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SPRING 2013

UNIVERSITY

Holy Family University Evolves with Higher Education

MAGAZINE

A M PA I G N C E E F

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Annual fund

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2012-2013

A cup of coffee. It not only invigorates you but the cost of one cup can keep Holy Family University going too. You may think that such a small amount couldn’t possibly help, but when you combine your “cup” with others, we form a pot from which the University can draw to serve our students. So please give us a cup today—your venti caramel latte with a double shot of espresso will be used where the University needs it the most. And for that, we thank you!

Show your support by giving online using our secure website at alumni.holyfamily.edu/coffee or contact development@holyfamily.edu or 267-341-3340 for more options.

In this issue

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CONTENTS

FEATURES

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Choosing to Interact: A New Academic Program to Address the Increasing Specter of Autism

Many teachers lack sufficient training to accommodate autistic students. Holy Family’s new Autism Endorsement will be key to providing a more effective educational experience for children with special needs. By Gale Martin

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The Ever Changing Campus:

Holy Family University Evolves with Higher Education When the higher education landscape changes, institutions must embrace innovation in order to remain relevant. As new life springs on campus, so does renewed dedication to the future. By Heather G. Dotchel

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Little Courage Senior Jonathan Dick has had a special journey to discover what he will do post graduation from Holy Family University— Jon has recognized his calling to the priesthood and intends to follow this vocation. By Sara Szymendera ’13

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DEPARTMENTS 2 FIRSTWORD

A message from the President

4 BRIEFLYNOTED Out and about on campus 30 1000WORDS

A visual slice of life at Holy Family

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

32 TIGERTALES

Reports from the court, track, and field

36 FAMILYREUNION

News for the alumni community

0 MEMORYLANE 4 A nostalgic trip back in time

2 GIVINGBACK 4 Making a difference on campus 44 LASTWORD

Q&A with Rosemary Parmigiani School of Education Special Projects Director

COVER

Photo by Bruce Cramer

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FIRSTWORD

A message from the President

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any of my messages to you in the past have acknowledged that change is a part of our lives. As educators, we are bound by our responsibilities to manage change well. Also, one of our goals is to prepare our students to manage change well by helping them develop their critical thinking abilities, understand keys to effective relationships, commit to lifelong learning, and integrate Gospel values in their personal and professional lives. Our stories in this issue focus on how the University and its partners have anticipated and responded to change, as well as a very personal story of how one student found himself changing the direction of his life and how that was made possible by the support he received from fellow students as well as other members of the Holy Family University family. Our cover story on our “Ever-Changing Campus” shares with you how we, like other colleges and universities nation-wide, have had to face challenges of the economy and ask tough questions that must be asked—and answered—in today’s world. My responsibility as President is to work with the University Board of Trustees to ensure that our investments are sound and that we are generating revenue and spending in the most effective way. The cost of education has been on everyone’s mind, as our students and parents know well. It is a national issue. We are committed to providing a high quality private Catholic education that has great value. At the same time, we must continue to make it accessible to the families we serve. That demands a hard look and even harder decisions than in the past. Responding to change also involves reaching out to our partners in Catholic education, our feeder schools. Read about our exciting new agreement with Archbishop Ryan High School and others. We like “win-win” and this is “win-win.” We have long been known for excellence in our School of Education, and Special Education has been among our strengths. Read about how we are leading Pennsylvania as an early adaptor and provider of the Autism Endorsement program. And, as always, the magazine features news on the faculty and student life. Catch up on alumni news and other regular features, and let us hear from you. E-mail, text, or tweet. We’re listening. May God bless each of you,

Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD President

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Editor Heather G. Dotchel Art Director Jay Soda Contributing Writers Heather G. Dotchel Bob Macartney Ed Marrone, Northeast Times Gale Martin Greg Pellegrino Sara Szymendera ’13 Kathy Warchol Contributing Photographers Susan Beard Design Michael Branscom Adam Cohn Bruce Cramer Heather G. Dotchel Bob Macartney Scott Nibauer Stephen Pellegrino Maria Pouchnikova, Northeast Times Jay Soda President S. Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD Senior Director of Marketing & Communications Gale Martin Holy Family University Magazine is published semiannually. Please address all correspondence to: Editor, Holy Family University Magazine 9801 Frankford Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19114 magazine@holyfamily.edu 215-637-7700 Letters to the Editor become property of the magazine. The opinions and views expressed in Holy Family University Magazine do not necessarily reflect the official policies of Holy Family University. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of published information. Holy Family University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national or ethnic origin, or disability in administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. © 2013 Holy Family University

holyfamily.edu/magazine

We’ve Got You

COVERED

with Attractive Rates for Alumni

The Alumni Association is pleased to sponsor an insurance program as a service to alumni and other members of our community. The program offers a variety of insurance products, mostly available to alumni • students • faculty and staff as well as spouses, children, parents, and siblings HEALTH INSURANCE For those with a temporary or permanent need for coverage, such as the unemployed, self-employed, and recent graduates.

ANNUITIES An ideal tax-deferred vehicle for conservative investors who want guaranteed fixed interest rates for extended periods.

LIFE INSURANCE Long-term protection with great rates and fantastic features. Coverage is available to $50 million.

SPECIAL EVENT INSURANCE Liability coverage up to $2 million is available for events lasting from a few hours to as much as 10 days.

LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE Intended to protect assets from serious erosion, while allowing access to quality care in the most appropriate and desirable setting.

PET INSURANCE Simple, customizable dog and cat insurance plans are available.

TRAVEL INSURANCE Travel medical or trip protection insurance options are available for individuals or groups traveling domestically or abroad.

ADVISORY SERVICES A licensed insurance professional is available, at no charge, to answer questions and provide customized guidance.

For more information, visit meyerandassoc.com/hfu or contact our program administrator, Meyer and Associates, at 800-635-7801. Revenue generated by this program supports the Holy Family University Alumni Association.

BRIEFLYNOTED

Out and about on campus

New Leadership at Holy Family Kicks Off New Year

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hree major leadership positions have recently been filled at Holy Family, one in Enrollment and the others in Academic Affairs. Arthur Goon, MS, began as the Associate Vice President of Enrollment Services in January.

Goon is no stranger to the region’s colleges and universities, having served at Felician and Chestnut Hill

Colleges, as well as Arcadia University and Montgomery County Community College. As the chief enrollment officer at Felician and Chestnut Hill, Goon oversaw increased enrollments in undergraduate freshman, transfers, and international students. Undergraduate adult and graduate enrollments also increased at both institutions under his leadership. “Like other private colleges and universities, Holy Family will face many challenges in the coming years. But along with those challenges are unlimited opportunities for strengthening existing relationships with area high schools and community colleges, expanding our geographic reach to attract more residential and international students, and providing more adult undergraduate and graduate educational programs,” said Goon.

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Michael W. Markowitz, PhD, was named as the incoming Vice President of Academic Affairs, to begin in the position officially as of July 1, 2013. Dr. Markowitz is currently serving as the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences here at Holy Family, where he has been a professor since 2009. Prior to Holy Family, Markowitz served as faculty and an administrator at Widener University and Cabrini College as well as a previous stint at Holy Family. He was also a Fellow with the American Council on Education at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. He holds a doctorate in Sociology from Temple University, a master’s degree in Criminal Justice from Rutgers University, a master’s degree in Sociology from Temple University, and a bachelor’s degree from Richard Stockton State College. “I am truly honored and humbled to have been chosen to fill this position,” said Markowitz. “The opportunity to play a leadership role in the academic future of Holy Family

University is thrilling, especially as we evolve to meet the needs of modern students.” J. Barry Dickinson, PhD, was appointed Dean for Holy Family’s School

of Business Administration last summer. Dickinson was formerly Director of Graduate Programs and an Assistant Professor of Marketing in Holy Family’s School of Business Administration.

He guided the redesign of Holy Family’s business school core curriculum to make it more reflective of skills and theories crucial to today’s business workplace. An entrepreneur, Dickinson has a career that includes 20 years of experience in the launch, marketing, and executive leadership of companies, with 15 years of experience as chief executive officer of a mobile technology firm, which he founded. He has also taught at LaSalle University, West Virginia University, DeVry University, and Strayer University in both traditional and online formats. He received his doctorate in marketing from Drexel University’s Bennett S. Lebow College of Business and also holds the distinction of Professional Certified Marketer (PCM) from the American Marketing Association. He has an MBA from LaSalle University’s School of Business and a Bachelor of Science in management from Rutgers University.

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Holy Family Partners with Archbishop Ryan HS and Archdiocese

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Catholic high schools very seriously,” stated

pioneer a new, official educational partnership. This partnership has three components: an admission and scholarship agreement for the high school’s students, a dual credit agreement, and a continuing education agreement. The Archdiocese has lent its support for this program and is excited at the potential for the archdiocese on the whole. “Holy Family University takes its commitment to support area

“We’ve always had a very good relationship with Archbishop Ryan High School, and this partnership will serve to further expand educational opportunities to their students, faulty, and staff.” Mr. Arthur Goon, MS, Chief Enrollment Officer at Holy Family University said, “We are fortunate

oly Family University and

Archbishop Ryan High School have collaborated to

University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD.

to have Archbishop Ryan High School as a partner in this endeavor. We hope this agreement will serve as a model for developing similar partnerships with other area Catholic high schools.”

Holy Family Faculty Win Awards for Research

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ive faculty members received competitive grants to conduct scholarly research at Holy Family University.

University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD, announced the winners of the 2013 Ray L. Taylor Memorial Awards on Monday, January 28. The Taylor awards will support faculty projects from a range of disciplines—nursing, business, and education. The grants offset the cost of travel, equipment, professional services, or other costs associated with their scholarly research. Nursing faculty Karen Montalto, PhD, Patricia Giuliana, MSN, and Gloria Kersey-Matusiak, PhD, received the award for their proposal, “Dismantling the Communication

TAYLOR AWARD WINNERS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT): Xiaojing (Joanne) Ma, PhD; Mary Kay Doran, PhD; and (L-R) Gloria Kersey-

Matusiak, PhD, Patricia Giuliana, MSN; and Karen Montalto, PhD

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

Barriers for ESL Nursing Students.” Their program, enabled by the award, will evaluate student-to-nurse and student-to-patient communication to help students whose first language is not English develop appropriate professional communication skills. School of Business faculty member Xiaojing (Joanne) Ma, PhD, received the award for her proposal, “The Effect of NCMS (The New Cooperative Medical Scheme) on the Usage of Medical Services.” Her project will study the effect of China’s public health insurance system on rural China. Education faculty member Mary Kay Doran, PhD, received the award for her project, “Second Language Acquisition by K-12 Students in Puerto Rico.” The award is allowing her to spend two months in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where she will volunteer and observe in a bilingual K–12 school, La Academia Perpetuo de Socorro. To be considered for the award, faculty must submit an application and funding proposal endorsed by the Dean of their school. The proposals are reviewed by a committee of their colleagues, which recommends proposals for funding, and by senior administration, which gives final approval. The award program was established through an endowment created by Carol Taylor, RN, PhD, a former University faculty member from 1979–1987 and 1995–1997 in the School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions. Taylor and her family created the award to honor her deceased father, Raymond Taylor.

SPRING 2013

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BRIEFLYNOTED

Out and about on campus

Holy Family MSN Students Discover Significant Motivators

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research manuscript by Holy Family University MSN students Deborah Byrne, Christine Rosner, and Roxanne Mayo was accepted for publication in Nursing 2013, an award-winning journal dedicated to clinical and professional information and news.

“Our study was on the internal motivators of RNs returning for their BSN. We decided on this topic after doing literature review and finding very little research in this area,” said Byrne. “It was a small pilot study, but we had some significant findings.” Byrne, Rosner, and Mayo found that

(L-R): MSN students and researchers Christine Rosner, Deborah Byrne, and Roxanne Mayo

the majority of their respondents projected that returning to school would be an unpleasant experience, and a quarter of them felt they were already adequately trained. However, nearly three-quarters of the respondents did indicate that they felt their jobs would be more secure if they pursued their BSN. On the other hand, only 33% felt that a higher nursing degree would translate into that nurse being more valued. Forty percent were motivated by the potential of returning to school with a colleague, and 59% wanted support of someone important to them. Only 14% felt confident that they could do the work, while 50% feared failure. In the face of this, though, 50% also planned on returning to school within the next year. “Nurses who associate the advancement of their degree with positive professional identity, empowerment, and professional or monetary advancement are more likely to return to school,” concluded Rosner. Holy Family University currently offers BSN, RN-to-BSN, and MSN programs and will be launching a new 30-credit MSN program in August 2013.

Holy Family Publications Win Regional Awards for Creative Excellence

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oly Family University has won three 2013 CUPPIE

Awards for Creative Excellence in Marketing and Communications in Education from CUPRAP, the Association for Communicators in Education, a professional organization with 100 member institutions in the Mid-Atlantic region. The Fall 2011 Holy Family University Magazine feature “Learning by Doing” earned a silver award; written by Richard Rys, it profiled four undergraduate students gaining professional experience with their individual research and projects. An advertisement for charitable giving to the University called “Loaves + Fishes” won a bronze. Additionally, the new undergraduate

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SPRING 2013

viewbook “Perform with Purpose,” created by Snavely Associates of State College in collaboration with the University’s Admissions and Marketing & Communications departments, won a silver award. More than 300 CUPPIE entries are received every year from colleges, universities, and providers of private, specialized, and secondary education in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, and Arkansas. Judges represented experts in the field of communications in education and included designers, writers, educators, corporate executives, and media professionals.

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Each January, Holy Family students, faculty, and staff brave frigid air in order to march on Washington, DC, with thousands upon thousands of other pro-life activists.

Holy Family Joins National March for Life

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tudents, faculty, and staff joined thousands of pro-life advocates from around the nation at the Annual March for Life in Washington, DC, on January 25. This is the seventh year that Holy Family University participated in the march to the U.S. Capitol to memorialize and protest the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which legalized abortion. Led by Campus Minister Reverend James MacNew, OSFS, the group arrived in Washington in the morning

and celebrated Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. After Mass, they took buses to Union Station and walked to the March for Life rally at the Capitol. The rally included hours of stirring speeches, personal testaments, prayers, songs, and poetry readings. “Members of the Holy Family University community make the sacrifice of participating in the March For Life in any weather, not as a political act, but as lived spirituality,”

said Father MacNew. “The Holy Family University Mission and Core Values challenge us in every moment to recognize that each human person is created in the image of God, and that human persons, therefore, are sacred. Participation in the National March For Life is one more way in which members of the Holy Family University community incarnate the Mission of the University.”

This is the seventh year that Holy Family has led a group on the March for Life. The March memorializes and protests the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

SPRING 2013

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SPRING 2013

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Choosing to

Interact A New Academic Program To Stem the Increasing Specter of Autism

By Gale Martin magazine @ holyfamily.edu

Photography by Michael Branscom SPRING 2013

9

“I

wanted him to make eye contact,” Donna Saraczewska confessed from the front of the classroom in Holy Family’s Education and Technology Center. With quiet urgency, she shared an experience working with an autistic child, her gestures underscoring the depth of her concern. “I wanted him to tell me something on his own.” Saraczewska is confident and expressive lecturing to adults, but she is not the instructor. Rather, she is a graduate student who began her studies at Holy Family in August 2010, having enrolled in the new Autism Endorsement as a component of her special education studies. The actual instructor, Geralyn Anderson Arango, EdD, Professor of Special Education, had relinquished her podium for the evening and seated herself among Saraczewska’s peers for three student-led presentations. The first to share, Saraczewska queued up her PowerPoint slides on the SCERTS model, an early intervention program that stands for Social Communication Emotional Regulation and Transactional Support. Saraczewska chose to present on SCERTS because it has proven especially helpful for children who have been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at a very young age. She shared the case study of a fouryear old boy from New Zealand who now “makes sense of his world,” his

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teachers claim, because of SCERTS interventions. Then, she personalized her presentation by introducing the case of a preschool-aged boy with ASD who became her charge in a Head Start program where she works as a special instructor in early intervention. For the entire first year Saraczewska met with him, he would not talk: completely non-verbal, no spontaneous communication during their sessions. With regard to autistic children, spontaneous communication is identified as communicative behaviors that occur in the absence of prompts, instructions, or other verbal cues, such as “Are you wearing a red shirt today?” For this type of child, a glance can constitute a “yes” or a “no” and is the sole cue the professional might ever get. The SCERTS model recommends that adults attune themselves to every sound, facial expression, and gesture that children with ASD use to communicate when they are hungry or tired, or for whatever reason communication becomes impossible or imperceptible. This particular boy will battle acute behavioral, communications, and socialization deficits for the rest of his life. And, day in and day out, Saraczewska chooses to work with children like him because special education is both her profession and her calling. As she described her situation, her fellow students nodded their understanding. Professor Arango who was

simultaneously observing the presenter and the class’s reaction to her, turned to her students and said, “Even mentioning the word autism arouses powerful emotions. What things do you feel, what words come to mind, at the mention of autism? Jot something down.” One student raised her hand and said, “I always think of these kids, that they didn’t ask to come into the world with these problems. They need help.” “It’s like they’re on a roller coaster. While we celebrate every success, the tough stuff,” Saraczewska added, referring to their frequent developmental setbacks, “is extra, extra tough.”

A PUZZLING TREND

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t’s difficult to imagine kindergarten age children suffering such extreme social and communicative impairment that they are unable to use words to express what they want or need. That they are unable to engage in spontaneous expression that comes as naturally to unimpaired children as breathing. Or that they cannot make eye contact with others. For many families, however, these are daily realities when raising children diagnosed with ASD. According to AutismSpeaks.org, a website highly regarded by experts, the incidence of ASD is on the rise and continues to increase in dramatic fashion. Currently, 1 in 88 children is diagnosed with ASD. This constitutes a 25-fold increase in diagnoses since autism was first identified in 1944. It is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the United States, it is found in five times as many boys (1 in 54) as girls, and it costs affected families $60,000 a year on average. The SCERTS model considers parents to be experts because they spend the most time caring for their child. That’s why SCERTS is considered a family-centered intervention: In the child’s weekly classroom sessions, the parents are encouraged to participate. Classroom time with teachers increases opportunities to share and learn from each other, all with the goal of improve the child’s social communication skills and emotional regulation. “The home visit,” Saraczewska

holyfamily.edu/magazine

PHOTO TO LEFT: Professor Geralyn Anderson Arango, EdD, leads class. PHOTOS ABOVE AND BELOW: Graduate students work on a simulated

communication training session using the Picture Exchange Communication System.

explained, “is also a tenet of SCERTS.” “A regular visit in the home?” one of the students asked sardonically. “When does that ever happen?” Prompted by her classmate’s frustration, a young woman with long dark hair raised her hand. “Actually, I work for the I. U. [Intermediate Unit]. A big push now is a once-a-month home visit,” she said. Home visits and early intervention can be extraordinarily impactful in helping children and families cope. Despite all the advances made in treating children with ASD, it is still considered a lifelong disorder. It is also referred to as a spectrum disorder because it can create unpredictable manifestations in children like exceptional visual, music, and academic skills. Typically, those with ASD have unique ways of looking at and interacting with the world that can be heterogeneous as snowflakes. More commonly, the world is an overwhelming place, fraught with confusion, for people afflicted with autism. Besides straining family resources— financial and otherwise—caring for a son or daughter with ASD can seem like an insurmountable challenge, driving some families to consider outlandish and exorbitant interventions. “Some websites claim that swimming with dolphins in India can cure autism,” explained Dr. Maria Agnew, Assistant Professor of Education at Holy Family.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

Installing oxygen chambers in the family home is a more common treatment, but its efficacy is unknown.

SHEPHERDING AN AUTISM ENDORSEMENT AT HOLY FAMILY

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gnew is a board-certified behavior analyst who once ran a preschool for children with autism. She believes that autism is a lifelong development disorder based in the brain, for which there is no cure. The persistent, unrelenting nature of autism is what ultimately drove Agnew to spearhead the University’s Autism Endorsement. Holy Family’s program is based in applied behavior analysis, an evidence-based practice fully supported by current literature and proven effective in helping ASD children overcome profound deficits in language and cognition. Presently, there are 14 other colleges and universities in Pennsylvania offering an Autism Endorsement in a state crammed with hundreds of institutions of higher learning. That means Holy Family is strongly positioned to meet the burgeoning need for professionally trained teachers with documented expertise in working with ASD diagnosed children. Agnew recalled her first classroom experience when she began teaching in 1988. She had a student with autism but was unprepared professionally to accommodate the student’s special

needs. The disorder has been her life’s work ever since. When she started with Holy Family 13 years ago, autism was a single elective offering within the education curriculum. In a real sense, she has been waiting for decades to develop a comprehensive program that can markedly improve the quality of life for ASD children. Holy Family’s program consists of four courses (maximum 12 credits) along with a supervised field placement of 80 hours total. The field experience component to the endorsement is embedded in each course. The hours are monitored and tracked by the instructor of the course. “It’s an add-on for students who already hold an undergraduate degree,” Agnew said. Satisfactory completion of the 12-credit program will allow candidates to apply to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for an endorsement on an existing Pennsylvania Level I or Level II certificate. “Graduate students use the courses as electives, too.” As ASD diagnosed students become mainstreamed in classroom settings, teachers need the specialized training and classroom strategies that the Autism Endorsement provides—not just special education teachers either. When asked about the cause of the rising numbers of children diagnosed with ASD, Agnew cited earlier and

SPRING 2013

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better diagnoses as a factor. “Fifteen years ago, children only began to be diagnosed with autism at age 5 or 6, when they entered school. These days identification begins between 12-18 months.” As a result, services to ASD children have increased along with access to services. While some so-called experts have claimed environmental factors as contributing to the meteoric rise in autism cases, Agnew says there is no evidence to support environmental causation. More likely, children inherit a genetic predisposition to autism. “The research is looking at and pointing to genes and genetic factors.”

AS TEACHERS SUCCEED, SO DO STUDENTS

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gnew contends that many contentarea teachers feel as though they need more training to accommodate increasing numbers of ASD students. How many Pennsylvania teachers may have received certificates in Secondary English, Mathematics, or Social Studies, for example, yet their training included little or no preparation for helping special needs children succeed in a mainstreamed environment? Agnew believes that Holy Family’s Autism Endorsement responds to a moral imperative that all children deserve a certain quality of life. “Our program gives teachers in many settings some incredible skills to get to ASD diagnosed children early,” she explained. “With early intervention, children with a mild case have a chance to lead relatively normal lives.” She believes that by offering this endorsement, the University is making a commitment to meet societal needs, including those of children with disabilities. “One thing that sets our program apart is that it teaches our students how to work with parents,” she explained. The chronic stress that parents of ASD diagnosed children experience was also a theme underscored by the students in Geralyn Arango’s class. Parents need more strategies to help their children. “We can’t send our teachers into the world of work without this training,”

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Agnew stressed. “There is a profound need to help address growing incidences of ASD, and we are responding to it.” Nearly 40 students are taking classes in the Autism Endorsement program since it was first offered in Fall 2012. This summer, Holy Family will offer two hybrid courses—those that include fifty percent online and fifty percent onground instruction time. These hybrid or blended classes will also be delivered in an accelerated format, making it more convenient than ever to obtain

an educational credential that makes certificated teachers more valued in the districts they serve and integral to their school’s growing need to accommodate children with ASD. As for Donna Saraczewska, she will complete her master’s degree and graduate this May. “I use what I’ve gained in my classes at Holy Family in my daily work with children,” she said. Eventually she had a breakthrough with her autistic student. “We had a training in positive peer models. One day, I had an opportunity to use positive peer modeling with him. And I can tell you, he is responding to his peers in the classroom. Now he’s at the point where he can have reciprocal conversation with children his own age.” She smiled gently. “It’s fun watching a child become someone who chooses to interact.”

Special Education Teacher Pursues Rewarding Career on an Island Paradise Since 2011, Lindsey Lehman ’07 has been employed as a private special education teacher or para-educator on the tiny island of Bermuda. She found her current job online in the spring of that year and moved three months later: “I’ve been here two years on a work permit,” Lehman said. “I really enjoy it and all the experiences it’s provided me.” Her responsibilities include creating and maintaining all the behavioral paperwork for an eight-year-old girl who suffers from Chorioretinal Microcephaly Developmental Delay and who also suffers from ADD and Non-Verbal Learning Disorder. In addition, she provides training for all adults who have interaction with her client—classroom teachers, specialists (such as music, art, and physical therapy), outside therapists, and after-school activity teachers. For the four years prior, she taught in a multi-age classroom of students with multiple disabilities in New Jersey. Looming budget cuts and a bit of wanderlust caused her to search for a new post with a hint of adventure. In her new position, she doesn’t have a multi-disciplinary team to converse with, like she did in a classroom setting. “I have to be able to make the tough calls when it comes to my student.” It’s a level of professional challenge she enjoys. She believes her Holy Family education together with her field work have given her the skills she needs to combine class support and home instruction in a catered education plan for her student. “When I left Holy Family, I was taught to have a passion towards what I did,” Lehman explained. “I was also equipped with the knowledge that I have the skills to succeed at anything I was going to do. Dr. Claire Sullivan and Dr. Jeanne Ratigan in particular were both a personal and professional inspiration to me.” Besides authoring and editing several online publications, Lehman herself was interviewed for two websites: TravelingTeaching.com and IWantHerJob.com, where she was asked what it takes to be successful in her line of work. “Find the passion first. That is what motivates me to keep at it,” she said, adding, “When a student accomplishes the only thing everyone else told him his whole life he could never do, that’s when you know you picked the right profession.”

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Create a Scholarship

It’s kinda like this, but different. The Sister Francesca Onley President’s Scholarship, first presented in 1998, was established to honor Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD, President of Holy Family University  and former principal of Nazareth Academy High School. The scholarship is awarded to an all-around student of high character, who excels academically, is service-oriented, exhibits commitment to an academic discipline or professional career path, has potential for success, and needs financial assistance. It is not difficult to set up your own personalized scholarship, honoring those important to you  and helping those who might continue that legacy. While many named scholarships were established by individuals, a large percentage were established by groups of friends, families, or employees,  coming together in honor of those, both living and passed, who touched them.

For more information, please contact  ob Wetzel at 267-341-3428 or scholarships@holyfamily.edu B

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“Be who you are and be that well, + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + in order to bring honor + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + to the + + + + + + + + + + + Master + + Craftsman + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +whose + handiwork + + + we + are.” + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + –St. + Francis + + de + Sales + + + + + + + + + +

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+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + PHOTO BY SCOTT NIBAUER

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+ magazine + +holyfamily.edu + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +2013 + 23+ + SPRING + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + @

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During college, students are faced with the daunting task of deciding what to do after they graduate. While this is not easy for any student, senior Jonathan Dick has had a special journey to discover what he will do post graduation from Holy Family University—Jon has recognized his calling to the priesthood and intends to follow this vocation. With all decisions in life come struggles. Jon recalls his early days at Holy Family, when he began thinking

of the priesthood to which he felt drawn. Ultimately, Jon credits much of the love and support he has received from Holy Family to his acceptance of this lifestyle. As a freshman, Jon attended the Hour of Power Experience, hosted by Sister Marcella Louise Wallowicz, CSFN. A Resident Advisor had invited Jon to attend, and the experience sparked good feelings—emotions that he used to get when he attended Catholic School as a child. While this adoration was different because it was more adult, Jon fell in love with and soon began helping Sister Marcella with the adoration.

Father James “Mac” MacNew, OSFS, offers Communion at Mass in the Campus Center Chapel. Jon has applied to the same Order as Father Mac. + + +

about the priesthood: “Some days were easy, and I was 100% for the Oblate lifestyle, and other days were hard, and I just wanted to get as far away from it as possible.” He questioned if he were pursuing a religious life for the right reasons— because he wanted it rather than because God did. He debated whether he wanted a wife and children, whether poverty and celibacy were his calling, whether there were professions outside

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“It brought me back into my Catholic world,” says Jon. Soon, Jerry Wutkowski, Pauline Seewald, and Jessica Raichle, some of Jon’s friends at Holy Family, were also attending. Jon realized that these three friends attended Mass together every Sunday at St. Katherine of Siena, so he soon decided to ask if they would mind if he joined them each Sunday, despite his past separation from the Church. He believes that by allowing

him to tag along for Sunday services and answering his preexisting questions about the Catholic faith, they helped to reignite his desire to become a priest. Without the help of Jerry, Pauline, and Jess, Jon may not have given any more thought to the priesthood. “I am so graced to have so many people who support me in my priesthood endeavors,” says Jon. From the continued support of his family and the friends, faculty, and staff on the Holy Family campus, Jon has a vast number of people who are standing behind him in this journey. Jon’s two biggest supporters on campus, roommate Jerry Wutkowski and Piotr Kopinski ’11, challenged Jon to become a better individual, showed him his faults, and helped him improve both personally and spiritually. Jerry remarks, “Living with Jon this past semester, we have continued our talks about important Catholic events and struggles we currently see in the church. I continue to pray for him by asking God to ‘make him a good one’ when I say my daily rosary.” Jon recognizes that he has numerous other supporters, notably Father James “Mac” MacNew, OSFS, Holy Family University’s Chaplain. “Jon came to us as an anxious freshman who gave of himself tirelessly in efforts to help others and to discover his own God-given talents,” said Father MacNew. “Perhaps it is no surprise that Jon, who has so totally given himself to the spirit of Teneor Votis, would respond so generously to God’s call to enter the Order of Priests and Brothers dedicated to God according to the Spirit of St. Francis de Sales.” Fellow student, senior Jenna Spadaccino, comments, “His devotion to God’s work and in applying for the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales makes me all the more grateful that God has provided me with a friend like him.” Jon’s support on campus does not stop there. He has club moderators, area coordinators, and numerous friends on campus who support him every day in this adventure. They all have contributed to giving Jon a healthy mindset about the priesthood and his upcoming journey.

holyfamily.edu/magazine

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BRANSCOM

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PHOTOS BY MICHAEL BRANSCOM (TOP), MICHAEL TOLBERT/SUSAN BEARD PHOTOGRAPHY (BOTTOM)

“My friends help me to maintain a sense of levelheadedness and to not get swept out of reality. They continuously bring my head out of the clouds. There were so many times where I became enveloped by my own Catholicity that I wasn’t aware of the reality of the world. We can’t forget the reality and joy of life.” The excitement that comes with the Oblate life has not skipped over Jon. He is excited to commit himself more fully to Christ and to the order of St. Francis de Sales. As Jon works toward his acceptance into the Oblates as an Aspirant, he is excited for the joy, the tears, and the days of anguish. Furthermore, while Jon did express some fears, such as for the days as a Novitiate when he will have little contact with the outside world, he comments, “I do not really fear anything, because it all feels so right!” Jon believes that Father Mac says it best: “God has his hand over this campus. He is always watching, because great stuff happens here.” Jon believes that without Holy Family, none of this would have happened; he would not have seen this life happen: he would not have met the brilliant people he has met. The students, faculty, and staff at Holy Family have helped to push and guide Jon along the route he chose. Without his family and friends, both at home +

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Jon is a member of the Student Ministry Group here on campus. The very active chapter is the backbone of campus spirituality. + + +

and here at Holy Family, Jon could not imagine the priesthood lifestyle. Holy Family brought back Jon’s faith, his vocation, and a sense of happiness, and filled the void in him, helping him realize and fulfill his potential. The faculty and staff at Holy Family have encouraged Jon every step of the way, from giving him advice to being a listening ear. The students have provided a loving and supporting environment, allowing Jon the chance to speak openly about his decision to join the Oblates. Everyone on campus has respected Jon and his decision and supported him as much as possible. Founded by Father Louis Brisson, the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales strive to “Live Jesus” everyday. This is accomplished by living their mission, as it is stated on their website, “to grow

Jonathan dances with Fox-29 news anchor Dawn Timmeney at the 2012 Scholarship Ball.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

as a religious community in loving union with God and with each other, to share our charism with the People of God, and affirm them in ‘living Jesus’ as the needs of the Church dictate.” During the Oblate Associate Program, which lasted approximately two years, Jon examined his life in relation to the Oblate life and his specific vocational calling, whether to be an Oblate Priest or Brother or not. In June 2012, Jon decided that he would answer his call to the priesthood. This revelation came to Jon while working as a camp counselor with the Oblates, when he was able to experience the Oblate life. While many college students slept in on their summer vacation, Jon woke up at 7 am and completed manual labor, such as raking leaves or shoveling sand for the rest of the day. During this time, Jon decided that he loved the Oblate lifestyle. “They are so normal, you can crack a joke with them, and they will not look down at you or scold you,” says Jon. Should he be accepted into the order, Jon will enter Postulancy, a time that is used for a smooth transition from his current lifestyle to the reality of the Oblate community living. Upon the completion of the Postulancy, the Novitiate program will begin. During this time, a Novice will begin to study and appreciate the roots of the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales and grow in his awareness of the Oblate life and the Salesian Spirituality. Father Brisson once stated, “It only takes a little courage to become a great saint.” This short quote has taught him a lot about life. Jon has learned that, “you do not have to pour out all of your energy to do good on earth, and that small things go a long way sometimes.” This is just the beginning of what Jon hopes to learn from the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales in the near future. Pending the finalization and acceptance of his application, Jon hopes to begin the next step in joining the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales in the fall of 2013.

SPRING 2013

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H o l y F a m il y U n i v e r s i t y Evolves w ith Higher Education

When the higher education landscape changes, institutions must embrace innovation in order to remain relevant. As new life springs on campus, so does renewed dedication to the future. By Heather G. Dotchel

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holyfamily.edu/magazine

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

SPRING 2013

15

It might not seem likely that a quiet

Catholic university in Northeast Philadelphia would be a hotbed of change, where solutions to the national troubles of higher education would percolate. It might also not seem likely that a college president with a long-standing appointment would be at the forefront of dramatic change. And yet, that is exactly what is happening. Spring brings with it great potential. Watching nature awake from winter slumber, flora blossoming, is a neverending source of inspiration. The difficulty of cold months melts away in the face of new life. Spring is continuously called upon as a metaphor when describing transitional periods. These transitions usually start with the discontent of winter, a resistance to change, but soon morph to excitement as new ideas germinate and tangible plans take hold. The challenge, always, is getting from winter to spring.

Toss and Turn

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colleges traditionally draw undergraduates and reducing the number of teachers seeking graduate degrees as part of their employment and promotion requirements. These factors lead to a reduced tuition base when universities need to meet not only day-to-day budgets but also need to invest in new programs and services to keep up with a changing educational landscape. In the midst of the financial turmoil, higher education is also being challenged by a rapid evolution in models of course and degree delivery unlocked by online learning. Companies like Coursera, partnering with universities like Stanford and Penn, are offering courses to hundreds of thousands online for free through what are known as MOOCS (Massive Open Online Courses). These courses do not offer degree benefits yet, and regulation proves to be tricky, but there is no question that they are pushing higher education to reexamine knowledge delivery and what constitutes a college experience.

igher education is in a state of flux. A quick media Value and Benefits search will confirm that most institutions of learning are facing steep challenges in recent years. In midhe good news is that Holy Family already imparts January, Moody’s Investors Service trumpeted, “US Higher terrific value for the dollars spent by students. The Education Outlook Negative in 2013.” The New York Times University was cited by the Philadelphia Inquirer claimed, “It Takes a B.A. to Find a Job as a File Clerk”; and as maintaining the highest per pupil spending and one of Forbes dourly predicted that schools without a strong enough the lowest tuition rates among similar Catholic private instibrand would be toppled by the shifting academic landscape. tutions along the Atlantic coast. In fact, when compared to its In the meantime, the government criticized the area competitors, Holy Family tuition comes in at only 85% cost of education while it exhorted leaders to innovate and expand their offerings to the underserved. This paradox, to keep tuition low but to find the money to invest in educational transformation, adds yet another layer of pressure to university budgets. The cause of all of this unrest is multifold. Moody’s points to price sensitivity, strained revenue sources, rising student loan burden, a tainted perception of what a degree is worth, and unsteady long-term sustainability of university structures. Prospective students and their families are looking all the more closely at the value of a degree and the consequences of loans as the cost of a college degree continues to rise. Investments of that magnitude demand significant return, especially when coupled with fears of unemployment and the stress of everyday costs of living. On a national and regional level, high school graduation rates are projected to decline in coming years, and yet, nearly half of colleges and universities are already experiencing significant declines in enrollment in all student categories: traditional undergraduate, professional and adult programs, and, most significantly, graduate programs. Additionally, major changes in the Philadelphia education landscape hold serious ramifications for the region on the whole. Both the public school districts and archdiocese have merged and closed schools, Holy Family University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, ’59, PhD creating a pool of fewer students from which area

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holyfamily.edu/magazine

The School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions is unveiling a new 30-credit MSN program this fall.

of their average tuition. In addition to that, Holy Family offers substantial scholarships, grants, and other forms of aid. Traditionally, Holy Family has been able to deliver this value by unwavering focus on managing costs and keeping expenditures in line with revenue. While many other schools are just beginning to acknowledge the issues at hand, Holy Family has already started to act to create options and to focus on what will benefit students in both the short and long term. And, while the perception of degree worth might be down, the actual worth of a degree is still documented. People with college degrees tend to earn more, have better benefits, and, so importantly in the current economy, are less likely to be unemployed. Beyond that, college graduates have also been shown to improve quality of life for themselves and their children, and they enjoy increased hobbies and leisure and better decision-making. Additionally, many jobs that

The good news is that Holy Family already imparts terrific value for the dollars spent by students. have traditionally required only a high school diploma now require entry-level bachelor’s degrees, as employers value the critical thinking skills and motivation that an undergraduate degree generally confers. The reality is that Holy Family is, like so many other institutions of higher education, feeling the pinch of declining enrollments, especially on the graduate level,

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

as the unstable economy continues. Expansion of campus personnel and services, necessitated by better economic times, has now outpaced current needs. The appropriate response is that when these forces combine and impact the University’s ability to fulfill its mission then it must act with extra focus, strategy, and action.

Meet and Adapt

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ignificant change always has a point of instigation. University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD, has cautioned for years that higher education would not continue as it always has and that the community would need change the way it viewed programs and resources. As a result, many faculty and staff were already working in concert to transition to more contemporary models of knowledge delivery, migrating classes to online formats and integrating current technology. But a discovery in 2012 necessitated a quickening of the pace of change. When the President and the Board of Trustees looked at previous budget years, they saw a trend that needed to be addressed to ensure Holy Family’s future financial health. Rather than simply patching their budgets, Sister Francesca and the Board of Trustees decided to rethink the fundamentals and focus on what Holy Family needed to do to fulfill its mission. “Holy Family University wants to be proactive to address the changes and challenges that higher education faces. Too many institutions have gotten themselves into trouble by not paying attention to their markets,” states Dennis Colgan, Chair of the Board of Trustees. “We are in a sound financial position, and we want to make sure that we stay that way and are ready for tomorrow.” Not wanting to waste time, Sister and the Board decided to work with a firm, which had deep experience in helping organizations assess their condition, rebuild their foundations,

SPRING 2013

17

“We must take action to preserve the health of the University— this is how the students are best served now.” and help the leaders and the organization to establish sustainable, lasting changes that would allow them to prosper. The person (and firm) selected was Patrick J. McCormick of PMCC Ventures. “When the economy was strong and colleges and universities grew, seemingly without effort, the personnel and support grew accordingly to meet students’ needs,” states Sister Francesca. “The unfortunate flipside to this is that when enrollment declines in uncertain economic times, the college system must respond as well. This is exceedingly difficult because we are talking about people, not numbers. On the other hand, the evolution of classroom learning and technology, along with new community partnerships, is a positive change. The Board of Trustees and I are

strategy to deal with these kinds of issues in years ahead,” says Robert Truitt, Chair of the Finance Committee for the Board of Trustees. “We are in the forefront of dealing with these issues and are committed to keeping Holy Family strong, safe, and financially stable.” To say that some of these changes have been difficult would be an understatement. Administration met with students for frank conversation about these changes, why they were implemented, and how they would help. The members of student government were quick to offer their assistance, asking to form student recruitment committees and wanting to know the best information and the best way to disseminate that information to help the greater student population understand what was going on. “With all of the changes, it was great to get some insight from the administration and see what Holy Family is adjusting,” remarks Jack Monari, President of the Student Government Association. “Student Government is in the position to ease our fellow students into these transitions, and hopefully, we can take one big step forward as a University.”

Action and Collaboration

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College graduates earn more and also have higher employment rates.

certain that quickening the pace of adjustment is the best decision for the University. We must take action to preserve the health of the University—this is how the students are best served now.” Lowering cost structures is not enough. “We can’t cut our way to prosperity,” Sister Francesca often points out. Reallocation of resources and program prioritization are also key. While changing cost structures was certainly the first step to avoid future financial discomfort, Holy Family is looking to the future at the course of studies it offers, the way it offers them, and the means of attracting students to its programs as well. “We are fortunate to have leadership that is focused not only on the current issues in education but also on projected

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his is what Holy Family is doing now. First, the University is making sure that costs and cost structure are in line with the realities of its revenues so that tuition remains affordable and the value of its degrees grows. Second, the University is revisiting every process and cost to make sure that it procures the highest value for money spent; this means that contracts are evaluated and internal communications are clarified. Third, the Holy Family community is looking for ways to make sure its offerings continue to be relevant to both young adult and adult students. Fourth, the Schools are investigating knowledge delivery methods and assessing outcomes to make sure that students are successfully employed and prepared to realize their career dreams. Fifth, the University is looking for ways to grow its presence in the market so that more can take advantage of its value and values. Lastly, Holy Family is embracing leadership and structural changes, which has resulted in a sharpening of its vision, increased cooperation, and more effective communication. “We are taking advantage of our size,” says Sister Maureen McGarrity, CSFN, PhD, Holy Family University’s Provost. “While many universities attempt to change through elaborate committee and report structures, our size and heritage

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Despite U.S. economic troubles, inquiry and application numbers were up last year.

allow us to come together quickly, be nimble, and act on our research and decisions quickly.” To analyze current programs and marketing strategies, the University enlisted a cross section of educators, administrators, and business people from multiple levels of the organization to focus on initiatives to “Fill the Seats” and “Fill the Beds.” The groups’ work is about looking forward and thinking about higher education in unconventional ways. With the academic landscape evolving so rapidly, traditional measures clearly would not suffice. The groups met to brainstorm and to think of new ways for Holy Family to increase the value in its existing programs and relationships with students and to identify new needs and markets to serve. Many organiza-

We are a model NCAA Division II Athletic Program.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

tions facing tough revenue situations rush to new products and markets—and abandon existing markets. The University is redoubling its efforts with traditional markets and taking measured and steady actions to identify and develop new offerings that meet market needs today and in the near future. Ana Maria Catanzaro, PhD, Interim Dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions, and Karen Galardi, PhD, Executive Director of Newtown and Institutional Planning, are leading efforts to “Fill the Seats.” “I was delighted to witness the collegiality among faculty and professional staff,” says Catanzaro. “The ‘Fill the Seats’ initiative is giving all of us who are part of the University community an opportunity to contribute our creativity and ingenuity and to identify priorities in ways that will help the University grow and thrive.” During their intensive brainstorming sessions, group members projected goals for program offerings, delivery systems, and enrollment with both immediate and mid-to-long term timelines. Since most campus offices were represented, rapid change was possible as solutions could be hammered out immediately. Within a week, a hybrid course initiative was born (with some classes projected to convert by Summer 2013), with support from all Schools. New degree program details were fleshed out, including a second degree accelerated BSN program—in which an existing bachelor’s degree is converted to a BSN in only fourteen months. The possibility of an accelerated MSN program is being explored, in addition to the revised 30-credit MSN program that will launch in Fall 2013. Several new enrollment campaigns, designed to remind alumni of continuing degree requirements, were launched. “This process links the institution’s strategies with operational activities that will result in consistent focus at all levels of the organization,” says Galardi. “These newly identified operational initiatives will strengthen our ability to meet our institutional priorities of enhancing and improving student experiences, as well as increasing enrollment and diversifying our student body.”

SPRING 2013

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Hand-in-hand with the “Fill the Seats” initiative is the complementary “Fill the Beds” initiative, headed by Sister Marcella Binkowski, EdD, Vice President of Student Life, Mike McNulty-Bobholz, Director of Student Activities, and Brett Buckridge, Director of Residence Life. Not only is the University aiming to bolster enrollment by better meeting the evolving needs of students, but it is also aiming to bolster campus life by encouraging students to get more involved and to take advantage of residence life. “Initiatives like the ‘Fill the Beds’ proposals and other student life activities not only benefit the University’s bottom line by augmenting room and board, but they also benefit the campus as a whole,” says McNulty-Bobholz. “These new ideas provide the building blocks for Holy Family awards substantial scholarships and financial aid. a vibrant campus experience for all students.” To encourage students to both reside on campus as they seek personal and professional growth, student an opportunity to guide the development of accelerated life and residence life have proposed three new programs: programs that are aligned with the outcomes and accreditathe enriching senior experience, the transfer year experience, tions of their respective disciplines. and a new living and learning community that focuses on Dean of the School of Business Administration J. Barry service and leadership. The enriching senior experience will Dickinson, PhD, has been most affected by this change, be open to academically qualified, first-time resident seniors as many accelerated degree programs will now be and, in addition to residence, will focus on career placement administratively housed within the Business School. and other life skills that young adults will need to succeed on their own. The transfer year experience seeks to immerse transfer students in Holy Family’s community, reaching out to a population who might struggle to integrate with established students. The living and learning community will add to an established program at Holy Family by offering a leadership track, encouraging students to be globally oriented, to support the University’s Core Values, to develop self and to develop leadership skills, and to serve the community.

Vision and Leadership

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he plan is to sustain momentum of these two initiatives. Combined with a baseline budget and a refocused strategic plan, the next three years will be mapped out in a manner that reshapes Holy Family’s vision while staying true to its mission. Chad May, Holy Family’s Director of Institutional Research and Assessment, explains this metamorphosis: “The University is in what some would characterize as being at an inflection point. An inflection point, mathematically speaking, is when the curve of a line changes from minus to plus or vice versa. With sound assessment, data, and practice, we will be able to keep the course toward the positive.” One example of change that the University has introduced to influence these positive trends is the merger of the Division of Extended Learning and the School of Business. Organization of these instructional units under a single administrator will streamline operations. At the same time, with this revised structure, each of the Schools will have

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“…our size and heritage allow us to come together quickly, be nimble, and act on our research and decisions quickly.”

“When I look into the future for the School of Business Administration, I see nothing but opportunity and potential for growth. The recent integration of the Division of Extended Learning into the School of Business Administration is an example of this opportunity. By merging the two academic units, we will gain cost efficiencies and operational synergies, allowing us to streamline administrative processes, share faculty, leverage marketing communications, and share other resources. Additionally, this structure will aid ongoing development of new accelerated degree programs both in the School of Business and the other Schools. This is a very positive development for Holy Family University,” says Dickinson. Another major change on Holy Family’s landscape that is not a direct result of the reshaping but will complement that reinvention and renewal is a shift in School leadership

holyfamily.edu/magazine

with three new Deans administering the Schools of Education, Nursing and Allied Health, and Arts and Sciences in the 2013-14 academic year. The current Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, Michael Markowitz, PhD, who has been appointed to the position of Vice President for Academic Affairs, has observed that the landscape of higher education is changing rapidly: “Holy Family has not only embraced these changes but, with its current program of institutional refinement, is using this dynamic environment as a platform forward. The University is poised to become an educational leader in the region and, as the incoming Vice President of Academic Affairs, I am honored and excited to help chart that path.” Additionally, Arthur Goon stepped into the position of Associate Vice President for Enrollment Services in January. Within weeks, he established an Educational Partnership Agreement, to be piloted at Archbishop Ryan High School, that models a symbiotic relationship with high schools, benefitting both their students and their teachers. The partnership was officially signed on March 20, 2013, and plans to expand this opportunity to more Archdiocesan high schools were immediately implemented. “Holy Family University feels strongly about its commitment to support all area Catholic high schools and to assist them in continuing to provide challenging and quality educational opportunities to their students, teachers, and employees,” states Goon. “We want the Archbishop Ryan High School agreement to be the model by which we can develop the same kind of partnerships with other Philadelphia-area Catholic high schools.” The Educational Partnership Agreement was not the only other recent enrollment success. The Nursing program, well respected for its fantastic NCLEX outcomes, is also rapidly expanding their RN-to-BSN program. In less than two years, the program has nearly quadrupled its numbers. The new Autism Endorsement program in the School of Education has proved a popular option since its inception, and its courses are being converted to a hybrid online format, to begin this summer, for greater flexibility for students. A new Finance Certificate is also set to launch in the summer of 2013, available within the School of Business Administration for current students and for postbaccalaureate work for others. The Psychology program enrollment numbers continue to be strong and the School of Arts and Sciences has seen growth in Criminal Justice, Biology, and Communications.

One of the founding principles at Holy Family was that higher education should be and should remain affordable so the greatest number of students can attain a college degree. “The University is committed to value, meaning that it is always willing to take a tough self-evaluative look and make changes accordingly,” says Sister Francesca. This commitment means that in the face of quickly shifting paradigms in higher education Holy Family is also evolving to reflect this new reality. Presidential veteran Sister Francesca and her committed community have embraced this evolution and, at times, revolution. The University invites all students to explore our programs and to join us as Holy Family’s commitment to its mission, core values, and service to students will never change.

Sustainability and Potential

T

rustee Matthew McFillin, Managing Director for KPMG Advisory, reflects, “The changes that have been implemented by the University are intended to provide the institution with a solid foundation from which to grow over the next 20 to 30 years. The financial and structural changes on campus will help ensure the growth and sustainability of Holy Family for the next generation of students in the Philadelphia region.”

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

A new undergraduate finance certificate will launch in Summer 2013.

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1000WORDS

A visual slice of life at Holy Family

“Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and charm and gaity and life to everything.� PLATO

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Reports from the court, track, and field

A Perfect Match

By Ed Morrone, Times Sports Editor

spoke of her desire for a phone, she’d get one. No chance, her father thought … she’d get 100 views, tops. But once the Holy Family girls found out about Arianna’s cause, they shared her video on Facebook and Twitter. She had 1,000 views by the next day. Sorry, Dad. “Now I have more than 3,000 views,” Arianna said as she happily fiddled with her iPhone. “So, really, I should get three phones.” When spending time with Arianna, it’s hard to believe she’s even sick. Her personality is engaging, bubbly even. She smiles constantly, and is enthusiastic on seemingly Arianna Barricelli cheers on the Holy Family Women’s Basketball team. every topic. She has attacked her affliction with the same leven-year-old Arianna Barricelli became aware of the Friends of Jaclyn tenacity her newfound friends display wanted a cell phone. Her father Organization, which seeks to “imon the court. said “no way.” prove the quality of life for children Like most girls her age, Arianna enBut if there’s one thing Lou Barwith pediatric brain tumors,” accordjoys playing sports, going to the mall ricelli has found out about his oldest ing to the group’s website. Friends of with her friends, and now, texting daughter over the last year or so, it’s Jaclyn places the ill children with lo…“typical tween stuff,” as she so aptly that her fierce determination would cal sports teams, which “adopt” them put it. not be easily shaken. and make them a part of their seasons. While her long-term prognosis is In November 2011, Arianna was Arianna, a soccer fanatic, ended up still iffy (the tumor stubbornly refuses diagnosed with optic nerve glioma, being placed with the Holy Family to go away despite the chemo, and a non-cancerous brain tumor that University women’s basketball team now a cyst has formed behind it), was a “total case of bad luck, nothing before the 2012-13 season. Although Arianna’s immersion into Holy Famgenetic or hereditary,” according to initially hesitant because she was ily’s program has worked wonders her father. unfamiliar with basketball, Arianna for all parties involved. For parents The tumor, while not considered took to the team right away, and it’s Lou and Sue, it’s given them reason to life-threatening, has wreaked havoc easy to see why. smile for a change; for the team, it’s on Arianna’s optic nerve to the point “I wanted a phone really, really bad, offered important life perspective; for where she is blind in her right eye. and all of my friends at school have Arianna, it’s much simpler. Rounds of chemotherapy at Chilthem,” Arianna said during a recent “It was something different, somedren’s Hospital of Philadelphia over chat on Holy Family’s campus. “Then thing fun that kept my mind off the the past year have been grueling, but it just came to me…inspiration!” bad and brought out the good that’s it was through her illness that AriAlso an avid singer, Arianna procoming through,” she said. “I’ve liked anna got to know a new family, one posed the following deal to Lou: If and enjoyed everything about it. They that would help her acquire the cell she could get 1,000 YouTube views on helped me get a phone. They’ve bephone she so desperately wanted. her own rendition of Mariah Carey’s come my big sisters and now all of my Through CHOP, the Barracellis “All I Want for Christmas is You” that friends are jealous and want to meet

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holyfamily.edu/magazine

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIA POUCHNIKOVA/NORTHEAST TIMES

TIGERTALES

illness has often overwhelmed them. As Sue said, “If one of my kids has a fever it’s a nightmare for me.” They appreciate the way the team has gone out of its way to help, from the cell phone campaign to an invitation to attend senior Erin Mann’s family Christmas party. Originally hesitant to go, Sue said she was floored by how welcoming everyone was to her and her family. “The power of the positive is how we live our lives now,” Sue said. “She’s changed us all, and so has this team. Them coming into the picture has made her ecstatic to the point where it wipes away any bad news we get.” “It really has become a family,” Lou added. “They call and text her, and all of those little things help. If it were me I’d probably be in bed with the covers pulled over my head, but not her. That’s not her way. Has she gotten scared? Have there been bad days? Sure. There’ve been days she’s walked into the hospital and I’ve had to carry her out. So it’s just been phenomenal to see her interact with this team.” The feeling has been mutual. “It’s allowed our kids to look at the big picture outside of their own little worlds,” Holy Family head coach Mark Miller said. “We just wanted our program to be a distraction for the family to get them away from a

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIA POUCHNIKOVA/NORTHEAST TIMES

them and come to the games to see me with them.” Arianna has been a source of inspiration for the team. She attends most of Holy Family’s home games, standing with the players for the National Anthem before joining them in huddles and on the bench. Now that she’s no longer confused by the sport, Arianna has become the team’s biggest cheerleader. Whatever she’s doing seems to be working, as Holy Family has sprinted out to a phenomenal 24-2 season (ranked sixth in the nation among all Division II schools), including a perfect 13-0 mark at home, where the Tigers’ number one fan is usually in attendance. “Big things come in small packages,” said senior guard Ana Cruz. “There aren’t enough words to describe her. It reminds me to take nothing for granted; you think you have it bad, then seeing her you realize other people have gone through so much worse. It doesn’t affect her character or who she is. She’s still so happy. She’s influenced us to do great things.” The Barracellis, of Bensalem, have needed the extra support just as much as Arianna. Lou and Sue are also parents to 10-year-old Alessia and 5-year-old Luigi, and Arianna’s

tough part of their day. It gives you perspective in life. As a father myself, I can’t imagine what they’re going through, so whatever we’re able to do for their family is worth it.” As Mann added, “She’s given us someone to rally for…someone to play for.” Arianna is not out of the woods; far from it, in fact. Lou said her current situation was “in limbo,” and although he and everyone else knows that being part of the Holy Family team won’t dissolve Arianna’s tumor by itself, the inclusion has done wonders for her and the family’s collective psyches. The walls in her bedroom are now adorned with Holy Family-related pictures and posters, and the team has become a part of her the same way she has become a part of their lives. It’s a relationship that is likely to extend far beyond this season, as the team and Arianna are now linked for life. “At first, I wasn’t sure what would go on,” said Arianna, who is already looking forward to signing up to play basketball next winter. “It was kind of like going to a new school. What would they say? Would they like me? But once we got to know each other better, it just became a fun activity for us all. Everyone was so nice, and they care about me. When I think about it, I get happy that they’re all there for me. “It gets my mind off everything that’s going wrong and all the bad that’s happened. When I think about it, I realize that other kids sicker than me need this more than I do, but then I realize how much it’s helped me and it makes me happy. Every moment counts, and so far I’ve enjoyed all of them.” Sports Editor Ed Morrone can be reached at 215-354-3035 or emorrone@bsmphilly.com

Arianna attended most of the home games, sitting on the bench and huddling with the team.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

Reprinted with permission from Northeast Times. Published 2/27/2013

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TIGERTALES SPORTS ROUNDUP

Reports from the court, track, and field

Megan Tole ’13

Men’s Soccer

The men’s soccer team finished the 2012 season with an 8-7-3 overall record and 5-5-1 in the CACC to earn the seventh seed in the CACC Tournament. The Tigers came up short in the overtime shootout, falling to second-seeded Dominican College in the quarterfinals. Senior Dodji Freitas and junior Ira Woodruff earned All-CACC honors. Freitas, who earned All-CACC honors for the third straight season, was named to the first team for the first time in his career. Woodruff received All-CACC honors for the first time in his career after being named Honorable Mention. Freitas also earned NSCAA All-East Region accolades this year, named to the second team, and was

Dodji Freitas ’13

named to the Daktronics, Inc. All-East Region second team. Freitas capped his senior season scoring 15 goals setting a new single-season career-high. He also recorded three assists to finish with 33 points. His 15 goals scored this year had him tied for the sixth most goals in a season in program history. He concluded the season tied for second in goals scored in the CACC and was third in points.

Women’s Soccer

The Holy Family women’s soccer team finished the 2012 season with an 8-11-0 overall record and wrapped up conference play with a 7-5-0 mark to qualify for the CACC Tournament for the 14th

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consecutive season. The Tigers earned the sixth seed and faced third-seeded Caldwell College in the quarterfinals. Seniors Melissa Benson and Megan Tole were each selected to the All-CACC first team, as well as earning Daktronics, Inc. All-East Region accolades. Tole earned first team honors, while Benson received second team recognition. Furthermore, Benson was named to the NSCAA All-East Region third team for the first time in her career. Tole led the team in scoring this past season with 13 goals and five assists for 31 points, setting a new career-high for points in a season. She finished second in the CACC in both goals scored and total points. The fourtime All-CACC selection finished her career tied for fourth all-time in goals scored (48) and fifth all-time with 113 points. Benson was the anchor of the Holy Family defense that allowed fewer than 2.0 goals per game. The three-time All-CACC honoree tallied a pair of goals and two assists for six points this year. Benson finished her career with 11 goals and 14 assists for 36 points.

accolades. Ambach received second team recognition for the second straight year after finishing her junior season leading the team in kills as she averaged 2.55 kills per set. She collected 268 kills to bring her career total to 779 kills, which ranks fourth all-time in program history. In addition, Ambach set a new single-season record for highest attack percentage with a .312-percent breaking her previous mark of .302-percent that she set last year. She surpassed 200 blocks for her career after totaling 60 blocks this season. Keegan earned All-CLACK second team honors for the first time in her career and wrapped up the season with a team-best 817 set assists. She finished the year leading the conference with a career-best 9.96 assists per set. With her 817 assists this season, Keegan became just the second player in program history to record over 2,000 assists. She will enter her senior year with 2,029 career assists. Holy Family also earned national recognition as freshman outside hitter

Volleyball

Holy Family finished the 2012 season with a 13-18 overall record and concluded conference play with an 11-8 mark as the Tigers just missed out on postseason play. Juniors Sarah Ambach and Chelsea Keegan highlighted this year’s All-CACC honorees as both players received second team

Emma Herring ’13

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Academic Honors CoSIDA/Capital One Academic All-District 1 First Team Sarah Ambach, Women’s Volleyball

Philadelphia Inquirer Academic All-Area Megan Tole, Women’s Soccer Sarah Ambach, Women’s Volleyball.

CACC Fall All-Academic Men’s Cross Country Patrick Monteith (Philadelphia, PA,

Women’s Tennis Steicy Castro (London, England,

LaSalle; Accounting - 3.71)

Norwood; Management Marketing & Int’l Business - 3.67)

Women’s Soccer Melissa Benson (Rockledge, PA,

Maja Pantelic (Palic, Serbia;

Little Flower; Accounting - 3.58)

Accounting & Finance - 3.96)

Erin Blaney (Philadelphia, PA,

Juliana Victoria (Guayaquil, Ecuador,

Little Flower; Criminal Justice - 3.52)

Rachel Dillinger (Phoenixville, PA,

Unidad Educativa Nuevo Mundo; Management & Marketing - 3.58)

Phoenixville; Psychobiology - 3.85)

Women’s Volleyball

Kathryn Helkowski (Levittown, PA,

Sarah Ambach (Springboro, OH,

Conwell Egan; Psychobiology - 3.57)

Katie Maguire (Philadelphia, PA, Saint Huberts; Elementary/Special Education - 3.88)

Samantha McCusker (Philadelphia, PA, Archbishop Carroll; Nursing - 3.51)

Megan Tole (Philadelphia, PA, Archbishop Ryan; Criminal Justice - 3.68)

Emma Herring wrapped up her first

year of collegiate action ranked fifth in Division II in aces per set. Herring tallied 70 aces during the course of the season to lead the CACC with 0.64 aces per set. She was one of eight players in Division II to record 70 or more aces. As a team, Holy Family finished the year ranked eighth among Division II teams averaging 2.33 aces per set. The Tigers totaled 254 aces on the year to lead the CACC.

Women’s Tennis

The Holy Family women’s tennis team wrapped up its fall season with a 9-6 overall record and 5-3 in conference play. The Tigers earned the fourth-seed

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

Springboro; Management Marketing - 3.96)

Mackenzie Bickes (Orchard Lake, MI, Mercy; Elementary Education - 3.62)

Chelsea Keegan (Bucyrus, OH, Colonel Crawford; Biology - 3.63) Christina Mastroeni (Belleville, NJ, Mount Saint Dominic Academy; Communications - 3.51)

in the CACC Tournament, qualifying for the sixth straight season under head coach Brett Shavitz. The team came up short in the semifinals, falling to topseeded Concordia College, 5-0. Senior Juliana Victoria and freshman Alina Nersesyan both earned All-CACC honors. Victoria earned All-CACC first team accolades for the fourth straight season as she continues to add to an already impressive career as the Tigers’ top-flight player. Victoria wrapped up the fall with a 9-4 record at first singles and finished conference play with a 6-1 mark. She currently sits fifth alltime in program history with 39 career singles victories. In doubles play, Victoria teamed with Nersesyan at first doubles as the duo finished the fall

Juliana Victoria ’13

9-6 overall and 5-3 in conference play. As a result, Victoria surpassed former Holy Family standout Liana Lui for most career doubles victories with 54. Nersesyan earned All-CACC Honorable Mention as she finished her first fall with a 9-6 overall record at second singles.

Cross Country

Senior David Richardson and freshman Jennifer Boyle highlighted the 2012 cross country season as both runners received All-CACC honors at this year’s CACC Championships. Richardson, who earned All-CACC honors last year for the first time, finished ninth overall among 66 competitors to lead the men’s squad to a sixth place team finish. The two-time All-CACC honoree completed the five mile course in a time of 28:37. Boyle, competing in her first CACC Championship, finished 11th overall among 85 competitors to lead the Tigers to a sixth place team finish. Boyle finished the 5K-course in a time of 21:03 as she was the Tigers’ top finisher for the seventh straight meet. Boyle finished the season leading the Tigers in all eight races. Earlier in the season, both Richardson and Boyle each won the Belmont Classic hosted by Cheyney University at the Belmont Plateau. – Greg Pellegrino

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FAMILYREUNION

News for the alumni community

Class Notes What you do is news to your fellow alumni and your alma mater! Tell us if you have moved, changed your phone number, updated your e-mail address, become engaged, gotten married, had or adopted a baby, reunited with a group of classmates, received an award or promotion, or changed jobs—or if you just want to say “hello!” Please forward details to the Office of Alumni & Parents, Holy Family University, 9801 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19114-2009. You can also fax your information to 215-637-2110, e-mail us at alumni@holyfamily.edu, or use the form at our new online magazine: holyfamily.edu/magazine.

50s

Janina Choromanska Lindh ’59 and husband, Roland, have three children and three grandchildren, who range from 5th grade to a high school junior, living in Michigan, Texas, and Pennsylvania. Mildred Copeland ’59 shares that the Copeland Media Center was recently dedicated and blessed at St. Brendan High School in Florida, where Mildred worked since the school opened in 1975. A plaque honoring Mildred was placed in the Media Center.

60s

Arlene Sablowski Postupak ’63 retired after 30 years as a licensed nursing home administrator and as a consultant for operations and marketing and strategic planning. Arlene’s husband, Lawrence (Larry), died on February 22, 2012. Arlene spends time at her beach condo on Hilton Head Island and would enjoy meeting Holy Family alumni there. Dorothy Kpojime Amako ’67, EdD, thanks God and Holy Family for the knowledge, disciplined education, and training she received here. Dorothy was a foreign student from Nigeria, where she returned after Holy Family to work and

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raise a family. In September 2002, Dorothy set up the Dora Amako International Nursery/Primary School located in Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria. Dorothy is now back in the United States and resides in East Stroudsburg, PA. Margaret Thompson Lippin ’67 retired from the Free Library of Philadelphia and is being kept busy by her grandchildren.

70s

Paula McKenna Myers ’76 retired after 30 years of teaching (mainly kindergarten). Barbara Michaels ’77 accepted the position of Executive Director/ CEO of the Fort Dodge Housing Agency of the Municipality of Fort Dodge on June 1, 2011.

80s

Beth Ann Reck Swan ’80, PhD, is the Dean of the Jefferson School of Nursing at Thomas Jefferson University. Beth serves as the chief academic and administrative officer of the school, with the responsibility for planning and execution of its education and research missions. Susan Ulmer Schipper ’83 received the NJ State Teacher of the

Year in 2006; $10,000 was awarded to Charles Street School in Palmyra, NJ, where Susan teaches. The award, funded through Walmart, was sponsored by Phi Delta Kapp, who determined the winning educator. Teachers throughout the state were nominated by parents of the students they taught. Bernice Lisicki Purcell ’85, Associate Dean of the School of Business at Holy Family, presented at the Academic and Business Research Institute Conference on Thursday, January 3, 2013, in Orlando, FL. Her topic was “Big Data and the Cloud.” Karen Garbarino Green ’88 was appointed Executive Director of the Association for Radiologic & Imaging Nursing (AMN) in January 2012.

In Memoriam Mary Youell Walker ’74 died on 10/20/12 Karen Skibiszewski Kowalick ’87 died on 10/21/12 Julia McNulty ’87 died on 10/26/12 Victoria Inverso Lombardi ’69 died on 11/4/12 Michele Hoffman Shannon ’87 died on 12/25/12 Dr. Helen Dougherty Hanson ’69 died on 3/3/13

holyfamily.edu/magazine

Samuel Tancredi ’89 finished his third master’s degree, an MS in Human Resource Development. Additionally, Samuel earned a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) certification. He was promoted at First Savings Bank to VP/Director of Retail Operations. Samuel is the proud grandfather of two with another on the way.

90s

Ronald Vitale ’92 recently published Stolen: Cinderella’s Secret Diaries. Ron graduated with an English Literature/French degree from Holy Family and thought this news might be of interest to other aspiring writers who are currently attending the University. Stolen is a sequel to Lost: Cinderella’s Secret Diary which climbed as high as #42 in gothic fantasy on Amazon. Joni Sabatini O’Farrell ’93 was married to Michael O’Farrell on November 3, 2012, at St. Jerome’s Church in Philadelphia, with a reception at the Torresdale Frankford Country Club. Joni works for the Internal Revenue Service. Sharon Mazzacano Tarallo ’94, after working at Academy Collection Service since 1989, now owns 25% of the company, which was renamed Monarch Recovery Management Inc. The company is a debt collection agency with a human touch. The company recently launched “Monarch Cares,” which is a program designed to give back to the community. They are also a supporter of BLOCS (Business Leadership Organized for Catholic Schools). Valerie Angjelo Delman ’94 was married to Josh Delman on October 7, 2012 in Emmaus, PA. Josh is a 1999 graduate of SUNY Cortland. Jennifer Valentino Gladen ’98 published three children’s books.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

Jennifer’s third book, Angel Donor, recently won first place in the Preditors and Editor’s Poll: Children’s Books. The Preditors and Editor’s poll is a national reader’s poll where readers and authors vote for their favorite books. Ronald Masciantonio ’98 was promoted to the position of Chief Administrative Officer at Destination Maternity. Ron will continue to serve as the company’s Executive Vice President and General Counsel. Destination Maternity Corporation is the world’s largest designer and retailer of maternity apparel. Ronald Ragen ’99 was promoted to Captain of Engine 41, Platoon “D,” of the Philadelphia Fire Department in September 2012.

00s

Clare Pfeil ’01 works for Capital One, the fifth largest bank in America, in Wilmington, DE. Laura Bucci ’04 is engaged to Nick Taylor with a fall 2013 wedding planned. Laura is an Operations Manager at Jo-Ann Fabric and Crafts and also a Personal Support Staff member at KenCrest Services in Plymouth Meeting, PA. Meghan Grissell M’06 is engaged to Rick Sabol with a wedding planned for this summer. Meghan is a first grade teacher in the Council Rock School District. Erin Neumann Domer ’07 received the Special Contributor Award on November 20, 2012, at Fox Chase Cancer Center, where she works as a biochemist in the laboratory. The award honors those at Fox Chase who contribute significantly beyond the demands of their particular duties, serve as a source of strength and inspiration to colleagues, and demonstrate behaviors that bring the values

of curiosity, respect, compassion, excellence, and integrity to life. Staci Altomari ’09 recently returned to Holy Family as Alumni Social Media Coordinator. In this position, Staci updates the Holy Family Alumni Facebook page (facebook.com/HolyFamilyAlumni) and Twitter account (@HolyFamilyAlum) on a daily basis. Through these platforms, Staci shares news from campus, keep you informed of HF events, and helps you connect with the larger alumni community. Consider “liking” the Facebook page, or “following” the Holy Family Twitter account to stay in touch with your alma mater. Lorraine Borisuk ’09 and Linda DiGennaro M’11 began new roles at Holy Family University in July 2012. The two are working together; Linda is Director of Special Events, with Lorraine taking on the position of Special Events Coordinator.

10s

Edward Gallagher ’10 was promoted to Assistant Dean of Students at Girard College Upper School. Edward received the PTA’s Staff Appreciation of the Year award 2011-2012. Marek Kowalski ’11 has earned admission into multiple MD/PhD programs and will begin his medical and doctoral studies in the fall. Jenna Morse ’12 has been accepted to the Masters of Library Science program at the University of Maryland. Jenna will start coursework this fall. Timothy O’Driscoll ’12 started working at Holy Family University on October 1, 2012, as a graduate admissions counselor. Lauren Peters ’12 is enrolled in the Hahnemann Physician Assistant Program.

SPRING 2013

33

FAMILYREUNION

News for the alumni community

Golden Anniversary Luncheon

G

raduates from the Classes of 1962 and 1963 attended the third annual holiday luncheon with University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, ’59, PhD. The Class of 1963, celebrating their 50th Anniversary, will be honored at the Commencement Mass of Thanksgiving and at the undergraduate Commencement ceremony in May.

SEATED (L–R): Claire McKeever Monti ’63, Anne Daley Pepper ’63, Cynthia Britt Roberts ’63, Frances Cianfrogna ’62, Cathy McGrath Hoffman ’63 STANDING (L–R): Jeannie Narcisi Lacovara ’62, Theresa Romanowski ’62, Dolores Oscilowski Czaplicki ’62, S. Frances Veitz, CSFN, ’62,

Ronnie Hagen Fudala ’62, Nancy Lisowski Poindexter ’62, Dorothy Hansbury Cassidy ’63.

Young Alumni Networking Event

R

ecent grads of Holy Family enjoyed a networking event held at Three Monkeys on September 13, 2012. Nearly 60 alumni attended the outdoor two-hour program. A good time was had by all and plans are in the works for future networking events. (L–R) Amanda Jenigan ’12 and Amy Apice ’12

Dinner in Washington, DC

O

n January 31, 2013, Holy Family University

President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, ’59, PhD, and Bob Wetzel, Interim Vice

President for Development and Alumni, hosted a dinner in Washington, DC. Dorothy ’70 and Richard Chiarantona, Pamela Doyle Penne ’70, Brenda Nadijcka-Higgins ’73 and husband Brian Higgins, and Moya and John Dittmeier

were in attendance.

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holyfamily.edu/magazine

Nursing Reunion Event

Philadelphia Half Marathon

O

n Friday, November 12, 2012, School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions (SNAHP) alumni gathered in the Campus Center for the second annual Nursing Alumni Reunion and Distinguised Lecture Program. Carol Taylor ’75, PhD, MSN, RN, was honored with the Distinguished Nursing Alumni Award. She also

P

rem Rabindranauth ’90, MD, Keith Lafferty ’89, MD, and Vince Frascatore ’90

delivered the lecture for the evening: Health Care Decision Making: Rethinking Nursing Advocacy. Attending registered nurses received a one-hour continuing education credit.

(L-R) participated in the Philadelphia Half Marathon on September 16, 2012.

TOP (L–R): Provost S. Maureen

McGarrity, CSFN, PhD, and honoree Carol Taylor ’75, PhD BOTTOM (L–R): BSN Chair Karen Montalto, PhD; Taylor; and Interim Dean and MSN Chair Ana Maria Catanzaro, PhD.

Contact Bob Wetzel 267 -3 4 1- 3 4 2 8 r w e t z e l @ h ol y fam i l y. ed u f or m or e i n fo rm at i o n.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

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35

MEMORYLANE

A nostalgic trip back in time

“Workin’ at the car wash!”

Many thanks to the Archives and Jenna Morse ’12, former intern for the Archives, for this research. The carwash was organized by the Resident Students Association, which was in existence from 1955-1976, in order to raise money not only for Lourdes Hall, but also for a new resident hall. St. Joseph Hall (pictured) was used intermittently as the residence for the Provincial Superior and her Council; an infirmary for ill and senior Sisters; an emergency residence for victims of a fire in 1938 at St. Joseph’s Home for the Aged in Conshohocken; a house of formation for postulants, novices, and student Sisters; and as a faculty residence until 1979 for Sisters teaching at Holy Family College. By the 1970s, it had become unsafe for occupancy and was eventually demolished in December 1980. Currently, the faculty parking lot across from the Library stands on its former site. (If you are in this picture, we’d love to know; please email us at magazine@holyfamily.edu.)

Fall 2012 Memory Lane Response I am the girl on the far left playing the guitar with Sister Consolata in the Memory Lane picture. Maryann Mazzafro D’Alfonso ’79 The students in the photo with Sister Consolata are Maryann Mazzafro and Kathleen Hornemann…it was literally a “blast from the past!” I went to school with both of them. I believe they were a year behind me. Sister M. Marcella Louise Wallowicz, CSFN, ’77

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GIVINGBACK

Making a difference on campus

ON THE SCENE

Golf Outing 2012 Golfers gathered at the Spring Mill Country Club in Ivyland, Pennsylvania, for another lovely day of golf and comradery on Monday, October 1, 2013, for the 24th Annual Holy Family Golf Classic. The Golf Classic benefits student financial aid, and it raised more than $53,000 for Holy Family University students. 1 1) ( L-R) Manny Broomall, PECO; Mark Miller, Holy Family University Women’s Basketball Coach; and Tim McLaughlin, PECO 2) G  olfing techniques weren’t the only thing in fine form on the course. 3) C  harlie Keuny of Beneficial Bank demonstrates his Golf Classic winning swing. 4) ( L-R) Frank Borrelli, Tom Nicell, and Paul O’Donnell of the Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Company 5) C  lassic Winners! Beneficial Bank’s team took home the day’s top prize. (L-R) Joe Krisciunas, Charlie Keuny, Bob Keddie, and Rob Streit

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6) O  nce again, golfers were impressed by the beauty of the Spring Mill Country Club golf course.

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ON THE SCENE

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Evening of Donor Appreciation Holy Family University honored all of its benefactors at an Evening of Donor Appreciation on Friday, November 16, 2012, held in the Education and Technology Center. The University honored two Founders’ Award Recipients: Louis P. Canuso, Inc, and the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth—USA, Inc. The Founders’ Society was created to give grateful recognition to those who have invested $100,000 or more during their lifetimes. 1) U  niversity President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD, presents the Founders’ Award to Sister Loretta Theresa Felici, CSFN, President and CEO of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth—USA, Inc. Mission and Ministry 2) M  axwell Rowland of Trustees of Lower Dublin Academy and daughter Cynthia O’Donnell, MEd ’04 3) F  ormer Holy Family Professor John L. Harbison and his wife Irene

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Corporate Partnership PROGRAM

Thanking our new corporate partners for investing in future graduates of Holy Family University! Please visit holyfamily.edu/ia/corporategiving.shtml to learn more about this program and to see a full list of our business partners. For information on the Corporate Partnership Program, contact Bob Wetzel, Vice President of Development, 267 341-3428 | RWetzel@holyfamily.edu Washington Savings Bank Martin G. Bednarek, President/CEO 2900 Comly Road Philadelphia, PA 19154 215-698-9400 www.washingtonsav.com

NEastPhilly.com Shannon McDonald, Owner/Editor 2722 Mower St Philadelphia, PA 19152-2107 215-901-1597 www.neastphilly.com

Holy Family University does not endorse the products or services of the above named companies.

magazine @ holyfamily.edu

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LASTWORD

Questions and answers with…

Rosemary Parmigiani School of Education Special Projects Director and current Holy Family University doctoral student Rosemary Parmigiani has been a driving force in Holy Family University’s iPad initiative. Bob Macartney sat down with her to find out more about classroom technology integration.

Tell us how you wound up at Holy Family.

The Dean of the School of Education, Len Soroka, called me in 1998 and asked me to come in and join the adjunct faculty to integrate technology into the courses that I taught. Two years ago, after 43 years of work and two days before I retired, Dr. Soroka called me again and asked me to teach during the day as well. Now, I’ve assumed the responsibility of the Philadelphia Fellows program, and I got involved in the iPad initiative. This is my retirement. In addition to teaching and serving as Special Projects Director, you are also a student in the University’s Doctoral Program. What is your biggest challenge?

I never had a desire to get my Doctorate before. I was so busy with my job, and I never had the time. Now I am retired, and I have the time. The biggest challenge I face is trying to separate being a student from being a professor. It is a very fine line, but I have been able to work through that. The other challenge is getting everything accomplished. Thank goodness I am organized and able to juggle all these hats. After four decades as an educator, what was your reasoning for joining the Doctoral program?

People say to me, “You are getting a degree in leadership and you have already been there?” I tell them I am not doing it for the leadership piece; it is the special project work I will be doing. My primary area of emphasis is on technology integration across the curriculum and preparing pre-service teachers to integrate technology. My responsibility is to prepare our young teachers to use these tools with the students they are going to teach. The biggest job we as educators of future educators have is to prepare them to teach with the tools they need to teach. How can schools use technology to educate better?

Starting with elementary, the schools have to start thinking outside the box because our society is mobile. We have to think of technology as tools, just as we used to think of a pencil and paper as tools. When I was a middle school principal, I was big on bringing technology in. If you can do it another way, do it. Don’t tie the kids to the chair.

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Use smart boards to do problem-based learning so they can interact. They are better thinkers, creators, collaborators. We have to instill the skills in the pre-service teachers to be able to go out and teach that way. What is your role in the University’s iPad initiative?

I was asked to represent the School of Education on the committee. We started by reviewing all the faculty proposals to make the decisions on who would get the iPads. Once they were distributed, I started having lunchtime get-togethers. Faculty and staff would gather with their iPads, and we would share apps and exchange ideas on how to use them in the classroom. We met once a month; we created a wiki for the iPad users to go to for resources. Len Soroka asked me to chair the iPad committee for the School of Education. The Committee decided that the iPads would be the platform of use for professors so we would have a common ground.

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Inspire? How many years

By remembering Holy Family in your will, you can shape your legacy for years to come— illuminating the paths for future students through your generosity. A bequest is a simple, purposeful, and effective way to ensure future Holy Family students learn to create and discover, just as you did.

For details,

call 267-341-3428 or send an email to rwetzel@holyfamily.edu.

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IN THIS ISSUE

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Choosing to Interact:

A New Academic Program to Address the Increasing Specter of Autism

The Ever Changing Campus:

Holy Family University Evolves with Higher Education When the higher education landscape changes, institutions must embrace innovation in order to remain relevant. As new life springs on campus, so does renewed dedication to the future.

Many teachers lack sufficient training to accommodate autistic students. Holy Family’s new Autism Endorsement will be key to providing a more effective educational experience for children with special needs.

Little Courage Senior Jonathan Dick has had a special journey to discover what he will do post graduation from Holy Family University— Jon has recognized his calling to the priesthood and intends to follow this vocation.

A Perfect Match If there’s one thing Lou Barricelli has found out about his oldest daughter over the last year or so, it’s that her fierce determination would not be easily shaken.


Holy Family University Magazine Spring 2013