers, and heuchera. http://www.mtcubacenter.org/horticultural-research/trialgarden-research/

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VNLA –Winter Board Meeting Notes Tuesday, January 5, 2016 – 1 p.m. - 5 pm

Baltimore Convention Center, Rm. 334

Mission Statement: “To enhance, promote, and advocate for Virginia’s nursery and landscape professionals" 1:10 p.m. – Call to Order, by Sonya Lepper Westervelt, President with the following in attendance: Virginia Rockwell, Matt Shreckhise, Christopher Brown, Josh Ellinger, Brent Hunsinger, Doug Rodes, Aaron Williams, Mike Hildebrand, Jeff Miller and Jeff Howe. Not present: Tom Thompson, Craig Attkisson, and Bill Gouldin. VNLA Dashboard Metrics Current Membership ** Membership 1 year ago 12/30 Peak Membership (2008)

525 579 632

** Includes 33 comp memberships for 2/4yr VT seniors Current VCH Count VCH Count 1 Year ago

545 521

Consent Agenda Reports President’s Report – Sonya Westervelt Minutes, 11/10/15 – Virginia Rockwell Legislative Report – Brent Hunsinger 2014 CPA Financial Review Report Advertiser/Sponsor packages and benefits (in reports) – Craig Attkisson, Sonya Westervelt  Constant Contact Email Tracking Report –Jeff Miller  Certification Report – Jeff Miller, Jeff Howe It was moved and seconded to approve the above consent agenda reports, seconded and passed.     

Committtee Reports Requiring Action  Financial Report – Virginia Rockwell reviewed the 2015/2014 Profit & Loss Previous Year Comparison and the 2015 Budget to Actual, both as of 12/28/15, but not all year end entries had been made yet. Virginia recommended that the Budget Committee have a conference call with the CPA after the 2015 year-end entries were complete. A motion was made to approve the financial reports as emailed to the Board, seconded and passed.

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 Scholarships – a policy should be developed on disbursements based on the fund balances and gains/losses for the year.  2016 Budget – a motion was made to approve the 2016 Budget, seconded and passed.  Constitution/Bylaws – Sonya Westervelt reported on Bill Gouldin’s behalf that the Bylaws had been reviewed at the June and November Board meetings and had been reviewed by our attorney. A motion was made to approve the Bylaw revisions as amended, seconded and passed.  Research – Christopher Brown Jr reported that the committee would discuss changing the name of the Virginia Nurserymen’s Horticulture Research Foundation at their committee meeting on Wednesday morning.  MANTS Report – a written request will be sent to the VNLA MANTS Directors to provide a written report and copies of the financial reports after each MANTS Board Meeting.  VNLA Grants Policy – Sonya Westervelt presented a draft example to develop a VNLA policy on regional grant requirements. It was the consensus of the board to move forward on this. Sonya will develop the policy and grant application.  Membership - Doug Rodes reported that four VNLA Social Events are scheduled for 2016: o Wednesday, February 10 in conjunction with the CVNLA Short Course o Wednesday, February 17, in conjunction with the PLA Seminars o August, in conjunction with the VNLA Workshop/Field Day o One in the Fall in the Tidewater area Board members will do a 2-minute “Did You Know that the VNLA did………? A Membership Challenge was issued by Doug Rodes to each board member to get 5 new members at MANTS with the 50% show special and to get another 5 new members by the March board meeting. VNLA generic business cards – It was the consensus of the board to get generic business cards so each board member could have 50 to use with their board duties. Virginia Turf Council’s Mid-Atlantic Turfgrass Expo, Fredericksburg – a motion was made to reimburse expenses for Brent Hunsinger to attend, seconded and passed. Emergent Group – Sonya reported that the Executive Committee approved a $500 sponsorship of the Emergent Group event at the Pratt Street Ale House, Wednesday immediately after the trade show closes. The VNLA will handle the financial transactions for this event. The Emergent

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Group is working to start a 501(c)3 organization. (Formerly the Young Nursery Professional Group) Other Reports MANTS Directors Report  John Lancaster and Danny Shreckhise, VNLA MANTS directors, reported the following info after their board meeting:  960 Exhibitors with 92% retention rate  300,000 sf of exhibit space, now the largest green industry trade show in the U.S.  75 new exhibitors with several international exhibitors  5,000 room nights, which enables MANTS to save on room rentals  An exhibitor waiting list continues to be maintained  Baltimore as increased security in the Convention Center area  Pre-registration was approximately 8,000, which equals 2015 and an additional 2,500-3,000 register on site during the show.  Increasing MANTS exposure with a press conference with Garden Writers  MANTS future schedules are always the first full week of January.  Old Business

Board Policy Review – Sonya Westervelt and Virginia Rockwell will review the Policy Manual and make recommendations for updates. New Business  Board Meeting Dates for Spring, Summer, Fall 2016 (see below) 

Adjournment - Being no other business the meeting was adjourned. Respectively submitted, Jeff Miller, Exec. Dir. TASK LIST FOR NEXT MEETING 1. Policy Manual Review 2. Succession Planning Committee to meet 3. Field Day, Educational Workshop and Summer Tour details finalized Spring Board Meeting, Wednesday, March 2, 2016 Location: Richmond, VA Summer Board Meeting, Saturday, June 11, 2016, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg Fall Board Meeting, Wednesday, October 25, 2016 Location: Williamsburg, VA What are our members’ problems? How is the VNLA going to make them more successful?

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Annual   Membership  Breakfast  Meeting Minutes 

7 a.m. – Buffet Breakfast 7:25 a.m. The meeting was called to order by VNLA President Sonya Lepper Westervelt. She thanked the Board for their support and work in moving the VNLA forward in 2015. The Strategic Plan was reviewed by Sonya Lepper Westervelt and she noted the following objectives had been accomplished or were moving forward: 1. Developing a more reliable revenue stream  Protecting the long term association investments  Grower Guide was made accessible on any mobile-friendly device, anytime, anywhere.  Certification was being upgraded to be more relevant and have a positive revenue stream.  Discontinued the “Plant Something” program  Developed a package sponsor program with discount incentives.

Thursday, January 7, 2016 ‐ 7‐9 a.m. 

Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel, Harbor View Room  Mission Statement: To enhance, promote and advocate  for  Virginia’s  nursery  and  landscape  professionals   Vision Statement: To be the leader and resource for the  Virginia nursery and landscape industry  2. Member relevancy  Bylaws have been updated and reviewed by an attorney for the first time in over 20 years.  The Policy Manual is in the process of being revised and updated. 3 Succession Planning – a committee has been appointed and has met to begin planning for the retirement of the Executive Director in June 2018. The revised Bylaws were reviewed by Sonya Westervelt and noted that a new policy of using the voting card method would be used, which would insure one vote per member. After some discussion, and failure of a second to approve the revised Bylaws, a motion was made to send the revised Bylaws by mail to all members and provide a form to vote, sign and return to the VNLA Office, seconded, and passed. VNLA Dashboard Metrics 

Ad – Plantworks Nursery

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Current Membership  **  525 Membership 1 year ago 12/30  579 Peak Membership (2008)  632 **  Includes  33  comp  mem‐   brships    2yr/4yr VT Seniors  Current VCH Count  545 VCH Count 1 Year ago   521 Secretary’s Report – Virginia Rockwell reviewed the Dashboard and noted that the membership was down slightly, due mostly to less VA Tech student members. The number of Virginia Certified Horticulturist was up. A motion as made to approve the Secretary’s Report and the Minutes from the January 15, 2015 Annual Membership Meeting, seconded and approved. Financial Reports – Virginia Rockwell reviewed the summary Balance Sheet and Profit & Loss Sheet as of December 28, 2015 compared to the previous year and noted that these were not the final figures for 2015. The 2016 Budget had been approved by Board on Tuesday and had been sent out to the membership to review in December. She also noted that she and Aaron Williams had met with VNLA members to review the VNLA finances and that they were available anytime to answer questions from members. AmericanHort (formerly the ANLA) – Craig Regelbrugge, Senior VP - Industry Advocacy & Research, thanked the VNLA for their support of AmericanHort. Some successes for 2015 were that research and development and Section 179 for equipment will be continued, the Transportation Bill passed and plants were not eliminated from the bill; $500,000 was made available for funding research on Pollinator Health, which has been leveraged to $8 million. SNA Update – Danny Summers noted that VNLA Executive Director, Jeff Miller, had been awarded an Honorary Membership in the Southern Nursery Association at their annual meeting in 2015 and thanked the VNLA for their long tradition of supporting the SNA, as well as Sonya Westervelt’s participation the SNA State Officers Conference in August. The SNA has 650+ members and noted that there were a lot more landscaping businesses coming into the industry. The SNA now has their latest BMP Guide online as well as all the research proceedings. They awarded 12 scholarships of $1,500 each with Virginia Tech students receiving 25% of the scholarships. 

The SNA Trade Show will have a new event name in 2016 and will be held in Athens, GA August 30 - September 1. This is the first time it has been outside of Atlanta since 1967. The event will have more landscape exhibits and will continue with the Annual Research Conference and the Southern Plant Conference. Norm

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Cole, Cole Nurseries, Pipestem, WV is the Virginia representative on the SNA Board. VA Tech Horticulture Dept. - Roger Harris introduced staff and students in attendance and noted that the merger of the Horticulture Department, Crop and Soil Environmental Science and Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed Science was progressing and that there is good synergy between the departments. Robert McDuffie, new director of the Hahn Horticulture Gardens, noted that there were many ongoing garden improvement projects and that Jim Monroe had made a ten year commitment to donate plants to the gardens. Certification – Jeff Howe, incoming VCH Chair, reported that the Virginia Certified Horticulturist program has been evolving for almost 40 years. His goals for the committee are to expand credence and awareness and to become the leader in the certification arena. The committee is working with the VSLD, testing is being updated, the online Scholar study program is being enhanced, and the Advanced Certification program will be brought back. He noted that he and Virginia Rockwell and working on a committee developing the Chesapeake Bay Landscape Certification program. Legislative/Regulatory Review – Brent Hunsinger reported that 2015 had been a busy year with invasive and noxious weed issues with Delegate Patrick Hope, water quality and quantity issues with Mission H2O, and working with Senator Creigh Deeds on shaping a Pollinator bill, which he will be carrying forward in the 2016 General Assembly. Instead of the traditional plant baskets that had been distributed to the members of the Virginia General Assembly, two General Assembly members, two Secretariats and the Governor were recognized through The Journey Through Hallowed Ground Tree Planting Program with tree plantings at Montpelier Station. Brent presented each recipient a commemorative certificate in Richmond. He introduced and thanked Katie Frasier, President of the Virginia Agribusiness Council for her support of VNLA legislative and regulatory issues. Katie reviewed the hot issues for 2016 including noxious weeds, water quality and TMDL reductions, BMP’s, Waters of the U.S. and water withdrawal permitting. Membership – Doug Rodes noted that VNLA MANTS Exhibitors had been given a VNLA logo flag to post at their exhibits to note their support of the association, which was coordinated by Christopher Brown Jr.. A membership engagement task force has been working to set up more Happy Hour meet up events around the state. He urged members to complete the new online membership survey for guidance to the board on being responsive to member needs.

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2016 VNLA Officers and Directors (Back, l-r) Jeff Howe, Brent Hunsinger, Doug Rodes, Josh Ellinger, Christopher Brown Jr, Jeff Miller, (seated) Sonya Lepper Westervelt, Virginia Rockwell, Aaron Williams (not in photo) Bill Gouldin, Scott Price, Thomas Buckley Education & Public Relations – Aaron Williams reported that the VNLA Annual Field Day would be hosted by Grelen Nursery in Somerset, VA on Thursday, August 11 with another Educational Workshop on Wednesday, the day before, and the annual Summer Tour on Friday. Webinars for members have been set up for 6 programs in 2016, every other month on the 3rd Thursday at noon for a free “Lunch and Learn” opportunity. The first webinar is on January 21, featuring Marcus vandeVliet with a continuation from our 2015 Workshop. The VNLA has also awarded over $11,000 in Scholarships in 2015. Research – Christopher Brown Jr reported that $20,263 had been awarded to four research projects for 2016. The committee will be re-evaluating the investment fund due to the volatility of the market over the last year and may 52 52

request some funding from the Budget in the future. The board is also reviewing the options to move the Scholarship investment funds to be under the VNA Horticulture Research Foundation Inc, which is a 501c3 corporation. This would allow tax deductible donations to the Scholarship funds. MANTS Update – Danny Shreckhise, one the VNLA’s MANTS Directors, reported that the show was going well and the attendance should be similar to last year. There is still a waiting list for exhibit space. Awards Presentations Professional of the Year Award – was presented by Tom Saunders, on behalf of Paul Saunders, (last year’s recipient) to Peggy Singlemann, VNLA member and Director of Horticulture at Maymont in Richmond.

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Environmental Steward Award – was presented by Josh Ellinger, Environmental Chair, to Eric Gunderson, of Southern Branch Nursery, Chesapeake, VA. Watkins Recognition – Mike Hildebrand recognized Senator

John Watkins, VNLA member and Chairman of the Board of Watkins Nurseries, Midlothian, for 34 years of service as a member of the Virginia General Assembly. He was presented a commemorative certificate for a tree planting in his honor by The Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership’s Living Legacy Tree Planting Project.

Nominating Committee for 2016 Officers/Directors – Matt Shreckhise presented the following slate of officers and directors for 2016: President – Bill Gouldin Vice President – Virginia Rockwell Secretary/Treasurer – Aaron Williams Past President – Sonya Lepper Westervelt 2-Year Directors: Jeffrey Howe, Certification Scott Price, Education Thomas Buckley – Public Relations 1-Year Directors: Christopher Brown, Jr – Research Josh Ellinger – Environmental Affairs Brent Hunsinger – Legislation Doug Rodes – Membership Director at-Large – Tom Thompson Being no nominations from the floor, a motion was made to accept the nominations as presented, seconded and passed. 8:50 a.m. - Final thoughts and adjournment were made by Virginia Rockwell, on behalf of Bill Gouldin, after she presented Sonya Westervelt a plaque in appreciation of her service as VNLA President in 2015. 9:00 a.m. Adjourn Respective submitted by Jeff Miller, Exec. Dir. What are our members’ problems?

How is the VNLA going to make them more successful?

News – VDOT Landscape Projects Requirements for VNLA Certified Horticulturalist "On independent landscape projects, the Contractor is also required to have or to furnish personnel possessing appropriate Traffic Control and Erosion and Siltation Control certifications to control the work according to Sections 105.14, 107.16 and Section 512 as appropriate." Below is the language that will appear in the July 2016 Road and Bridge Specifications: VNLA Newsletter VNLA Newsletter

605.03--Qualifications of Personnel 1. Contractor and Equipment Qualifications: The Contractor shall be personally experienced or arrange to furnish a subcontractor who is personally experienced in all aspects of landscape preparation, planting operations, arboriculture, and landscape maintenance operations as required by the work described in the contract documents, including these specifications. Workers and equipment shall conform to Section 105.05. The Contractor shall submit documentation of equipment proposed for use on the project to the Engineer. On independent landscape projects, the Contractor is also required to have or to furnish personnel possessing appropriate Traffic Control and Erosion and Siltation Control certifications to control the work according to Sections 105.14, 107.16 and Section 512 as appropriate. 686 - (b) Landscape Operations Crew and Crew Manager Qualifications: The Contractor shall furnish the following personnel to supervise landscape field operations: 2. Work Crew - The majority of crew personnel must have at least two years continuous experience working on a commercial landscaping crew. 3. The Crew Manager - Crew Manager must have at least three years continuous experience working as a Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association (VNLA) Certified Horticulturalist, or approved equivalent from a neighboring state. This individual shall be proficient in areas of worker safety, environmental regulations, and efficient landscape management in conformance with accepted horticultural practice and methodologies. 4. Herbicide/Pesticide Applicators must be Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) certified or a registered technician to perform all applications of pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides as required herein. Certified applicators shall have at least 5 years continuous experience in the commercial application of pesticides and herbicides required for the establishment and maintenance of trees, plant materials and grasses specified in this section and on the plans. 5. Pruning shall be performed by personnel certified by the International Society of Arboriculture. Copies of current certifications shall be furnished to the Engineer prior to the start of work requiring the specific certifications. The Contractor will not be allowed to begin the specific work until the Engineer receives such certifications. For more information, contact your local VDOT Environmental Director or Dale Huff dale.huff.@vdot.virginia.gov

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Monarch Joint Venture Partnering across the U.S. to conserve the monarch migration w w w. m o n a r c h j o i n t v e n t u r e . o r g The Monarch Joint Venture is a partnership of federal and state agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and academic programs that are working together to protect the monarch migration across the lower 48 United States.

Mission

Recognizing that North American monarch (Danaus plexippus) conservation is a responsibility of Mexico, Canada and the U.S., as identified in the North American Monarch Conservation Plan, this Joint Venture will coordinate efforts throughout the U.S. to conserve and protect monarch populations and their migratory phenomena by developing and implementing sciencebased habitat conservation and restoration measures in collaboration with multiple stakeholders.

Mowing: Best Practices for Monarchs Mowing can be an effective management tool to control woody and weedy species and manage undesirable species from setting seed if timed appropriately. However, mowing too often or during certain times of the year may result in higher mortality for monarchs and other wildlife, including important pollinators, using the habitat. Maintaining high native plant diversity, including milkweed, will provide larval host plants and nectar sources for monarchs and other pollinators. In addition to providing ecological benefits, native plants require less maintenance than non-native plants once established. This document targets mowing practices, but it is also important to consider monarch timing and pollinator-friendly practices for other management techniques used. Management Window: Before May 15 [~June 30 - July 5] After September 20

Management Window: Before May 1 [~June 20 - July 10] After October 1

Management Window: Before May 1 [~June 30 - July 10] After October 1 Management Window: Before April 1 [~July 1- July 20] After October 15

Management Window: Before April 1 [~June 20 - July 1] After November 1

Management Window: Before March 1 [~June 30 - August 10] After November 1 Management Window: Before March 1 [~June 30 - August 15] After November 1

Visual created by Kelly Nail, University of Minnesota

Our mission will be achieved by coordinating and facilitating partnerships and communications in the U.S. and North America to deliver a combination of habitat conservation, education, and research and monitoring.

Best mowing practices

Management Windows

These regions, separated primarily by latitude, offer different management windows in spring, summer and fall when mowing or other management may be safer for monarchs. • • •

Spring recommendations are primarily based on monarch breeding activity. Fall windows account for both monarch breeding activity and peak migration activity. Options listed in [ ] are recommended only if necessary. These summer mowing intervals may still cause some mortality. The two southernmost regions have been adjusted to avoid the primary nesting season for other grassland species. Data are based on long-term trends and variation

from year to year may occur. noTE: These recommendations are based primarily on monarch breeding and migration activity. Please use these in conjunction with recommendations for other priority species to identify the most appropriate timing for your situation.

Untimely mowing can result in high levels of insect mortality. Insect eggs, larvae, pupae and even adults may be killed directly by the mower, and mowing also destroys landscape features that provide structural diversity and may impact nesting areas used by pollinators. To limit mortality to monarchs and other pollinators, the following guidelines are recommended for established native plantings: 1. Avoid mowing the entire habitat to leave refuge areas for wildlife using the site at the time of mowing. This will allow for recolonization of the mowed site. Leave areas that may be good nesting or overwintering sites (leaf litter, dead stems, other ground cover) for pollinators or other wildlife, or known host plant areas if mowing during peak reproduction. Marking known areas may prevent accidental mowing. 2. Timing of mowing is critical (see map above for regional recommendations). Avoid mowing during times of Vision peak insect activity; this timing will vary between species. If your goal is monarch habitat, do not mow during The vision of this Joint times of high monarch reproduction or migration. Some areas may benefit from summer management to Venture is abundant monarch promote fall milkweed growth (and thus, monarch reproduction); this is reasonable for the southern Great Plains where monarch activity is low for an extended period of the summer. populations to sustain the monarch migratory phenomena 3. If possible, avoid mowing while native plants are in bloom or before they have dispersed seed. into perpetuity, and more 4. Limit mowing to no more than twice per year, and even less if possible. Mowing too frequently disrupts plant growth and the ability of forbs to compete with grass species. However, during the first year of prairie restoration, broadly to promote monarchs more frequent mowing may be needed for weed control. as a flagship species whose 5. Use a flushing bar and cut at reduced speeds to allow conservation will sustain wildlife to escape prior to mowing. habitats for pollinators and 6. Use a minimum cutting height of 8-12 inches (shorter other plants and animals. heights may be needed for early establishment mowing). Mowing at this height will effectively remove seed producing parts of most invasive plants while minimizing Monarch Joint Venture impact to native plants and many insects. University of Minnesota Karen Oberhauser monarchs@monarchjointventure.org 7. Avoid mowing at night, when insects are inactive and unable to escape.


Karen Oberhauser

Monarch Hab itat DO NOT MO W

Milkweed and nectar Resources

Improve public awareness of pollinators by sharing information and displaying educational signs.

Timely mowing can promote milkweed growth, but if done during times of peak reproduction or migration it can be detrimental to monarchs. The most appropriate timing for mowing to promote monarch survival will vary with milkweed species and region. Fischer et al. (2015) found that mowing in early July in upstate New York could promote the growth of fresh foliage on milkweed plants, which is preferred for egg-laying by monarchs. Mowing or burning milkweed habitat during the summer in the southern Great Plains (OK, and parts of TX, NM, KS, CO, and NE) can promote milkweed growth to support late summer or early fall breeding in the region (Baum and Mueller, 2015). Research is ongoing to refine regional recommendations.

When are monarchs present in your area? Monarchs east of the Rocky Mountains migrate south to the mountains of central Mexico for the winter. They depart from their overwintering colonies beginning in March, laying eggs in Texas and other southern states in mid-March through early-April. These eggs take a month or more to become adults; the adults expand northward, laying eggs on milkweeds along the way and reaching the northern parts of their range in early to mid-June. As long as milkweed is present in the landscape, there is a chance that monarchs are also there and that mowing could result in direct monarch mortality. Check milkweed plants for monarch eggs and larvae, or for telltale signs that monarchs may be present, such as chewed leaves and caterpillar frass. If you find signs of monarchs, consider delaying mowing. The timing of peak monarch breeding and migrating activity can vary from year to year. The recommendations presented here illustrate long term trends shown by data from Journey North, Monarch Watch, and the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project, but to verify monarch presence, we recommend you visit the Journey North interactive maps frequently to see real-time observations of monarch activity each year:

Nectar resources are needed by adult monarchs throughout their breeding and migration seasons. Thus, it is important to delay fall mowing activity until nectar sources have finished blooming to ensure abundant resources for monarchs’ journey to their overwintering grounds. Mowing too frequently may impact floral resource diversity and abundance, in addition to putting monarchs and other pollinators at higher risk of being directly killed by the mower.

www.learner.org/jnorth/monarch

Above: Monarch Life Cycle (egg, larva, pupa, adult), photos: Michelle Solensky, Denny Brooks, Wendy Caldwell, Dave Astin, Mary Holland Left: Small chewed hole from first instar monarch caterpillar, and frass from fifth instar, photos: Wendy Caldwell

Resources • • • •

Data used to calculate management windows during the monarch breeding season were provided by the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project from 1997-2014, www.mlmp.org. Peak migration estimates from www.monarchwatch.org were used to generate recommendations for management during fall migration. Fischer, S. J., E. H. Williams, L. P. Brower, and P. A. Palmiotto. 2015. Enhancing monarch butterfly reproduction by mowing fields of common milkweed. Am. Midl. Nat. 173: 229–240. Baum, K. A., and E. Mueller. 2015. Grassland and roadside management practices affect milkweed abundance and opportunities for monarch recruitment, pp 197–202. In K. S. Oberhauser, K. R. Nail, and S. M. Altizer, (eds.), Monarchs in a changing world: Biology and conservation of an iconic butterfly. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York Hopwood, J., S. H. Black, E. Lee-Mader, A. Charlap, R. Preston, K. Mozumder, and S. Fleury. 2015. “Literature Review: Pollinator Habitat Enhancement and Best Management Practices in Highway Rights-ofWay.” Prepared by The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in collaboration with ICF International. 68 pp. Washington, D.C.: Federal Highway Administration.

w w w. p l a nt m i l k w e e d . or g Monarch Joint Venture


“ Without milkweeds

there can be no monarchs ” — Douglas W. Tallamy

Wild for Monarchs Butterfly gardeners show they care about the environment and their connection to nature. While providing food and shelter for monarchs and other pollinators, they also help to conserve native plants, reduce habitat fragmentation and increase biodiversity. Healthy ecosystems directly affect our food, water and air quality.

JOIN THE

Wild for Monarchs C A M PA I G N wildones.org

Butterflies and moths depend predominantly on native plants as their larval host plants. In the case of monarchs, milkweed species are critical for their survival. Whenever possible, grow local genotype native plants that have co-evolved in their native habitats with other plants and wildlife, such as insect pollinators. Local genotype native plants are vigorous and hardy. Adapted to their region, they can survive winter cold and summer heat. The deep roots of native plants, especially those of prairie plants, trees and shrubs, hold soil, control erosion and withstand droughts. Native plants, once established, require little watering and better tolerate native pests. To prevent the local extinction of native flora, plants should be purchased from reputable nurseries and not dug from natural areas.

Native Plants Matter

NEED MORE MILKWEEDS? Contact local native plant growers or your local Wild Ones chapter for information on their plant sales. Local Wild Ones chapter contact: wildones.org/connect Monarch Watch’s Bring Back the Monarchs Program: monarchwatch.org/bring-back-the-monarchs Native butterfly host and nectar plant lists: wildones.org Wild Ones Butterfly sign: wildones.org/learn/wild-for-monarchs Monarch Waystation sign: monarchwatch.org North American Butterfly Assoc. sign: naba.org

Collect native milkweed seed and encourage others to grow milkweeds. Details: wildones.org/learn/wild-for-monarchs Local genotype guidelines: wildones.org/learn/native-plantsand-landscaping/local-ecotype-guidelines

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2016 VNLA VOLUME PRICING Major sponsors will all be recognized with their logo on the VNLA website as well as with signage at all VNLA events. Major sponsors paying for their sponsorships in full by January 15, 2016 will receive an additional 2% discount. Otherwise, discounts are as follows with the ability to schedule biannual or quarterly payments. Major Sponsorship Level

Value Amount

Discount

Actual Amount Spent

____ Platinum ____ Gold ____ Silver ____ Bronze

$10,000+ $7,500-$9,999 $5,000-$7,499 $2,500-$4,999

10% 8% 6% 4%

$9,000 or 10% off total $6,900 - $9,199 $4,700 - $7,049 $2,400 - $4,799

Sponsorship and Advertising Options Quarterly Newsletter Advertisement (Price per newsletter, 10% premium for inside covers, 25% premium for 2/3 back cover...based on availability at time of commitment) ____ Business card B&W $40 ½ page B&W $130 ____ Business card 4 Color $60 ½ page 4 Color $565 ____ ¼ page B&W $80 Full page B&W $235 ____ ¼ page Color $225 Full page 4 Color $795 (Contact the VNLA office for non-member rates)

Guide to Virginia Growers Advertisement ____ ½ page B&W $165 Inside Front Cover (full page/color, 1 avail) $750 ____ ½ page Color $350 Inside Back Cover (full page/color, 1 avail) $750 ____ Full page B&W $275 Back Cover (half page/color, 1 avail) $900 ____ Full page 4 Color $550 Back Cover Flap Outside (½ flap/color, 2 avail) $600 ____ Back Cover Flap Inside (1/2 page flap/color, 2 avail) $400 Additional Ino Contact Person: ______________________________________________________________________ Company: ___________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________ City _______________ ST ____ Zip ________ Phone: ___________________________ Email: ______________________________________________ 58

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Field Day Sponsorship * (Hosted by Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA) ____ General Sponsor (1 comp registration) Silver $250 ____ General Sponsor (2 comp registration) Gold $500 ____ Speaker Sponsor (2-4 avail, 2 comp registrations) $500 ____ Lunch Sponsor (2 avail, 4 comp registrations) $1,000 ____ Water Sponsor (1 avail, 4 comp registrations) $1,000 ____ *(All Field Day Sponsors have a choice of a 10x10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; exhibit space) Summer Tour Sponsorship*(Charlottesville area) ____ General Sponsor - Silver ____ General Sponsor- Gold ____ Bus Sponsor (2 avail, 2 comp registrations) ____ Lunch Sponsor (1 avail, 2 comp registrations) ____ Water Sponsor (1 avail)

$250 $500 $1,000 $1, _____________ 000 $250

Webinar Sponsorship (based on availability) $500@ NEW FOR 2016!! ____ January 21, 2016 Marcus VandeVliet, Business Management ____ March 17, 2016 Ryan Contreras, Plant Breeding and Selection ____ May 19, 2016 Cheryl Boyer, Social Media ____ July 21, 2016 Anthony LeBude, Nursery Pour-through and Water Quality ____ September 15, 2016 Mike Goatley, Urban Nutrient Management ____ November 17, 2016 Amy Fulcher, Nursery and Landscape IPM Membership Breakfast Sponsorship for 2017 ____ General Sponsor - Silver ____ General Sponsor - Gold

$250 $500

Foundation Endowment Donation ____ $ _________________donation towards industry research. Scholarship Endowment Donation $_________________ donation towards industry scholarships and will be distributed equally between the scholarship funds, unless a specific scholarship fund is checked below. _______ Shoosmith Scholarship Fund _______ CW Bryant Scholarship Fund _______ Laird/Gresham Scholarship Fund $ _________________ TOTAL SPONSORSHIPS AND ADVERTISING ___________ % DISCOUNT AMOUNT ENCLOSED $ _____________ CHECK # __________ Return to: Virginia Nursery & Landscape Association 383 Coal Hollow Rd; Christiansburg, VA 24073-6721 Email: info@vnla.org Fax: 540-382-2716 Questions: Contact Jeff Miller at 1-800-476-0055, info@vnla.org *All communication to members about these events will showcase sponsors logos and/or name. VNLA Newsletter

January / February / March 2016

59


SAVE THE DATE!!! VNLA Field Day 2016 Grelen Nursery Somerset, VA

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Educational Workshop Wednesday, August 10

Summer Tour Friday, August 12


Lunch and Learn 2016 Webinar Series The 2016 lunch and learn educational series provides VNLA members and Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) staff 6 bi-monthly, one-hour, live webinars at 12:00 PM on the third Thursday of each odd month. Participants can listen and question experts in landscape, nursery, and plant breeding; receive continuing education credits for certification; and gain new business and horticulture knowledge. Each webinar will be recorded and available to VNLA members as contiunuing education. Date Jan 21

Presenter Marcus vandeVliet, MV Enterprises

Topic Business Management - 20 Key Business Metrics

This webinar is available on the VNLA website under the Certification tab, as will all the others, after they are presented and recorded. These will only available to members. Mar 17

Ryan Contreras, Oregon State University

Breeding New Plants that Work

Description How can you manage your business if you don’t measure everything. Key information and metrics will improve owner decisions from day-to-day operations all the way through to long term business strategy. Business metrics should include profitability, but the real question is where is the profit being generated, and by whom? What impacts profits in production? Are we managing our sales people and process? How effective is our marketing and advertising? This webinar will cover what metrics to focus on, and how to generate accurate and current information.

Ryan Contreras is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University where he runs the Ornamental Plant Breeding program. His program breeds a diversity of nursery and landscape crops from Acer to Vaccinium with goals such as sterility, improved adaptability, and new combinations of ornamental traits. Ryan also has an active teaching program including woody plant identification and plant growth & development. If you find yourself in the Willamette Valley, Ryan’s program welcomes visitors year round!

May 19

Dr. Anthony LeBude, Dr. LeBude will discuss results from his North Carolina Nursery and Source2016 WaterWebinar Quality Used for Lunch and Learn Series Lunch and Learn 2016 Webinar Series North Carolina State Landscape Association grant-funded irrigation tour of nurseries this past Irrigating Nursery Crops The 2016 lunch and learn educational series provides VNLA members and Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) staff 6 bi-monthly, one-hour, live Come learn about irrigating with high or low pH water and some University summer. 2016 and learn educational series provides VNLA members and Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) staff 6 bi-monthly, one-hour, live webinars at 12:00 PM on the third Thursday of each odd month. Participants can listen and question The experts in lunch landscape, nursery, and plant breeding; webinars 12:00 PM on recorded the third Thursday of each odd month. Participants can listen and question experts in landscape, nursery, and plant breeding; receive continuing education credits for certification; and gain new business and horticulture knowledge. Each at webinar will be and available plant problems they might contribute to during production. Additionally he receive continuing education credits for certification; and gain new business and horticulture knowledge. Each webinar will be recorded and available to VNLA members as contiunuing education. to VNLA members as contiunuing education. will discuss some possible solutions to common pond management Date Presenter Topic Description problems in the field. Date Topic Keyobserved while Description Jan 21 Marcus vandeVliet, How can you manage your business Presenter if you don’t measure everything. Business Management - 20 Key MV Enterprises

July

Business Metrics

21 Marcusdecisions vandeVliet, Business Management - 20 Key information and metrics Jan will improve owner from day-to-day Enterprises operations all the way through to longMV term business strategy.Business Business Metrics

How can you manage your business if you don’t measure everything. Key information and metrics will improve owner decisions from day-to-day operations all the way through to long term business strategy. Business

metrics should include profitability, but the real question is where is the This webinar is available on the VNLA metrics should include profitability, but the real question is where is the profit being generated, and This by whom? What impacts in production? webinar isprofits available on the VNLA 21websiteDr. Cheryl and tab, How do you know if your return on investment for social media marketing 5 Questions to Ask Your Social profit being generated, and by whom? What impacts profits in production? under the Boyer Certification as Are we managing our sales people and process? How effective is our website under themetrics Certification tab, as Arekey we managing our sales people indicators and process? Howshould effective is our marketing and advertising? This webinar will cover whatefforts to focus will Mr. all the others, after they are Scott Stebner, are working? What performance you look at? Media Manage marketing and advertising? This webinar will cover what metrics to focus will all the others, after they are on, and how to generate accurate and current information. presented and recorded. These will only on, and average”? how to generate accurate and current information. Kansas State What is considered “industry In this webinar we’ll share 5 tips to presented and recorded. These will only available to members. availablehelp to members. University you understand how your business is faring in the social media Mar 17

Sept 15 May 19

Nov 17 July 21

Sept 15

Nov 17

Ryan Contreras, Oregon State University

Breeding New Plants that Work

Dr. Mike Goatley, Virginia Tech Dr. Anthony LeBude, North Carolina State University

Ryan Contreras is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University Mar 17Plant Ryan Contreras, Breeding New Plants that Work where he runs the Ornamental Breeding program. His program Oregoncrops State from Acer to Vaccinium breeds a diversity of nursery and landscape with goals such as sterility, improved University adaptability, and new combinations of ornamental traits. Ryan also has an active teaching program including woody plant identification and plant growth & development. If you find yourself in the Willamette Valley, Ryan’s program welcomes visitors year round!

landscape.

Ryan Contreras is an Assistant Professor at Oregon State University where he runs the Ornamental Plant Breeding program. His program breeds a diversity of nursery and landscape crops from Acer to Vaccinium with goals such as sterility, improved adaptability, and new combinations of ornamental traits. Ryan also has an active teaching program including woody plant identification and plant growth & development. If you find yourself in the Willamette Valley, Ryan’s program welcomes visitors year round!

This webinar will detail the current status of nutrient management Urban Nutrient Management recommendations, new chemistry and strategies in fertilization, and simple Where We Are & Where We Are that landscapers can positively impact water quality in their overall Headed Dr. LeBude will discuss results from his North Carolina ways Nursery and Source Water Quality Used for May 19 Dr. Anthony LeBude, Dr. LeBude will discuss results from his North Carolina Nursery and Source Water Quality Used for Landscape Association grant-funded irrigation tour of nurseries this past Irrigating Nursery Crops lawn and landscape management programs. Carolina Landscape Association grant-funded irrigation tour of nurseries this past Irrigating Nursery Crops summer. Come learn about irrigatingNorth with high or lowState pH water and some plant problems they might contribute University to during production. Additionally he will discuss some possible solutions to common pond management problems observed while in the field.

summer. Come learn about irrigating with high or low pH water and some plant problems they might contribute to during production. Additionally he will discuss some possible solutions to common pond management problems observed while in the field.

pesticide without sacrificing pest control. A series of nursery-based examples on recognizing fertilizer-related plant problems will show how detecting problems early and accurately interpreting the problem can help growers avoid costly production issues. Resources that are available to growers who are interested in adopting IPM will also be featured.

rate program, growers in several states have seen that they can spray less pesticide without sacrificing pest control. A series of nursery-based examples on recognizing fertilizer-related plant problems will show how detecting problems early and accurately interpreting the problem can help growers avoid costly production issues. Resources that are available to growers who are interested in adopting IPM will also be featured.

Dr. Amy Fulcher, Dr. Fulcher will share tried and true techniques from the nursery scouting Tried and True IPM Techniques How doyour you knowNursery’s if your return on investment for socialprogram media marketing Social University of5 Questions to Ask Your starting with monitoring flatheaded apple tree borer infestations that Improve July 21performance Dr. Cheryl Boyer and How do you know if your return on investment for social media marketing Questions efforts are working? What key indicators should5you look at? to Ask Your Social Media Manage Mr.In Scott efforts are working? What key performance indicators should you at? Media What is considered “industry average”? this Stebner, webinar and we’ll share 5 Manage tips to Tennessee interpreting granulate ambrosia beetle trap information tolook maximize Bottom Line Kansas State What is considered “industry average”? In this webinar we’ll share 5 tips to help you understand how your business is faring in the social media University you understand your business is faring in the social media a novel control of these and otherhelp pests. Dr.how Fulcher will also discuss landscape. landscape. approach to pesticide applications, the 1/2 rate program. Through the ½ Dr. Mike Goatley, This webinar will detail the current status of nutrient management Urban Nutrient Management Sept 15 Dr. Mike Goatley, webinar will detail the current of nutrient management Urban Nutrient Management rate program, growers in This several states havestatus seen that they can spray less Virginia Tech recommendations, new chemistry and strategies in fertilization, and simple Where We Are & Where We Are Tech quality in their recommendations, new chemistry and strategies in fertilization, and simple Where We Are & Where We Are ways that landscapers can positively Virginia impact water overall Headed pesticide control. A series of quality nursery-based ways pest that landscapers can positively impact water in their overall Headed without sacrificing lawn and landscape management programs. lawn and landscape management programs. examples on recognizing fertilizer-related plant problems will show how Dr. Amy Fulcher, Dr. Fulcher will share tried and true techniques from the nursery scouting Tried and True IPM Techniques Nov 17 flatheaded Dr. Amyapple Fulcher, Fulcher will share tried and true techniques from the nursery scouting can help Tried and True IPM Techniques detecting problems early Dr. and accurately interpreting the problem University of program starting with monitoring tree borer infestations that Improve your Nursery’s University program starting with monitoring flatheaded apple tree borer infestations Improve your Nursery’s Tennessee and interpreting granulate ambrosia beetle trap of information tothat maximize Bottom Line growers avoid costly production issues. Resources that are available to and interpreting granulate ambrosia beetle trap information to maximize Bottom control of these and other pests. Dr. Tennessee Fulcher will also discuss a novel Line control of these and other pests. Dr. Fulcher will also discuss a novel approach to pesticide applications, the 1/2 rate program. Through the ½ who are interested in adopting IPM will be featured. approach to pesticide applications, the 1/2also rate program. Through the ½ rate program, growers in several states have seen that growers they can spray less Dr. Cheryl Boyer and Mr. Scott Stebner, Kansas State University

Sponsor s: s: Sponsor s:

VNLA Newsletter

Sponsor s:

January / February / March 2016

61


Upcoming Events March 17, 2016, VNLA Webinar: Breeding New Plants that Work” by Ryan Contreras, Oregon State University, noon – 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 March 18, 2016, Shenandoah Valley Plant Symposium, Waynesboro. Presented by Waynesboro Parks and Recreation Department, At Best Western Inn & Suites Conference Center, Waynesboro, VA 22980 www.waynesboro.va.us April 21-24, 2016, Middle Atlantic Chapter - American Rhododendron Society & the American Azalea Society Joint Convention, Williamsburg, VA www.macars.org arsasaconvention2016.org April 23-30, 2016, Historic Garden Week in Virginia, http://www.vagardenweek.org/ May 11-13, 2016, American Boxwood Society 56th Annual Symposium, Shenandoah Valley & over to the Piedmont http://www.boxwoodsociety.org/abs_symposium.html May 19, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “Source Water Quality Used for Irrigating Nursery Crops” by Dr. Anthony LeBude, NCSU, noon – 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 June 11, 2016, VNLA Summer Board Meeting, Blacksburg, VA info@vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 June 11, 2016, VA Tech Hahn Horticulture Garden Gala, Blacksburg, VA http://www.hort.vt.edu/hhg/ June 29 – July 2, 2016, American Hosta Convention, “Daylilies in the Blugrass”, Louisville, KY, http://ahs2016convention.org/

August 2-4, 2016, IGC Show East, Valley Forge Casino Resort/Philadelphia Metro, www.IGCshow.com 203-682-1664 August 4-6, 2016 Virginia Christmas Tree Growers Association Annual Conference and Farm Tour, Staunton, VA www.VirginiaChristmasTrees.org 540-382-7310 secretary@VirginiaChristmasTreeGrowers.org

VNLA Workshop, Field Day, Summer Tour August 10, 2016, VNLA LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP, location TBA. www.vnla.org August 11, 2016, VNLA ANNUAL FIELD DAY at Grelen Nursery, Somerset, VA (near Charlottesville) www.vnla.org August 12, 2016, VNLA SUMMER TOUR, Charlottesville area, www.vnla.org August 25-27, 2016, Farwest Trade Show, Portland, OR www.farwestshow.com/ September 15, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “Urban Nutrient Management – Where We Are & Where We Are Headed” noon – 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 November 17, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “Tried and True IPM Techniques that Improve your Nursery’s Bottom Line:” noon – 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 January 11-13, 2017, MANTS Trade Show, Baltimore, MD http://www.mants.com/

July 9-12, 2016, AmericanHort “Cultivate ’16 – The New Now”, Greater Columbus Convention Center, OH www.americanhort.org 614-487-1117 July 21, 2016, VNLA Webinar: “5 Questions to Ask Your Social Media Manager” by Dr. Cheryl Boyer & Mr. Scott Stebnere, Kansas State University noon – 1 pm, www.vnla.org 1-800-476-0055 August 30 – September 1, 2016, Southern Nursery Association Trade Show, Southern Plant Conference, SNA Research Conference, the SNA Annual Business Meeting, and SNA State Officer’s Conference, Athens, GA, www.sna.org August 1-5, 2016, Perennial Plant Symposium, Minneapolis, MN http://www.perennialplant.org/

62 62

Test Schedule 2016 ___ Leesburg, Monroe Technical Center, Friday, May 20, 2016, 10 am–2 pm (Deadline 5/6/16) ___ Suffolk, Lancaster Farms. Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 1-5 pm, (Deadline 5/25/2016)

For a Current Calendar of all Green Industry Events, go: http://www.vnla.org/Calendar

NEW Interactive Calendar!

January/February/March 2016 January / February / March 2016

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January / February / March 2016

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