Page 1

SUMMER TWO THOUSAND SEVENTEEN

VOLUME FIFTY-ONE / NUMBER THREE

M

The arts have been a pillar of a Holy Cross education since the beginning.

A

CREATIVE ENERGY

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Today, the College is on the cusp of a new era of innovation and creativity.


FROM THE PRESIDENT

Fr. Boroughs leads the academic procession of faculty and staff members, proudly passing the graduates of the class of 2017, at the 171st Commencement on May 26, 2017, at the DCU Center in Worcester.

H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017


Today’s Challenges, Tomorrow’s Leaders

W

ith every passing commencement season, I marvel at just how quickly the months speed by on Mount St. James. The feeling is likely magnified for our students who spend four years immersed in a flurry of academics and research, community service, cultural immersion, athletic competition, self-exploration and spiritual growth. Acquiring the values and skills they need to be successful in this world is, after all, a full-time job. And as you, our alumni, no doubt appreciate – and our new graduates have come to understand – human discernment encapsulates much, much more than technical know-how. As a Jesuit liberal arts college, our goal is to prepare the whole student. That means equipping each individual with the knowledge, empathy and skills needed to fully embrace the world and all its challenges, so that he or she can then make it a better place. Key to that preparation is an understanding and appreciation of the human condition – those elements, both positive and negative, that make us loving, fallible, imperfect beings. And while some graduates who received their diplomas this spring may feel uncertain about what the future holds, they are blessed to have spent four years nurtured, challenged and supported by a community that has taught them just that.

A key member of that community is Jackie Peterson, vice president for Student Affairs and dean of students, who capped 20 outstanding years of service to Holy Cross this summer. In that time, she worked to create a fulfilling student experience founded on respect, service and love. At commencement, our graduates and their families, faculty and staff all showed their appreciation for Jackie by filling the DCU Center with thunderous applause. I have tremendous gratitude for all she and her team have done to shape our students into compassionate, thoughtful, prepared human beings. Our graduates also had the privilege of hearing from an individual who has spent the last three decades exploring the human condition in an intensely personal way. James J. O’Connell, founding physician and president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, started working as a doctor at the Pine Street Inn shelter as part of a grant program more than three decades ago. He learned to respect and honor the suffering of patients who found their way to the shelter clinic, and discovered the joy of treating someone with dignity and compassion. One year morphed into 32, and today he’s still traveling around the city to treat patients and deliver blankets and clean socks. If you’d like to hear his address, you can find it on our website at holycross. edu/commencement.

We want our graduates to be intelligent, compassionate, action-oriented problemsolvers. The Jesuits believed the arts were a key way to explore and interpret the human condition, and that tradition continues today on Mount St. James with a commitment to the arts that is stronger than ever. This issue of Holy Cross Magazine features the stories of three alumni whose arts education gave them the skills to be successful in whatever career they chose – including fields they never anticipated. This issue also unveils the artist renderings of the new center for arts and creativity, one of the most important priorities of the Become More campaign. This facility is a critical conduit to ensuring the arts are deeply integrated into every student’s experience. While not every student is destined to become a great artist, every individual exposed to creative engagement and flexible thinking can apply those experiences to the real world. Those skills are what will turn our students into the next generation of leaders – a generation prepared to tackle the most complex and pressing needs of today. I hope these summer months grant you the opportunity to rest and reflect. Thank you, as always, for being a part of our Holy Cross family. ■ Blessings,

Rev. Philip L. Boroughs, S.J.

President

john buckingham

T O D A Y ’ S C H A L L E N G E S , T O M O R R O W ’ S LF ER AODME T RH S E/ PF RR EOSMI DTEHNET P/ ROE PS EI DN EI N G T / 1


HOLY CROSS MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2017 / VOLUME FIFTY-ONE / NUMBER THREE

At the 2017 Commencement Exrercises, a student’s decorated mortarboard displays a quote from her mother, in Spanish, which translates to “Education is your inheritance.”

30

10

38

2 \ H O LY C R OS S M AG A ZI N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

40

44 50

P H OTO S B Y D A N V A I L L A N CO U RT ( PA G E S 1 0 A N D 3 8 ) A N D TO M R E T T I G ( PA G E S 3 0 , 4 4 A N D 5 0 )


HC M TEA M

REBECCA FATER Editorial Director | MAURA SULLIVAN HILL Managing Editor | STEPHEN ALBANO Art Director / Designer | MEREDITH FIDROCKI Editorial Assistant

H O LY C R O SS M AGA Z I N E (USPS 0138-860) is published quarterly by College Marketing and Communications at the College of the Holy Cross. Address all correspondence to the editor at: One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395. Periodicals postage paid at Worcester and additional mailing points.

TA B LE OF CON TE NTS 1 2 4 6 7

From the President Table of Contents Dear HCM, Editor’s Note Who We Are / Contributors

8 Campus Notebook 8 Snapshot 10 Spotlight 12 On The Hill 18 Faculty & Staff 18 20 26 28

Creative Spaces Headliners In Their Own Words Syllabus

30 The Creative Spark The arts ignited their imaginations as students, and, today, that creative background is what makes them leaders in fields as varied as business, medicine and literature.

HOLY C R OSS MAGAZ I NE O N L I NE

38 Artistic Expression The arts at Holy Cross today have a breadth and depth that inspires the campus community, and this photo collage offers a sampling of the arts that members of our community create and appreciate. 40 Building For Our Future, Inspired by Our Past The arts have always been a pillar of Jesuit education, and today, nearly 175 years since the College’s founding, a new center for arts and creativity will enrich and elevate the arts for students across campus.

54 Sports The Comeback Captain: Peter Pujals ’18 returns from a season-ending injury last year for a historic fourth season as a captain for the Crusader football team. plus , a recap of the baseball team’s standout season, including a Patriot League Championship, their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1978 and Anthony Critelli ’17, winner of the prestigious Senior CLASS Award. 58 Alumni News

44 Changemakers Not only was the 2016 election cycle divisive, it was downright nasty at times. But it’s a new year — and the voices on Mount St. James are seeking to change the tone of the conversation. 50 The Secret Lives of Books In an age of digitization, the Book Traces project reveals yet another reason to value the printed word — just as Holy Cross does in Dinand Library.

58 60 66 67 68 70 72 76 80

Mystery Photo HCAA News Book Notes Solved Photo The Power of One The Profile Class Notes Milestones In Memoriam

96 Artifact / The Next Issue / Ask More.

magazine.holycross.edu

w e b e x c lu s i v e

PHOTO GALLERY: VOICE IN ACTING, IN ACTION Theatre Professor Lynn Kremer’s Voice in Acting course is filled with movement and sound: singing, dancing and acting. You’ll read more about Kremer, The Rev. John E. Brooks, S.J., Chair in the Humanities and director of Arts Transcending Borders, and her students in Syllabus on Page 28. But you can see photos of them in action during class in a web exclusive at magazine.holycross.edu. The students tackle songs from classic musicals and scenes from plays, recording their performances on iPads and phones for later viewing and critiquing. And all along, Kremer bounds around the rehearsal room giving positive and enthusiastic feedback.

COVER P HOTO

CONTACT US With an issue focused so heavily on arts and creativity, Art Director Stephen Albano decided to make art of his own for this issue’s cover. Playing off “The Creative Spark” story, the illustration is a peek inside the mind and its potential to imagine, create and pursue one’s passions — wherever they may lead.

POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO Holy Cross Magazine One College Street Worcester, MA 01610-2395

PHONE

508-793-2419 FAX

508-793-2385 E-MAIL

hcmag@holycross.edu CIRCULATION

44,024

TA B L E O F CO N T EN TS / 3


DEAR HCM, looking and I love the recent photos of faculty in their offices. I don’t think such a publication existed (along with lots of other things) during my years there. I gave the commencement address in 2002 and told the students they were graduating from a college I did not recognize as mine, having studied there during the “Years of Deprivation.”

directly … it will be most enjoyable swapping stories and info with him. My thanks for the follow-up on that … these sort of connections are what make the Holy Cross alumni community the legendarily cohesive group that it is.

All the best, Billy Collins ’63

Winchester, Massachusetts

All the best and thanks for another great issue. Steve Flynn ’81

Winter Park, Florida

Shared Irish Roots

“I can’t thank Holy Cross enough for the support, guidance and educational, as well as moral, foundation she has received over the past four years. Her Holy Cross family will always be in her heart and mine.” —

Thank You, HC In the article “Putting Students First” (Page 10) with Jackie Peterson, vice president of student affairs and dean of students, my daughter, Gabriella Motta ’16, was featured accepting her diploma from Dean Peterson. At last year’s awards luncheon, my family had the pleasure and honor of sitting with both Dean Peterson and Antonio Willis-Berry ’13. Gabriella is finishing her first year in veterinary medicine at UPenn. I can’t

JOYCE MOTTA P16

thank Holy Cross enough for the support, guidance and educational, as well as moral, foundation she has received over the past four years. Her Holy Cross family will always be in her heart and mine. Thank you again, Joyce Motta P16

Cranston, Rhode Island

Praise for Creative Spaces Congratulations on a terrific magazine. Very cool-

4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

I was struck by the item submitted by Steve Flynn ’81 on Page 78, concerning the birthplace of his ancestors in Tipperary County, Ireland. The sign behind Mr. Flynn in the photo points to the town of Thurles, also in Tipperary County, which happens to be the town where my grandmother was born. Specifically, she was born in a hilltop village in Thurles called Upper Church. I believe my parents took me to Holycross in 1960. Tom Hogan ’67

Litchfield, Connecticut HCM put Mr. Hogan in touch with Mr. Flynn, so they could trade stories of their Irish roots: First of all, thanks so much for printing the picture and anecdote about Holycross in County Tipp! I welcome all the teasing I’ve gotten about it already! Thank you very much for forwarding on the note from Mr. Hogan, class of ’67. I absolutely will contact him

More Fr. K Memories Fr. K wrote this to me prior to a retreat in Narragansett. I read it every day – it is how I live my life. “Courtney – Good wishes and prayers for you during these days at Narragansett. As Paul wrote in Timothy, I now remind you: ‘The spirit God has given us is no cowardly spirit, but rather one that makes us strong, loving and wise.’ (2 Timothy 1:7)” Courtney R. Herbert, M.D. ’92

McLean, Virginia

Erratum In the article “Off the Course with Retiring Golf Coach Bob Molt” (Page 55), the text was inadvertently cut off at the end. Read the full version at magazine.holycross.edu/ issue_51_2. In the obituary for Rev. William J. Richardson, S.J. ’41 H81 (Page 93), his field of study, ontology, was misspelled. Holy Cross Magazine regrets these errors. ■


Social Media Shoutouts

When we tweeted the article about retiring vice president of Student Affairs Jackie Peterson from the Spring 2017 issue, alumni and colleagues shared their respect and appreciation for Dean Peterson with us:

Tell Us More

EMAIL

WRITE

hcmag@holycross.edu

Holy Cross Magazine One College Street Worcester, MA 01610-2395

FAX

(508) 793-2385 FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@holycrossmag

DEAR HCM /

5


tom rettig

EDITOR’S NOTE

Character Sketch

G

rowing up, one of my closest friends was an artist. You know, the born-to-be-great kind. She was always doodling, and the scribbles that would flow from the tip of her pencil inevitably turned into some amazing sketch fit to be hung on a museum wall. Me, not so much. I liked art, and I was kind of okay at it. But next to her, it was clear who the real talent was. That’s why I’m still amazed by the fact that I enrolled in studio art classes as a college student. I mean, who did I think I was? Those classes were for the gifted. Sure, I was an English major with my own passions – I ran the student paper’s news department like it was my full-time job – but secretly, a little piece of me wanted to be one of those artists carrying a portfolio around campus, brimming with confidence and natural talent. I can’t remember what gave me the courage to register for that first intro

to drawing course. It was probably the hope that, since I didn’t really know the other students in the class, they wouldn’t notice me. But I do recall, rolling that charcoal pencil between my fingers, how fast my self-consciousness receded. I was completely absorbed. We drew plants, people, nature scenes, still lifes. We worked for hours in silence on the same piece, breaking only for a critique from the professor. And as the days and weeks rolled by, a new realization broke over me – I belonged. Not because I was amazing at drawing (I wasn’t). It wasn’t about measuring my talent against that of someone else. Rather, I had discovered a new, intrinsic part of myself – and drawing brought that something to life. And if I had found that, what else might there be to find? It was a revelation that taught me just how complex we all are. That I – all of us, really – possess the strength, talent, courage and inspiration we need to propel ourselves through life. To help us grow into the people we’re destined to be. And taking the time and space to let those precious discoveries bubble to the surface – to be examined, ahh’d over and added to one’s understanding of self – is priceless.

6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Holy Cross knows that better than anyone, and that’s exactly why we decided to make arts a focus in this issue. Our story on Page 40 unveils the artist’s renderings for the future hub of artistic exploration, experimentation and collaboration on campus – one of the centerpieces of the Become More campaign. We also showcase some of the finest arts programming happening on The Hill today, and we interview James O’Connor ’98 about his decision to major in theatre and his success in the film and television industry. And, since you’re already a believer in the unparalleled value of a liberal arts education, you won’t be surprised to hear how the arts informed the careers of three alums working in finance, medicine and literature today. College is all about taking risks, trying new things and becoming your best, truest self. What better way to make that journey than by exploring the arts? ■ Warmly,

Rebecca Fater, Editorial Director


WHO WE ARE

REBECCA FATER

MAURA SULLIVAN HILL

STEPHEN ALBANO

MEREDITH FIDROCKI

TOM RETTIG

joined the College Marketing and Communications team in late 2016 to develop and execute content strategy. Combining her passions for storytelling, brand development and education gets her out of bed in the morning (along with strong coffee). Coming home to the world’s best kids and superhero husband makes her day complete. She wrote “The Secret Life of Books” feature story on Page 50.

writes and edits content for the magazine, including campus news, class notes and obituaries. A graduate of the University of Notre Dame with a degree in American studies and journalism, she has also written for Notre Dame Magazine, Loyola Magazine, the Scranton Journal and South Shore Living magazine. In this issue, she wrote the “Changemakers” feature story on Page 44 and Syllabus on Page 28.

has been a part of the HCM team for nearly six years – with this being his 24th issue. He earned his degree in studio art at Clark University, where he just celebrated his 10-year reunion with his Clarkie friends and Sigmund Freud (above). This issue also makes him reminisce about his college days, working with his fellow arts friends and collaborating, critiquing and making each other better artists. The nostalgia is strong.

assists with writing, editorial planning and copy editing for the magazine. She graduated from Bates College with a degree in English and French. She loves supporting the Holy Cross Magazine team and seeing the issue come to life for the alumni community to enjoy. In this issue, Meredith learned more about Professor Osvaldo Golijov’s workspace for Creative Spaces (Page 18).

joined the College Marketing and Communications office after working as a photojournalist for 15 years for newspapers and magazines in Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut and Ohio. A true New Englander, Tom enjoys the “country life” in Connecticut with his family.

Editorial Director

Managing Editor

Art Director / Designer

Editorial Assistant

Photographer / Videographer

CONTRIBUTORS

1

9

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

10

11

12

13

14

15

WRITERS Born in Cleveland, 1 BENJAMIN GLEISSER now lives in Toronto, but still roots for the Indians. He is a ghostwriter, a medical writer and an award-winning journalist who has published over 300 articles in newspaper, magazines and online. As a ghostwriter, he has coauthored books on spirituality, self-help and complementary medicine. In this issue, he wrote “The Profile” of James O’Connor ’98 (Page 70). 2 PAYSHA RHONE has written for The Boston Globe and People magazine, among other publications. She specializes in education, disability and mental health; she also works with children with emotional disabilities and autism. She is a graduate of the University of Washington and a current graduate student at Lesley University in expressive arts therapies. In this issue, she got to know Peter Pujals ’18, who is making history as a four-year football captain (Page 54). 3 RITA SAVARD is a writer and editor who cut her teeth working with heroes of daily news at The Sun in Lowell, Massachusetts, prior to founding HOWL, an arts and culture magazine spotlighting the free-wheeling spirit of people, places and events north of Boston. In this issue, she wrote “The Creative Spark” feature story on Page 30. 4 REBECCA (TESSITORE) SMITH ’99 and 5 KIMBERLY (OSBORNE) STALEY ’99 are longtime contributors to Holy Cross Magazine — and even longer-time friends. Former roommates in Loyola, they’ve come a long way from washing dishes in Kimball, now writing, editing and proofreading marketing and fundraising communications at their freelance writing firm, SmithWriting. In this issue, Rebecca and Kim wrote about Dean Jackie Peterson’s retirement (Page 20), the future of the arts at Holy Cross (Page 40) and alumni obituaries (Page 82), and also served as our copy editors. PHOTOGRAPHERS 6 MICHAEL PARAS is a New York City-area freelance photographer and videographer with more than 20 years of experience. He specializes in higher education portraits, video and campus reporting. In this issue, he captured piano major turned financial strategist Natalya Krykova ’14 for “The Creative Spark” feature story (Page 30). 7 RYAN HENRIKSEN is a freelance photojournalist and the multimedia specialist at the University of Nebraska Omaha. He has worked for National Geographic and the Dallas Morning News, among others, and has been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and more. He captured Dr. Jim Maliszewski ’07 for “The Creative Spark” (Page 30). 8 DAN VAILLANCOURT graduated from the Hallmark Institute of Photography in 1995 and has been photographing professionally for 19 years. He feels blessed to make a living doing something fun. In this issue, you’ll see Dan’s photos from Commencement (Page 10) and Dean Jackie Peterson’s retirement celebration (Page 20). CAMPUS CONTRIBUTORS 9 THE HOLY CROSS ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS TEAM collects, preserves, arranges and describes records of permanent value from the College’s founding in 1843 to the present. Made up of MARK SAVOLIS, archivist, SARAH CAMPBELL, assistant archivist, and HANNAH KOLESAR, archival assistant, this team is an invaluable resource for HCM — we couldn’t put together an issue without their historical research and context, as well as the access to archival images and objects. 10 JOHN L. BUCKINGHAM joined the College’s Audio-Visual Services (now a division within ITS) in October 1988. What began as a favor in taking a headshot for a desperate theater student some 20 years ago has led to photography becoming a major component of John’s role in A-V, with his work featured in numerous publications, posters and inadvertently on many a Facebook and LinkedIn page. 11 NICK MARKANTONATOS is the assistant director of web content. A member of the College Marketing and Communications Office for 12 years, he holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a master’s in professional communication from Clark University. 12 EVANGELIA STEFANAKOS ’14 is the staff writer for College Marketing and Communications, writing primarily for the College’s online newsroom. She studied English and art history at Holy Cross and is a steadfast advocate of the Oxford comma. STUDENT WRITERS 13 MICHELLE K. JIN ’17 is a psychology major/studio art minor from the state of New York. She enjoys brunching, organizing events and do-it-yourself crafting. When not on The Hill, you will likely find her scoping out new venues to Yelp in town. Michelle intends to pursue a career in public relations or account management post-graduation. In this issue, she wrote “Book Notes” (Page 66). 14 COLLEEN NABER ’18 is a political science major and a peace and conflict studies concentrator from Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. She is the co-executive director of the nonprofit, Working for Worcester for the 2017-2018 year, a program director for SPUD, a member of the Alpha Sigma Nu Honor Society and a member of the Phi Sigma Alpha Honor Society. In this issue, she wrote about how Holy Cross supports Dismas House, a Worcester transitional housing program for recovering drug addicts (Page 16). 15 CAROLINE SHANNON ’17 is originally from Lynnfield, Massachusetts, and is a political science major with a minor in environmental studies. She is a member of the Political Science Student Advisory Committee and the Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society. In this issue, Caroline wrote about the Living History Program that the class of 1951 uses to keep in touch (Page 58) and helped solve the Spring 2017 issue Mystery Photo (Page 67).

CONTRIBUTORS

/

WHO WE ARE

/

EDITOR’S NOTE

/

7


CAMPUS NOTEBOOK

MORTARBOARD TOSSING Class of 2017 graduates avoid the rain-filled commencement week with a celebration in Fenwick’s Mahogany Row.


8 Snapshot • 10 Spotlight • 12 On The Hill

tom rettig

tom rettig

to m r e t t ig

SNAPSHOT / CAMPUS NOTEBOOK / 9


SPOTLIGHT

667 Graduates Join the Alumni Ranks

I wish you uncomfortable but exciting lives, full of balance, promise, failure, compassion, fun, love and utter devotion to the core principles that are seared into the hearts and souls of each of you at Holy Cross,” Dr. James J. O’Connell, president and founding physician of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), said in his address to the newly graduated members of the class of 2017 at the 171st Commencement Exercises on May 26. A total of 667 students were awarded

Bachelor of Arts degrees in the presence of family and friends, Holy Cross faculty, administrators, staff and honored guests at the DCU Center in Worcester. Addressing the full convention center, with particular focus on the class of 2017, O’Connell offered students anecdotes of the many turns of his own journey in the years following his undergraduate experience, which eventually led him to pursue a career as an oncologist. Then, what was supposed to be a one-year commitment to working with the homeless of Boston turned into a 32-year career with BHCHP, the country’s largest and most comprehensive program of its kind, serving more than 12,000 homeless people a year in two hospital-based clinics and more than 60 shelters and outreach sites.

1 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

O’Connell admitted he is still incredulous at where life has brought him and offered students advice to take with them as they begin their own journeys: “Stay dynamically present to the cosmic unfolding … Be humble and listen to those around you … Never lose your sense of wonder; wonder transforms routine … Listen to your heart. Defy convention, be irreverent, but always diplomatic. Stand for something larger than yourself … Embrace failure.” Beyond this advice, O’Connell stressed that the class of 2017 already had many tools in hand, garnered from their four years at Holy Cross.

Jackie Peterson and Antonio Willis-Berry ’13 “I promise you, if youtalk keep hearts andyour reminisce about open, as you have learned do here at in herto 20-year career Rehm Library Holy Cross, your passion will come to

you, and often when you least expect it.”

photos by tom rettig, dan vaill ancourt and john buckingham


From May 25-26, Mount St. James was abuzz with pride and excitement as faculty, staff and families celebrated the class of 2017 at awards ceremonies, Baccalaureate Mass, and the main event, the 171st Commencement Exercises.

Valedictorian Haylie Butler, a Spanish and biology double major in the Health Professions Advising Program, addressed her classmates who listened, newly minted diplomas in hand. “Whether you knew it or not, the day we chose to attend Holy Cross,” said Butler, “we made a collective decision as a class — a decision to let Holy Cross change us.” Butler explained how Holy Cross challenged her and her classmates to put their personal checklists aside and push beyond their anticipated plans — to do more, give more and ask more of their education and themselves. For Butler, this meant spending her junior year in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and in the rainforest of Costa Rica, falling in love with new cultures and places and

rediscovering her passion for service.

Assistantship in Galicia, Spain.

“We are not the same people who rolled up to Wheeler, Hanselman and Mulledy on August 24, 2013, because we have shared the valuable and impactful gift that is a Holy Cross education,” said Butler. “One that encourages us to achieve greatness in a myriad of ways, so that we may cross dimensions and interact meaningfully with others. We are a class of activists, leaders and scientists. Storytellers, athletes, artists and philosophical thinkers.”

In addition to O’Connell, Holy Cross awarded honorary degrees to Clementina Chéry, the president and CEO of the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute in Boston, and Rev. Robert Kennedy, S.J., Roshi, professor emeritus of theology at St. Peter’s University in Jersey City, New Jersey, and the only American Jesuit priest who has also been installed as a Zen roshi (master teacher).

As Butler concluded her address, she sent off her classmates with a simple assurance: “We are ready.” After Holy Cross, Butler will be teaching English to high school students through a Fulbright English Teaching

At a ceremony before commencement, seniors William Byrne, Bridget Carey, Sean Cruess and Anne Grimmke were commissioned as ensigns in the U.S. Navy. Captain Mark Edwards, commanding officer of the Holy Cross NROTC Unit, administered their oath of office. ■ — Evangelia Stefanakos ’14

2 017 CO M M EN C EM EN T / S P OT L I G H T / C A M P US N OT EB O O K / 11


ON THE HILL

tom rettig

What exactly is going on?

Wired

S

itting with perfect posture in Brooks Concert Hall, Marena Ella Minelli ’17 lifted a violin to her chin and began to play, releasing beautiful streams of music with her bow. Moments later, she placed the string instrument on a chair, picked up a video game controller and toggled the joystick – producing an entirely different, but equally riveting, sound. Minelli is a member of the Holy Cross Laptop Ensemble Federation, or H-CLEF, an unusual chamber group that juxtaposes everything classical and computerized. Laptops are propped on stands in place of sheet music. Hacked game controllers, like the one Minelli used, sit on amps. And electronic, otherworldly sounds float by stained-glass windows and echo through the high ceilings of the concert hall.

“Students are studying electronic music and sound design in an experiential environment,” says Chris Arrell, associate professor of music and associate chair of the music department. He started H-CLEF two years ago as the performance part of a coding music class. “They learn the science behind digital synthesis, or sound creation, and they code their own electronic synthesizers. They build the software, then they build the hardware to trigger the sound.” That’s where the keyboards, cell phones and game controllers come in. Students “play” the sounds they have engineered in real time by tapping keys, pushing joysticks and otherwise instructing their devices when and how to emit sound. Together, they compose musical scores and perform, as Arrell suggests, a “natural extension of chamber music.” “They’re not simply cuing up a track and hitting play,” he says. “Just like plucking a guitar string, these sounds are synthesized by human touch. They have to listen to each other while they’re playing, and they work together to write compositions. It’s kind of like a coauthored paper.” And while Arrell’s ensemble includes

some classical instruments like the violin, an electric guitar and a banjo, the goal is not to replicate those sounds with electronic devices. “A synthetic violin will never sound as good a real violin,” he says. “I don’t want to imitate acoustic instruments, because they already do what they do really well. My intent is to expand on the colors and the possibilities.” That’s exactly what drew the attention of Ben MacDougald ’19, a history major. “Using the Macs, you can go beyond what a single instrument is capable of,” he says. It’s also a way to enjoy the fun of making music without spending years learning how to play a classical instrument,” adds Bill Hamilton ’17, a biology major. While students without a music background still have to learn the fundamentals, there is an element of “instant gratification,” he says. “I took the class because I’m thinking of double majoring in computer science and music,” says Zhiran Xu ’19. “It’s a combination I didn’t expect.” This past spring, students wrote and performed the musical score for a 1920 German silent horror movie, called “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” a chilling story of an insane hypnotist. “This (the film score) is a great representation of how computers are recognized as legitimate sources of music,” says James Tatar III ’17, a political science major. “It’s just another step of what’s possible in the evolution of music.” ■ — Rebecca Fater

MARCH

A P RI L

SPRING BREAK SERVICE More than 200

REFUGEE AWARENESS WEEK Pax Christi, a student

students traded spring break beach trips for community service, traveling to 23 sites across the country with the Spring Break Immersion Program, which is in its 42nd year and allows students to engage with, learn from and stand in solidarity with communities all over the world.

group that promotes peace and justice, sponsored Refugee Awareness Week from April 18-25 to increase awareness and promote action around the refugee crisis. Students donated toiletries and wrote welcome messages for refugees arriving in New England, and also wrote letters to legislators urging change in the current immigration policy.

1 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017


tom rettig

On campus, Ouellette conducts research in the organic methodology lab of Bianca Sculimbrene, associate professor of chemistry, exploring the immunomodulating drug fingolimod, which is currently used for treating multiple sclerosis. Additionally, he conducted research last summer at ebbu, a company in Colorado, studying the separation, purification and analysis of cannabinoids.

Ouellette Wins Goldwater Scholarship

E

rik Ouellette ’18, a chemistry major and physics minor, has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship for the 2017-2018 academic year.

The Goldwater Scholarship is considered the nation’s premier scholarship for undergraduates studying mathematics, natural sciences and engineering and is awarded to undergraduate sophomores and juniors based on academic merit. Students selected to be Goldwater Scholars are identified as having outstanding ability and promise, with hopes of pursuing advanced study and research careers.

Ouellette, from Denver, Colorado, was one of 240 students to receive the competitive award, selected among 1,286 students from 2,000 colleges and universities across the country. The scholarship will cover the cost of tuition, fees, books and room and board up to a

This summer, Ouellette is working as an intern at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado. “My goal is to be able to apply chemistry toward projects in sustainability and clean energy, whether that’s in industry or academia,” Ouellette explains. “As someone who enjoys a lot of what the mountains and outdoors have to offer, I think it’s important to use natural resources in a responsible way, so that we’re not destroying the earth around us, and it would be pretty rewarding to be able to use chemistry to approach that issue. Hopefully, my internship experience, combined with the Goldwater and my time at Holy Cross working with Professor Sculimbrene, will prepare me for what the future holds.” Since 2005, six Holy Cross students have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships. “This scholarship is one of those awards that sets a student up for his or her career, and is a strong indicator of future success as a research scientist,” says Anthony Cashman, director of the Office of Distinguished Fellowships and Graduate Studies at the College. “Our past winners have all gone on to wonderful careers in the sciences.” ■ — Evangelia Stefanakos ’14

tom rettig

maximum of $7,500 per year.

Big Brothers Big Sisters Field Day

O

n May 9, Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) of Central Mass/ Metrowest hosted its annual field day for all the Holy Cross participants in the BBBS program. More than 400 “bigs” and “littles” spent the day together, participating in a STEM activity and sports in the Field House. The bigs also showed their littles around campus, and Cool Beans was the littles’ favorite spot. “The littles love getting to visit the College and many leave saying that they would like to attend Holy Cross when they are older,” says Jackie Lyon, the assistant director of marketing and special events for BBBS of Central Mass/Metrowest. “It was a fun day for the bigs and littles, and it is always great to give the kids opportunities to picture themselves in a college setting later in life.” ■ — Maura Sullivan Hill

««

TAKING A STAND Students hosted a Stand Against Racism rally on April 27, featuring spoken word, readings and a violin performance. The event was sponsored by the Multicultural Peer Educators, Black Student Union, Caribbean African Student Assembly, Latin American Student Organization, SGA Diversity and the Office of Multicultural Education.

TASTE OF WORCESTER Students, faculty and staff sampled food from popular city restaurants at the Taste of Worcester on April 28, hosted by Student Programs for Urban Development (SPUD) community organizers. El Patron, Loving Hut, Tom’s International Deli, Hacienda Don Juan’s and Cafe Reyes set up tables on the Hoval to feed hungry participants, which included 35 refugee transition students from Worcester Public Schools. The event was free of charge with optional donations to support refugee resettlement in Worcester. ON THE HILL / CAMPUS NOTEBOOK / 13


ON THE HILL

8

2

3

9

4

10

Holy Cross Produces 13 Fulbright Scholars

T

welve members of the class of 2017 and one member of the class of 2016 have been awarded Fulbright grants to teach and conduct research around the world during the 2017-2018 academic year. Since 2005, Holy Cross students have received a total of 92 Fulbrights, placing the College consistently among the nation’s top producers of Fulbright scholars at the undergraduate level. This year’s recipients are headed to Spain, the Philippines, Morocco, Taiwan, Ireland, Mexico, Thailand, Malaysia, Greece, Nepal and South Africa.

The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and established in 1946, is widely recognized as the most prestigious international exchange program in the world. The highly competitive grants are awarded

11

5

12

on the basis of academic merit and professional promise. Each year approximately 1,900 grants are awarded through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, which offers opportunities for students and young professionals to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching and primary and secondary school teaching in more than 140 countries worldwide.

THIS YEAR’S RECIPIENTS: 1 Haylie Butler ’17, of Rossmoor, California, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Spain, where she will be teaching English to high school students in the region of Galicia. In addition to teaching, Butler, a Spanish and biology double major in the Health Professions Advising Program, hopes to pilot an afterschool mentoring program in STEM, which will mirror her work at Holy Cross as the founder and chair of XCHROM, an organization that empowers young women in science in underprivileged communities.

2 Timothy Gardner ’17, of Worcester, has been awarded a Fulbright Study/ Research Award to the Philippines.

6

13

7 Since 2005, 92 Holy Cross students have been named Fulbright Scholars.

Gardner, a biology major with minors in environmental studies and studio art, will survey and analyze the migration patterns of breeding populations of humpback whales off of the Babuyan Islands in Cagayan for the first three months of his award. He will then stay at a field research station in Jagna, Bohol, where he will write a scientific article on his study, and will also run art and science classes for children based around marine organisms.

3 Alexander Kochenburger ’17, of Storrs, Connecticut, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Morocco, where he will be teaching English at a Moroccan university. While there, Kochenburger, an international studies major with a focus on the Middle East, plans to give presentations on topics related to the United States and the English language, participate in cultural events and enroll in language courses to continue his study of Arabic.

4 Catherine Leeber ’17, of New Canaan, Connecticut, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Spain, where she will be teaching English in a secondary school in the region of Galicia. In addition, she will be working on a project to help bring

APRIL

tom rettig

TALKING TOLSTOY The McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture hosted a conference on Tolstoy and Spirituality from April 21-22. International authors and scholars gathered to analyze Russian writer Leo Tolstoy’s controversial view of Christianity, which approved of the moral mission of Christianity, but disagreed with the notion that human nature causes sins and rather blamed social institutions.

1 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

BANG FOR YOUR BUCK Holy Cross ranked at No. 12 on Payscale’s list of Best Value Liberal Arts Colleges in April 2017. Payscale, a website focused on salary, benefits and compensation, ranked more than 900 U.S. colleges and universities based on total cost and alumni earnings.

photos by john buckingham

1


5 Holly Nord ’17, of Killingworth, Connecticut, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Taiwan. She will teach English to elementary or middle school students in Taitung, a city in the southeast region. Nord, a political science and Chinese double major, will also serve as a cultural ambassador.

6 Sean O’Rourke ’16, of Wakefield, Rhode Island, has been awarded a Fulbright Study/Research Award to Ireland, where he will be studying in the Irish Writing and Film Master’s Program at University College Cork. O’Rourke was an English major at Holy Cross.

7 Khorally Pierre ’17, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Mexico. Pierre is an English and Spanish double major.

8 Samantha Speroni ’17, of Redondo Beach, California, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Thailand, where she will teach English to students in primary or secondary school. Speroni is a psychology major and a neuroscience minor.

9 Luke Thompson ’17, of Greenville, Rhode Island, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Taiwan. Thompson, a Chinese and political science double major, will teach English to students in Kinmen, located in the Fujan province of Taiwan.

10 Caroline Tibbitts ’17, of West Hartford, Connecticut, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Malaysia, where she will teach English to Malaysian children. Tibbitts, an international studies major with a concentration in gender, sexuality and women’s studies, plans to start an empowerment club for female students.

11 Mary Kate Vanecko ’17, of Chicago, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to South Africa, where she will be teaching English to high school students. Vanecko, a political science major with a concentration in gender, sexuality and women’s studies, will give presentations on topics related to the United States and the American government, help with sports and extracurriculars and hopes to coach boxing with Boxgirls South Africa.

12 Melody Wauke ’17, of Athens, Georgia, has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Greece, where she will be teaching English to Greek students at the Hellenic American Educational Foundation in Athens. Wauke is a classics major.

Academic Conference a Showcase of Student Research, Creativity

O

ver the course of four jampacked days, more than 350 students from across academic disciplines presented the results of their independent work in the performing and visual arts, social sciences, humanities and natural sciences during the 2017 Academic Conference. Performances, poster sessions and presentations filled the campus, from Seelos Theatre and the Hogan Campus Center, to the Cantor Art Gallery and the Stein Atrium, showcasing a high level of independence, creativity and intellectual discipline, as well as the role professors play as mentors and model teacherscholars for Holy Cross students.

has been awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship to Nepal. In addition to teaching English to his students, Weller, a chemistry major in the Health Professions Advising Program and a member of the College Honors Program, hopes to volunteer in a clinic or visit hospitals to learn how medicine is practiced in Nepal. ■

Major highlights of the annual Academic Conference included: a kick-off event presented by Holy Cross’ bilingual theatre troupe, Uni2ACT; presentations by 30 seniors in the College Honors Program; the opening of the senior studio art major exhibition, “re,” in the Cantor Art Gallery; departmental presentations offered by students of all class years; inductions into national honor societies; performances by Holy Cross’ Chamber Orchestra; and readings by creative writing concentrators. ■

— Evangelia Stefanakos ’14

— Evangelia Stefanakos ’14

13 Andrew Weller ’17, of Cincinnati,

M AY JAZZ HANDS The annual dance concert took place on May 3 in the Fenwick Theatre. Students from the ballet, jazz and modern dance classes took to the stage to strut their stuff for the final dance performance of the year.

««

American culture to her community. Leeber is a Spanish major, education minor and a member of the Teacher Education Program (TEP).

SPRING HAS SPRUNG Spring Weekend celebrations took place across campus from May 4-8, giving students one last hurrah before finals. Musical artists T-Pain and Timeflies performed at the spring concert on Friday, May 5, and the weekend fun continued with the Easy Street Fair, a pig roast, fireworks display and a carnival. ON THE HILL / CAMPUS NOTEBOOK / 15


S PN OTT HL EI GHHITL L O Worcester community for more than 25 years, but its services are even more essential now because of the heroin epidemic, says Molly Hourigan ’16, program coordinator at Dismas House (pictured at left). “A majority of the men who come to Dismas House are recovering addicts, not criminals, and need to be in addict recovery programs, not jail.”

Dismas House Looks to Break the Cycle of Addiction

T

he Massachusetts heroin epidemic continues to make headlines as a growing – and devastating – problem. Here in Worcester, Dismas House, a transitional housing program for men, seeks to break the cycle of addiction, and members of the Holy Cross community are helping make it happen. Dismas House has been serving the

Dismas House provides transitional housing and services to former prisoners, with the goal of reintegrating them into society to decrease the recidivism rate. It serves a total of 32 men at a time, who stay for an average of nine months, although there is no maximum or minimum length of stay. Dismas House’s mission is a simple goal with complex implications: “To reconcile former prisoners to society, and society to former prisoners, through the development of a supportive community.” “Dismas House breaks the sad cycle of drug addiction and shows the men how life can be without drugs. Many of Dismas House’s residents were raised in homes with drug users, so they don’t know any better. They need support to help them have a positive influence on the city and they need society to take a chance on them by focusing on supporting their recovery, not on jail time,” Hourigan says. Dismas House is making progress in breaking that cycle, given the recidivism

rate of its residents is 50 percent lower than the state average, which is largely due to the structure of the program. Residents of Dismas House are transitioned throughout the organization’s three locations. When the men first arrive from jail or detox programs, they are sent to Dismas Family Farm in Oakham, Massachusetts. Many of these men have grown up in Worcester or neighboring cities, so the farm in Oakham provides a different, rural lifestyle that allows them to reflect and focus on themselves. Residents then graduate to Richard Street, the original Dismas House, located in Main South, which is the center of the heroin epidemic in Worcester. The Richard Street location provides a safe haven for those residents that have graduated from the farm, but are not quite ready to reintegrate into society on their own. This allows residents to be exposed to the neighborhood they will likely return to following their graduation from Dismas House. The location of Richard Street is purposeful: first, it shows them to what life can be like without drugs in this neighborhood and second, its proximity allows Dismas House to reach addicts in the heart of the epidemic in order to help them recover. Those suffering from drug addiction need services in their neighborhood, otherwise they will not seek them out, making the Richard Street location vital to Dismas House’s success. Lastly, residents have the opportunity to move to the Father Brooks House, named for the late president emeritus of Holy Cross and a major supporter of Dismas House. The Father Brooks House offers affordable apartments to Dismas House graduates and their families, providing a next step, while keeping them connected to its services.

M AY GOLD MEDAL FOOD Holy Cross Dining won the Gold

HOCKEY HYPE Women’s ice hockey will join the Hockey East conference

Award in the Catering/Special Event category in the National Association of College and University Food Services annual Dining Awards. The winning meal was served at the “Become More” Gala, a kickoff dinner for the most ambitious, comprehensive fundraising campaign in the history of the College, with the goal of raising $400 million by June 2020.

for the 2018-2019 season. “This is a historic day for the College of the Holy Cross and for our women’s ice hockey program,” Director of Athletics Nathan Pine said when the news was announced. “I’d like to thank Commissioner Bertagna and the Women’s Hockey East membership for their confidence in Holy Cross and for this wonderful opportunity to join their ranks. We are committed to competing for championships in Hockey East.”

1 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

all photos by tom rettig


Crawford stresses that Dismas House truly works and turns people’s lives around, and it is an important mechanism for former prisoners to find jobs, stay clean and sober, reconcile with society and reconnect with families. This emphasis on reintegration is what makes Dismas House stand out and what has contributed to much of its success in decreasing the recidivism rate in Worcester. ■

— Colleen Naber ’18

Two Juniors Awarded Full-Tuition Scholarship for Women in the Sciences

P

hallika Mon ’18, a chemistry major, and Michelle Yu ’18, a mathematics major and environmental studies minor, have been named recipients of Clare Boothe Luce Scholarships for the 2017-2018 academic year. The scholarship is awarded to two women entering their fourth year at Holy Cross and majoring in the physical sciences, which include mathematics, computer science, physics and chemistry. The scholarship covers tuition and fees. In addition, the College supports the Clare Boothe Luce Scholars with paid research fellowships during the summer prior to the start of their senior year. Mon (right), of Lynn, Massachusetts, will continue her research on the misfolding and aggregation of protein. The goal of this research, being conducted under the

guidance of Sarah Petty, associate professor of chemistry, is to explore the earliest stage of protein aggregation, which has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Mon has been working in Petty’s lab since she was a first-year student in the First-year Research Advancement Program (FRAP). Mon, who moved to the United States at the age of 10 from Cambodia, is a member of Science Ambassadors, a teaching assistant in the chemistry department, and also volunteers through Student Programs for Urban Development (SPUD). Yu (left), of San Francisco, has been conducting research on comparing frequentist and Bayesian statistical methods in modeling varicose vein treatment outcome. During the upcoming academic year, Yu will be completing a mathematics honors thesis on using Bayesian statistics to identify climate change points, under the guidance of Eric Ruggieri, assistant professor of mathematics. The goal of the research is to develop an efficient technique that will detect the exact timing of change points in various climate time series. This summer, Yu will be conducting energy systems research at Argonne National Laboratory, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Yu is a beekeeper and a Calculus Workshop tutor at the College, and also volunteers as a tutor for local elementary to middle school students and is on the executive board of the American Women in Mathematics (AWM) chapter at Holy Cross. ■

— Evangelia Stefanakos ’14

Seven Holy Cross students from Student Programs for Urban Development (SPUD) volunteer their time to cook dinner at Dismas House on Richard Street each month. They help reintegrate the residents into society by supporting them through the community-based Dismas House approach of living, eating and working as a family. Leonard “Lenny” Crawford ’18, Dismas House SPUD program director explains, “The SPUD program allows college students to play an active role in their reintegration by co-existing with the residents and showing them they have a family beyond their Dismas House one. The joy this program brings to me personally is invaluable because I know Dismas House gives individuals a second chance at life. Watching the residents succeed and give back to the community during their reintegration is amazing.”

FIRST RATE The English department ranked at No. 9 on USA Today College’s ranking of the best colleges for a major in English, beating the likes of Harvard University at No. 10. The publication praised “the small class sizes” at Holy Cross, which “help ensure students have the opportunity to work closely with faculty while fostering intellectual discussions.”

LATE NIGHT EATS The popular Midnight Breakfast finals week tradition continued this year, with administrators staying up late to serve students eggs, bacon, waffles and more. Students flocked to Crossroads and Kimball for the midnight snack as a break from studying for final exams and writing papers. ON THE HILL / C AMPUS NOTEBOOK / 17


F A C U LT Y & S T A F F

For his winery and his alma mater, Joe Donelan ’72 expects nothing less than the best. I live and work in what used to be a large, stone church. It was deconsecrated in the 1980s, but, to me, thousands of prayers felt, said and sung here for over a century are still floating. At the smaller piano, I can play with headphones and work very early or very late without disturbing other residents. During the daytime, I usually move to the grand piano and bang on it loudly. Sometimes, a neighbor's dog responds. I used to work upstairs, where there are very high ceilings and great acoustics, but I found that Leonardo da Vinci was right when he advised artists to work in spaces not too large, so that the energy doesn’t dissipate.”

p h oto by tom retti g

BY R E B ECCA SM IT H ’ 9 9 A N D K I M B E R LY S TA L E Y ’ 9 9

OSVALDO GOLIJOV | Loyola Professor of Music | Home Studio | Brookline, Massachusetts

b y m e r e d it h f id r o ck i


18 Creative Spaces • 20 Headliners • 28 Syllabus

COMPOSING A PIECE TITLED "FALLING OUT OF TIME"

C R E AT I V E S PA C E S / FA C U LT Y & S TA F F / 1 9


HEADLINERS

Celebrating Jackie When the class of 2017 ended its tenure on Mount St. James, so, too, did Dean Jackie Peterson, whose groundbreaking 20-year career left a lasting legacy on The Hill. BY R E B E C C A S M I T H ’ 9 9 A N D K I M B E R LY S TA L E Y ’ 9 9

S

tanding before a crowd of 300 in the Hogan Ballroom, Mable Millner, the College’s associate dean of students for diversity and inclusion and director of multicultural education, addressed current and former administrators, faculty and staff who had gathered to celebrate the contributions of her colleague and friend Jacqueline “Jackie” Dansler Peterson, vice president for student affairs and dean of students. “You have seen much change in the life of this campus and been a part of it all,” Millner said to Peterson.

Peterson, the first woman, person of color and lay person to be named to the president’s cabinet, capped her 20 years of service at the close of the academic year. The reception in May, held in Peterson’s honor, was an opportunity for her colleagues to express their gratitude and well wishes. “The change that [Jackie] has pioneered and the transformational work that she has done to serve our students, their parents, our staff, faculty and alumni over the past two decades has been extraordinarily graced,” extolled College President Rev. Philip L. Boroughs, S.J.

2 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

From the development of programs that connect classroom learning with campus life opportunities, to the revision of student conduct and community standards, to the establishment of the Office of Multicultural Education and the Gateways Orientation programs, Peterson’s legacy at the College is one of transformation, diversity and inclusion. Peterson played a key role in the College’s efforts to become more diverse ethnically, socioeconomically and religiously. Former College President Rev. Michael C. McFarland, S.J., worked alongside Peterson for 12 years. “We worked together not only to recruit a more diverse pool of students, but also to ensure that they had the support they needed to be happy and successful. With a dedicated team from across the College, we were able to more than double the proportion of students of color in the student body and significantly increase all the indicators of success, engagement


(opposite) In her speech, Mable Millner invoked Maya Angelou's poem, "Phenomenal Woman," and drew comparisons to Peterson. (above) Members of Peterson's family joined her at her sendoff on campus in May: son, Brett, daughter-in-law, Nicole, granddaughter, Avery, husband, Daryl and daughter, Danielle. (top right) Fr. Boroughs honored Peterson as a groundbreaker in his speech. (bottom right) Peterson thanked Jane Reynolds, her executive assistant of 20 years, and congratulated Reynolds on her impending retirement.

and satisfaction for that group.” Throughout her career, Peterson was guided by a holistic philosophy of education — one that helped students find success both in and out of the classroom, and taught them to nurture their mind, body and soul. “Who am I? Who do I want to become? Who do I want to be for others?” These are the questions that Peterson posed to students year after year as she challenged them to live the mission of Holy Cross. “Over the past 20 years, under Jackie’s leadership, Student Affairs has become a critical partner in our efforts to educate the whole person,” says Peterson’s longtime colleague Margaret Freije, provost and dean of the College. “She and her staff have taken the lead in developing our students as leaders, teaching them the importance of working together to achieve common goals and helping them do the hard work of building communities that are

diverse and inclusive. Jackie and her team, through their expertise in student development and their commitment to our Jesuit mission, provide the network of support our students need to fully participate in the rigorous liberal arts education Holy Cross offers them.” Remarkably, Peterson has had an impact on approximately 14,000 Holy Cross students. She welcomed them on move-in day and witnessed their joy on graduation day — and she was there for all the days in between, assisting those struggling with personal and family issues, training and mentoring those in leadership roles, and celebrating students’ myriad athletic, artistic and community achievements. Through it all, in good times and in bad, she was the consummate professional, demonstrating a deep understanding of what students needed in order to grow into mature and responsible adults. “I’ve greatly admired Jackie’s strength, her determination and her character

though all of the varied challenges of our day-to-day work,” says Paul Irish, associate dean of students and director of student conduct and community standards at the College. “Above all, Jackie places faith and family first. This ethos was modeled in the Division of Student Affairs and helped to create a division that has been welcoming, warm and compassionate.” Millner agrees. “Having found one like you as a leader and colleague has been no less than a gift,” she shared as the reception came to a close. “Jackie, I felt so privileged to have found deeper community with you both professionally and personally. These same feelings have been extended to the many students who found comfort, refuge and safety with you. Your guidance and encouragement have helped so many students thrive and survive [at Holy Cross]. “We have all been fortunate to have you as a member of this community,” concluded Millner. ■

H E A D L I N E R S / FA C U LT Y & S TA F F / 2 1


HEADLINERS

HC Bids Farewell to Three Beloved Faculty Members

NAGY

A

s the campus tipped its hat to the class of 2017, it also bids farewell to three faculty members who retired at the end of the academic year: Blaise Nagy, Karen Turner and Helen Whall. These faculty, who have been fixtures in the Holy Cross community for many years, share memories and anecdotes from their time at the College and talk about what’s next.

Blaise Nagy, professor of classics Where is your favorite spot on campus? My office, of course. I've been the sole occupant of Fenwick 413 since 1976. What was your proudest scholarly moment? When I learned in 1991 that the American Journal of Archaeology had accepted for publication an article I had written on the Parthenon Frieze — a topic that had been all but picked clean by scholars over the last two centuries. What is your favorite course to teach? "Greek 341: Thucydides" – an author course in which we read about the history of the Peloponnesian War. During its last few iterations, I was able to teach the course using my own “Thucydides

TURNER

Reader” (“Thucydides Reader: Annotated Passages from Books I-VIII of the Histories,” Focus/Hackett, 2012). Is there any memorabilia from your office that you will keep? Yes, the plaster Horse's Head, a replica of a sculpture from the West Pediment of the Parthenon. I bought it years ago from a now-defunct Museum Store at the Burlington Mall (in Burlington, Massachusetts). The salesperson could hardly believe that I was actually willing to pay $15 for it. What’s next? I want to play a significant role in the lives of my seven grandchildren. If time allows, I will return to my favorite classics field — Greek epigraphy (the study of ancient inscriptions).

Karen Turner, professor of history

What is your favorite course to teach? My favorite course is the one I just taught in Montserrat, Dao and the Arts. The students are just amazing and they understood that Daoism offers a different way of living in the world ... and what more can a teacher hope for?

2 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

WHALL

What was your proudest scholarly moment? My proudest scholarly moments have been two, as I work in both China and Vietnam. In both areas of my research I have been so happy when I learn that my take on Chinese law or Vietnamese women soldiers opens up new ways of looking at history. What is something you always told your students? Take joy in learning. Too often students equate suffering with a challenging course. It should not be that way. Learning should be a pleasure. That does not mean you don't have to work hard, but it does mean that the process should be one of wonder and discovery. What's next? A book called “Love and Law in Early China,” that draws on decades of scholarship based on new texts and a revised version of my film on Vietnamese women soldiers. And a collaborative work with Professor Shirish Korde that combines the music he has composed with historical footage of women in war in Vietnam. Much work to be done!


Helen Whall, professor of English Where is your favorite spot on campus? My favorite spot on campus is Fenwick 2, lined with benches from the original Jesuit chapel. I love coming on to that long corridor when the benches are full of students waiting to see their English professors, talking to each other, reading a book or, best of all, fiddling with the magnetic word board. What is something you always told your students? From fairly early in my career, whenever I taught first-year students in the fall, I would wait for a picture-postcard perfect New England autumn day, then ask my students to take a mental snap shot and tuck it away, because the next four years were going to go by in a blink. I’m beginning to feel that way myself about the last 40 years. Is there any memorabilia from your office that you will keep? Many years ago, students I taught in a First-Year Program seminar cut open a world globe and then hinged the front half. When you open the globe, you find a stage filled with images of those students, each in a “representative” costume. That goes home with me. What’s next? I have some unfinished business exploring Shakespeare’s comic vision, so I will be taking my Shakespeare files home with me, as well as that globe. I also want to continue examining the literary dimensions of contemporary theater. I hope to continue teaching, though perhaps in nontraditional venues. I expect I’ll return to Iceland — the culture fascinates me as much as the country. And, more than anything, I want to help those who strive for a more just society. ■

— Evangelia Stefanakos

by the absence of dramatic text and the use of improvisational dialogue and comic stock characters wearing masks, and was a unique type of theatrical performance, relying on improvisation and the actors’ virtuosity, explains Partan. With her main research interests lying in the performing arts and theatricality of Russian literature and culture, Partan became interested in Russia’s prerevolutionary fascination with Italian commedia dell’arte masks, such as Harlequin, Pierrot and Columbine, during the era of Russian modernism before the Revolution of 1917. From there, she began investigating the deeper roots, going all the way back to the 17th century, and tracing the “vagabonding Italian masks.”

Professor Explores 300 Years of Russian Artistic Imagination in New Book

W

hat does commedia dell’arte, a form of theatre born in Italy in the mid-16th century, have to do with Russian cultural history? In “Vagabonding Masks: The Italian Commedia dell’Arte in the Russian Artistic Imagination” (Academic Studies Press, 2017), Olga Partan, assistant professor of Russian in the modern languages and literatures department, explores how the artistic principles of the commedia dell’arte have profoundly affected the Russian artistic imagination, providing a source of inspiration for leading Russian artists for more than three centuries.

Commedia dell’arte is characterized

In this book, Partan offers a comparative cultural study with an emphasis on what she defines as “harlequinized” Russian art and literature, with an analysis that spans from Russia’s cultural landscape before its westernization by Peter the Great in the 18th century to popular culture in Putin’s Russia. “I hope that readers will be able to trace the interconnectedness between Russia and the West, following the narrative that balances between high and low cultural spheres,” says Partan. “I also hope they will better understand how leading Russian writers and artists were able to draw on the commedia to produce innovative works of art in the Russian context, and that a better understanding of the commedia influences in these works can shed new light on how we interpret them, as well as appreciate inspirational linkages between Russian and Western art and artists.” Partan’s book has been well received from fellow scholars, with one reviewer calling it “original, alluring and persuasive” and another saying “its breadth of thinking and range of reference are truly astonishing.” ■

— Evangelia Stefanakos

H E A D L I N E R S / FA C U LT Y & S TA F F / 2 3


HEADLINERS led strategic integrated marketing initiatives and crisis communications.

tom r etti g

A graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, Kim served as deputy executive director of the State Bar of Michigan from 1996-2000 and editor and publisher of the ABA Journal for the American Bar Association from 20002005. He held a variety of editing, publishing and media-related roles earlier in his career, and worked for two years as a litigation attorney for Clark Hill, one of Michigan’s largest law firms. He began his career in writing and production at WDIV-TV4 in Detroit.

Dan Kim Joins the College as VP for Communications

D

an Kim arrived at Holy Cross in April in the new role of vice president for communications. “We are pleased to welcome Dan to Holy Cross in this new role on our executive team,” says Rev. Philip L. Boroughs, S.J., president of the College. “Dan has deep experience in directing integrated communications

and marketing efforts at higher education institutions, professional associations and media organizations, as well as the proven ability to build and lead teams of talented, creative individuals. We look forward to his leadership in effectively telling our Holy Cross story and communicating the hallmarks of the distinctive Jesuit, liberal arts education that we provide.”

2 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Kim previously worked as the executive director of communications and marketing at the University of Michigan College of Engineering. He has been leading strategic marketing communications for more than 20 years in for-profit, nonprofit and higher education organizations, working at his alma mater, the University of Michigan, since 2010. Prior to returning to Michigan, he directed news and information for West Virginia University, where he served as chief spokesperson for the university and

“I am extremely honored to have been selected for this leadership role,” Kim says. “It’s an exciting time to be a communications professional. The way we get and share information has changed dramatically, especially in the last 10 years. Social media is just one example of new and changing communication platforms that we need to embrace. I am looking forward to bringing my background and experience to Holy Cross to help meet the challenges presented by this evolving landscape.” Kim is the first to hold this newly created vice president role at Holy Cross, and serves as a member of the president’s executive leadership team and cabinet. He reports directly to Fr. Boroughs and oversees strategic communications and marketing, as well as government and community relations for the College. ■


student activities from 1996–1998. Prior to starting a career in Jesuit education, she held roles in residential life and multicultural affairs at the University of Vermont and served as director of external affairs for the Oakcrest School for Girls in Washington, D.C. “I am thrilled to be joining the Holy Cross community,” Murray says. “From my first interaction with the search committee and throughout my campus visit, the pride that students, faculty and staff feel for the College was evident. I have long admired Holy Cross, its commitment to excellence and its dedication to holistic student development, and I can’t imagine a better place to continue serving Jesuit higher education.”

VP for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Named

M

ichele C. Murray has been named the new vice president for Student Affairs and dean of students. She will succeed Jacqueline D. Peterson, who is retiring after serving the College for 20 years. "We are delighted that Michele will join our executive team at Holy Cross in this important role,” says

College President Rev. Philip L. Boroughs. “She has served Jesuit higher education for 21 years, and has successfully led a diverse and dedicated team within the increasingly complex landscape of higher education. She will be an excellent partner for our students and their families, as well as our faculty and staff, to further our Holy Cross mission of developing our students intellectually,

socially and spiritually.” Since 2006, Murray has served as vice president of the Division of Student Development at Seattle University. In addition to her administrative work, Murray has also served as a member of the faculty, teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in leadership and student development. She moved to Seattle from Loyola College in Maryland, where she worked as director of leadership and new student programs from 1998–2006 and assistant director of

Murray holds a B.A. in rhetoric and communication studies and psychology from the University of Virginia, a M.Ed. in higher education and student affairs administration from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. in education policy and leadership in higher education from the University of Maryland. She has served on the executive boards of the Jesuit Association of Student Personnel Administrators (JASPA) and the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) Center for Women. Murray, who will assume her duties on July 17, will serve as a member of the president’s executive leadership team and cabinet and will report directly to Fr. Boroughs. ■

H E A D L I N E R S / FA C U LT Y & S TA F F / 2 5


IN THEIR OWN WORDS

beaudoin

raguin

c h r i s f e lv e r

(far left) Acconci in 1984 (left) Acconci's senior portrait in the Purple Patcher (below) Co-editor of The Purple, Acconci (third from right) stands with the rest of the 1962 The Purple staff

callahan

Remembering Vito Poet, performance artist, architect. The public knew many different sides of Vito Acconci '62, but Holy Cross was privileged to experience a side of him fewer people had the chance to know: the student. Acconci, a New York native raised in a Catholic family, came to campus in 1959 and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English four years later. Following his death in April, we asked three members of the Holy Cross faculty to reflect on the artist and the impact he made on Mount St. James and the world.

2 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

E D W A R D F. C A L L A H A N , professor emeritus of English who taught at Holy Cross for more than 30 years until his retirement in 1990, first encountered the young Acconci in his own classroom in 1959.

I

t was the late 1950s when Rev. Thomas Grace, S.J., then-head of the English department, and I realized the talent and promise of Vito Hannibal Acconci, a novice freshman. The following four years I worked with him, and the 50 ensuing years of witnessing his achievement, were one of my outstanding joys about teaching at Holy Cross. How fondly I recall sharing his devotion to Shakespeare, Joyce, Toscanini, Galileo, Ferlinghetti, Warhol. Encouraging and controlling the Acconci talent and creative adventures were the redeeming challenges of the profession. His sartorial preference for black

clothing and enigmatic prose style were often misleading and at times could be frustrating, but my wife and those who appreciated his work insisted on his promise: He possessed the gentile modesty of a true gentleman, an Italian artist. He was a rebel in prose and poetry, as well as performing art and architectural design. He represented the United States at least twice at the Venice Biennale and held a gallery show of inflated dolls at the Wagner Palazzo in Venice. He designed the lounge in the Coca-Cola Company headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, and was the focus of a gala show at Manhattan's MOMA. I recall with pride my visits to Acconci’s Murinsel in Graz, Austria, a floating platform with footbridges that connect the banks of the Mur River. He was ever eager to


meet any challenge of design to expand the dimensions and excitement of modern art. My travels to Santa Monica, Montana, Chicago, New York, Venice, Bruch and Worcester were cachets for being associated with his Holy Cross. To adapt Hamlet: “Rest. Rest, Thou Restless Spirit.” WELCOME HOME!

V I R G I N I A C H I E F FO R AG U I N, distinguished professor of humanities, and head of the art history division in the Department of Visual Arts. Raguin has taught at Holy Cross for more than 40 years.

V

ito Acconci was one of the most important innovators in modern art, not simply in the United States, but on a world stage. He would object to the term “art” because he was initially drawn to verbal creativity – not the seen or tangible – and “art” in his school years seemed relegated to things passed from owner to owner.

His impetus was grounded in the encounter. One wonders if his experience of Catholicism played a part. Many of the movers and shakers of the contemporary world, including Andy Warhol, Paul Thek, Kiki Smith and Antony Gormley, have built off Catholic roots. In the arts of the Catholic Church, the image was invariably integrated into a process. In moving through a cathedral, turning pages in a prayer book or witnessing the elevation of a chalice, we, the audience, engage. Art for Acconci was unsettling, even fearsome, and never pretty. In a modern world of blasé viewing, a sure method of dialogue is surprise – and even shock. In the late 1960s, he was a pioneer leading up to the notorious "Seedbed" of 1972 at the Sonnabend Gallery in New York City. There for a specified time, he engaged the visitor through voiced sexual fantasies. The event has been described as one of the most important live artworks of its era. Acconci took on architectural constructions in the 1980s, and in 1983

made his first permanent installation as a visiting artist at Middlebury College in Vermont. Ever the man on the edge, Acconi’s Way Station I (Study Chamber) made waves. Reactions were strong, and vandals set it on fire in May 1985. The situation caused some soul-searching about what education was actually accomplishing and in 1994, Middlebury began allocating 1 percent of the construction cost of new buildings to public art on campus, and even reconstructed Way Station in 2013. Shortly after completing his work at Middlebury, Acconci’s interest in sculpture, installation and their intersection with architecture led to his founding Acconci Studio, a collaborative enterprise where designers, sculptors, architects and engineers come together. Playful, iconoclastic and sensually diverse, the Studio’s production of buildings and interiors are worldwide. Never repetitive or commercial, ever searching and open, Acconci might be considered an artist who never ceased being a student.

Fifteen years ago, R A C H E L L E B E A U D O I N ' 0 4 was a studio art major studying at Holy Cross. Today, she’s a lecturer at the College’s Millard Media Lab in the Department of Visual Arts. She’s also an artist who uses video, wearables and performance to explore feminine iconography and identity within pop culture.

I

t’s 2001 or 2002, and I’m a sophomore in Digital Art 1 or Digital Art 2. I can’t remember those details now. I do remember and will always remember what I felt when I saw Vito Acconci’s work for the first time. A grainy videotape reveals a man’s hand trying to open the eyes of a young woman who’s resisting, squirming and trying to close her eyes with all of her strength. Professor Alexandra Opie plays the piece, "Pryings (1971)," by Vito Acconci and Kathy Dillon, without commentary for its entire duration – 17 excruciating minutes. I’m physically uncomfortable. I’m angry and feel like I have just

endured the piece myself, as if those are my eyes. Professor Opie then reveals that this artist, Vito Acconci, went to Holy Cross. I exchange glances with Sean, a friend and senior on the swim team. Until this moment, I have been comfortable with my definition of art and my ability to make art; my ability to render realistic fruits, flowers and portraits; my ability even to abstract forms and consider color relationships. But now, a new world has opened up. I can see that art doesn’t only have to be pleasant and pretty and hang over your couch, but it can also be visceral, metaphorical, challenging and even upsetting. This is a seminal moment for me. It’s 2011 and I am back on The Hill – but now I am teaching Digital Art 1 and Digital Art 2. Dave Matthews Band blares out of the dorm windows and I wonder what year it really is. It’s a strange feeling, being back, and I think often of Vito Acconci’s work and its impact on my own artistic development. In graduate school I started to create performance art clearly influenced by Acconci. I decide to begin writing him letters, as an art piece in itself, and send them to his studio. The letters are diaristic, banal and occasionally philosophical. It’s 2017 and I am taking my lunch outside on a bench near the Millard Art Center on what seems like the only sunny day we’ve had this semester when I see on my Facebook feed that Vito Acconci has died. At the start of my next class, Digital Art 1, I show "Pryings" – but first tell the class that this influential artist has just died. Watching the video, they squirm, like Dillon. I even hear an uncomfortable giggle, the kind of laugh that arises from uneasiness. This radical and influential artist, I reveal at the film’s conclusion, attended Holy Cross. I know my students won’t all become performance artists, but I’m still compelled to expose them to it. The experience of being challenged, upending what you thought you knew, the experience of being comfortable with discomfort – that is the gift of Vito Acconci’s work. ■

IN T HEIR OW N WO RDS / FACU T LY & S TA F F / 27


SYLLABUS

Voice in Acting

B Y M A U R A S U L L I VA N H I L L

with Lynn Kremer, professor of theatre, The Rev. John E. Brooks, S.J., Chair in the Humanities and director, Arts Transcending Borders

T

he 12 students in Kremer’s Voice in Acting class are all shoeless, having a pillow fight. Standing in a circle, they’re tossing a pillow from one student to another, shouting a sentence with each throw. “They throw the pillow to someone and say their high-intensity line,” Kremer

says to me as an aside. “It gets them to physicalize and release energy, so they don’t get too tight.” The lines are from pieces of text that they will perform for the class in a workshop setting throughout the semester, in addition to two songs. A group of three stages a scene from the Tony Award-winning play “August: Osage County” with Kremer

2 8 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

giving them cues and reminders as they go. “Take a breath, don’t get too tight.” “Stay in the moment.” “Play an objective.” I can follow along with breathing and staying in the moment, but playing an objective is where this theatre-goer gets lost. I’ll let Kremer explain:

“An objective is what the actor or singer/actor wants, and the tactics are how you achieve the objective. Both objectives and tactics need to be verbs. Verbs like cajole, plead, threaten, test and guilt are all good and keep the performer engaged and focused on what they are doing as opposed to how they are performing. If you worry about the how, you become self-conscious … The tactics help with phrasing, connection to lyrics and overall performance, because the students have something active to strive for.”

photos by tom rettig


Course Catalog THEA-202 Voice in Acting P ROF E SS OR Lynn Kremer DEPART M E N T Theatre DESC RI PT I ON Develop your voice for both acting and public speaking, using breath, projection and articulation. MEETING TI M E S Tuesday and Thursday, 11 a.m. – 12:50 p.m. C LASSR OOM O’Kane Hall, Room 481 REQUIR E D READING “On Singing on Stage” by David Craig “Voice: Onstage and Off” by Robert Barton TOOLS OF THE TRAD E Voice and an iPad or phone to record performances and analyze them with a partner A SSIGN M E N TS • Four performance exams: two of texts and two of songs • Two written vocal analyses, plus one each

written song and text analysis based on the textbooks • Quizzes and iPad recordings • Performance final exam GRADES Attendance and assignments, based on improvement and not talent P R ER EQ UIS IT ES Basic Acting; open to non-theatre majors A B O UT T HE P R O F ESS O R Kremer, professor of theatre and The Rev. John E. Brooks, S.J., Chair in the Humanities, has taught Voice in Acting at Holy Cross since 1984. She is also the director of Arts Transcending Borders and teaches courses in acting, voice and performance traditions of Asia, as well as CreateLab, interdisciplinary courses co-taught by six professors that investigate real world problems through hands-on, collaborative projects. She has been at the College since 1983 and is active as a director both on campus and in the theatre world. Read more about Professor Kremer at holycross. edu/hcm/kremer.

Playing the objective allows the students to focus on the motivations of their characters, but they also pay attention to movement. Each student practiced one of their two songs for the semester, accompanied by a pianist. Kremer also has her shoes off, the easier to float around the room while offering commentary. As she advises a student to add some dance moves to her performance of “All That Jazz” from the musical “Chicago,” Kremer dances herself, saying, “do it à la Catherine Zeta-Jones!” There is rarely a moment when Kremer wasn’t in motion – she offers hands-on adjustments to each student, moving their jaw or shoulders into position for a better-delivered note or line. When one student needs to relax his forehead during the (left) Professor Kremer encourages Alec David '17 to open his mouth more while singing, to improve pitch and projection. (above) Martin Dorsey '19 performs a piece from "Shrek The Musical" while his partner records it for later analysis.

song, Kremer simply places her hand there as a reminder. Each adjustment she calls out or demonstrates has an almost magical effect, helping students hit the desired notes. For nearly two hours, the students practice being open and vulnerable, taking constructive feedback from both Kremer and their peers. Not only will their scenes and songs be better for it, Kremer says, but they’ll see benefits off the stage as well. “It doesn’t matter what your discipline is – we all need to use our voices, and it is important to learn how to use your voice in a healthy way so you can use it for your entire life,” Kremer says. “While I teach the class in an intensive, conservatory-like manner, learning how to use your voice healthily covers all aspects of life, because we speak all the time.” ■

web exclusive See more photos from Professor Kremer’s class at magazine.holycross.edu.

S Y L L A B U S / FA C U LT Y & S TA F F / 2 9


The arts ignited their imaginations as students. That creative background is what makes them leaders today.

B Y R I T A S AVA R D

W

hat happens when we bridge the gap between the real world and our imagination?

“Balance,” says chief executive James “Jim” Keyes ’77, “and the ability to move forward in wonderfully creative ways.” When technical know-how is coupled with art, the result can produce wonders like Edison’s light bulb, Wilbur and Orville Wright’s first flight and Steve Jobs’ Apple revolution. It’s why CEOs like Keyes, chairman and chief executive officer of natural grocery chain Wild Oats Marketplace, take note of job applicants who have

an interest or background in the arts. A former history major who enjoys sculpting, painting and music when he’s not at the office, Keyes credits Holy Cross’ liberal arts education with propelling him to success in business strategy and marketing. Tapping into the arts, he says, trained him to thrive in subjectivity, critical thinking and communication — necessary skills in the corporate world, where few things are black and white. “In retail, consumer demand changes every day. There is constantly a new consumer product on the market,” explains Keyes, who also served as CEO of Blockbuster and 7-Eleven. “The challenge lies in being open and

3 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

seeing into tomorrow’s needs, not yesterday’s. That requires a combination of left-brain technical skills to lead the business and right-brain creativity to understand the needs of a consumer.” A 21-year veteran of 7-Eleven, the world’s largest chain of convenience stores, Keyes served as president and CEO from 2000 until 2005. Under his leadership, the company experienced record sales and profits. He is a firm believer that employees trained in the liberal arts add value to a company by imagining possibilities and adapting to changing priorities. An emphasis on creativity and critical thinking, Keyes adds, is vital to the success of any business.


Reminiscent of keys on a piano, this crosswalk is on Wall Street in New York City — where Natalya Krykova ’14 uses skills from her piano training every day as a financial analyst at JP Morgan Chase.


Piano taught me to be very methodical, diligent and determined. Like any instrument, it takes so much practice. That has also taught me patience. I apply what I’ve learned from piano to my job every day.” – natalya krykova ’ 14

stickler about coloring inside the lines. “It’s a matter of overcoming our fear of failure,” he adds. “We tend to go through life with our heads down, just focusing on the task. The arts at Holy Cross have given me the ability to go through life with my head up, still focusing on the task, but at the same time taking in all the beauty around me.” Keyes’ perspective on the arts is far from unique. Meet other Holy Cross alumni who say their arts background enriches and enhances their careers.

Around 12 years ago, following a business trip to Japan, Keyes convinced Anheuser-Busch to get excited about beer in aluminum bottles, and he stocked 7-Eleven with it, a first in the United States. “The aluminum bottle originated at a minibar in Japan. The first time I picked one up, it was so cold, I could barely hold it,” recalls Keyes. “I brought that package back to the U.S. and shared it with Anheuser-Busch. For me, that experience stands as a classic example that there are opportunities to be creative everywhere we look. Even in a minibar at a hotel, you can find the next great idea.” Michael Beatty, acting chair of Holy Cross’ visual arts department, says a background in the arts, whether it’s visual, music, theater or literature, is a signpost for hiring managers. “It suddenly makes that person a little more interesting,” Beatty says, adding that one of his former students, now an employee at Voya Financial, was an attractive prospect thanks to his visual arts training at Holy Cross.

“Students who have a deeper understanding of what art means in our culture – that’s a very important perspective to have. It broadens your horizon, and that’s a very important thing in the world for better understanding other people and one’s self.” Having a visible space on campus dedicated to the arts (see story on Page 40), adds Beatty, where students can study, perform, discuss and explore those places where imagination and the real world intersect, takes the idea that arts are integral to a Holy Cross liberal arts education and transforms it into a physical manifestation. “The new center for the arts and creativity is a place to experiment and cross boundaries as students take inspiration from working in the arts and integrate those lessons into the rest of their lives,” Beatty says. “Whether one is a biology student, a math major or a theatre major, the new center will be a space where diverse perspectives can collaborate and learn to question what is possible.”

“The arts stand out because it’s original research,” Beatty explains. “You’re creating something new and just doing that gives you a certain sense of confidence in your own ideas and projecting them to the public.”

Keyes likes to think of his business projects as blank canvases. He often gives public talks on “The Art of Business,” in which he shares three ingredients to becoming successful: expect things to change, have confidence and maintain a sense of simplicity.

Employees trained in the arts also bring an alternative point of view in day-today decision-making, Beatty adds.

“We are all artists, we were all born with the ability to create,” says Keyes, who praises his mom, Dorothy, for not being a

michael paras

NATALYA KRYKOVA ’14

Music & Psychology Double Major

N

atalya Krykova was a recipient of the Brooks Music Scholarship, which provides a full-tuition scholarship to students who demonstrate outstanding achievement and also major in music or pair their music major with a second course of study, and she chose a psychology major in addition to piano. While a classically trained pianist might seem an unlikely fit for Wall Street, Krykova says her education in the arts fine-tuned her performance for her current role as a strategy associate at one of the largest financial institutions in the country. Today at JP Morgan Chase, Krykova breaks down complex business issues into simple terms so that they are not only understood by an audience, but can be altered as needed. “Piano taught me to be very methodical, diligent and determined,” Krykova says. “Like any instrument, it takes so much practice. That has also taught me patience. I apply what I’ve learned from piano to my job every day.” Born in Ukraine, Krykova began playing piano when she was 5 years old. Her family moved to the U.S., settling in Nashua, New Hampshire, when she was 8. In addition to naming her a Brooks Music Scholar, Holy Cross gave her the opportunity to explore other interests simultaneously, Krykova says. She delved into courses in the health professions advising program and interned at Fallon

T HE CR E AT I V E S PA R K / 3 3


Dr. Jim Maliszewski '07, an internal medicine physician, checks in with patients during morning rounds at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He relies on his background in the arts as a means to better understand his patients and his role as a healthcare provider.


“The unique thing we acquire at Holy Cross is a very broad intellectual foundation. I have depended on that foundation throughout my training and career and it has allowed me to keep a much more open mind. Being open to learning new things and having new experiences is what the Magis is all about.” – james maliszewski ’ 0 7

Community Health Plan in Worcester, where she was introduced to strategy and business development. “I didn’t really see myself going into medicine, but strategy was problem solving, and it was helping people,” Krykova says. “Holy Cross is all about that. This was work where I found myself helping to make policies that worked for people, to make their lives better by guiding them through a complicated system.” Still, finance was not even on her radar. “Econ majors want to do finance,” she says. “I had no desire to do anything related to finance.” In her senior year, she began applying to jobs with an open mind. Every business has strategy jobs and she combed through listings from technology to retail. Then her parents gave her some wise advice: Why don’t you call up alumni from your school and ask them what they do? She reached out to several Holy Cross alumni, asking questions about what their average work days were like, what they loved best and what they found most challenging about their jobs. Finally, a call to an alumna working in strategy at Morgan Stanley piqued her interest. “I thought, you’re learning everyday – problem solving, helping teams and

ryan henriksen

helping to make the company better?” she says. “It sounded like a perfect fit.” Krykova fired off her resume to Morgan Stanley. Her training in music combined with her education at Holy Cross, she says, made her a more interesting candidate for the job. These days, the musician/Wall Street strategist continues to play piano to feed her artistic soul. At 24, Krykova has already crossed two major items off her bucket list. The first was performing on stage at Carnegie Hall when she was just 17. The second was moving to New York City after graduation. “Every day I thank piano for helping develop my artistic side, and Holy Cross for helping me take that training and think outside the box with it.”

JAMES MALISZEWSKI ’07 Visual Arts Major with Pre-med Concentration

J

ames Maliszewski understands the value of listening. A hospitalist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha, Maliszewski treats adult in-patients. Those individuals most likely have no clue their caregiver was a visual arts major. But majoring in art in tandem with taking pre-med classes (known today as Health Professions Advising) gave Maliszewski the best of both worlds.

“Focusing on more than just the science has definitely made me a better doctor,” he explains. “There’s the whole art of medicine — the human interaction — that goes into your work as well. To connect with and empathize with another human being is not something that can be learned in a textbook.” Like many first-year students, Maliszewski wasn’t exactly sure which career path he wanted to pursue. At first, he studied chemistry, before exploring visual arts courses during his junior year. “I always loved drawing and felt I would have a lot more fun focusing on what I really enjoyed,” he says. His first drawing class sold him on a major in visual arts. “That really got me started because it sparked within me an approach to drawing that I had never really thought about,” he recalls. “Every new art class expanded my view. There wasn’t a class I didn’t enjoy.” That same year, Maliszewski, whose parents both work in medicine, decided he wanted to become a physician. His training in the arts, he says, was just as vital as the sciences to the development of his physician skill set. “Day to day, working in medicine can be an odd job,” he says. “You frequently meet people in the setting of real physical and emotional suffering. Helping a patient navigate that experience can be tricky.” Life is not a straight path, and Maliszewski credits his arts and humanities education at Holy Cross for preparing him to be flexible and adapt to changing circumstances. That same education also makes him a unique candidate in a hospital setting, where many of his peers are strictly science-oriented. “When someone comes in and is diagnosed with cancer, I’m not going to

T HE CR E AT I V E S PA R K / 3 5


Murals depicting the history of Lynn, located on the side of the LynnArts Building in the town’s Central Square. Anderson is working to bring moreon public art towith Lynnher thisideas, summer. Propped the couch her two children and Shakespeare over her left shoulder, Emily Strong Holmes ’04 works on a draft of her sixth novel – leveraging the imagination from her theatre major to fulfill a childhood dream born at age 10.

3 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S PR I N G 2 017


Theatre prepares you to take risks, to trust your creative strengths and put yourself out there to tell stories that you might not be able to do otherwise. The arts help us discover who we are, teach empathy and give us a broader sense of the world. Because if we can’t connect with people, then what are we here for? – emily strong holmes ’ 0 4

open a book and explain it on a cellular level,” he says. “In that moment people need a physician who can guide them through by listening, asking the right questions without lecturing, and using imagination to walk in their shoes. On the worst day of their life people don’t need a doctor, but another human being who can empathize.”

program at Holy Cross was a major reason why I decided to attend.”

Every student, Maliszewski adds, can benefit from taking some classes in the arts.

“We can easily get too caught up with the idea of perfection,” she explains. “With scene work and production work, you never really get it right. You just get it closer. It’s a beautifully messy, creative process that lets us walk in other people’s shoes, helps us to understand life experiences and reminds us that we’re all human.”

“The unique thing we acquire at Holy Cross is a very broad intellectual foundation,” he says. “I have depended on that foundation throughout my training and career and it has allowed me to keep a much more open mind. Being open to learning new things and having new experiences is what the Magis is all about.”

EMILY STRONG HOLMES ’04 Theatre Major

O

nce upon a time, Emily Strong Holmes was bit by the acting bug. “Reading, writing plays and performing was a huge part of my life,” says Holmes, who fondly recalls her days on the stage at Wakefield High School in Wakefield, Massachusetts. “I knew I wanted to focus on the arts in college and the strength of the theatre

tom rettig

At Holy Cross, Holmes immersed herself not only in stage performances, but the behind-the-scenes creative process of writing and production work. Here, Holmes says, she learned one of her most important life lessons.

Following graduation, Holmes’ love of theatre brought her back to Wakefield High, where she worked as the school’s theatre director. She became certified in English and public speaking, which led her to teaching English full time. Then five years ago, Holmes’ daughter, Lily, was born and Holmes found herself stepping back from theatre and diving into her laptop, where a book began to emerge. A young adult paranormal thriller, “Spirit Legacy” follows college student Jess Ballard who, at a critical time in her life, begins to see ghosts. Some of the book’s

imagery, adds Holmes, comes from her memories of the Holy Cross campus. “It started out as a bucket-list kind of thing,” she says. “I thought, even if this never takes off, I can say I started it, I finished it, and I can be proud of the fact that I produced something tangible to put on my bookshelf.” Nearly six books later, Holmes’ writing career has become successful enough for her to quit her day job and pursue writing full time. But getting here, she adds, had much to do with her experience in theatre at Holy Cross. “Theatre prepares you to take risks, to trust your creative strengths and put yourself out there to tell stories that you might not be able to do otherwise,” she says. After sending out several query letters to traditional publishers and not getting any serious bites, Holmes decided to publish her book herself. Lily Faire Publishing was born and Holmes’ first book was available for sale to the public in July 2013. Since then, she has welcomed her second child, Myles, now 2, and her Gateway Trilogy series has sold tens of thousands of copies on eeholmes.com and Amazon. The third book in Holmes’ Gateway Trackers spin-off series is due out this year. “Ten-year-old me would be very excited about this because she was always curled up with a book,” Holmes says. The arts at Holy Cross, she adds, is vital in offering life skills that are applicable across the spectrum of job opportunities and life opportunities. “Everyone at some point in their lives is going to have a job interview, to speak in front of a group or sit down one-onone with a colleague to work through a project or solve a problem,” Holmes says. “The arts help us discover who we are, teach empathy and give us a broader sense of the world. Because if we can’t connect with people, then what are we here for?” ■

T HE CR E AT I V E S PA R K / 37


ARTISTIC EXPRESSION The Arts at Holy Cross Today

F

rom the studio to the stage, the arts are a vibrant and allencompassing part of life on The Hill. Students stretch their comfort zones and challenge themselves in classes in visual arts, theatre and

3 8 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

music, whether it is their major or something new to explore. In their free time, students perform in choirs, theatre productions and dance ensembles that range from ballet to hip hop – there is even a group for songwriters.

photos by tom rettig, dan vaill ancourt and john buckingham


And when they aren’t creating themselves, there is a front row seat to incredible, worldrenowned artists – like Lil Buck, Yo-Yo Ma’s Silkroad Ensemble and Patrick Dougherty – who come to Mount St. James to perform and share their expertise. Together, these abundant opportunities to both participate in and appreciate the arts on campus cultivate the imagination and inspire our community. ■

A R T IS T I C E X PR E S S I O N: T HE A R TS AT H O LY CR OS S TO DAY / 3 9


BUILDING FOR OUR FUTURE , INSPIRED BY OUR PAST


The arts have always been a pillar of Jesuit education, and today, nearly 175 years since the College’s founding, a new center for arts and creativity will enrich and elevate the arts for all students B Y R E B E C C A S M I T H ’ 9 9

P

oised on the brink of a new era in arts education, the College community eagerly awaits the construction of a dedicated center for the arts and creativity, one of the major initiatives of the College’s Become More campaign. Publicly launched in 2016, the campaign is the most ambitious fundraising initiative in the history of Holy Cross, with the goal of raising $400 million by 2020. A main priority for the campaign is “Inspiring Creative Teaching and Learning.” A new arts facility is central to this vision.

curriculum, fostering the experiential, interdisciplinary and collaborative learning necessary for the leaders of tomorrow.

* * * * Holy Cross’ forward-thinking emphasis on the arts is, in fact, rooted in its past. According to Rev. William R. Campbell, S.J., ’87, the College’s vice president for mission, “Recent academic scholarship continues to reveal the significant role the arts played in Jesuit ministry and missionary efforts over the centuries.

“Once the Jesuits committed themselves to the running of schools, they encouraged their students to cultivate their own creative talents through the visual arts and theatrical performances, including music and dance,” says Campbell. “And they did so not just for recreational purposes, but as expressions of the talents bestowed upon them by God. The Jesuits quickly understood (above) A rendering of the interior “beehive” of the that the center for the arts and creativity; the new building arts could will not only be an outlet for students majoring in the transform arts, but also a place where every student can explore lives by the arts and incorporate them creatively into their deepening studies (bottom) Visual arts department co-founder, John Paul Reardon instructs Kevin Murphy ’57, John one’s Hardy ’56, Frank Prebenda ’56, Peter Antanavicius ’55, understanding James Harley ’55 and Thomas Lane ’59 in a drawing of one’s class in the “Barn” (now where Loyola Hall stands). relationship The differences between the spaces couldn’t be more with God.” vast, but the principles remain the same. The center for the arts and creativity will both enrich and elevate the arts at Holy Cross: It will attract the brightest artistic minds to Mount St. James to teach, perform and study. It will encourage increased participation in the arts among the community. And it will facilitate the integration of the arts and creativity into the

The College’s new center for the arts and creativity will build on this tradition, advancing the arts as a force for addressing the world’s most pressing concerns and empowering students to initiate positive change in their local, national and global communities. Designed by acclaimed architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the center will be

named in honor of the late Kenneth “Ken” Happe ’58, a former associate professor in the classics department who also directed campus theatre productions, per a $5 million anonymous gift; practice and production spaces; a small outdoor amphitheater; flexible teaching spaces; and a media lab. To date, the College has raised $38.7 million in current and future commitments toward the building’s estimated $92 million total cost. “We know that an education infused with the arts makes students better problem solvers and more flexible thinkers,” says Margaret Freije, provost and dean of

My hope is that this gift creates a visible and integrated way for all Holy Cross students to experience the arts during their four years here. - Cornelius B. “Neil” Prior Jr. ’56

situated between the Hogan Campus Center and the Luth Athletic Complex, providing a gateway to the Holy Cross campus — a visible space for the arts, accessible to the entire region. The world-class facility will serve as the creative hub of campus, providing a shared home for the performance and rehearsal programs of the theatre and music departments, along with a new space for the Cantor Art Gallery and studios for dance. It will also feature a 400-seat concert hall and theatre; a 200-seat studio theatre to be

the College. “This center will magnify those benefits by inviting students and faculty to explore together in a space that encourages creativity and experimentation. And it will allow the entire campus to embrace the arts as a way to build community and engage the wider world.” From its modern, open layout to its innovative “beehive” creative gathering space, the center aims to open new possibilities for both theoretical and experiential learning. It will also foster opportunities for interdisciplinary

LOOKING FORWARD, INSPIRED BY OUR PAST / 41


collaborations, enabling such programs as Arts Transcending Borders — a visiting artist-in-residence program initially funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation — to widen their reach and inject the arts into every aspect of the Holy Cross experience.

1

“Holy Cross and its professors offer students an extraordinary education — I believe there is none finer in the United States,” reflects Cornelius B. “Neil” Prior Jr. ’56, a College trustee whose gift of $25 million has catalyzed the center’s creation. “My hope is that this gift creates a visible and integrated way for all Holy Cross students to experience the arts during their four years here.”

2

4

3

“The center for the arts and creativity is a critical investment in our vision for the College’s future,” says Tracy Barlok P19, vice president for advancement. “We’re grateful for the support of our donors, whose early gifts are a powerful endorsement of our mission and capacity for excellence. And our momentum keeps growing. In the coming months, the College will announce a significant fundraising challenge for the building, prompted by an anonymous donor.”

5

1 The late Ken Happe ’58, associate professor of classics, also directed many campus theatre productions. 2 A view of the studio theatre that will bear his name. 3 A view of the center for the arts and creativity from Figge Hall. To the left, you can see the Hart Center at The Luth Athletic Complex and on the right, Hogan Campus Center. 4 Photos of Cornelius Prior Jr. ’56 and his father, 5 Cornelius Prior ’23 from the Purple Patcher. Prior attributes his father’s encouragement to pursue the arts as a reason he has donated money to help fund the center 6 Bernie and Iris Cantor H03 stand with Fr. John E. Brooks ’49 at the September 1983 opening of the Cantor Gallery, which currently resides in Fenwick Hall. 7 A rendering of the new, larger Cantor Gallery which will be in the new building.

6

7

4 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Concludes Iris Cantor H03, who, along with her late husband B. Gerald “Bernie,” has been a longtime benefactor of the arts at the College, “I’m proud to support Holy Cross in its exciting new endeavor to ‘Become More’ in the arts and across its enterprise. Holy Cross, your future is bright!” ■


Renderings of the center for the arts and creativity interspersed with archival shots of students and faculty engaged in the arts, along with trivia in the yellow boxes.

DID YOU KNOW? Fundamentals of Drawing and Introduction to Visual Arts are two of the most popular arts courses on campus. Students pack into these classes, which had the highest enrollment in the arts department during the spring 2017 semester.

DID YOU KNOW? There are four large works by Auguste Rodin — a renowned French sculptor of the late 19th century who is known for bridging the gap between traditional and modern sculpture — on display on campus: two in Dinand Library, one in O’Kane Hall and another on Memorial Plaza (right) behind Fenwick and O’Kane.

DID YOU KNOW? When you think of studying music, instruments and performance usually come to mind – but there is a whole other side to the field devoted to the study of music in society, in history and in diverse cultural contexts. It’s called musicology, and it’s a discipline where Holy Cross alumni thrive. The small, close-knit Department of Music has produced more than a dozen professional and award-winning musicologists – alumni who earned or are currently earning a Ph.D. in the field and now teach at the college and university level. “Musicology is ideally suited to the liberal arts environment. It allows students to explore music as an expression of human experience, emotion and identity.” –Jessica Waldoff, associate professor of music


CHANGE BY MAU R A S U L L I VA N HILL

W

hen Brian Senier ’19 woke up the day after the 2016 American presidential election, he was happy to see a Republican victor, albeit not his chosen candidate. But when he left his dorm room, he was surprised to find a different mood hovering over the Holy Cross campus.

“I was really floored by how somber the campus was, so I went to see Fr. Rogers [Rev. Michael Rogers, S.J., ’02] in the Chaplains’ Office,” Senier recalls. “Fr. Rogers said, ‘I don’t think you understand how people are worried about the policies that this administration might enact, and how it could affect their family members who

4 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

are undocumented.’” Fr. Rogers exhorted him to attend the Latin American Student Organization event that night to participate in a discussion about the election results. Both men went, and Senier left with a new understanding of the other side’s perspective. His own opinions hadn’t


Not only was the 2016 election cycle divisive, it was downright nasty at times. But it’s a new year – and the voices on Mount St. James are seeking to change the tone of the conversation.

changed, but his mindset had: “It made me redouble my efforts to be a voice for the Republican Party who would be civil and engage in discussion in a bipartisan manner, speaking with respect, focusing on the Jesuit and Catholic identity of Holy Cross and upholding the dignity of every person.

I don’t want anyone on campus to feel alienated while I am sharing my views.”

informal calls to action to attend protests or call government officials.

Anthony Saltarelli ’18 was one of those people who awoke in a somber mood on Nov. 9. He scrolled through a Facebook feed of distraught reactions: people disappointed that their chosen candidate hadn’t won and sharing

He was inspired and wanted to participate, but felt like there had to be a more efficient and organized way to communicate this information to people serious about activism. The computer science major turned to what

CHANGEMAKERS / 45


he knows best – coding – and started working on an app that would make it easier for people to participate in political processes. “Tech is so powerful,” he says. “Especially today, when there are so many things going on, there needs to be some type of engine behind activism.” Though they come from opposite sides of the political spectrum, both Senier and Saltarelli take a uniquely Holy Cross approach: first engage in thoughtful conversation, then take action.

The calls to action page makes it easy for people to take concrete actions: “You can push a button and call your senator, there will be a prewritten tweet and you just push the tweet button, or you can go to a fundraising page for a cause you care about,” Saltarelli says. As of press time, the app has offered 36 separate calls to action, which resulted in 119 individual actions – categorized as anything from a call to a tweet to an email.

Saltarelli first learned to code in his Holy Cross courses Techniques of Programming and Data Structure, “We are called to listen carefully to and enjoyed it so much that he was one another, to identify our shared determined to learn more programming commitments and to discern how languages. Using a combination of what best to work together, even when we he learned in class and some selftaught coding skills, Saltarelli put together the 8,000 lines of code that became Stand Up for Change. This is actually Saltarelli’s second app; the first was Chin Up!, which - JODI RYMER, lecturer and director of biology labs encourages students on disagree,” Rev. Philip L. Boroughs, S.J., college campuses to share positive College president, wrote to the campus messages with their peers. community in an email that same morning Senier and Saltarelli were To populate his app with content, grappling with the election results. Saltarelli partnered with an organization called Action Alliance, a And members of the Holy Cross collaboration of call-to-action websites community have answered that call, in and apps, and the Center for American more ways than one. Progress, a progressive think tank in Washington, D.C. Content from these Saltarelli’s coding became a phone groups and their partners appears in app called Stand Up for Change, which Stand Up for Change, which is now aims to make it easier for people managed by Saltarelli and a dedicated to get involved in activism. There group of fellow Holy Cross students are three main sections in the app: and alumni: Meaghan Body ’17, Vince events, discussions and calls to action. LaMonte ’17, Caroline Ambrose ’19, Ed The events listing includes protests, Ryan ’15 and Jon Bachmann ’16. rallies and demonstrations, and the discussions page lets like-minded The biggest partnership for the app people have a conversation about to date is with Rise Stronger, a citizen topics and issues that are important watchdog organization. As of May 2017, to them. Stand Up for Change will become the

People are directing so much hate and incivility at each other. I feel that disrespect and name-calling are being normalized, when they most definitely should not be. So I decided to do something, because civic engagement is a positive force.

4 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

(right, top) Anthony Saltarelli ’18 built the Stand Up for Change app using a combination of coding knowledge he learned at Holy Cross and self-taught skills. (bottom) A sampling of the calls to action in the app, on topics ranging from military spending to the environment.

official app of Rise Stronger. Saltarelli and his team will stay involved, and he would love to work on the app full time after his graduation next year. Saltarelli says that he wasn’t that politically involved or engaged until this election, and the same could be said for Danielle Kane, associate director for communications for the McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture. Witnessing this election cycle inspired her to get involved in the Democratic Party on the local level. “I actually wasn’t even registered as a Democrat until January, after the election,” Kane says. “I decided I’m taking a stand; I’m going to support this cause.” She revived the Democratic town committee in her town of Brookfield, Massachusetts, and now serves as its chair. Each town in the commonwealth of Massachusetts can have a town committee from either party, and these committees serve their party at the state level. “Working on the party platform is our role this year, because it is a nonelection year,” Kane says. “There is a convention in June, and we will vote on the party platform for the next fouryear cycle. In election years, of course, we support candidates.” Delegates from each town in Massachusetts will attend the state Democratic convention in June, and Kane will represent Brookfield. Though there is less attention on conventions outside of election years, she says that this is the time to put in work that will, hopefully, be rewarded in an election year. “Our town is focused on refugees

tom rettig


CHANGEMAKERS / 47


jesse costa / wbur

tom rettig

Jodi Rymer collected donations of hats, gloves and scarves to hand out at the Worcester Public Library during the cold New England winter. (top left) Danielle Kane leads the March 12 meeting of the Brookfield Democratic Committee. (top right) Brian Senier ’19 is committed to being a civil voice for the Republican Party at Holy Cross.

4 8 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

tom rettig


and immigration, health care, the environment and local legislation and election priorities,” she says. “Since I’ve been in this position, another committee formed in our neighboring town of North Brookfield, and they want to work with us and join forces, so that’s great. We have a couple people from other towns and Sturbridge, as well, is trying to coordinate with us, so I think if we get a regional coalition of people, we will have a greater voice representing central Massachusetts.” The word is already getting out: Kane and her Brookfield committee were featured in a segment on WBUR, Boston’s NPR affiliate, in March. “I feel humbled by it, but I have to tell myself not to turn down these opportunities,” she says. “Part of why I am doing

online journal launched in the second semester of the 2016-17 academic year. Ford asked Senier to come on board with the publication in the planning stages, during the summer of 2016 and in the midst of the primary campaign.

of Biology, shares Senier’s hopes of creating more civil and respectful conversations. Rymer, who has taught at Holy Cross since 2009, was distressed by the discourse throughout the election and in the days since.

“As a result of certain things that then-candidate Donald Trump had said about Mexicans and prisoners of war and a variety of other offensive comments, I knew that it was important for others to know that, at the College of the Holy Cross, there are articulate Republicans engaging in heated but civil political debate and not demagoguing certain groups in order to lift others up,” Senier says.

“People are directing so much hate and incivility at each other. I feel that disrespect and name-calling are being normalized, when they most definitely should not be,” Rymer says. “So I decided to do something, because civic engagement is a positive force. My community is Worcester, my friends, my neighbors, my fellow citizens.”

In addition to his work on “A Contest of Ideas,” Senier is also part of the Charles Carroll Program, an initiative that offers lectures and conferences to study the major themes of the American political tradition. The program hosted four lecture events leading up to the election, discussing - REV. PHILIP L. BOROUGHS, S.J., President the role of party elites in determining this is to build more awareness and presidential nominations, Donald support of the groups that are out Trump’s assertion that “I alone can fix there and to inspire other people to it,” candidate debate preparations and get involved.” how campaign finance laws have been used to restrict political discourse Senier, a member of the opposite party, in America. felt a similar desire to build awareness “Our events played a crucial role after the election. He is on the executive in helping frame the narrative on board of the College Republicans and is campus during the election, and, most the Republican political editor of a new, importantly – whether students were nonpartisan College journal called “A conservative or Republicans who Contest of Ideas.” supported Donald Trump, or did not support Donald Trump, or Hillary With sections on politics, the economy, Clinton supporters, or progressives the environment, philosophy and supporting Bernie Sanders – everyone religion, “A Contest of Ideas” seeks to would be able to voice his or her views “create a robust discussion on campus without feeling that theirs would not about the problems we face as a world, be welcomed,” Senier says. as a nation, as a local community and as individuals,” according to the Jodi Rymer, lecturer and director journal’s website. Created by Billy Ford of biology labs in the Department ’19 and Connor Hennessey ’19, the

We are called to listen carefully to one another, to identify our shared commitments and to discern how best to work together, even when we disagree.

As the winter months set in and Rymer thought about what this community might use most, she decided to organize donations of gloves, hats and scarves for those in need. On eight Sundays from December to March, Rymer could be found in the entrance area of the main branch of the Worcester Public Library in Salem Square, handing out these winter necessities. She gave out nearly 500 items this year, and has plans to continue the drive next year. Rymer is humble and downplays her contributions, pointing out that many people at Holy Cross and in the Worcester community reach out and help their neighbors. And many of these people helped with her project. Her Tuesday night knitting group made scarves for the giveaway and her book club (including Holy Cross economics professors and some of their spouses) made some donations. Another faculty member saw Rymer knitting at a workshop and the next week brought five scarves to donate to Rymer’s project. Amit Taneja, associate dean for diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer at the College, also knitted a few items. “I think people should just make their immediate worlds as nice as possible,” Rymer says. “I just want us all to be nice to each other, to start. That’s just the way we should be.” ■

CHANGEMAKERS / 49


A pressed Akebia quinata leaf, discovered in a book in Dinand Library by Andrew Stauffer, founder of the Book Traces project, during a Book Traces event on campus.


Another held a pressed Akebia quinata leaf. One reader had taken the time to draft an entire poem. “How do people interact with their books? How do they personalize it?” he mused. “It’s a little like mining or archaeology, or digging in King Tut’s tomb!”

the secret lives of books In an age of digitization, the Book Traces project reveals yet another reason to value the printed word

D

eep in the stacks of Dinand Library, Jane McGrail ’17 knelt on the floor, surrounded by a wealth of information contained by the library’s half-million volumes. But that afternoon, she was on the hunt for a different kind of treasure. She thumbed carefully through the yellowed pages of a book titled “The Life of Charles Dickens,” written by John Forster and printed in the late 1800s. “Here’s an interesting inscription!” she said excitedly, stopping to point to a handwritten scrawl in black ink. Those traces of the pen, some say, are just as valuable as the printed words inside. It’s evidence of the human hands that touched the book, turned its pages and perhaps gifted that particular copy to a friend or loved one. And as more people consume information in digital formats, some worry those pieces of human history – and the insight they can offer about the people who left them behind – are at

risk of being lost forever.

“These are cultural treasures,” says Jonathan Mulrooney, associate professor BY and chair of REBECCA the English FAT E R department. “Within these books are personal, written responses to (the words). There are flowers pressed into the pages. Something in the text prompted a particular feeling by the readers. And when you put these findings together, cultural histories can emerge.” To unearth the treasures hidden between the pages at Dinand Library, Mulrooney partnered with Andrew Stauffer, associate professor of English at the University of Virginia (UVA), and organized a scavenger hunt in the spring that sent students and faculty scouring the library for books augmented by readers of the past. Stauffer has held several similar events at colleges and universities across the country as part of Book Traces, the project he founded in 2014 to inspire others to join the search and start a national conversation about the value hardcopy books hold. “What makes them valuable are the traces of history inside,” Stauffer said, standing in Dinand’s browsing room, leaning over a selection of old texts students had already culled from the shelves. Inside one book, a newspaper clipping had been glued to the cover.

Dinand Library was built and dedicated in 1927 as part of a post-World War I campus expansion, and renovated in 1979 to include the Hiatt wings. By and large, the books it holds were private collections donated to the College. One of the things that make Dinand’s acquisitions unique, Mulrooney says, is its significant collection of late 19th and early 20th century IrishAmerican literature. That was a period of time when “books were king and almost everyone could read,” says Stauffer. They were the primary source of entertainment, comparable to today’s social media. When someone wanted to give a gift, the top choice was usually a book, complete with a personalized note scrawled inside. Scavenger hunts held in connection with Book Traces across the country have turned up many augmentations made by women, Mulrooney says. One such discovery was contained in multiple copies of a poetry book owned by UVA. At least three of them had notes in the margins, written by women, about children they had lost. “Something in those poems prompted a particular feeling to which people were responding,” he says. “That can tell us something about the way women were dealing with losing children in that time period. And every single library around the country has these kinds of stories to tell that can be connected.” For the Book Traces project, Stauffer is targeting books printed before 1923 for a couple of reasons. Books circulated in the 19th century are typically not old enough for people to consider them precious artifacts simply due to their THE SECRET LIVES OF BOOKS / 51


old age. And many of them have not been checked out by students or staff for decades. That’s the same reason many college and university libraries are questioning whether storing these books – oftentimes several copies of the same book – is the best use of their limited space. Many higher education communities are mulling the idea of modernizing traditional library spaces to include “collision zones” and Internet hubs, where groups of students can collaborate and exchange information for research projects and study groups.

The Book Traces project came to Holy Cross on April 6-7, 2017, and students combed the stacks in Dinand Library for what readers left behind in books.

Holy Cross has found itself pondering similar questions. In fall 2013, the College assembled a committee, dubbed Dinand 2020, to research and assess library trends in higher education. The committee was charged with envisioning a future Dinand that would serve as an “intellectual hub of the College,” according to the committee’s final report, produced in May 2014. That report proposed a number of changes, including: physical renovations; greater variety of study and social spaces to allow for silent and collaborative learning; better incorporation of and access to technology; and new programming. To accommodate those evolutions, and

5 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

in sync with the “natural shift in the face of electronic publishing,” the report proposed that the College develop a plan to slowly reduce the library’s overall holdings by 15 to 20 percent. The plan, developed in consultation with an outside agency, moved too aggressively and was protested loudly by a number of faculty. The College agreed more discussion was needed and appointed a second committee to carefully assess the collections and recommend next steps. The task of implementing those recommendations landed in the hands of Mark Shelton, who joined Holy Cross as director of library services in July 2016. He has dedicated much of the last year to meeting with academic departments to discuss the issue. As a collections librarian – which, by definition, focuses on identifying content and building collections – he says he understands the issues libraries face today. “Our challenge is to maintain the library as a living, organic entity that needs to breathe and change and adjust, while also continuing to grow,” he says. “Information today comes in so many different forms. You have to respect the positives and negatives of each different format, so you can maximize the kinds of information that people have access to. We’re here to facilitate people’s access, not get in the way of it.”


English Professor Jonathan Mulrooney asks his students to take a “selfie” as proof that they went to the library and consulted a print source, and then he displays the selfies on the bulletin board in the hallway of the English department.

Per the second committee’s recommendations, Shelton says, the library will still move toward reducing some of its print volumes, but it will do so very slowly – and will start by looking at items such as text-heavy journals that are better digested in electronic format than, say, “War and Peace.” “E-books are good for things like edited works, where a single chapter is what you want,” Shelton says. “A journal is a whole bunch of smaller, digestible units. Most faculty and staff go online and download a PDF, so we’re starting to look at these journals as a way to create a little more flexibility.” He is also working to expand the boundaries of Dinand’s content by purchasing e-books that don’t take up additional space on the shelves, while thinking about how the library’s physical space could be used more efficiently. Hosting the Book Traces project, and reflecting on the value of the printed word, is a valuable part of the process, he says. “I think the value of a library is not just in the books themselves, but on each

individual page,” he says. “A book allows you to stop, pause, handle, smell and feel the weight of the information inside. And to feel the weight of that diversity of thought; to move, browse and discover something new – the library is that place. It allows you to put different books side by side on different issues, so you can process them and figure out how you see the world.” For Associate Professor of English Deb Gettelman, who participated in the Book Traces scavenger hunt, this kind of research is important for the Holy Cross community. “It’s about preserving Holy Cross’ history,” she says. “I’m fascinated by the idea of how this collection developed, and who gave these books.” For others, particularly students, it can be a deeper and more personal introduction to the stacks. “It’s an interesting way to get to know the library,” says Zach Williams ’17, a music major, who flipped through a blue book on the English Romantic Movement, published in 1893. “It’s really cool to see

what people thought while reading.” Stauffer says he created Book Traces not so much to preserve every scrawl and doodle, but rather to spark important conversation about what the digital age means for this trove of tangible treasures. When scavengers discover something worth sharing, they snap a photo of it with their smartphone, and – ironically enough – upload it to Booktraces.org. More than 700 books have been archived in this manner since he started the project. “We want to prove that these books are here, and to get a conversation going about what to do with these books,” Stauffer says. Mulrooney, for one, is doing his part to get his students off their tablets and into the stacks. When assigning a project, he says, he often includes a rather unusual instruction along with the typical research. “I say to my students, ‘Go to the library, find a book – and take a selfie with it, so I know you held the book in your hand.’” ■ THE SECRET LIVES OF BOOKS / 53


SPORTS

After a broken leg cut his 2016 season short, quarterback Peter Pujals '18 returns for his final season and a history-making fourth year as captain

The Comeback Captain BY PAYS H A R H O N E

5 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

TOM RETTIG


W

hen Crusader quarterback Peter Pujals ’18 felt his left leg crack under a hard tackle in the fourth game last season, he assumed he’d walk it off. Playing through pain was normal. But when teammates saw their captain limping on the sidelines, they knew. “He was like, ‘I’m going back in,’” remembers friend and co-captain James Murray ’18. “But you can’t play on a broken leg.” Breaking his fibula and playing a fifth year wasn’t in Pujals’ game plan. But it’s given the 22-year-old psychology major a unique opportunity.

This fall, he’ll become the first Holy Cross football player to serve as team captain four years in a row. And his return is creating a lot of excitement for the upcoming season.

With that kind of dedication, Pujals was named a captain as a sophomore, and he’s remained in that leadership role ever since. Pujals has always been a fiercely competitive athlete. Growing up in Glenview, Illinois, he started playing football in third grade; he’s played quarterback since fifth. He also played baseball and basketball. He and Murray – also a returning fifth-year player – grew up in the same community and played football and basketball together at Loyola Academy in Wilmette, Illinois. Pujals was a high school basketball

nearby Leominster, Massachusetts, was also a draw. He never regretted his choice. Every year, the team’s record improved – from achieving three wins and eight losses in his first year, to six wins and five losses in his junior year. Going into his senior year, Pujals was pumped. “It was supposed to be our year.” Suffering a season-ending injury in the Dartmouth game was a setback, he admits. But luckily, it occurred just before the deadline that allowed him to play another season. He was in a boot for about eight weeks and he spent months strengthening his

“It’s not just rare, it never happens,” says head football coach Tom Gilmore, of Pujals’ fourth-year captaincy, which Gilmore says places Pujals in an elite group of college athletes nationwide. “It might be the first time in college football history.” It’s no accident Pujals is making Holy Cross history, Gilmore says. “Peter’s leadership qualities are off the charts. Even as a young player coming in, you could tell he was very special. He was a hard worker. He’s always the first one out and the last to come in.” Pujals also immediately landed in a starting position, due to the injuries of older players.

captain too, Murray says, and during their senior year of football, he played through an injury. "He's crazy competitive in everything he does. But he's very humble at the same time."

“It’s very difficult for anyone to come in as a starting quarterback,” Gilmore says. “But he was able to perform. No one wants to win more than he does. No one prepares more than he does.”

Pujals says he had to decide whether to play football or basketball in college. Ultimately, he felt he could continue to play basketball casually. Playing college football was special. “I loved the culture and environment of football, the team aspect of it.”

(left) Pujals on campus in front of Fenwick Hall (right) Pujals with his family support system: brother, J.C., mother, Catherine, brother, William, and father, Pedro.

He liked the coaches and academic environment at Holy Cross, which began offering scholarships the year he joined the team. Having family in

leg in physical therapy and rehab. He had to take the spring semester off from both sports and academics to remain eligible for fall. Gilmore says Pujals worked tirelessly with the younger players while he was injured. “He was another set of eyes, another coach on the field,” he says. “I’d look in the film room, and there was Peter, conducting a meeting. His will to win didn’t dissipate after his injury.” Pujals says he works to lead by example. “You can’t be slacking, you have to be doing it right.” He’s learned when to push his teammates and when to encourage. “It’s about getting people

T H E CO M EB A C K C A P TA I N / S P O R T S / 5 5


SPORTS

Perkins rises above the Oregon Ducks to take a shot during the men's basketball team's historic appearance in the 2016 NCAA Tournament.

Baseball Wins FirstEver Patriot League Title, Returns to NCAA Tournament

T

he Crusader baseball team captured their first-ever Patriot League Championship at the end of May, punching a ticket to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 1978.

to be their best.” Though Pujals is highly driven, his background has also made him compassionate. He has two younger brothers, one of whom has Down syndrome. Taking care of his brother taught him so much, Pujals says. “He’s so happy all the time. I think he brings out the best in other people.” He also mentors a 10-year-old boy through Big Brothers Big Sisters in Worcester, and recently interned for BERG Associates, a global financial investigations firm founded by John Moynihan ’83. In his spare time, he works at a local liquor store. He can see himself going into the business world someday, or coaching. He’s also hoping for a shot at going pro, and he’s grateful for another year to attract attention. “Honestly, I think this extra time will open up doors,” he says. “Every year, I learn more.” Gilmore confirmed that almost every pro team scouted Pujals last year, and he’s betting they’ll return.

“I do think he’s capable of going on in football. It’s a bright, bright future for Peter.” But between Pujals and that future – the time remaining until his December graduation – is summer training, August camp and his much-anticipated last season. “I’m extremely appreciative to come back and play another year,” he says. “I’m excited to have another shot at a championship.” Pujals’ return – along with the return of several other strong, fifth-year seniors – gives this year’s team the potential to achieve an extraordinary season, Gilmore says. “We have a very talented team. It does make it special, and it raises the expectations. It gives us a lot of optimism for this season.” “Peter elevates himself and the rest of team, because of his work ethic and his passion,” he says. “It’s all in how hard you work, and his ability to lead the team through preparation is one of his biggest assets. That’s why the sky’s the limit.” ■

5 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

After breaking the nearly 40-year drought, the fourth-ranked Crusaders had an impressive showing in the tournament. They took on #1 Oregon State, #2 Nebraska and #3 Yale in Corvallis Oregon, in a double elimination regional. Though they didn’t win the group and advance in the tournament, the team did come away with a 7-4 upset victory over Nebraska in game three of the regional. Crusader faithful in Oregon gathered for a pre-game party before cheering on the team in their first game on Friday, June 2, and other fans supported from afar on social media using the hashtags #RiseTogether and #RoadToOmaha. ■ — Maura Sullivan Hill

(top) First baseman Anthony Critelli '17 (left) and pitcher Danny Barlok '19 (right) rushed pitcher George Capen '17 (center) at the mound as they clinched the Patriot League win. (middle) The rest of the team joins in the celebration in a pile on the pitcher's mound (bottom) Seniors pose with their new Patriot League trophy: (top row) Anthony Critelli, Ben White, Justin Finan, Christian Doughty, Zach Fox, Joe Cravero, Bill Schlich (middle row) Alex Voitik, Brendan King, Phil Reese, Jon Escobar, George Capen (bottom row) Josh Hassell


Critelli Wins NCAA Senior CLASS Award

A

nthony Critelli ’17 won the Senior CLASS Award, beating out 29 other outstanding senior baseball players from across the country. The prestigious award recognizes excellence in the community, the classroom, character and competition, and also honors seniors who stayed in school and used all of their athletic eligibility. CLASS stands for “celebrating loyalty and achievement for staying in school.” "This award could not go to a more deserving student-athlete and a perfect representative of the College of the Holy Cross," says Greg DiCenzo, head baseball coach. "Anthony Critelli has been one of the most dependable Crusaders, both on and off the field. His work ethic, coupled with his care and concern for others, has led him to become one of the most remarkable young men in college baseball." Critelli was chosen to receive the award in a selection process that includes NCAA Division I baseball coaches, national media and fan voting. With 40.6 percent fan support, he easily led the fan voting process – his

ALL PHOTOS BY MARK SELIGER

closest challenger clocked in at only 25.3 percent of the vote. Critelli, a first baseman from Holmdel, New Jersey, received the award for both his baseball prowess and his community involvement. He was named the preseason Player of the Year in the Patriot League at the start of this season and lived up to the recognition, scoring 32 runs and hitting nine home runs in 49 games this season. Off the field, Critelli and his teammates support the Vs. Cancer Foundation, which partners with college baseball teams to battle pediatric cancer; Big Brothers Big Sisters; Team IMPACT, which pairs children who have chronic or lifethreatening illnesses with college sports teams; the Home Base Program, a partnership between the Boston Red Sox and Massachusetts General Hospital that offers mindbody wellness programs for service members and their families; and the Pete Frates Foundation, which supports ALS research and awareness. ■

— Maura Sullivan Hill For more coverage of the Crusaders’ historic season and Critelli’s win, visit goholycross.com.

B A S EB A L L W I N S / T H E CO M EB A C K C A P TA I N / S P O R T S / 57


ALUMNI NEWS

58 Mystery Photo

Mystery Photo 5 8 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017


• 60 HCAA News • 66 Book Notes • 67 Solved Photo • 68 The Power of One • 70 The Profile • 72 Class Notes • 76 Milestones • 80 In Memoriam

There's a lot going on in Kimball Hall in this photo. Can you spot yourself among the crowd? Do you remember when this was or what you were talking about? Let us know at hcmag@holycross.edu.

MYSTERY PHOTO / ALUMNI NEWS / 59


HCAA NEWS

A Message from Bryan TOM RETTIG

engage alumni for life, to maintain our incredible Holy Cross community and to provide a connection to alma mater for all.

H

ello, fellow Crusaders! As I write to you one last time, I am extremely grateful for my experience over the past year as HCAA president. From attending HCAA events, witnessing the growth of HCAA programs, working with my fellow HCAA Board members, meeting current students and interacting with the Holy Cross administration, it has truly been an incredible year and I hope that I’ve represented each of you well. I also hope that many of you were able to share in my experience by attending one of our events or aiding in the growth of the HCAA through work in your regional clubs or with our national programs. As I’m sure you know by now, the HCAA’s goal is to

On the topic of alumni engagement, one of this year’s highlights has been the growth of new HCAA programs and the involvement of more alumni than ever. We have seen this at the three ALANA alumni receptions in New York, Boston and Washington, D.C., as well as many brand-new spirituality-based programs taking place across the country. We’ve also seen a great increase in meetings of our affinity groups and have created positions on our board to represent the affinity groups of the HCAA. Another exciting change for the HCAA this year is the inclusion of the HCAA president as a full voting member of the Holy Cross Board of Trustees. Beginning with our incoming president, Brian Duggan ’96 – who will now serve a two-year term – we, as alumni, will have a voice in making the major decisions that impact the present and future of Holy Cross. For a school rich in tradition like Holy Cross, this is a great development and it has been a pleasure to work with the trustees and Kim Stone ’90, HCAA past president, to lay the framework for this change. I was also fortunate to experience Holy Cross’ first Volunteer Summit in April. All college volunteers, including HCAA

board members, class chairs, trustees, class agents, reunion committee members and more, came together to network, train and enjoy a great weekend on campus. The Summit included recognition of some of our most dedicated volunteers, a roundtable discussion with College President Rev. Philip L. Boroughs and his cabinet and interaction with student volunteers, as well as training and information sessions to enable us to better represent Holy Cross. I look forward to more of these events in the future! As I conclude my year as HCAA president, I want to extend my gratitude for the hard work of my colleagues on the HCAA Board of Directors, the support of the College administration, the enthusiasm and participation of all HC alumni and, of course, the support of my wife, Katy, and my son, Jack, who allowed me to serve as your HCAA president this year! I’ll close by, once more, reminding you that each one of us can play a key role in strengthening our Crusader network and, as always, I encourage you to be involved by volunteering or attending an HCAA program soon! Go Cross! ■ Bryan DiMare ’06 HCAA President

Bryan.DiMare@alumni.holycross.edu @hcalumni #HCAAPrez

Save the Date

WELCOME TO YOUR CITY DAY 2017

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

C 6 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

onnect with fellow Crusaders, socialize and network all across the country (and world!). Be on the lookout for more details later this summer.


Holy Cross Volunteer Summit

O

n April 21-22, the Office of Advancement hosted a Volunteer Summit on campus to celebrate and strengthen our robust volunteer community. Named "Aspire," the weekend program provided volunteers with information and ideas to strengthen the work they do to help Holy Cross achieve its highest aspirations, whether through class-based fundraising, regional programming or compelling communication. Representing classes from the 1940s to the 2010s (including both current and past parents), volunteers attended workshops, planning sessions and behind-the-scenes, exclusive tours to deepen their understanding of today's Holy Cross. By attending the Summit, one volunteer commented that she is "much more informed about the financial needs of Holy Cross at a critical time in its development." If you have ever thought about putting your gifts and talents to work for alma mater as a volunteer, check out the many opportunities open to alumni to get involved. ■

(from top) Steve Vineberg, professor of theatre, gives volunteers a taste of today's classroom experience with his Reading Movies seminar; Volunteers take a behindthe-scenes tour of the Luth Athletic Complex, witnessing the progress on the renovation and new construction (scheduled for completion in summer 2018); Nicholas LaMothe '18 reflects on his Holy Cross experience during the Generosity & Gratitude Luncheon; Volunteers and staff show off their "I Love HC" hats, celebrating the success of February's 24-hour giving challenge; Trustee Shaun Mathews '77 (left) chats with Caroline Cataldo '12 and Tara Greeley '12 before the Celebration Dinner on Friday evening.

Bryan J. DiMare ’06

pr e side n t Brian P. Duggan ’96

pr e side n t-e le ct Laura Cutone Godwin ’96

vice pr e side n t Margaret O’Rourke Granados ’88

vice pr e side n t Michael H. Shanahan ’78

t r e asur e r Kristyn M. Dyer ’94

e xe cut ive se cr e ta ry

questions, comments and suggestions: hcaa@holycross.edu 508- 793- 2418 alumni.holycross.edu/hcaa

The Holy Cross Alumni Association (HCAA) supports alma mater in its Catholic, Jesuit mission by bringing together the diverse talents, experience and knowledge of Holy Cross alumni. We accomplish this by engaging alumni for life through our reunions, regional clubs, community outreach and intellectual and spiritual formation programs. By these means, we nurture our love for and dedication to Holy Cross, its students and its alumni as men and women for others. ■

HCA A NEWS / ALUMNI NEWS / 61


HCAA NEWS

Alumni Recognized for Extraordinary Service

T

he Holy Cross Alumni Association has announced the 2017 recipients of its highest alumni honor, the In Hoc Signo Award, which is given in recognition of significant, longstanding and exceptional service to the College: Colleen M. Doern ’89, Ronald T. Maheu ’64, Thomas F. McCabe ’65 and The Honorable Harry K. Thomas ’78, H16. Sarah M. Jensen ’08 is the recipient of the HCAA’s Young Alumni Leadership Award.

COLLEEN M. DOERN ’89 has been an active, committed member of the HCAA since joining its Board of Directors in 2004. In that time, Doern has served on several HCAA committees in various capacities, including the Budget and Finance, Executive, IT, Nominations and Elections, HCAA Dinner and Strategic Planning committees, among others. Doern took on the role of HCAA vice president from 2011-2013, then president-elect from 2013-2014, before serving as president from 2014-2015. In this stewardship role, Doern demonstrated strong, thoughtful and forward-thinking leadership of the HCAA. Now as past president,

she remains actively involved in the association, offering advice that draws on her experience and expertise, as well as serving on various ad hoc committees. She also works closely with the Office of Alumni Relations as a volunteer for the Holy Cross Club of Metro New York City; she has been an alumni admissions volunteer since 2000. Doern resides in Hartsdale, New York, where she volunteers in her parish’s CCD program and at a local food pantry.

RONALD T. MAHEU ’64 is well-known for his selfless, devoted service to the College — and particularly to the class of 1964. Described by many as the “glue” and the “heart and soul” of his class, Maheu has served as class chair since 1995, keeping classmates connected through his engaging letters as well as his personal emails, phone calls and visits. He has planned several successful and well-attended reunions and has been instrumental in setting and surpassing class fundraising goals, most notably when the class of 1964 raised more than $1 million in unrestricted gifts to the Holy Cross Fund in honor of their 50th reunion – a first for any class.

6 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Maheu is a member of the Fitton Society, and is actively involved in the College’s athletics program, as well as the Gridiron Club Leadership Council. A football player at Holy Cross, he was the driving force behind the creation of the Crusader Football Legends Ring of Honor program, an honor society for alumni football players. Maheu, who served in the U.S. Marine Corps, was recognized as a “Man for Others” by his Holy Cross classmates during their 45th reunion for his successful efforts to save his alma mater Central Catholic High School (Lawrence, Massachusetts) from closure due to lack of funding. Maheu resides in Boston with his wife, Jane, and is retired from a career with PricewaterhouseCoopers; he currently serves on the boards of several organizations. The Maheus have three children.

THOMAS F. MCCABE ’65 has demonstrated caring and commendable service to Holy Cross and the class of 1965 for decades. The longtime class co-chair is tireless in his efforts to organize class reunions, dinners and gatherings, and also provide informative class letters. Under McCabe’s guidance, the class of 1965 has consistently distinguished itself in annual giving, with participation averaging more than 60 percent and


reaching highs of 70 percent for its 25th reunion and 76 percent for its 50th reunion. He received the Matthew P. Cavanaugh ’20 Award for outstanding class chair in 2000, and his classmates dedicated a bench in his (and his cochair’s) honor at their 50th reunion.

received an honorary degree from the College and addressed graduates during the commencement ceremony in 2016. He was a member of the College’s board of trustees from 2008-2010, and he served as guest speaker at the President’s Council dinner in 2008.

In addition, McCabe served as president of the Holy Cross Club of Cape Cod from 2013-2015. Based on his outstanding efforts to increase club membership and involvement, he received the HCAA’s Regional Club Volunteer Award in 2015, and the club’s Crusader of the Year Award in 2016. McCabe continues to sit on the HCAA Board of Directors and is a member of the Dinner Committee, among others.

Thomas is renowned for his generous engagement with the College. He has visited classrooms and met with students, faculty and staff to discuss careers in foreign service. He has worked closely with the College to provide students with valuable internships in Washington, D.C., and at the U.S. Embassies. And, he has served as an outstanding mentor to students and alumni pursuing careers at the State Department.

Retired from a distinguished career in business, McCabe resides with his wife, Ginny, in Dennis, Massachusetts, where his charitable endeavors include participating in the hospital chaplain ministry at Cape Cod Hospital and volunteering for his parish’s St. Vincent de Paul Society. The McCabes have four children including Sean, class of 1996.

THE HONORABLE HARRY K. THOMAS JR. '78, H16 has a remarkable record of service to Holy Cross, its students and his fellow alumni. United States Ambassador to the Republic of Zimbabwe, Thomas

In addition, Thomas supports the HCAA’s Bishop Healy Committee and its efforts to achieve and maintain a diverse and multicultural campus. He serves as a resource to prospective students and has written recommendations for those interested in attending the College. The recipient of many honors from the State Department during his 32-year diplomatic career, Thomas’ professional roles include U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines and to Bangladesh, executive secretary of the U.S. Department of State and director

general of the Foreign Service. A resident of Dulles, Virginia, Thomas is married to Mithi; they have three children.

SARAH M. JENSEN '08 has been a loyal and dedicated Holy Cross volunteer for nearly a decade. A class chair since graduation, Jensen joined the HCAA board of directors in 2015, subsequently serving on both the Dinner and Spirituality committees; she is also a member of President’s Council. Recognized for her dependability and leadership, Jensen was asked to chair the Spirituality Committee after serving on it for just one year. Under her stewardship, the committee hosted a record six different events this spring, including a faith-based conversation during Winter Homecoming, book club discussions for two different books, “Stories of Faith” events in both Boston and New York City, and the HCAA’s second annual visit to St. Joseph’s Abbey in Spencer, Massachusetts. In fact, Jensen has doubled the number of programs offered by the Spirituality Committee in her inaugural year as chair. Jensen is an account executive with Crown Media Family Networks and resides in New York City. ■

Mark Your Calendars

HCAA FALL HOMECOMING DINNER FRIDAY , SEPTEMBER 29 , 2017

A

lumni, family and friends are invited to attend this annual gathering to honor the In Hoc Signo and Young Alumni Leadership award recipients. For tickets or sponsorship information, visit http://alumni.holycross.edu/hcaadinner or call 508-793-2418.

HCA A NEWS / ALUMNI NEWS / 63


HCAA NEWS

Living Histories Program Keeps Class of 1951 Connected

I

t was a summer day in 2015 when Gus Concilio ’51 (top, in the 1951 Purple Patcher and bottom, today), scrolling through his Facebook feed, happened upon a photo of former classmate Jim Jebaily ’51. Not having spoken with Jebaily since graduation, Concilio sent his old friend an email in hopes of reconnecting. Jebaily’s response – a descriptive narrative of the past 60-plus years of his life – was a pleasant surprise. It was also the perfect inspiration for what Concilio now calls “Living Histories.” Due to age and declining health, Concilio says, many of his classmates have not had the opportunity to connect in person in a number of years. Concilio serves as the chair of the class of 1951 and sends monthly newsletters to his classmates, including obituaries for those who have passed, to help friends stay in touch. But without the context of a classmate’s post-college activities, those obituaries are essentially meaningless to his readers, he says. Jebaily’s letter, along with a similar narrative penned by friend

Bob Mumford ’51 in honor of the class’ 60th reunion, offered a solution. “If people had the opportunity to talk about themselves when alive, the result would be more meaningful to the class than sending out obituaries,” he says. Concilio has since included the writings of both Mumford and Jebaily in the monthly newsletter. He even wrote his own history, first titling it “My Proposed Living Obituary,” and then thinking better of it. “The word ‘obituary’ was a little gruesome,” he laughs. “I changed it to Living History.” Concilio encourages all members of the class of 1951, as well as other classes, to join the Living History program. To date, he has collected 31 histories from his 124 living classmates. If you are interested in starting a Living History program for your class or would like more information, please feel free to contact Gus at MaryGusC@aol.com. ■ ­— Caroline Shannon ’17

Holy Cross Travel & Service Opportunities: Spring 2018 Explore Iceland APRIL 14-21, 2018

Alumni Immersion Service Trip to Haiti

A

A

$3,299 per person/double occupancy lumni, parents and friends are invited to experience the natural wonders of this beautiful country! The eight-day tour includes round-trip airfare from Boston, six nights of hotel accommodations, three dinners and daily breakfast, luxury motor coach and tour manager.

JUNE 14-23, 2018

lumni Relations has partnered with the Chaplains’ Office to offer our first immersion service trip for alumni. Our group will be working with the Be Like Brit Foundation in Haiti to assist families affected by the devastating 2010 earthquake. This sevenday service experience will be preceded by two days at the Thomas P. Joyce ’59

6 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Contemplative Center in West Boylston, Massachusetts. This time will allow participants to meet and bond together in faith. Our group has a capacity of 12 participants and will be accompanied by Rev. James Hayes, S.J., ’72, the College's associate chaplain for Mission.

To learn more about both of these programs, visit www.holycross.edu/alumni/crusadersconnect/alumni-travel ■


Save the Date for the Annual Women in Business Conference PROACTIVELY PURSUING THE DOORS TO SUCCESS POSSIBILITIES: OPENING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2017 featuring Deirdre Latour '95, VP and CCO of GE

COME HOME THIS FALL! | SEPTEMBER 29-30, 2017

Come back to Mount St. James and enjoy a wide variety of FALL HOMECOMING events throughout the weekend. Don’t miss a chance to reconnect with friends and alma mater! Check out www.holycross.edu/alumni later this summer for more information!

HCA A NEWS / ALUMNI NEWS / 65


BOOK NOTES

From Our Alumni Authors

BY MICHELLE JIN ’17 WHAT OTHERS SAY

Red Line:

American Foreign Policy in a Time of Fractured Politics and Failing States By P.J. Crowley '73 Rowman & Littlefield

“Red Line” dissects the events that unfolded after Sept. 11, with a specific focus on the Obama administration and the challenges he inherited during his presidency. Crowley explores the intersection of American domestic policy, foreign policy and strategic narratives to try to find a balance between the U.S. as a global police officer and as a more modest presence. A retired Air Force colonel and veteran of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in the 1990s, Crowley served as a U.S. government spokesperson for 30 years, and currently teaches as a professor of public diplomacy and global communication at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. WHAT OTHERS SAY

“Defining America’s role in the world is all too often reduced to slogans. Is the United States, in Madeline Albright’s words, the ‘indispensible nation’? By analyzing the foreign policies of Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama and where

they were right and wrong, he concludes that we do have a special role to play in the world, but we should temper our self-image of being indispensible. Even those who may question his conclusion will learn much from reading this very thoughtful book.” —

Dennis Ross, distinguished fellow, The Washington Institute

It's All Fun and Games By Dave Barrett '95 Inkshares, Inc.

What happens when you can no longer put your favorite game on pause? Barrett didn’t hit pause and wrote the first draft of “It’s All Fun and Games” in one month, during the National Novel Writing Month contest. The story begins with two best friends, TJ and Allison, who start to notice deadly mystical creatures around them, and healing powers within them. They struggle to make it out alive as their live-action roleplaying — also known as LARP — becomes a frightening reality. Find out if they conquer the monsters, escape the trap and make it back home. WHAT OTHERS SAY

"‘It's All Fun and Games’ is one of those rare books that makes

6 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

you wonder if around every corner magic and adventure await. Kids and adults alike will find themselves swept away into the world Mr. Barrett has created." ― Shannon Mayer,

"Whether engaged or longmarried, Catholic couples will fall in love again as they implement these simple but powerful strategies for creating a lifetime of mutual joy. 'The Four Keys to Everlasting Love' unpacks the secrets of genuine togetherness through personal witness, case studies, the writings of the Church and superb practical recommendations. Not to be missed!" — Lisa Mladinich,

author of the “Be An Amazing Catechist” series

USA Today, best-selling author of the Rylee Adamson series

Get Off Your Street: A Personal Travelogue

The Four Keys to Everlasting Love:

Frank E. McGinity Accountancy Corporation

How Your Catholic Marriage Can Bring You Joy for a Lifetime By Manuel P. Santos, M.D., '91 and his wife, Karee Santos Ave Maria Press

“The Four Keys to Everlasting Love” demonstrates how faith can help manage the inevitability of conflict in a relationship. Drawing upon their own experiences and practice with couples and marriage counseling, the authors provide their expertise on how to maintain a strong relationship. In between the stories and scripture presented in the book, readers will be able to reflect on chapter discussion questions and prompts to stimulate conversation, understanding and positive change. This book will inspire new and longtime couples alike to stay in love with each other and with their spirituality.

By Frank McGinity '56

“When I was a sophomore at Xavier High School in New York, I never forgot a statement by our teacher, a Jesuit priest: ‘Get off your street.’ I have taken that comment to heart and have traveled the world.” Through fun facts, personal anecdotes and beautiful imagery, Frank E. McGinity takes his audience on a journey through the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia, Middle East, Mexico and Antarctica. McGinity is a CPA and president of Frank E. McGinity Accountancy Corporation. WHAT OTHERS SAY

“This book was inspiring. McGinity has clearly traveled widely and communicates his joy of travel in his wideranging tales from around the globe. I look forward to having a chance to visit many of these same exotic locations.” —reader review, Amazon.com ■


S O LV E D P H O T O

Questions Linger About Mystery Photo and broadcast over the radio. “If your birthday was chosen in the first 100, chances were that you were headed to Vietnam after graduation. If you had a number over 250, you probably would never be drafted,” recalls Robert J. Clancy ’72. “I was there, I remember it well. Just look at the faces of the guys hanging out — very serious indeed,” Clancy says. Others recognize the photo as displaying a sit-in protest against the Vietnam War, or a discussion on the entry of women into the College, or a meeting about governance within the residence hall.

S

oon after the Spring 2017 issue of HCM hit mailboxes, numerous theories surrounding the Mystery Photo flooded into our inbox. We received quite a few – and quite a variety – of ideas as to what was being discussed at this gathering, and we still have some lingering questions. Here is what we do know: The photo was taken on the second floor of Lehy Hall sometime between 1970-1972. Though

Rev. Jim Hayes, S.J., ’72, associate chaplain for mission (pictured second from left), remembers this as a typical meeting of the residents who lived on that floor, the prevailing theory is that the men were gathered to listen to the U.S. Army Draft Lottery on the radio.

Others pictured in the photo have been identified as members of the classes of 1971 and 1972. Faces in the crowd include: Fr. Jim Hayes ’72, Ed Fitzgerald ’71, Randy Aubuchon ’71, Jack Tarpey ’71, George Hill ’71, Ed Gannon ’71, John Doran ’72, Pat Logan ’72, Larry Jenkins ’71, Bruce Corrigan ’71, Mike Pazik ’72 and Mike Gagnon ’72. ■ — Caroline Shannon ’17

During the Vietnam War, draft numbers based on birthdays were picked at random at the Selective Service National Headquarters in Washington, D.C.,

If you have any more information or you are able to confirm any of these theories, we would love to hear from you! Let us know at hcmag@holycross.edu.

Help Holy Cross Welcome the Incoming Class of 2021! MOVE-IN DAY 2017 SATURDAY, AUGUST 26

J

oin HCAA volunteers and welcome the newest members of the Holy Cross community to campus during First-Year Student Move-In Day! We're looking for volunteers to greet students

and their parents, hand out information packets, transfer belongings from car to residence hall and provide on-campus directions. Snacks and lunch will be provided. ■

To sign up, please email us at HCAA@ holycross.edu or call 508-793-2483.

B O OK NOTES / S OLV ED PHOTO / A LUMNI NE WS / 6 7


THE POWER OF ONE

Young alumni are a vital part of the Holy Cross family. No matter how frequently they return to The Hill, they share the same desire: to stay connected and pay it forward.

SIMONE BLANCHARD ’12

6 8 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017


name

people I have ever met.”

Simone Blanchard ’12 how she stays connected to holy cross

hometown Springfield, Massachusetts family Fiancé, Peter Dwyer ’12 Mother, Sandra Blanchard Sister, Sierra Blanchard

“As a financial aid recipient, I am incredibly grateful to the alumni, parents and friends whose contributions allowed me to attend this amazing college.”

what she did at holy cross “I was a rower on the women’s varsity rowing team, an orientation leader and a senior interviewer in the Admissions Office.” how holy cross affected her life “Holy Cross and the people I met there continue to be a big part of my life. I was very lucky to develop such strong relationships during my time on The Hill.”

“I stay connected as a 2012 class agent for the Holy Cross Fund and an alumni interviewer. When I am not on The Hill, I enjoy going back to Lake Quinsigamond on the weekends to cheer on the women’s and men’s rowing teams and spend time with other alumni.” why she stays connected to holy cross “I love being a part of the Holy Cross community. It’s exciting to see new projects and initiatives getting started on the campus and within the alumni community. Plus, it’s always fun to come home to Mount St. James!” why she believes in holy cross

the working life “I work at Public Consulting Group, a public-sector management and technology consulting firm focused on improving the performance of education, health and human services agencies. I oversee our digital marketing strategy for business development in the education practice area.”

“I’ll never forget my first-year orientation, where we learned all about Jesuit values, and how we would become ‘men and women for and with others’ during our four years on The Hill. It is the College’s commitment to encouraging us to assess our own personal accomplishments by how we impact the lives of others that makes me a very proud alumna.”

holy cross memories

Blanchard at the Public Consulting Group office on State Street in Boston.

“Some of my greatest memories are the ones spent with my teammates — from our post-practice Kimball dinners, to cheering each other on through challenging workouts. I am so thankful to have been part of such a great group of women. I also have many fond memories of my professors, who are hands down some of the most intelligent and devoted

why she gives to holy cross “As a financial aid recipient, I am incredibly grateful to the alumni, parents and friends whose contributions allowed me to attend this amazing college. I give back to honor their kindness and generosity, and see it as my opportunity to ‘pay it forward’ by investing in the experiences offered to Holy Cross students now and in the future.” ■

DAN VAILLANCOURT

THE POWER OF ONE / ALUMNI NEWS / 69


THE PROFILE

Acting Up James O’Connor ’98 got his start with Shakespeare and is now a character actor in critically acclaimed TV shows and movies BY B E N JA M I N G L E I S S E R

H

e’s been a Commie and a cop, a goon and a grieving father, a hitman and he’s been hit a few times. Welcome to the world of character actor James Andrew O’Connor ’98, a guy who growls like a grizzly bear before the camera, but chuckles like a teddy bear when you meet him in person. “I’m a big, six-foot-five, 300-pound guy,” he says with a laugh. “I’m not going to play Bob Dylan. But I’d love to play Orson

Welles, a person I get compared to all the time.”

Stephanie, 3, and James, 1, with his wife and audition coach, Tammy.

O’Connor, who was a theatre major at Holy Cross, has built his career playing nuanced supporting characters on television shows, including “The Americans,” “Chicago P.D.,” “Gotham” and “The Blacklist,” and in movies, like “St. Vincent.” But don’t let his steely on-camera stare fool you – at home, his favorite role is playing dad to his kids,

“You should see me at home,” he says, chuckling. “I’m a teddy bear. I’m a mush. Sometimes I cry at car commercials.”

7 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

O’Connor grew up in the Bronx, raised by parents who constantly took him to movies and Broadway plays. His first acting gig was in high school English class, where everyone had to perform


O'Connor with (clockwise from top left) Dominic West on "The Affair;" his castmates in the Off-Broadway play "Money Grubbin' Whores;" Bill Murray in the film "St. Vincent;" Donnie Wahlberg on "Blue Bloods;" Richard Gere in the film "Time Out of Mind;" Anthony Carrigan on "Gotham;" Elias Koteas on "Chicago PD;" and with Willie Garson on "White Collar."

a monologue from Shakespeare. He chose Shylock’s speech from “The Merchant of Venice.” “My father, James, rehearsed it with me, and kept quizzing me about the choices I was making with the speech,” he remembers. “In class the next day I was terrified, but I raised my hand to go first. And I nailed it. Afterward, some of my classmates said, ‘You did really good.’” He was in a few high school plays and entered Holy Cross as an English major, joining Alternative College Theatre and acting for fun in productions of “My Fair Lady,” “Measure for Measure” and “Iolanthe,” among others. “[Theatre] Professor Steve Vineberg told me, ‘I’d love to see more of you in class,’” O’Connor says. “And at the end my sophomore year, Professor Edward Isser [current chair of the theatre department] asked me, ‘Are you in this to have fun, or do you want to learn and grow?’” While he thanks Vineberg, Isser and other faculty mentors for encouraging him to pursue a theatre career, it was a heartto-heart talk with his father that finally pushed him on stage. “I was worried about my grades and told my father over the phone that I didn’t want to be an English major. He asked, ‘If it was up to you, what would you want to do?’ I told him I’d rather study theatre. He told me to go ahead and do it. I couldn’t speak; I was floored. I asked him, ‘Why didn’t you tell me I could do that?’ and he said, ‘Because I’ve been waiting for you to tell me that.’” O’Connor pauses, then adds, “That was a very significant moment in my life.” After graduation, he studied acting in New York City and auditioned for countless

roles, “getting to the Actors Equity Association office by 6 a.m. sometimes,” he says. He performed in several OffOff-Broadway productions and with the National Shakespeare Touring Company. But his big break came when he moved into an apartment in Jersey City, New Jersey, next to a couple whose daughter was a casting director for several television shows, including “Law & Order.” “Not knowing who her parents were, I was helping them move some furniture one day, and they said they’d put in a good word for me,” he says. “So I called her and we spoke every couple months, and then she offered me a part in a show. I was a character in a hospital bed.” In the 17 years since, O’Connor has appeared in dozens of movies and television shows, and also does voice-over work on video games. You can catch him this December as the fire chief in “The Greatest Showman,” a biopic about P.T. Barnum starring Hugh Jackman. “We had an overnight shoot in the pouring rain, and we did several takes on a scene where I had to tackle him to prevent him from entering a burning building,” he says. “Hugh was great to work with. He always carried scratch-off lottery tickets in his pockets, and he’d hand them out to everyone.” Though the ticket Jackman handed him wasn’t a winner, O’Connor feels he’s winning greater recognition in the film and television industry. He’s also helping others find success by coaching young actors and assisting his fellow Holy Cross alumni with their projects, including co-producing, with Brud Fogarty ’00 and Clifford Kirvan ’98, “No Alternative,” a film about mental illness, written and directed by William Dickerson ’01.

FIVE QUESTIONS

with JAMES O’CONNOR ’98 WHAT’S THE ODDEST EXERCISE YOU’VE EVER DONE IN AN ACTING CLASS? Probably being an animal. Acting exercises are supposed to break your inhibitions. Some teachers say when

you’re approaching a character, pick an animal and model your character after that animal. I was always a bear – maybe I should’ve challenged myself and tried to be a lamb.

WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE MUPPET? I keep telling my agent, “I want you to get me on ‘Sesame Street.’” He just laughs at me. [O'Connor laughs.] I’ve always liked Fozzie Bear because, like me, I was once a struggling actor and Fozzie’s a struggling comedian. But I also like Rowlf the Dog, which was Jim Henson’s favorite. Rowlf could drop one-liners and keep everything light.

WHAT WAS IT LIKE WORKING WITH BILL MURRAY ON “ST. VINCENT”? Bill was a sweetheart. He was so approachable, funny and kind. He knew how to keep things upbeat. During our scenes together, he kept telling me to look at things over my shoulder. He’d say, ‘Is that a yellow-bellied warbler?’ and I’d look around, and then he’d throw me a fake punch.

WHAT WAS THE LAST MOVIE THAT MADE YOU CRY? “Dead Poets Society.” I revisit that movie at least once a year. I just watched it last week, largely for Robin Williams. No other actor could make me laugh or cry with such ease. I knew if I was walking into the theatre to watch him, I'd walk away feeling better than when I walked in. In my field, I've encountered many artists battling resistance to their passion and choices. This film manages to simultaneously devastate me and inspire me. It has definitely shaped me as an artist.

WOULD YOU RATHER PLAY A SUPERHERO OR A SUPERVILLAIN? I’d rather be superhero. When I was younger, I was drawn to darker stuff, but I’m attracted to more significant roles now. I want to have a positive influence on people. I like telling stories that make you think, inspire you and make you feel good about yourself. I want people to say, “You inspired me with your performance.” My resume is full of gangsters and thugs. (Pause.) But playing a supervillain would also be fun. ■

THE PROFILE / ALUMNI NEWS / 71


IN MEMORIAM Holy Cross Magazine publishes In Memoriam to inform the College community of the deaths of alumni, trustees, students, employees and friends. In Memoriam content, which is based on obituaries published in public forums or provided directly to HCM by the family, is a limited overview that includes service to alma mater and a survivors listing. Portrait photos from The Purple Patcher appear as space permits and at the discretion of the editor (photos provided by the deceased’s family are not accepted). Tributes appear in the order in which they are received; due to the volume of submissions and magazine deadlines, it may be several issues before they appear in print. To notify the College of a death, please call the Alumni Office at 508-793-3039 or email AlumniRecords@holycross.edu, attaching a copy of an obituary, if available.

1937 Joseph W. Daly Joseph W. Daly, of Holden, Massachusetts, formerly of Worcester, died on July 26, 2016, at 99. Mr. Daly served in the U.S. Army during World War II, including an extended assignment to the Adjutant General's Office in Casablanca in North Africa. During the Korean War, he was activated from the U.S. Army Reserves to serve in Korea; he attained the rank of lieutenant colonel before his retirement. He worked as a postal inspector for many years. He also served on the staff of the Massachusetts Senate Ways and Means Committee, and he retired after working several years in the Worcester Court system as a probation officer in the Family Court. Mr. Daly is survived by one son, Joseph P. Daly ’90; one daughter, Mary Ann T. Coppolino ’98, and her husband; three granddaughters; one brother, Edward F. Daly ’42; and his niece, Patricia Gibbons Haylon ’83. He was predeceased by his wife, Ann Marie.

1939 Edmund W. Carroll Edmund W. “Ed” Carroll, of Windsor, Connecticut, died on March 28, 2016, at 98. Mr. Carroll served in the U.S. Marine Corps as a 1st lieutenant during World War II, finishing his career in Okinawa, Japan. He worked in the Insurance industry until his retirement in 1983, and was a fellow of the CPCU Charter Property Casualty Underwriters. He is survived by five sons and their spouses; 14 grandchildren and their spouses; four great-grandchildren; one sister; and one sister-in-law. He was predeceased by his wife, Marguerite; two sisters; and two brothers.

1940 John Gorman McLean John Gorman McLean, of Holyoke, Massachusetts, died on April 22, 2016, at 96. Mr. McLean served in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific, attaining the rank of major.

He graduated from Boston College Law School, and served as assistant to the registrar of probate of Hamden County and assistant clerk of courts in Holyoke; he also managed his own law practice in Holyoke. Mr. McClean was an honorary coach for the Holy Cross men’s basketball team for many years, and he supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society. He is survived by several cousins and many friends. He was predeceased by his wife, Alice; two stepbrothers; two stepsisters; and one cousin.

George W. Ogar George W. Ogar, of Wakefield, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 29, 2015. Mr. Ogar is survived by his wife, Catherine; six children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

1941 Leo J. Kelleher Jr. Leo J. Kelleher Jr., of Greensboro, North Carolina, died on Dec. 4, 2015, at 94. He trained with the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He owned and operated Southern Converting Company for many years. He is survived by one sister; eight children and their spouses; 16 grandchildren; 11 greatgrandchildren; and his nephew, Kenneth S. Kelleher Jr., M.D., ’68. He was predeceased by his wife of 55 years, Teresa.

Lt. Col. Louis C. Renaud, USAF (Ret.) Lt. Col. Louis C. “Lou” Renaud, USAF (Ret.), of Santa Barbara, California, died on Aug. 18, 2016, at 97. Lt. Col. Renaud enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps, finished pilot training and was sent to the Pacific, where he flew 241 combat missions during World War II. He retired as a lieutenant colonel after 23 years of service, and he worked at Crocker Bank for many years. He is survived by his wife of 74 years, Marjorie; three sons; three daughters-in-law; seven grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren.

8 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

1942 Anthony P. Culotta, D.D.S. Anthony P. Culotta, D.D.S., of Bethesda, Maryland, died on Feb. 9, 2016. He is survived by three daughters, one son and their spouses; one son-in-law; two brothers; one sister-in-law; eight grandchildren; one step-granddaughter; two step-great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Margaret; one son; and one daughter.

Michael F. Donoghue Michael F. Donoghue, of Clermont, Florida, died on July 6, 2015, at 94.

1943 Edward J. Finn Sr. Edward J. Finn Sr., of Convent Station, New Jersey, died on Nov. 4, 2015, at 93. Mr. Finn was a salesman and owned his own consulting firm. He is survived by two sons and their wives; three sisters; five grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. He was predeceased by his first wife, Adelaide; his second wife, Lorraine; and one daughter.

Leon M. Osachuk, M.D. Leon M. Osachuk, M.D., of Sandwich, Massachusetts, died on Feb. 28, 2016, at 94. Dr. Osachuk graduated from Boston University Medical School, and was a radiologist at Burbank Hospital in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1945-1947. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; one daughter; one son and his wife; and two grandchildren.

including William M. Sullivan, M.D., '76, and their spouses; 21 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and extended family. He was predeceased by his wife of 54 years, Barbara.

1944 Louis S. Bernadotte Louis S. Bernadotte, of White Lake, Michigan, died on April 23, 2016, at 94. Mr. Bernadotte graduated from the University of Detroit Law School. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Virginia; two daughters; two sonsin-law; four grandchildren and their spouses; and one great-grandson.

Mario H. Colecchi, D.D.S. Mario H. Colecchi, D.D.S., of Newton, and formerly of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, died on Oct. 23, 2015, at 94. A graduate of the University of Maryland School of Dentistry and the orthodontia program at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Dr. Colecchi was a dentist with a practice that specialized in orthodontics. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Jacqueline; two daughters; one son, Christopher H. Colecchi ’87; one daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren. He was predeceased by one daughter and one brother.

John E. Fitzgerald

Edward J. O'Shaughnessy Jr., M.D., of Honolulu, died on Oct. 5, 2015, at 93. A biology major at Holy Cross, Dr. O'Shaughnessy was a medical doctor and an Army veteran. He is survived by one son; two daughters; nine grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

John E. Fitzgerald, of Sherborn and Old Lyme, Connecticut, died on June 2, 2016, at 92. Mr. Fitzgerald was director and treasurer of the John A. Fitzgerald Electrical Corporation and a founder of Westbank Corporation, where he served on the board of directors from 19601997. He served with the 14th Combat Cargo Squadron, 4th Combat Cargo Group in the China-Burma-India Theatre during World War II. He is survived by his wife of 67 years, Frances; 10 children, including John E. Fitzgerald, D.M.D., ’73, and their spouses; 21 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and one sister. He was predeceased by two brothers.

Hon. Paul F. Sullivan

Albert E. Frost Jr.

Edward J. O'Shaughnessy Jr., M.D.

Hon. Paul F. Sullivan, of Bethesda, Maryland, died on Nov. 14, 2015. He is survived by two daughters, 11 sons,

Albert E. Frost Jr., of Corvallis, formerly of Pawcatuck, Oregon, died on Aug. 12, 2016, at 94. Mr. Frost studied chemistry at Holy Cross and earned his bachelor’s degree cum laude in 1943 and his


master’s degree in 1944. He received his doctorate in organic chemistry from Clark University. He worked for Pfizer Inc. in the patent department, from 1958-1988, retiring as assistant director of patents. He was a paratrooper with the 101st Airborne Division in World War II. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Helen; three daughters; one son; 12 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by one brother.

Robert J. Lawson Sr. Robert J. “Bob” Lawson Sr., of Hollywood, Florida, died on April 6, 2016, at 93. Mr. Lawson was an executive officer of an LST during World War II, an FBI agent and head of security for World Jai Alai. He was an accounting major at Holy Cross, played football and was a member of the Varsity Club. He is survived by his wife of 72 years, Muriel; five sons, including Robert J. Lawson Jr. ’68; two daughters.

Rev. Msgr. Francis G. O'Sullivan Rev. Msgr. Francis G. O'Sullivan, of Woburn, Massachusetts, died on Nov. 27, 2015. He is survived by one sister and her husband; five nieces and nephews, including Brian T. McCarthy '87; and several cousins and extended family members.

1945 Ralph E. Cook Sr. Ralph E. Cook Sr., of Lake of the Woods, Virginia, died on Nov. 25, 2015, at 90. Mr. Cook studied naval science at Holy Cross and was a member of ROTC. In World War II, he was commissioned a Naval Officer and served in the Pacific Area; he remained in the Naval Reserve until 1971. He earned a master's degree and Ph.D. in international relations from the Fletcher School at Tufts University; he was also a graduate of the Senior School at the Naval War College. Mr. Cook was employed by the National Security Agency for five years and the Central Intelligence Agency for 35 years. He stayed connected to the College as a member of the O’Callahan Society. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, L. Louise; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and five great grandchildren.

Hon. Joseph F. Deegan Jr. Hon. Joseph F. Deegan Jr., of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, died on Dec. 3, 2015, at 91. Judge Deegan served in the U.S. Navy during World War II; his career in the Navy and Reserves lasted for over 28 years. A graduate of Boston College Law School, he practiced law for 16 years until his nomination as Middlesex County judge in 1968; he then served as Superior Court judge for 25 years. At

Holy Cross, he studied economics, and was a member of ROTC, the sailing club and the Tomahawk student newspaper; he supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society, the class reunion committee and the Holy Cross Lawyers Assocation. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Mary; four children, including Jeff F. Deegan III ’75; five grandchildren; one sister; and his nephew, Brian J. Donnelly ’91.

Hon. Thomas B. Galligan Hon. Thomas B. Galligan died on July 30, 2015, at 90. A World War II veteran, he served in the U.S. Navy. The longtime judge served as acting justice of the State Supreme Court in New York County for 20 years. He supported the College as a member of the Fitton Society.

Robert C. Gilmore Robert C. Gilmore, of Simsbury, Connecticut, died on July 3, 2016. Mr. Gilmore was an accounting major at Holy Cross and a member of ROTC. He stayed connected to the College as a member of the O’Callahan Society, NROTC October 1945 Class and Naval ROTC. He is survived by his wife, Marion; one son; one daughter; one son-in-law; two daughters-in-law; two nieces; two nephews; nine grandchildren; one great-grandchild; extended family; and many friends.

Rev. Maurice P. Meade Rev. Maurice P. Meade, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, died Dec. 25, 2015, at 91. Fr. Meade attended Holy Cross before entering St. John’s Seminary; he was ordained on May 6, 1948. He also received a master’s of education degree from Boston State College. Fr. Meade served in several Boston-area parishes, and as chaplain-in-charge at local hospitals. He is survived by seven nephews and 12 grandnieces and grandnephews.

Lucien E. Perreault Jr. Lucien E. “Doc” Perreault Jr., of Melbourne, Florida, died on May 24, 2016, at 92. Mr. Perreault attended Holy Cross for one year before entering the U.S. Army. He entered the Aviation Cadet program and was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Army Air Force; he served as a pilot instructor until being discharged in 1945. He was subsequently commissioned as an officer in the newly established U.S. Air Force in 1947, serving in assignments all over the world until his retirement as a lieutenant colonel. Thereafter, he relocated to Brevard County, Florida, engaging in various business endeavors. He is survived by his wife, Margot; one

daughter; two sons; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

William F. Threlkeld William F. “Bill” Threlkeld, of Williamstown, Kentucky, died on Oct. 23, 2015, at 89. An attorney, Mr. Threlkeld was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, serving during World War II and for many years following in the Naval Reserves. He is survived by three sons and their spouses; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Helen; two brothers; and two sisters.

1946 John G. Landers John G. “Jack” Landers, of Arlington, Massachusetts, died on March 26, 2016, at 89. Mr. Landers attended Boston College and Holy Cross through the Navy V-12 program. He was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy and graduated in 1949; after five years of sea service, he taught at Tufts and MIT for the Naval ROTC program. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and the Korean War. After his naval service, he attended Harvard Business School. He is survived by one son, John G. Landers Jr. ’76; four daughters; five grandchildren; and one brother. He was predeceased by his wife, Anna “Nan,” and three brothers.

Capt. Leo J. Marshall, USN (Ret.) Capt. Leo J. Marshall, USN, (Ret.), of Chesapeake, Virginia, died on April 20, 2016, at 90. Capt. Marshall earned master’s degrees from the University of Maryland and George Washington University. He also attended the U.S. Naval War College and the U.S. National War College. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy and was commissioned via the V-12 program in 1945 at Holy Cross. During his 32-year career, Capt. Marshall commanded two ships and a destroyer squadron, and was chief of staff, U.S. Seventh Fleet. He also served on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations and the Joint Chiefs of Staff; he received numerous military decorations for his service. He later served as the founding executive director of the Tidewater Maritime Training Institute and the executive director of the South Tidewater Ship Repair Association. He is survived by two sons, one daughter and their spouses; one son-in-law and his wife; nine grandchildren and their spouses; and 15 great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Marilyn Jane, and one daughter.

Stanley A. Spring Stanley A. Spring, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, died on Feb. 2, 2016, at 89.

Mr. Spring fought as an officer in the U.S. Navy during World War II, finishing with Naval Intelligence in Washington, D.C. He graduated from the University of Miami School of Law and was an active member of the Florida Bar. He served as a special agent in the FBI for 28 years, then as staff counsel to the Board of Governors for the Florida Bar; and, later, he was a partner at Spring & Spring LLC in Baton Rouge. Mr. Spring played football at Holy Cross, and in the 1946 Orange Bowl against the University of Miami. He is survived by one son; two daughters; and six grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 50 years, Rosemary; one daughter; and his parents.

1947 John A. Facey Jr. John A. “Jack” Facey Jr., of West Hartford, Connecticut, died on March 2, 2016, at 90. Mr. Facey joined the V-12 U.S. Naval Air Pilot Program and was assigned to the Officer Training Program at Holy Cross. He was a mathematics major at the College and also received a master’s degree in mathematics from Boston University. He was a math professor at the Universities of Connecticut and Maryland before accepting a position in the Connecticut General Life Insurance Companies Actuarial Program in 1952; he later became a fellow of the Society of Actuaries. He stayed connected to the College as an admissions and career advisor, class agent, class chair and supporter of men’s and women’s basketball and football, as well as a member of the class reunion committee. Mr. Facey is survived by his wife of 67 years, Mary; four sons, including John A. Facey III ’72, James W. Facey ’76 and Jerald P. Facey ’94, two daughters and their spouses; 15 grandchildren and their spouses; seven great-grandchildren; two brothers and their wives; one brother-inlaw; and two sisters-in-law.

Charles E. Fitzgibbon Charles E. “Charlie” Fitzgibbon, of Rochester, New York, died on March 14, 2016, at 89. Mr. Fitzgibbon served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, and he continued his service in the Navy Reserves as a commander for many years afterward. He obtained a master's degree in journalism from Syracuse University and, for more than 40 years, worked in public relations; he retired as director of state and local government affairs at Eastman Kodak Co. He is survived by two sons, one daughter and their spouses; four grandchildren;

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 81


IN MEMORIAM and many nieces, nephews and lifelong friends. He was predeceased by his wife of 52 years, Rosemary; his parents; one sister; and friend, Lori Chamberlain.

He is survived by one sister; one brother; five nieces, three nephews and their spouses; and many grandnieces, grandnephews and extended family.

William B. Houston

Thomas L. Smyth, D.D.S.

William B. “Bill” Houston, of Lakewood, Colorado, died on Oct. 27, 2015, at 93. A business major, Mr. Houston participated in intramural sports at Holy Cross. He is survived by his nephew, Richard F. Houston ’78.

Thomas L. Smyth, D.D.S., of Belmar, New Jersey, died on Feb. 14, 2016. Dr. Smyth graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dentistry in 1948, later returning there to complete post-graduate work in orthodontics. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Jane; seven children, including T. Kevin Smyth ’75, and their spouses; and 12 grandchildren and their spouses.

Robert D. Hursh Robert D. Hursh, of Rochester, New York, died on June 28, 2015. Mr. Hursh served as a Naval Intelligence Officer in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict. A graduate of the Law School of the University of Virginia, he spent his career in law publishing. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Charlene; one son; one daughter; one daughter-in-law; one sister; six grandchildren; and one greatgrandson. He was predeceased by his parents and one son.

John J. Layden John J. “Jack” Layden, of Whitehall, New York, died on June 7, 2016, at 92. Mr. Layden attended Holy Cross before joining the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II; he attended flight school, was commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant, and was assigned as a B-17 bomber aircraft commander with the 336th Bomb Squadron of the 95th Bomb Group. He returned to the College and graduated with the class of 1947; he was a member of the Alpha Sigma Nu Jesuit Honor Society. Mr. Layden graduated from Harvard Law School and joined his father and, later, his two brothers at the law firm Layden and Layden; he also served the Whitehall School District in a number of roles for over 40 years. He is survived by six children and their families; one brother; and many nieces and nephews, including David J. Layden ’87. He was predeceased by his wife of almost 50 years, Eleanor; his parents; one sister; and one brother.

Rev. Francis J. Manning Rev. Francis J. Manning, of Springfield, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 10, 2015, at 89. Fr. Manning studied at the St. Thomas Seminary in Bloomfield, Connecticut, and the Seminary of Philosophy and the Grand Seminary in Montreal, Canada. He served in several parishes and schools in the Springfield area, as well as in various roles within the Diocese of Springfield.

1948 John J. Falvey John J. Falvey, of Hingham, Massachusetts, formerly of Virginia Beach, Virginia, and Acton, Massachusetts, died on March 28, 2016, at 92. Mr. Falvey served as a U.S. Navy officer in the Pacific during World War II. He earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Notre Dame and began his 33-year career as a research chemist at American Cyanamid in Stamford, Connecticut; he subsequently worked for Foster Grant and American Hoechst. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Sheila; seven children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by one sister.

John W. King John W. “Jack” King, of Hampton, New Hampshire, died on Oct. 24, 2015, at 88. Mr. King was a veteran of World War II, serving in the U.S. Navy. He worked for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company for 43 years. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Cecile “Sis”; one son and his wife; one daughter and her husband; four grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Robert E. Lambert Robert E. “Bobby” Lambert, of South Deerfield, Massachusetts, died on Feb. 14, 2016, at 94. Mr. Lambert attended the College on a football scholarship. In 1943, he interrupted his studies to serve in the 405th Fighter Squadron in the European Theatre during World War II; he re-entered Holy Cross in 1946 and graduated with the class of 1948. He earned a master’s degree in education from Springfield College and taught briefly, before joining his brother to form a 50-year partnership, Lambert Brothers Plumbing. He is survived by

8 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

one sister; three daughters and their spouses; 15 grandchildren and their spouses; seven great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary Danaher; two brothers; and two sisters.

Marcus A. McGee Marcus A. McGee, of Worcester, died on Jan. 9, 2016, at 93. He entered the Air Cadets, completing bombardier and navigation schools. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. McGee also earned a B.S. in elementary education from Worcester State College and an M.S. in education from Fitchburg State College. He was a reading teacher for many years at Burncoat Sr. High School in Worcester. He was a member of the Holy Cross Sodality for 65 years. Mr. McGee is survived by his wife of 65 years, Lillian; one daughter, two sons; one daughter-in-law; one son-in-law; and two grandsons. He was predeceased by two brothers.

Louis R. Simeoni Louis R. Simeoni, of Philadelphia, died on May 19, 2016, at 91. Mr. Simeoni studied premed at Holy Cross and earned a graduate degree at the University of Massachusetts. A U.S. Army veteran of World War II, he was a 33-year employee of the Philadelphia Health Department. He is survived by his wife, Gilda; one son, two daughters and their spouses; three grandchildren; one grandson-in-law; two greatgrandchildren; and his cousin, Joyce G. Leger '79.

1949 Walter P. Barlow Walter P. Barlow, of Medway, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 14, 2016, at 91. Mr. Barlow served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II; he attained the rank of staff sergeant and participated in the invasion of Okinawa Island. An accounting major at Holy Cross, Mr. Barlow graduated cum laude. His career was centered in the trucking industry, where he spent 17 years at Holmes Transportation as the financial controller. He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Nancy; three sons, two daughters and their spouses; one daughter-in-law; nine grandchildren and their spouses, including Cassandra L. Dinkel ’15; three great-grandchildren; one sister-inlaw; and nieces, nephews, siblings and their spouses. He was predeceased by one son.

Walter F. Biggins Walter F. Biggins, of Longmeadow, Massachusetts, died on Oct. 11, 2015, at 90. A chemistry major at Holy Cross, Mr. Biggins also earned a master’s degree in 1951 from the College. He fought in the U.S. Army, 88th Division during World War II in Italy; he was awarded the Good Conduct Medal and the Bronze Star. Mr. Biggins worked as a research and product development chemist for many companies; he was the president of W.F. Biggins Associates. He is survived by two sons, one daughter and their spouses; one brother; two sisters; and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 61 years, Anne-Marie, and one sister.

Joseph A. Bodanza Joseph A. Bodanza, of Leominster, Massachusetts, died on May 12, 2016, at 88. Mr. Bodanza earned his master’s degree in education and worked for the Department of Education for many years. He then turned his focus in life to Joe's Kids, an organization he started to bring Vietnamese kids to the U.S. with medical disabilities to be corrected. He is survived by his main caregiver, Tuan Nguyen, and several cousins. He was predeceased by one sister.

John C. Goss John C. Goss, of Houston, died on March 3, 2016, at 88. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Goss attended law school at Boston University before entering officer training school for the U.S. Navy, where he served as a volunteer for two years. He took a position with Shell Oil in Houston before he founded John C. Goss Realty Company, where he worked for almost five decades. Mr. Goss is survived by three daughters; one son-in-law; two grandchildren; one sister-in-law; one niece and her husband; one nephew and his wife; one sister-in-law, her husband and their two children; and multiple grandnieces and grandnephews. He was predeceased by his wife of 54 years, Jacqueline; his parents; and one brother.

Thomas A. Hulsebosch, D.D.S. Thomas A. Hulsebosch, D.D.S., of Glens Falls, New York, died on May 13, 2016, at 88. Dr. Hulsebosch earned a degree in oral and maxillofacial surgery at the University of Pennsylvania Dental School. After serving for two years in


the U.S. Air Force as a captain, where he received the National Defense Service Medal, he pursued a 33-year career as an oral surgeon. He is survived by two daughters, two sons and their spouses; and five grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary; one son; and his parents.

Rev. Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. Rev. Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J., of Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, died on Aug. 24, 2015. He is survived by one brother and his wife; one sister; one nephew; three nieces; and his Jesuit brothers.

Raymond J. Sweeney Raymond J. Sweeney, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 7, 2015, at 87. Mr. Sweeney enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve while at Holy Cross, and was later called to active duty during the Korean War. He majored in accounting at the College and received a degree in business administration. Mr. Sweeney was the owner of Ray Sweeney Real Estate and Insurance Agencies. He is survived by one son, two daughters and their spouses; seven grandchildren; one sister-in-law; one brother-in-law; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by his wife of 43 years, Rita May; one daughter; and one grandson.

1950 George G. Ardito, D.D.S. George G. Ardito, D.D.S., of Cranston, Rhode Island, formerly of Hamden, Connecticut, and Bernardston, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 27, 2016, at 89. Dr. Ardito served as a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army prior to attending Georgetown University School of Dentistry. He had his own dental practice in Hamden for 37 years. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three sons and their wives; one daughter; and eight grandchildren. He was predeceased by one son.

Alfred E. Canedo Alfred E. Canedo, of Timonium, Maryland, died on Aug. 31, 2016. Mr. Canedo served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and then went on to graduate studies at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. He spent the majority of his career with General Electric and Grumman Aerospace, holding various positions in production and inventory control management until his retirement in 1991. He is survived by five daughters,

including Marianne C. Bohr ’78; six sons, including Richard G. Canedo ’83 and Robert T. Canedo ’85; in-laws, including daughter-in-law Cheryl G. Canedo ’84; and 29 grandchildren, including Joseph R. Canedo ’16 and Elizabeth A. Canedo ’19. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary.

Paul R. Chagnon Paul R. Chagnon, of South Bend, Indiana, died on March 22, 2016, at 86. Mr. Chagnon earned his Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University. He was professor emeritus at the University of Notre Dame, where he taught physics and conducted research in nuclear physics from 1963 to 1995. He is survived by one sister-in-law; three nieces; three nephews, including Charles W. Chagnon III '72; and nine grandnieces and grandnephews. He was predeceased by his father, Ovid E. Chagnon, class of 1905, and his brother, Charles W. Chagnon ’43.

William A. Collins William A. Collins, of Springfield, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 13, 2015, at 90. Mr. Collins served in the U.S. Navy from 1943 to 1946, including combat during World War II. A master electrician and licensed professional engineer, he served as chairman of the family business, Collins Electric, since 1950. Mr. Collins studied physics at Holy Cross and graduated magna cum laude. He supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society, alumni board senate and class reunion committee, and also served as an alumni board director. He is survived by his wife of 67 years, Ruth; six adopted children and their spouses; two sisters; one brother-in-law; one sister-in-law; many grandchildren and great-grandchildren; cousins, including John T. Collins ’68; and nieces and nephews, including Paul J. McKenna III ’75, Stephen W. McKenna, D.M.D., ’83, Lawrence F. Eagan ’83, James Krumsiek ’86 and Michael Krumsiek ’93. He was predeceased by his father, William P. Collins, class of 1919, and his brother, Donald P. Collins '49.

Joseph F. DeCicco Joseph F. DeCicco, of Belmont, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 6, 2016. A World War II veteran in the U.S. Marine Corps, Mr. DeCicco was the founder, president and CEO of American Home Toy Parties, Inc. He is survived by his wife, D. Gertrude; one son; four grandchildren; one brother; one son-in-law; and his wife’s children and their spouses.

Cmdr. Robert C. “Bob” Goetz, USN (Ret.) Cmdr. Robert C. “Bob” Goetz, USN (Ret.), of St. Augustine, Florida, formerly of McLean, Virginia, died on Feb. 6, 2016, at 87. Mr. Goetz was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy; he served in Korea. He earned an MBA from the University of Buffalo and a CPA from New York State; he was treasurer/CFO at the National Gallery of Art and the Catholic University of America. An accounting major at Holy Cross, Mr. Goetz graduated cum laude and made the dean’s list; he was a member of Navy ROTC and the Crusader student newspaper. He stayed connected to the College as a class agent and member of the O’Callahan Society. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary; one son; two sisters-in- law; and several nieces, nephews and their families.

Matthew E. Gormly Jr. Matthew E. Gormly Jr., of Pinehurst, North Carolina, died on March 27, 2016, at 87. Mr. Gormly served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict. He worked for the insurance brokerage firm Johnson & Higgins for 37 years, retiring as senior vice president. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Rita; one daughter; one son and his wife; six grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

Kirby Hendee Kirby Hendee, of Madison, Wisconsin, died on March 11, 2016, at 92. An English major at Holy Cross, Mr. Hendee was a member of the Alpha Sigma Nu Jesuit Honor Society and was involved in The Purple; he graduated magna cum laude. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. After graduating from the University of Michigan Law School, he became a practicing attorney. He served in the Wisconsin State Senate from 1957-1960, before becoming a highly respected lobbyist. Mr. Hendee supported Holy Cross as class agent, class chair and class correspondent, as well as a member of the 1843 Society, Alumni Board Senate and Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Mary; one daughter; one son and his wife; two grandchildren; one brother and his wife; and several nieces and nephews.

William M. Kane Jr., M.D.

and received his M.D. from George Washington University School of Medicine. A board certified OB/GYN, he served the people of northwest Kansas for more than 30 years. He was a U.S. World War II veteran, serving in Japan as a sergeant. He supported Holy Cross as a member of the 1843 Society. He is survived by three sons, three daughters and their spouses; one sister and her husband; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Shirley.

Francis C. McGrath Francis C. McGrath, of Princeton, New Jersey, died on April 24, 2016, at 89. Mr. McGrath majored in English literature at Holy Cross and served as a class agent. He is survived by three sons; three daughters; nine grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and one brother. He was predeceased by his wife, Joan Kathryn.

Nicholas D. Mercadante Nicholas D. Mercadante, of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 23, 2016, at 88. An accounting major at Holy Cross, Mr. Mercadante received a master's degree in taxation from Bentley University and had a 60-year career in accounting. After passing the CPA exam, he opened his own practice in Fitchburg; Mercadante & Mercadante, PC continues to operate under family ownership. Mr. Mercadante supported the College as a member of the President's Council and an admissions advisor. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Frances; four children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; one sister-in-law; and many cousins, nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by one brother.

William R. Peck Jr. William R. “Bill” Peck Jr., of Colchester, Vermont, died on Nov. 14, 2015, at 89. A World War II veteran, Mr. Peck worked for AT&T for 35 years and Sears for 10 years. He is survived by three sons, including Charles E. Peck '74; one daughter-in-law; seven grandchildren and their spouses; one great-grandson; several nephews, nieces and their families; and extended family. He was predeceased by his wife, Nancy.

James A. Sullivan

William M. Kane Jr., M.D., of Hays, Kansas, died on May 5, 2016, at 88. Dr. Kane studied premed at Holy Cross

James A. “Jimmy” Sullivan, of Scarborough, Maine, died on Dec. 21, 2015, at 87. Mr. Sullivan attended

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 83


IN MEMORIAM Holy Cross for one year before joining the U.S. Marine Corps; he served his country during the Korean Conflict. He was employed at the New England Telephone Company for 30 years as an equipment installer. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Jean; one sister; seven children; eight grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; one sister; two brothers; and one nephew.

1951 Lawrence H. Devereux Lawrence H. Devereux, of Lake Worth, Florida, died on Nov. 11, 2015, at 86. He was an economics major at Holy Cross and served as a class agent.

Joseph J. Foley Joseph J. Foley, of Needham, Massachusetts, died on Sept. 8, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; one son, two daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; two brothers, two sisters and their spouses; and many nieces and nephews.

Ralph A. Gebhardt Ralph A. Gebhardt, of Bernardston, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 31, 2016. He was the owner of his family’s five-star German restaurant, Gebhardts, in Glendale, New York, until his retirement in 1992. Mr. Gebhardt is survived by his wife of 64 years, June; one daughter and her husband; two grandsons; one brother and wife; two nephews; one niece; and numerous cousins.

Robert J. Kravutske Robert J. Kravutske, of Detroit, Michigan, died on June 26, 2016. Mr. Kravutske supported the College as a member of the Fitton Society. He is survived by one son, three daughters and their spouses; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Kathryn.

Capt. Robert J. Kurtz, USNR (Ret.) Capt. Robert J. Kurtz, USNR (Ret.), of Germantown, Tennessee, died on Aug. 4, 2016, at 87. Capt. Kurtz entered the U.S. Navy and completed boot camp at the U.S. Naval Training Center in Bainbridge, Maryland. He then entered Navy OCS in Newport, Rhode Island,

and from there, went to the Navy Supply Corps School in Bayonne, New Jersey. He served during the Korean War and then continued in the reserves for more than 30 years. He also had a 32-year career with the Bell System in Boston. An economics major at Holy Cross, Capt. Kurtz participated in the College Choir and the Glee Club. He was a class agent and a member of the O’Callahan Society. He is survived by his wife, Eileen; two daughters; two grandchildren; one sister; and one brother.

James F. Meehan James F. “Jim” Meehan, of Savannah, Georgia, a former longtime resident of the Boston area, died on Nov. 4, 2015, at 85. Mr. Meehan served two years as a counterintelligence special agent in the U.S. Army. A graduate of Boston College Law School, he was a successful trial lawyer and founding partner of the law firm Meehan, Boyle & Cohen in Boston. He supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society and friend of the football team. Mr. Meehan is survived by his wife, Carrollyn; four daughters and their spouses; one stepdaughter; one stepson; nine grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and in-laws. He was predeceased by his first wife, Dorothy Ring Kelleher; one son; his parents; and two brothers.

Michael J. Nugent Sr. Michael J. Nugent Sr., of Hopkins, formerly of Monroe, Michigan, died on June 23, 2003, at 77. Mr. Nugent is survived by two sons, one daughter and their spouses; four grandchildren; two brothers; and four sisters. He was predeceased by his wife, Ruth.

Gerard P. O'Keefe Gerard P. “Gerry” O'Keefe, of Fairfax, Virginia, died on July 4, 2016, at 88. A political science major at the College, Mr. O’Keefe was also involved in ROTC, intramural sports, Knights of Columbus and Sanctuary Society. A veteran of World War II, Korea and Vietnam, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps, serving as an enlisted radar operator-navigator in the F7F Tigercat night fighter and a as Ground Controlled Approach operator, rising to the rank of sergeant. Attending Holy Cross on an NROTC scholarship, he was commissioned a second lieutenant, USMC, in 1951. He served in combat in Korea as an infantry officer with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, with subsequent tours as a tactics instructor and guard detachment commander.

8 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

After active duty, he earned his law degree at Georgetown University and, for the next 35 years, established and directed the foreign affairs department for the Retail Clerks/United Food and Commercial Workers Union. As a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve during this entire period, he served with and commanded judge advocate general units, retiring as a colonel of Marines with over 30 years of service. He stayed connected to the College as a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association, O’Callahan Society and Naval ROTC. Mr. O’Keefe is survived by his wife of nearly 62 years, Barbara; three sons; one daughter; three daughters-in-law; 12 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

James F. O'Rourke James F. “Jim” O'Rourke, of Westfield, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 31, 2016, at 85. Mr. O’Rourke was an economics major at Holy Cross and a member of ROTC. He was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and served during the Korean War. He was employed as a quality control supervisor at Stevens Paper Mill in Westfield and Windsor, Connecticut. He stayed connected to the College as a member of the O’Callahan Society. Mr. O’Rourke is survived by two daughters; one son-in-law; one sister; one granddaughter and her husband; one grandson; one great-granddaughter; one sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife, Jeanne.

Charles F. Parker Charles F. Parker, of Norwood, Massachusetts, died on Oct. 9, 2015, at 88. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Mr. Parker spent his entire professional career as an educator in the Norwood Public Schools. He is survived by his wife, Josephine; one son and his wife; one daughter and her husband; and four grandchildren.

John F. Phelan John F. Phelan, of Waterbury, Connecticut, died on Oct. 19, 2015, at 86. Mr. Phelan also graduated from Yale Law School in New Haven, Connecticut, and served for two years in U.S. Army Intelligence. A respected lawyer, he supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society. Mr. Phelan is survived by two sons; one daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and one brother-in-law. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary, and one brother.

Joseph M. Redmond Joseph M. Redmond, of Harwich, Massachusetts, died on May 12, 2016, at 86. Mr. Redmond was a philosophy and sociology major at the College, where he was also involved in the Knights of Columbus. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Eileen; eight children; 16 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Leonard F. Smith, M.D. Leonard F. “Len” Smith, M.D., of Centerville, Massachusetts, died on July 27, 2016. Dr. Smith was a Greek major and studied premed at Holy Cross; he graduated cum laude and was a member of the Glee Club. A graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine, he specialized in obstetrics and gynecology. Dr. Smith served with the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps in Moses Lake, Washington, as well as in Savannah, Georgia, and at Boston City Hospital. He remained with the U.S. Air Force in active reserve until 1968, achieving the rank of major. He was a member of the medical staff of Cape Cod Hospital, where he served a term as chief of OB/GYN; he also served 25 years in private practice. He was a member of the faculty of Tufts University School of Medicine and the staff of New England Medical Center. Dr. Smith supported the College as an admissions advisor and career advisor. He is survived by eight children, including Eileen M. Smith '80, Michael A. Smith ’82, Kevin R. Smith ’79 and Sean L. Smith ’'86, and their spouses; 24 grandchildren; one brother, Arthur K. Smith ’58, and his wife; one sister; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife of 53 years, Joan.

Page W.T. Stodder Page W.T. Stodder, of Chicago, died on July 15, 2016. He was a member of Naval ROTC.

Jerome F. Waters, M.D. Jerome F. Waters, M.D, of Florida, died on Nov. 29, 2015. Dr. Waters supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society.

1952 Gerard B. DeBaun Gerard B. DeBaun, of Fort Myers, Florida, died on July 12, 2015, at 85. Mr. DeBaun studied prelaw at Holy Cross and was


a member of the swim team and Naval ROTC. He is survived by his wife, Alice.

James V. Ellard James V. Ellard, of Belmont, Massachusetts, died on Nov. 22, 2015. Mr. Ellard was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He earned an MBA from Boston College and had a long career as a sales and marketing executive. He is survived by his wife, Janice; one daughter, two sons and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and one sister-in-law.

James R. Foran James R. “Jim” Foran, of Cherry Hill, New Jersey, died on June 20, 2016, at 86. Mr. Foran was an economics major at Holy Cross. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Joan; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren and their spouses; and two great-grandchildren.

James F. Hickey Jr. James F. Hickey Jr., of Hazlet, New Jersey, died on Aug. 30, 2016, at 87. Mr. Hickey served three years as an officer in the U.S. Navy. He worked for Proctor & Gamble for many years. A political science major at Holy Cross, he graduated cum laude and made the dean’s list. As a student, his activities included NROTC, Cross Currents, Sanctuary Society, student congress and intramural sports. Mr. Hickey supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society; he was affiliated with Naval ROTC and was a member of the O’Callahan Society. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Jackie; four daughters, two sons and their spouses; three sisters; 16 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Lester G. Jenkins, M.D. Lester G. Jenkins, M.D., of Swampscott, Massachusetts, died on Aug. 10, 2016, at 89. Dr. Jenkins studied premed at Holy Cross and received his doctorate from the University of Ireland Medical School in Cork. He was an obstetrician/gynecologist and practiced medicine for 30 years in Lynn, Massachusetts. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by two sisters; one brother and his wife; one sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

John B. Martin John B. “Matt” Martin, of Freehold, New Jersey, died on May 16, 2016, at 85. A philosophy and

literature major at Holy Cross, Mr. Martin was ordained a Passionist priest in 1959; he left the priesthood in 1969 and worked for the New Jersey State Department of Health in Trenton as the chief of drug treatment. He supported Holy Cross as an admissions advisor. He is survived by his wife, Mary Louise; four children; eight grandchildren; two sisters; and his niece, Michelle A. Carbonneau '96. He was predeceased by his parents and one brother.

Alfred S. McIntyre Alfred S. “Al” McIntyre, of Centerville, formerly of Westwood, Massachusetts, died on April 21, 2016. Mr. McIntyre enlisted in the U.S. Army and served in the Army of Occupation in Tokyo. He worked for 40 years at New England Telephone/NYNEX. He majored in business at Holy Cross, played football and was also a member of the Varsity Club. He is survived by his wife, Carol; one son; one daughter and her husband; and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by one sister and two brothers.

Robert F. Mooney Robert F. “Bob” Mooney, of Nantucket, Massachusetts, died on April 4, 2016, at 85. Mr. Mooney served three years in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, and was Nantucket’s state representative for three terms, retiring in 1962. A political science major at Holy Cross, Mr. Mooney graduated with honors from Harvard Law School and practiced law for many years in Boston and Nantucket. He supported the Holy Cross Fund Scholarship and was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by two sons; two daughters-in-law; and two grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Elizabeth “Betty,” and one son.

Lawrence A. Sancilio Lawrence A. “Larry” Sancilio, of Virginia Beach, Virginia, died on May 6, 2016, at 85. Mr. Sancilio graduated from Army OCS in Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, as a 2nd lieutenant; he served during the Korean War. He started Larasan Realty and Insurance Company, which became one of the largest in Hampton Roads prior to its sale after more than 35 years. He is survived by one sister; three sons, two daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; and many other relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his wife, Rachel.

John B. Singleton John B. Singleton, of Kennebunk, Maine, died on March 26, 2016, at 85. Mr. Singleton received a bachelor’s degree in physics from Holy Cross and a master’s degree in physics from the University of Rhode Island; he completed additional graduate work at Lehigh University. He worked for many years at Bell Laboratories in North Andover, Massachusetts, and, later, with Raychem in Palo Alto, California. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Marie; six children; 12 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

1953 Ronald J. Abbott Jr. Ronald J. Abbott Jr., of Midlothian, Virginia, died on Dec. 27, 2015, at 83. Following his graduation from Holy Cross, Mr. Abbott served in the U.S. Army, then joined the CIA; he later worked with the United Parcel Service for 29 years. He is survived by his wife, Moulan; two sons; one daughter; two daughtersin-law; eight grandchildren; and his nephew, John A. Houlihan ’78.

Gregory L. Brennan Gregory L. Brennan, of New York, died on July 20, 2016. Mr. Brennan was an economics major at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude. He was a member of Naval ROTC, and he supported the College as a member of the O'Callahan Society. He is survived by one son, Mark G. Brennan ’86, and his wife; one brother, Thomas M. Brennan ’48; and 28 nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife, Barbara.

John P. Carey, M.D. John P. Carey, M.D., of Longmeadow, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 31, 2015, at 83. A biology major at Holy Cross, Dr. Carey graduated from the Yale School of Medicine, and specialized in internal medicine and pulmonary disease. He was vice president and chief medical director at MassMutual Life Insurance Co., medical director at Springfield College Health Center and assistant clinical professor of medicine at Tuft University School of Medicine. He served as captain in the U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division from 1959-1961. He supported the College as a member of the career advisor network. Dr. Carey is survived by his wife of 57 years, Ann; six children and their spouses, including daughter Kathleen Carey Thompson

’83, son-in-law Michael J. Thompson, M.D., ’82, son John P. Carey Jr. ’85, and daughter-in-law Andrea L. Carey ’85; 13 grandchildren, including Lauren R. Carey ’19; one sister and her husband; one sister-in-law; and 12 nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his stepfather and his brother-in-law.

Owen C. Coogan Owen C. Coogan, of Worcester, died on Feb. 26, 2016, at 84. Mr. Coogan served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He graduated from the Boston College School of Social Work and worked in fundraising for the Diocese of Worcester. He was inducted into the Holy Cross Football Hall of Fame, and he was a member of the Holy Cross Varsity Club Hall of Fame. He is survived by one son, three daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and his close companion, June Camarra. He was predeceased by one brother and one sister.

Hon. Conrad K. Cyr Hon. Conrad K. Cyr, of Maine and Florida, died on July 28, 2016, at 84. Mr. Cyr was a social sciences major at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude. He earned his law degree from Yale University and practiced law in Limestone and Bangor, Maine, for several years. He became an assistant U.S. Attorney and embarked upon a very rewarding and highly successful career in the federal judiciary, serving as U.S. District Court judge in Bangor as well as on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit in Boston and on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court in Washington, D.C, among other roles. Mr. Cyr supported the College as a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by his wife, Diana; two sons; one daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; three brothers; in-laws; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his first wife, Judith Pirie Cyr; his parents; one sister; and several in-laws.

Louis G. Murphy Louis G. “Louie” Murphy, of Portsmouth, formerly of Newport, Rhode Island, died on May 1, 2016, at 84. Mr. Murphy was a longtime teacher in Newport, having served as chair of the Social Studies Department at Rogers High School and an invested senior class advisor. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Alice; one sister, one brother, Leonard T. Murphy '58, and their spouses; five children and their

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 85


IN MEMORIAM spouses; nine grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; two brothers; and two sons-in-law.

Hon. Kevin M. O'Halloran Hon. Kevin M. O'Halloran, of Washington Township, New Jersey, died on Nov. 3, 2015, at 84. A graduate of Fordham Law School, the longtime judge served as a Superior Court judge in Bergen County for two decades. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Bobbie; five daughters, two sons and their spouses, including Sheila M. Kenny '82 and her husband, Stephen G. Kenny '81; 23 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; two sisters; one brother-in-law; one sister-inlaw; and many nieces and nephews.

1954 John J. Campbell Jr. John J. Campbell Jr., of Naples, Florida, formerly of Brockton and Abington, Massachusetts, died on Oct. 17, 2015, at 82. Mr. Campbell served in the U.S. Army and received the Good Conduct Medal. A former probation officer and chief of probation, he earned a master’s degree in criminal justice from Boston University. He is survived by four sons; one daughter; two daughters-inlaw; seven grandchildren; and one cousin. He was predeceased by his wife, Janet.

John A. Derba Jr. John A. Derba Jr., of Florida, formerly of Medford, Massachusetts, died on Nov. 2, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann; four sons, one daughter and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.

Stephen F. Durocher Stephen F. Durocher, of Devon, Pennsylvania, formerly of Toms River, New Jersey, died on July 27, 2016, at 84. A political science major at Holy Cross, Mr. Durocher was a member of Naval ROTC. As an officer in the U.S. Navy, he served in the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and was part of the security force for President John F. Kennedy's visit to Pearl Harbor in June of 1963. Subsequently, he was the plant manager for a mailing house in Jersey City and Hoboken, New Jersey for nearly 30 years, and later worked as an inmate counselor at the Ocean County Jail in Toms River. Mr. Durocher supported the College as a member of

the O'Callahan Society. He is survived by one daughter; one sister; and many nieces and nephews and their families. He was predeceased by his wife, Noreen.

Rev. James L. Fahey Rev. James L. Fahey, of Boston, died on March 16, 2016, at 83. A member of the class of 1959 of St. John's Seminary, he was a priest of the Archdiocese of Boston, where he served as pastor, associate pastor and priest in residence at various parishes. He was a member of the faculty, dean of men and librarian at Pope John XXIII Seminary in Weston from 1968-1997. He is survived by one brother-in-law; two nieces; three nephews; and six grandnieces and grandnephews.

George B. Fargis Jr. George B. Fargis Jr., of Pleasanton, California, died on Nov. 4, 2015, at 82. An English major at Holy Cross, Mr. Fargis earned an MBA at CUNY and had a long career in finance and leasing. He served as a counterintelligence officer in both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Navy. Mr. Fargis stayed connected to the College as a class agent and alumni board director, and a member of the alumni board senate and career advisor network. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two sons, two daughters and their spouses; one stepson, one stepdaughter and their spouses; 16 grandchildren; seven siblings and their spouses; his cousin, Charles F. Frost '52; and his niece, Catherine Swanz Glastal '89. He was predeceased by his parents.

J. Philip Grask John Philip “Phil” Grask, of Clive, Iowa, died on Feb. 14, 2016, at 83. Mr. Grask served in the U.S. Navy in Korea. He owned and operated the National Car Rental franchise at the Des Moines International Airport, along with his children, for 42 years. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth “Betty”; two sons, one daughter and their spouses; eight grandchildren; three siblings, including E. Stephen Grask ’50; and many nieces and nephews, including George F. Grask ’73 and Paul S. Grask '76 . He was predeceased by his parents.

Joseph R. Harrington Jr. Joseph R. Harrington Jr., of Acton, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 4, 2015, at 83. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Alice; nine children, including Kevin P. Harrington ’80, and their families; three brothers, including Christopher M. Harrington ’73; one sister; and a large extended family of nieces, nephews, inlaws and their families.

Herbert J. Heimerl Jr. Herbert J. Heimerl Jr., of Victor, Idaho, died on Feb. 13, 2016, at 83. Mr. Heimerl served in the U.S. Navy. He earned a Doctor of Law degree from Cornell University, and was a longtime lawyer in Buffalo, New York, serving as partner at the law firm Harris Beach. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Maureen; one son; one daughter, Kathleen H. Spitzer ’93; and three grandchildren.

Robert J. Flynn

Harry G. Hill Jr.

Robert J. Flynn, of Annapolis, Maryland, died on June 15, 2016, at 83. Mr. Flynn enlisted in the U.S. Army and attended the Army Language School in Monterey, California; he then served as an Army counterintelligence agent in Munich, Germany. He graduated from Georgetown University Law School, and served as law clerk to the assistant attorney general of the U.S. Department of Justice, practiced law, and was later appointed an administrative law judge and served in that role until retirement. Mr. Flynn studied economics at Holy Cross and made the dean’s list; he also participated in intramural sports. Mr. Flynn was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by his wife, Dolores Allison; one sister; four children; six grandsons; two granddaughters; two great-grandsons; and one great-granddaughter.

Harry G. Hill Jr., of Garden City, New York, died on Feb. 8, 2016, at 83. Mr. Hill graduated magna cum laude from Holy Cross with studies in history, political science, and foreign affairs & strategy. He was also a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by three children, including Grace Moran ’81, and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; one brother; and one sister. He was predeceased by his wife, Harriet.

8 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Thomas G. Hohman Thomas G. “Tom” Hohman, of Rockville, Maryland, died on March 9, 2016, at 83. Mr. Hohman served for two years in the U.S. Army and then spent his career with Xerox Corporation. He is survived by his

wife of 52 years, Patricia “Trish”; one daughter; two sons; one son-in-law; one daughter-in-law; 10 grandchildren; one sister; and one brother.

Rev. Robert G. Morhous, OCSO Rev. Robert G. Morhous, OCSO, of St. Joseph's Abbey, Spencer, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 28, 2016, at 83. An English major at Holy Cross, Fr. Morhous entered St. Joseph's Abbey in 1954, pronounced his solemn vows in 1959 and was ordained a priest later that same year. His seminary training was conducted both at St Joseph's Abbey and at the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas (The Angelicum) in Rome, Italy. He also received a degree in liturgy from the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. In his 61 years of monastic life, Fr. Morhous served the abbey in many capacities, including director of liturgy, retreat master and director of Trappist Preserves. He is survived by several cousins; many friends; and his monastic brothers.

Robert D. Roe, M.D. Robert D. Roe, M.D., of Cleburne, Texas, died on July 3, 2016, at 84. Dr. Roe was a graduate of New York Medical College. He entered the U.S. Navy and served as senior medical officer at the Naval Station Hospital, Midway Island, and chief surgeon at the Navy Hospital at Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. He was also an instructor at the University of Puerto Rico School Of Medicine, and he served as commanding officer and chief surgeon at the Children's Memorial Hospital of the 3rd Marine Division in Dong Ha, Vietnam, where he also served as commanding officer of the Delta Medical Facility. For six years he was chief of general surgery at the VA Medical Center in Temple, Texas, where he also was a professor of surgery for the Texas A&M University School of Medicine. Dr. Roe ran his practice in Cleburne for more than 20 years before working for the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston as a prison physician. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Helen; one son, three daughters and their spouses; 12 grandchildren and their spouses; one great-grandson; several nieces and nephews; and numerous other family members

David A. Sheehan David A. Sheehan, of New York, New York, died on June 22, 2016. He was a member of the varsity swim team.


1955 Angelo T. Arena Angelo T. Arena, of Middletown, formerly of Westfield and Mountainside, New Jersey, died on Feb. 10, 2016. Mr. Arena worked for IBM for 30 years. He is survived by four children and their spouses; and 14 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Estelle “Stella.”

Donald J. Belger Donald J. “Don” Belger, of Hopkinton, Massachusetts, formerly of Brooklyn, New York, died on April 16, 2016, at 82. Mr. Belger graduated from Fordham Law School and worked for many years in insurance claims at Allstate Insurance and Marsh and McLennan in New York. He is survived by two sons, one daughter and their spouses; and eight grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Betty.

Luke H. Boyd Jr. Luke H. Boyd Jr., of Winchester, Virginia, died on Dec. 24, 2015, at 82. Mr. Boyd received his MBA from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and he attended law school at the University of Denver. After working in the business sector for many years, he practiced law and served in the Winchester Public Defender Office until retirement. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; two daughters, three sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; one sister and her husband; and one brother and his wife. He was predeceased by one son; one grandson; one sister; and two brothers.

John F. Comerford John F. Comerford, of Normal, Illinois, formerly of Boston, died on Nov. 6, 2015, at 82. Mr. Comerford worked as a securities analyst in Boston. He is survived by his brother; one son and his wife; two grandchildren; two nephews; four nieces; two cousins; and additional extended family. He was predeceased by his wife, Mary; his parents; one sister; and one cousin.

Paul G. Dobbs Paul G. Dobbs, of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, formerly of Old Tappan, New Jersey, and Pocono Pines, Pennsylvania, died Jan. 23, 2016, at 81. His spent his career in accounting/ finance, serving as vice president of

finance for Sinclair & Valentine Co. in New York, controller for Inmont Corp in New Jersey and in various financial positions for BASF Corporation in New Jersey. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Janet; one son, two daughters and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

Vincent P. Genecco Vincent P. Genecco, of Fayetteville, New York, died on Jan. 13, 2016, at 82. Mr. Genecco served in the U.S. Army Counter Intelligence Corps in Japan. He managed his family’s grocery store before eventually becoming executive vice president of P&C Food Markets. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Anita; two sons; one daughter, Maria Genecco Stotz ’90, and her husband; one daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two sisters-in-law; one brother and his wife; one sister and her husband; one brother-in-law and his wife; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; one brother; one nephew; and one niece-in-law.

Rev. James J. Hosie, S.J. Rev. James J. “Jim” Hosie, S.J., of Dorchester, Massachusetts, died on May 31, 2016, at 83. An English major at Holy Cross, Fr. Hosie graduated cum laude; he was a member of Naval ROTC and was involved in intramural sports, the Purple Patcher and the Sodality group. He earned a licentiate at Weston College and a master’s in education at Harvard. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1955 at the Novitiate of St. Stanislaus in Louisiana, was ordained in 1965 at Weston College, and pronounced final vows in 1971 at St. George’s College in Jamaica, where he spent 24 years teaching Latin, religion and math and coaching tennis, eventually serving as headmaster. He joined the faculty at Boston College High School in 1989, and had a second career teaching scripture for 26 years. He supported Holy Cross as a member of the class reunion committee, Mutual Support Network and O'Callahan Society. Fr. Hosie is survived by one brother; three sisters; his niece, Julie Golden Tocci ’84; and his cousin, Paul T. Sullivan ’60.

Thomas G. McLoughlin, M.D. Thomas G. McLoughlin, M.D., of New Smyrna Beach, Florida, died on June 19, 2016, at 82. Dr. McLoughlin attended University College of Galway Medical School in Galway, Ireland, and he practiced medicine for 50 years, specializing in pediatric cardiology. He

maintained a private practice in Babylon, New York, was an attending physician at Saint Francis Hospital in Roslyn, New York, and was chief of the Pediatric Residency Program at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip, New York. He later opened a practice in Daytona Beach, Florida, and was an attending physician at Florida Memorial Hospital in Ormond Beach, and Halifax Medical Center in Daytona Beach. He was a biology major at Holy Cross. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Mary Eileen; four children and their spouses and partners, including daughter Katrina M. Cabral ’81 and son-in-law Howard J. Cabral ’80; five grandchildren; three brothers; two sisters; and many nieces and nephews.

Bernard J. McManus Jr. Bernard J. “Jim” McManus Jr., of Worcester , died on Feb. 2, 2016, at 83. Mr. McManus was employed in sales and marketing for American Greetings and Smith Corona. He earned a degree in business administration from Holy Cross, and he participated in intramural sports and played hockey, serving as captain in 1955. He stayed connected to the College as a class agent. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters and their husbands; six grandchildren; one brother and his wife; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife of 46 years, Margaret, and one brother.

Lawrence V. McMurrer Lawrence V. McMurrer, of West Hartford, Connecticut, died on Dec. 13, 2015, at 84. Mr. McMurrer is survived by his wife, Carol, and his niece, Elizabeth A. Kozerski ’84.

Michael P. Mehr, M.D., ’55 Michael P. “Mike” Mehr, M.D., of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, died on June 29, 2016, at 82. Dr. Mehr attended Georgetown Medical School in Washington, D.C., and graduated cum laude. He practiced medicine in Waukesha, Marshfield and Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, for more than 30 years. Dr. Mehr served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and retired with the rank of captain. He studied premed at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude; he participated in the Purple Key Society. He was a member of the 1955 Support Network Committee. He is survived by his wife of 27 years, Patricia; five sons, one daughter and their spouses; one stepson, one stepdaughter and their spouses; 15 grandchildren; and one

brother, J. Tracy Mehr ’50, and his wife. He was predeceased by his parents; two sisters; one brother-in-law; and one daughter-in-law.

Ronald J. Motta Ronald J. Motta, of Santa Rosa, California, died on Dec. 2, 2015, at 82. A respected lawyer, Mr. Motta received his law degree from Santa Clara University. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Marilyn; one son, two daughters and their spouses; nine grandchildren; one grandson-in-law; two greatgrandchildren; and extended family.

Michael J. Murphy Michael J. Murphy, of Shaker Heights, Ohio, died on July 22, 2016, at 82. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Murphy was a professor of social work and served in the U.S. Air Force, retiring with the rank of captain in 1967. He supported the College as a member of the career advisor network. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Margaret; one son, two daughters and their spouses; five grandchildren; one sister; and four nieces and nephews.

Walter K. Murray Walter K. Murray, of Lincoln, Massachusetts, formerly of Sarasota, Florida, Albany, New York, and Longmeadow, Massachusetts, died on May 1, 2016, at 84. Mr. Murray served in the U.S. Army. He then dedicated 32 years of service to Sears, Roebuck and Company, holding various executive management positions. Mr. Murray graduated cum laude from Holy Cross with a degree in English; he supported the College as an admissions advisor and as a member of the 1843 Society and career advisor network. He is survived by his wife, Mary; one daughter and her husband; one granddaughter, Caitlin M. Arnold '10, and her husband; and one grandson and his girlfriend.

Gerald M. Paradies Gerald M. “Gerry” Paradies, of Rochester, New York, died on Dec. 21, 2015, at 82. Mr. Paradies served in the U.S. Army. He studied business administration at Holy Cross and was employed by the National Cash Register Co. and Xerox. Mr. Paradies was a member of the 1843 Society and the class reunion committee. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Joanne; two sons; one daughter-in-law; one granddaughter; one sister; one brother-in-law; five nephews; and three nieces. He was predeceased by his parents.

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 87


IN MEMORIAM Terry D. Ryan, M.D. Terry D. Ryan, M.D., of Bonita Springs, Florida, and Niantic, Connecticut, died on May 21, 2016, at 82. Dr. Ryan was a premed student at Holy Cross and a member of the band; he graduated cum laude with a degree in biology and chemistry. He received a medical degree from Tufts University and Harvard University. He was chief of ophthalmology at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts. He supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society, career advisor network and HOIAH Marching Band Alumni committee. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Frances, and his brother John G. Ryan '55.

1956 William E. Bartik Sr., D.D.S. William E. “Bill” Bartik Sr., D.D.S., of Lake Ronkonkoma, New York, died on May 28, 2016, at 81. Dr. Bartik earned his doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania Dental School. After his studies, he served at Fort Benning, Georgia, as a captain in the U.S. Army and later became a successful and favorite local dentist. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Anita; two sons; two daughters; one sister; four grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren.

Joseph P. Boyle Joseph P. “Joe” Boyle, of Beverly, Massachusetts, died on March 30, 2016, at 81. Mr. Boyle was an economics major at Holy Cross; he also earned an MBA from Boston University. A chartered financial analyst, he spent his professional life in the banking industry, starting out as an oil analyst and retiring as a trust portfolio manager. As an alumnus, Mr. Boyle was a supporter of the Holy Cross football team. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Jolyne; one daughter, Johanna Boyle Robinson ’93; two sons, including Daniel J. Boyle ’91; one sonin-law; two daughters-in-law; seven grandchildren; two brothers; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by one brother.

Robert L. Cooney Robert L. “Bob” Cooney, of Vero Beach, Florida, died on March 9, 2016, at 82. An economics and history major at Holy Cross, Mr. Cooney made the dean’s list; he also played intramural sports and was captain of the golf team. He

served as a photo-intelligence officer in the U.S. Navy. After graduating from Harvard Business School, he pursued a career as an investment banker on Wall Street. He supported Holy Cross as a member of the 1843 Society, career advisor Network and the Varsity Club. Mr. Cooney is survived by his wife, Anne; one son, one daughter and their spouses; one stepson, one stepdaughter and their spouses; and nine grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents; one sister; and one brother.

John P. Cotter John P. Cotter, of Gulf Breeze, Florida, died on Aug. 4, 2015, at 81. Mr. Cotter was an economics major at Holy Cross and also served in the U.S. Air Force. He spent his career in the real estate business. He is survived by two sons, one daughter and their spouses; and five grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Nan; one son; and his parents.

Robert F. Dray Robert F. Dray, of Boston, died Dec. 23, 2015. A graduate of the New England School of Law, Mr. Dray was a partner with his father at the law firm Katzmann and Dray. He withdrew from Holy Cross for two years to serve in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War, and returned to graduate with the class of 1956. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; two sisters and their husbands; one brother and his wife; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents.

Henry B. Milroy Henry B. “Hank” Milroy, of Enfield, Connecticut, formerly of Longmeadow, Massachusetts, died on May 22, 2016, at 81. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Milroy was a 25-year employee of Mass Mutual Life Insurance Company, retiring as vice president and managing director in the Real Estate Investment Division. He was a seven-year veteran of the U.S. Navy; his last duty station was the Naval Supply Depot at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where he served as the base fiscal officer during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He is survived by one son, three daughters and their spouses; seven grandchildren; one great-granddaughter; several cousins, nieces and nephews; and his close friend, Virginia J. Broderick. He was predeceased by his wife of 42 years, Jacqueline.

8 8 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

Eugene T. Schayer

Charles F. Farrell

Eugene T. “Gene” Schayer, of Kennesaw, Georgia, died on June 27, 2016, at 81. Mr. Schayer was a veteran, serving in the U.S. Air Force. He owned Lady American Associates in Kennesaw. He studied political science and history at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude; he was involved in The Purple. He is survived by one brother; five daughters, one son and their spouses; and 12 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his first wife, Betty.

Charles F. Farrell, of Essex Junction, Vermont, died on Feb. 10, 2016, at 80. Mr. Farrell served in the U.S. Navy. He joined the Edmundite Seminary and served for 20 years as a Roman Catholic priest. He later worked as a full-time chair car driver for Baystate Franklin Medical Center, Greenfield, Massachusetts. Mr. Farrell is survived by his wife, Diana; 12 nieces and nephews; and 26 great-nieces and great-nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; two sisters; and one stepson.

1957 Howard F. Carpenter Jr., M.D. Howard F. Carpenter Jr., M.D., of West Dennis, formerly of South Easton, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 16, 2016. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Carpenter served in the U.S. Navy as a flight surgeon with the U.S. Marines during the Vietnam War. He retired as a captain from the Naval Reserve after 30 years of service. For over 40 years, Dr. Carpenter maintained his own surgical practice in Brockton and was also a medical examiner for the Plymouth County 1st District. He is survived by his wife of nearly 57 years, Wilma; two daughters, one son and their spouses; seven grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; two sisters; a brother-in-law and his wife; and many nieces and nephews.

Joseph V. Casale Joseph V. Casale, of Greenwich, Connecticut, formerly of Harrison, New York, died on May 3, 2016, at 80. An English and classics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Casale played on the varsity baseball team and made the dean’s list. He stayed connected to the College as a member of the 1843 Society, Fitton Society, reunion gift committee and career advisor network; he also served as an admissions advisor. Mr. Casale served on active duty as an infantry officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, stationed for a time on Okinawa. He then worked as an undercover agent for the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, before beginning his career in life insurance, first with Connecticut General, and then with the Phoenix Companies; he rose to become the general manager of the Manhattan Agency for the Phoenix Companies. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Doris; one daughter, two sons, including Francis E. Casale '88, and their spouses; six grandchildren; one brother; and two sisters.

Francis W. Favazza, M.D. Francis W. “Frank” Favazza, M.D., of Palmer Township, Pennsylvania, died on March 17, 2016, at 80. Dr. Favazza received his medical degree from New York Medical College; he was a psychiatrist serving as director of psychiatry at Easton Hospital and the VA, retiring from the VA in 2015. He served as a captain in the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by one son and his wife; one daughter; four grandchildren; and six greatgrandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Marilyn.

John B. Kelly John B. Kelly Sr., of Fall River, formerly of Westport, Massachusetts, died March 18, 2016, at 79. Mr. Kelly was a teacher for the Westport School Department. He is survived by one son; three daughters; two sons-in-law; five grandchildren; one great-granddaughter; his former wife, Mary; and several nieces and nephews.

Gordon R. Massa Gordon R. Massa, of Cincinnati, died on July 16, 2016, at 80. Mr. Massa was an economics major at Holy Cross, where he played baseball, basketball and football; he is a member of the Holy Cross Varsity Club Hall of Fame. He briefly played for the Chicago Cubs before he moved on to a successful sales career with Ashland Chemical. He supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society and the Varsity Club. Mr. Massa is survived by three sons, three daughters and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; two sisters; one brother; and his nephew, Mark A. Massa '77. He was predeceased by his wife, Clare.


Edward L. McDermott Sr. Edward L. “Ted” McDermott Sr., of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, died on May 6, 2016, at 81. Mr. McDermott enjoyed a 45-year career in the investment business. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Molly; two sons and their families; three grandchildren; and one brother.

James E. McDonald James E. “Jim” McDonald, of Kensington, Maryland, formerly of Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania, died on March 30, 2016, at 80. Mr. McDonald was an economics major at Holy Cross. He attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and was a longtime employee of IBM. He is survived by four daughters; one son and his wife; two grandchildren; one sister; four brothers, including John J. McDonald '58; and his niece, Lynne McDonald Harding '85. He was predeceased by his wife, Jane.

Robert P. McElynn Robert P. “Bob” McElynn, of Dayton, Tennessee, died on June 18, 2016, at 80. Mr. McElynn was a veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard, and he was the founder of RPM Associates. He is survived by his wife, Adair Reed; one sister; two daughters; one son; one daughter-in-law; one son-in-law; six grandchildren and their spouses; 10 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

1958 Paul T. Branon Paul T. Branon, of Acton, Massachusetts, died on July 17, 2016, at 80. Mr. Branon served as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, as a combat ready crew member of the B-47; he was a local business owner. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Mary; four children and their spouses; six grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by seven brothers and two sisters.

Richard A. Cardinal Richard A. “Dick” Cardinal, of Fountain Hills, Arizona, died on June 23, 2016, at 79. Mr. Cardinal served two years in the U.S. Air Force. He worked at Burroughs Corporation, and

at Itel as a marketing executive; later, he was vice president at Automatic Data Processing. He was an economics major at Holy Cross and a member of ROTC. He served as an admissions advisor and was a member of the Varsity Club. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons, two daughters and their spouses; seven grandchildren; two brothers; and two sisters.

Richard A. Cody Richard A. “Dick” Cody, of Marstons Mills, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 21, 2015. Mr. Cody graduated from Columbia Law School and was a respected lawyer who, after many years in private practice, served as director of the special investigation unit and assistant general counsel for the Massachusetts Division of Insurance. He studied English at Holy Cross and made the dean’s list. As an alumnus, he was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by two sons; and granddaughters.

Bruce A. Damm Bruce A. Damm, of Virginia Beach, Virginia, died on Aug. 23, 2016. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Damm served as an admissions advisor and class agent; he was also a member of the class reunion committee. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen, and three children.

Richard A. Durot Richard A. Durot, of Bristol, Rhode Island, died on May 27, 2016, at 79. Mr. Durot was an economics and philosophy major at Holy Cross. He graduated from Officer’s Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island, and served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy for three years. He was a stockbroker in Boston for over 25 years. He is survived by three stepchildren; four sons and their wives; one brother and his wife; four grandchildren; five stepgrandchildren; and a former spouse, Sonia Lowis Wilson. He was predeceased by his wife, Joan, and one son.

Hon. Thomas J. Giaimo Hon. Thomas J. Giaimo, of Cheshire, Connecticut, died on Feb. 14, 2016, at 78. A political science major at Holy Cross, he graduated from the University of Connecticut Law School. He practiced law for 40 years

and served as judge of probate for the Town of East Haven, Connecticut, from 1967-1998. He supported the Holy Cross Fund Scholarship, was a member of the 1843 Society and Holy Cross Lawyers Association and served as an admissions advisor. He is survived by his wife, Geraldine; two sons, one daughter and their spouses; eight grandchildren; one brother; and one daughter-in-law. He was predeceased by one son.

Charles F. Hughes Charles F. Hughes, of Lexington, Kentucky, died on Sept. 12, 2015. Mr. Hughes was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Mary.

James H. Lenden Jr. James H. Lenden Jr., of Delmar, New York, died on Oct. 28, 2015. Mr. Lenden was a political science major at Holy Cross and a member of Navy ROTC. He served in the U.S. Navy, and spent his career in the telecommunications industry. He was a member of the alumni board senate, the alumni executive committee and the O’Callahan Society, and also served as an alumni board director. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Joanne; five children and their spouses; and 12 grandchildren.

Richard F. Loman Richard F. Loman, of Bellevue, Washington, died on Jan. 26, 2016. Mr. Loman was an economics major at Holy Cross, and he was a member of the Beta Gamma Sigma business honor society and made the dean’s list. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two daughters; and two sons.

John M. McQueeny John M. McQueeny, of Garden City, New York, died on Jan. 25, 2016. He is survived by his wife, Madelon; three sons and their spouses, including John F. McQueeny II ’87; two grandchildren; and his brother, Stephen McQueeny ’63.

Walter G. Wrobleski Jr., M.D. Walter G. Wrobleski Jr., M.D., of Bedford, New Hampshire, died on May 18, 2016. Dr. Wrobleski earned his medical degree at the University of Vermont. He served in the U.S. Army before going into private practice in Nashua, New Hampshire. He also served as chief of staff at St. Joseph Hospital

in Nashua. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; five children and their spouses; one granddaughter; three sisters-in-law; three brothers-in-law, including Richard G. Sharek '75; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; one brother; and one sister.

1959 Joseph M. Civetta, M.D. Joseph M. Civetta, M.D., of Tavernier, Florida, died on March 30, 2016, at 77. He is survived by his wife, Judith.

Gordon L. Datka, M.D. Gordon L. Datka, M.D., of Franklin, Wisconsin, died on June 21, 2016, at 78. He is survived by his wife, Linda; six children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; one great-grandson; and one sister and her husband.

William D. Ferguson Jr. William D. Ferguson Jr., of Short Hills, New Jersey, died on March 31, 2016, at 78. Mr. Ferguson was a political science major at Holy Cross. He served two years in the U.S. Navy, stationed in Yokosuka, Japan. He is survived by his wife, Christine, and his brother, John D. Ferguson ’61.

Jerome E. Hickey Jerome E. “Jerry” Hickey, longtime resident of Winnetka, and then Chicago and Lake Bluff, Illinois, died on March 23, 2016, at 78. An economics and philosophy major at Holy Cross, Mr. Hickey served the Society of Jesus in many capacities throughout his life. He was director of the Western Golf Association. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Denise; five children and their spouses; 13 grandchildren; two sisters; two brothers; in-laws; his niece Mary G. Barry ’82; his nephews Daniel D. Hickey ’88 and Paul T. Hickey ’96; and his godson, Joseph B. Howell ’09 .

Hayes E. Irons Jr. Hayes E. Irons Jr., of Whitestone, New York, died on Feb. 9, 2016. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Patricia, and one son.

George F. Murphy George F. Murphy, of Worcester, died on March 5, 2016, at 78. Mr. Murphy earned his Master of Arts degree

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 89


IN MEMORIAM from Worcester State College and had a 40-year career as an educator in the Auburn (Massachusetts) Public School System. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons, Richard G. Murphy ’77 and Robert F. Murphy ’78, and their wives; one daughter, Lori J. Murphy ’83, and her husband, Gregory J. Young ’83; five stepchildren; nine grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Daniel T. Sweeney Daniel T. “Dan” Sweeney, of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, died on July 16, 2016, at 78. Mr. Sweeney served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was an insurance broker, employed by Mass Mutual Financial Group since May 1966. He is survived by his wife of 22 years, Sandra; three daughters; one son; two sons-inlaw; two daughters-in-law; two stepsons and their wives; 18 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

Arthur C. Ungerer II, D.D.S. Arthur C. “Bud” Ungerer II, D.D.S., of Syracuse and Cicero, New York, died on Dec. 15, 2015, at 78. Dr. Ungerer was a graduate of the University of Buffalo Dental School, and practiced dentistry in Camillus, New York. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. Dr. Ungerer was active in the Holy Cross Club of Central New York, and he supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society. He is survived by his wife, Mary; one daughter and her husband; seven grandchildren; three brothers; and one sister.

1960 Richard K. Ausbrook Richard K. Ausbrook, of Kennebunk, Maine, died on April 12, 2016, at 77. Mr. Ausbrook attended the University of Chicago Law School, interrupting his education to serve as a lieutenant with the U.S. Coast Guard Reserves; he later completed his J.D. and LL.M. degrees at Western New England Law School, while serving progressively as vice president, director and division head in the Ocean Marine Division of Travelers Corporation. An expert in marine insurance loss mitigation, he served in a number of executive leadership positions in the insurance industry worldwide; he was also an adviser to U.S. senators and congressmen regarding business operations in Iraq, Syria and Lebanon, and a member of the U.S. Department of State trade delegation to Iraq. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; four daughters; one son; three sons-in-

law; seven grandchildren; and many cousins and friends.

Anthony J. Bellanca Anthony J. Bellanca, of Chesterfield, Michigan, died on Aug. 14, 2016, at 78. Mr. Bellanca practiced law for 50 years with his brothers and nephews in the firm founded by his father. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Marianne; four children, including James V. Bellanca II ’93, and their spouses; four grandchildren; one brother; and nieces and nephews.

Thomas A. Brennan Jr. Thomas A. Brennan Jr., of Stamford, Connecticut, formerly of Eastchester, New York, died on Aug. 24, 2016, at 78. A history major at Holy Cross, Mr. Brennan earned his law degree from the Fordham University School of Law. He worked as an attorney for Keating & Ricca, then Whalen & O’Neill, both in New York City. He later joined the Office of General Counsel of The Hearst Corporation, and then served 10 years as director of The Hearst Family Trust. Mr. Brennan served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three daughters, including Eileen D. Brennan ’85, one son and their spouses; 13 grandchildren; one sister; in-laws; nieces, including Maureen McGrath Svoboda ’84 and Mary McGrath Donovan ’82; nephews, including Edward J. Burke Jr. ’86; and cousins. He was predeceased by his mother and his father, Thomas A. Brennan, Sr., class of 1925; one sister; and one grandson.

Deacon Richard A. Cloutier Deacon Richard A. “Dick” Cloutier, of Nashua, New Hampshire, died on March 24, 2016, at 78. Deacon Cloutier studied education at Holy Cross and received a master’s degree in international relations from Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska. He was a deacon in the Roman Catholic Church since his ordination in 1980; he served at St. John Neumann Catholic Community for 25 years. He completed 20 years of military service and retired with the rank of lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force; he received the Bronze Star for his service in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War. After retirement from the Air Force, he worked for Sanders Associates, Lockheed Sanders and BAE, where he was the manager of the Software Engineering Process Group. He also supported the College as an

9 0 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

admissions advisor. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Anne; one daughter; one son and his wife; and one grandchild.

Robert F. Connelly Robert F. “Bob” Connelly, of Springfield and Osterville, Massachusetts, died on March 7, 2016, at 77. A French major at Holy Cross, Mr. Connelly was in the honors program and graduated cum laude. His activities at the College included Aquinas Circle, College Choir and Glee Club. He was the recipient of the Bourgeois French Prize and the St. Thomas More Award. The recipient of a Fulbright grant, he studied at the Université de Poitiers in France and received a Master of Arts degree from American International College. He received a Woodrow Wilson fellowship for study at Princeton University and took educational accreditation courses at the College of Our Lady of the Elms in Chicopee, Massachusetts. He earned his Juris Doctor cum laude at Western New England College School of Law. Mr. Connelly taught French, English and Latin in the Suffield (Connecticut) Public Schools, retiring as director, Department of Foreign Languages. He also worked as a lawyer with the Springfield law firm of Moriarty, Donoghue and Leja, P.C. and was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. Mr. Connelly is survived by his wife of 50 years, Carolyn; two sons, one daughter-in-law; two grandsons; one sister and her husband; several nieces, nephews, including Richard T. O'Connor ’73, grandnieces and grandnephews; his in-law Thomas M. Murphy ’52 ; and many dear friends.

John W. Davis Jr., D.D.S. John W. “Jack” Davis Jr., D.D.S., of Holden and Dennis, Massachusetts, died on Feb. 2, 2016, at 78. Dr. Davis graduated from the former Seton Hall College of Medicine and Dentistry. A captain in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam era, he practiced dentistry in Worcester for almost 40 years. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Nancy; two daughters; one son; one brother; one sister-in-law; one niece and nephews; and close friends.

John E. Eckert John E. Eckert, of Marstons Mills, Massachusetts, died on Oct. 18, 2015, at 78. Mr. Eckert worked many years in advertising and hotel management. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Frances; one son; one daughter; three grandsons; his twin sister; and three feline friends.

James H. Holly James H. Holly, of Rolling Hills Estates, California, died on Feb. 7, 2016, at 77. Mr. Holly graduated cum laude from Holy Cross with a degree in business administration – marketing and was a member of Naval ROTC. After graduation, he served in the U.S. Navy until 1962. Mr. Holly earned his MBA from Harvard Business School, and spent many years working in the business sector. He was a member of the Holy Cross Alumni Association and the O’Callahan NROTC Society. He is survived by his wife, Judith; one daughter; two grandchildren; and one brother, two sisters, one nephew and their spouses.

Richard J. O’Brien Richard J. O’Brien, of Northampton, Massachusetts, died on April 7, 2016, at 77. Mr. O’Brien taught social studies in the Chicopee (Massachusetts) School System. He played football at Holy Cross. He is survived by one sister; one brother-in-law; nieces, including his goddaughter, and nephews; one grandniece; cousins, including Dana J. St. James ’77; and extended family and friends. He was predeceased by his parents and five brothers.

Terrence Wadsworth Terrence “Terry” Wadsworth, of Santa Rosa, California, died on June 7, 2016, at 77. Mr. Wadsworth served three years as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. An economics major at Holy Cross, he worked for 31 years in the International Division of Chase Manhattan Bank and retired as senior vice president. He supported the College as a member of the Fitton and 1843 societies; he was also a member of the Varsity Club as a former football team manager. He served as a Holy Cross class agent and on the class reunion committee. Mr. Wadsworth is survived by his wife of 50 years, Cristina; two sons, Gregory Wadsworth ’88 and Geoffrey Wadsworth ’90, one daughter and their spouses; six grandchildren; and one sister, her husband and their three children.

1961

John J. Darby Jr. John J. Darby Jr., of Washington, D.C., died on July 7, 2012. He is survived by four children; four sisters; six grandchildren; and a cousin, Raymond C. Hurley ’73. He was predeceased by his wife, Jane.


Robert Guillette

Carl A. Stetz, M.D.

Robert Guillette, of North Attleboro, Massachusetts, died on Feb. 18, 2016, at 77. Mr. Guillette earned a master’s degree from Northeastern University. He retired as a commander in the U.S. Navy Reserve, following active duty years teaching at the Officer Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island, and service as a Blue and Gold Officer for the U.S. Naval Academy. At Holy Cross, Mr. Guillette studied economics and philosophy, and was a CCD teacher. As an alumnus, he served as an admissions advisor. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; his daughter, Christine G. Abbott ’97; his niece, Mary Hobin Seely ’84; and his cousins, Charles R. Guillette ’60, Raymond A. Guillette, M.D., ’64, Andrew R. Guillette ’86 and Mary Ann Guillette ’91.

Carl A. Stetz, M.D., of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, died on Oct. 24, 2015, at 75. A graduate of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Dr. Stetz specialized in obstetrics and gynecology, having served as head of obstetrics and gynecology at Clara Maass Medical Center in Belleville, New Jersey. He was a biology major at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude. Dr. Stetz supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society and an admissions advisor. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Krystyna; one son; and one sister.

Monsignor Robert E. Lawrence Monsignor Robert E. Lawrence, of Tomball, Texas, died on May 25, 2016. He was a history major at Holy Cross. Monsignor Lawrence attended St. John Vianney Seminary in Randolph, Vermont, and Theological College at Catholic University of America in Washington, D. C., where he earned a licentiate in Canon Law. He was ordained a Catholic priest on May 19, 1967, in St. Peter’s Church in Rutland, Vermont, and served in a number of parishes in Vermont and California. He is survived by one brother, one sister and their spouses; three nieces, their spouses and children; and many friends.

James T.F. Mullowney James T.F. “Jim” Mullowney, of Marshfield, formerly of Belmont and Brookline, Massachusetts, died on April 24, 2016, at 77. Mr. Mullowney served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Carol; five children and their spouses and partners; nine grandchildren; two sisters-in-law; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

Richard A. Skinner Richard A. Skinner, of Alpharetta, Georgia, died on Aug. 18, 2016, at 76. In addition to being a small-business owner, Mr. Skinner specialized in finance, working for many companies, including Time Warner Inc., Celotex and Oki Telecom. He is survived by his wife, Judith; two brothers; two sons, two daughters and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.

a clinical preceptor for several medical schools, including Mayo Clinic Medical School and the State University of New York Medical School. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons, three daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; his mother-in-law and father-in-law; many brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews and close friends; and two dogs.

Col. Peter K. Foley, USAF (Ret.)

Joseph M. “Joe” Corr, of Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, died on Jan. 20, 2016, at 75. Mr. Corr earned a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Princeton University and a law degree from Temple University School of Law. After practicing law for several years at Boeing, Kilwanee and Certainteed corporations, he started a new chapter in his professional life as a venture capitalist and owner of several successful companies. He is survived by his wife, Janet; two daughters and their spouses; eight grandchildren; two brothers, three sisters and their spouses; and many nieces and nephews.

Col. Peter K. Foley, USAF (Ret.), of Georgia, died on Jan. 20, 2016, at 74. Col. Foley was an economics major at Holy Cross. During his 26-year military career, he served two tours with the 469th Fighter Wing, Korat RTAFB, Thailand during the Vietnam War; he also had assignments in Germany, Belgium and Saudi Arabia, among other locations. His many medals include two Silver Stars, three Legion of Merits and a Bronze Star. Following retirement from the military, he was active in business in Durban, South Africa, before relocating to Atlanta. As an alumnus, he served as an admissions advisor and was a member of the O’Callahan Society. Col. Foley is survived by his wife, Caryl; one daughter; two brothers, including Thomas F. X. Foley '66; one sister; and his nephew, Christopher D. Foley '94. He was buried, with full military honors, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.

Edward E. Eldridge, M.D.

Hon. Paul F. Healy Jr.

Edward E. “Ed” Eldridge, M.D., of Alton, New Hampshire, died on June 21, 2016. A biology major at Holy Cross, Dr. Eldridge received his Doctor of Medicine degree at New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York. After graduating from medical school, he served as a lieutenant commander, Medical Corps, in the U.S. Naval Reserve at the U.S. Naval Station Dispensary in Keflavik, Iceland; he continued his military career with the New Hampshire Army Reserves National Guard as battalion surgeon, Major Medical Corps, and as brigade surgeon, LTC, Medical Corps. Dr. Eldridge was a board certified pediatrician and family practice provider for over 45 years; he also served in such roles as staff physician and associate director of professional services at the University of New Hampshire, staff physician with the State of New Hampshire Department of Corrections and medical examiner for the state of Maine, among others. He was an adjunct professor at the University of New Hampshire’s Department of Nursing and Department of Health Administration and Planning, as well as

Hon. Paul F. Healy Jr., of Sudbury, Massachusetts, died on April 6, 2016, at 75. Mr. Healy served in the U.S. Navy as a judge advocate general (JAG), and he was a first justice of Framingham (Massachusetts) District Court, before retiring in 2010. He majored in economics at Holy Cross. As an alumnus, served as a class agent and was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Sherry; two daughters; one son, Paul F. Healy III ’96; one daughter-inlaw; one son-in-law; four grandchildren; one sister; one brother and his wife; and his nephew, Richard Frederick Sawyer Jr., M.D., ’80.

1962 Joseph M. Corr

Francis J. Montillo Francis J. Montillo, of Wake Forest, North Carolina, died on June 6, 2016, at 76. Mr. Montillo graduated from Boston College, Holy Cross and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He worked at IBM in New York for 27 years and retired as a senior engineer. Mr. Montillo earned a master’s degree in chemistry at Holy Cross and was an orientation leader. He

is survived by his wife, Charlotte; one daughter and her husband; one son and his wife; four grandsons; and one sister.

1963 Peter J. Cahill Peter J. Cahill, of Gloucester, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 9, 2016, at 74. Mr. Cahill earned a law degree from Boston College and practiced law in Gloucester. He is survived by his wife, Ann Joy; nine children and their spouses, including Jonathan W. Cahill ’88, Ann CahillSwenson ’91 and Mary Cahill-Farella ’93; two sisters and their husbands; 22 grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by one brother and one sister.

John E. Donegan John E. Donegan, of Branford, Connecticut, died on June 16, 2016, at 74. Mr. Donegan graduated from the University of Connecticut Law School. He practiced law in Branford for 50 years and was a partner in the law firm Gibson & Donegan, LLC; he also served as the probate judge of Branford for 20 years, until his retirement. He is survived by his wife, Betty Ann; two daughters, including Christine M. Donegan ’91; one son-inlaw; two grandchildren; one brother; one sister; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by one sister.

Dennis J. Driscoll Dennis J. Driscoll, of Garden City, New York, died on March 1, 2016. Mr. Driscoll was the owner and president of Great Eastern Printing Company Inc., in Syosset, New York. He is survived by his wife, Anne Denyse "Denny”; one daughter; two sons; one daughter-inlaw; four grandchildren; several siblings and their spouses; many in-laws; 20 nieces and nephews; and 15 grandnieces and grandnephews.

Gerald J. Fogarty Jr. Gerald J. Fogarty Jr., of Barrington, Rhode Island, died on April 6, 2016, at 74. Mr. Fogarty co-founded Phoenix Investment Management, where he served as managing director; he later served as co-leader of Washington Trust Investors. An English major at Holy Cross, he supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society and a class agent. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Sarah; two daughters, one son and

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 91


IN MEMORIAM their spouses; six grandchildren; one sister and her husband, Paul D. Cashion, D.M.D, ’64; and his nephew, John P. Cashion ’93.

Charles E. Hoye III, D.M.D. Charles E. Hoye III, D.M.D., of Taunton and Mattapoisett, Massachusetts, died on Jan. 9, 2016. Dr. Hoye studied premed at Holy Cross and received his doctorate of medical dentistry from Tufts Dental School. After serving two years as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, he opened a dental practice in Taunton, where he practiced for 42 years. Dr. Hoye also supported the Holy Cross Book Prize. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Carolyn; four daughters, one son and their spouses; 16 grandchildren; seven siblings, including Stephen R. Hoye, D.D.S., ’73, James P. Hoye, M.D., ’83, Thomas C. Hoye ’66 and William J. Hoye, D.D.S., ’64; and his nieces, Ann M. Cook ’96 and Elizabeth A. Hoye ’92.

Francis E. Morris Francis E. “Frank” Morris, of Summit, New Jersey, died on Aug. 31, 2016, at 74. Mr. Morris graduated from Harvard Law School and, later, earned his Master of Engineering degree from Stevens Institute of Technology (Hoboken, New Jersey). He was a patent attorney and spent most of his career as a senior partner at Pennie & Edmonds in New York City; he then worked at other law firms, including Kelley Drye & Warren. Mr. Morris was a physics major at Holy Cross and he graduated magna cum laude. He was the recipient of the Nugent Gold Medal for excellence in physics and the Rev. William F. Hartigan Medal for best essay in religion. He was also a member of the career advisor network and the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. Mr. Morris is survived by his wife, Carole; one son; one daughter; one son-in-law; one daughter-in-law; four granddaughters; his mother; seven siblings; and his cousins, Stephen J. O’Connell ’73 and Christopher P. O’Connell ’67. He was predeceased by his father.

James A. Prendergast James A. “Jim” Prendergast, of Salem, New Hampshire, died on Feb. 17, 2016, at 74. Mr. Prendergast earned a master’s degree in chemistry from Holy Cross. He served in the U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps during the Kennedy administration, at the Bethesda Naval Hospital. Mr. Prendergast started his career at Dupont, then joined Waters Associates, and served as CEO of Millipore INTERTECH; he retired

as CEO of Horizon Technologies in Salem. He is survived by his wife, Jane; one son and his wife; one daughter and her husband; five grandchildren; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces, nephews, godchildren and friends.

William J. Scanlon William J. “Bill” Scanlon, of Weatherford, Texas, formerly of Andover, Massachusetts, died on April 10, 2016. Mr. Scanlon served four years in the U.S. Navy. He was the owner of Scanlon Hardware, and later worked as a business consultant with companies across the country. He is survived by his wife, Sotela; his former wife and mother of his children, Kathleen; four children, including William J. Scanlon ’91 and Christine S. Delgado ’90, and their spouses; three stepchildren and their spouses; 15 grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; three siblings and their spouses; and numerous nieces, nephews and their families. He was predeceased by his parents and one sister.

1964 Peter M. Collins Peter M. Collins, of New York City, died on March 5, 2016, at 73. Mr. Collins received his master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania and his law degree from New York University Law School. He practiced law in New York City for more than 30 years and was a fellow of the College of Commercial Arbitrators. He is survived by his wife, Susan; one brother, Christopher J. Collins ’73; his cousin Richard J. O'Reilly, M.D., ’64; and many family members and friends.

Robert B. Miller Robert B. “R.B.” Miller, of Washington, D.C., died on April 25, 2016, at 73. Mr. Miller earned an MBA from Cornell and a master’s degree in communication from Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. He worked in several fields, including publishing, real estate development and financial management. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; one sister; and one brother. He was predeceased by two siblings.

Philip J. Power Philip J. “Phil” Power, of Larchmont, New York, died on April 13, 2016, at 73. A chemistry major at Holy Cross, Mr. Power earned his MBA from Columbia University. He then served in the U.S. Army and was posted to the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He later earned his J.D. from Fordham University School of Law, and worked as a commercial real estate banker in Manhattan for Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company and Emigrant Savings Bank. As an alumnus, he served as a class agent and was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. Mr. Power is survived by his wife, Jean; four children and their families, including son Edmund P. Power ’94, daughter Julia Power Sweeney ’98, and son-in-law Peter J. Sweeney ’95; one sister; and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, inlaws, including James M. Geiger ’74, and extended family and friends.

Anthony R. Pullano Anthony R. Pullano, of Cranston, Rhode Island, died on Aug. 18, 2015.

Richard J. Conley

David F. Ryan

Richard J. “Dick” Conley, of New Bern, North Carolina, died on March 25, 2016, at 74. Mr. Conley was an English major at the College. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, M. Elizabeth, and two sons. He was buried with military honors in the New Bern National Cemetery.

David F. Ryan, of Croton on Hudson, New York, died on Jan. 4, 2016, at 73. A graduate of the Columbia School of Law, Mr. Ryan practiced antitrust and intellectual property law, as a partner, at the renowned New York City firms Kaye, Scholer, Fierman, Hays & Handler and Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto, for over 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Linda; one son, one daughter and their spouses; six grandchildren; and six siblings.

Thomas J. McGlew Thomas J. “Tom” McGlew, of Edinburgh, Scotland, died on May 24, 2016. Mr. McGlew was a sociology major at Holy Cross and was involved in The Crusader. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; one daughter; two sons; and two granddaughters.

9 2 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

1965 Joseph R. Helfrick Joseph R. Helfrick, of Sea Cliff, New York, died on Dec. 23, 2015, at 72. He was an English major at Holy Cross and

a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association.

James J. Marcellino James J. “Jim” Marcellino, of Milton, Massachusetts, died on June 30, 2016, at 73. Mr. Marcellino earned a law degree from Boston College Law School and an MBA from Boston University. He was a trial lawyer for over 35 years with an expertise in intellectual property litigation. Mr. Marcellino was an adjunct faculty member at Boston College Law School, and he also served in such roles as deputy and special assistant attorney general in Massachusetts and project director and attorney for the Downtown Waterfront Project of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, among others. He was inducted into the Holy Cross Varsity Club Hall of Fame for football and men’s lacrosse in 2005. He is survived by his wife, Stacey; one son; one daughter; and his siblings, including William F. Marcellino Jr. ’65.

John J. McKenna III John J. McKenna III, of Boston, died on Oct. 17, 2015, at 71. Mr. McKenna also graduated from the Boston Police Academy and Suffolk Law School in Boston; he worked as an MBTA police officer and a lawyer. He is survived by his wife, Kathe; four daughters; three sons-in-law; eight grandchildren; two sisters; two brothersin-law; and many nieces and nephews.

James D. Sullivan James D. Sullivan, of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, died on June 11, 2016, at 73. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Sullivan owned and operated Handi-van/Care Ambulance, as well as the former Dillon’s Cleaners in Lowell, Massachusetts; he later served as transit manager for First Transit in Toledo, Ohio. He participated in the 1843 Club at the College, he served as an admissions advisor and he was a member of the Holy Cross Alumni Association. He is survived by one daughter; three sons; one daughter-inlaw; one son-in-law; three grandchildren; one sister and her husband; and several nieces and nephews.

1966 William E. Haynes William E. Haynes, of Milton, Massachusetts, died on Dec. 22, 2015. Mr. Haynes received a master’s degree in science and geophysics from Boston


College. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam era. He is survived by his wife, Nancy.

Alfred J. O’Donovan III Alfred J. O’Donovan III, of Dorchester, Massachusetts, died on Aug. 12, 2016, at 72. Mr. O’Donovan is survived by his wife, Diane; five children; six grandchildren; two sisters; and one brother.

1967 Dominic J. Balestra, M.D. Dominic J. Balestra, M.D., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, died on July 29, 2016, at 71. Dr. Balestra attended Holy Cross on academic and U.S. Air Force ROTC scholarships; he graduated cum laude. He also served as a reservist in the U.S. Air Force. He graduated from Dartmouth Medical School and practiced clinical medicine at the White River Junction, VT, Medical and Regional Office Center and also served as associate professor of medicine, emeritus, at Dartmouth Medical School for more than 20 years. Dr. Balestra is survived by his wife, Suellen; one sister; and many brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, cousins, nephews, nieces and friends.

Joseph W. O’Connor Joseph W. “Joe” O’Connor, of North Palm Beach, Florida, died on Feb. 25, 2016. An economics major at Holy Cross, Mr. O’Connor graduated from Harvard Business School and spent his career in the field of commercial real estate. He supported the College as a member of the career advisor network. He is survived by his wife of 24 years, Sandra “Sandy”; four children; seven brothers and sisters, including William J. O’Connor ’62, Peter D. O’Connor ’64, Michael G. O’Connor ’74 and Charles S. O’Connor ’78; his stepmother; nephews, including William Q. O’Connor ’91, Toby Banta ’08 and Michael G. O’Connor II ’19; nieces, including Marjorie O’Connor Furman ’95 and Sinead K. O’Connor ’17; and in-laws. He was predeceased by three brothers, including Jeremiah O'Connor ’63 and Christopher O'Connor ’71.

Roger J. Waindle Roger J. Waindle, of Punta Gorda, Florida, died on March 8, 2016, at 71. Mr. Waindle served in the U.S. Army Reserves and worked in several different jobs, including Ziebart, New England Bell and General Signal. He played trumpet in the Holy Cross Marching

Band. He is survived by his wife, Christine; one son, four daughters and their spouses; one sister; one brother and his wife; and eight grandchildren.

1968 Deacon Carl J. Adams Jr. Deacon Carl J. Adams Jr., of Albuquerque, New Mexico, died on April 17, 2016, at 70. Deacon Adams was ordained a Catholic deacon in 1999 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Burlington, Vermont, and went on to full-time ministry in Iowa parishes and schools. He served two years in the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Barbara; one son and his wife; one son and his partner; one grandson; one brother and his wife; one sister; one niece; and two nephews.

William F. Butler III William F. Butler, of Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, died on Aug. 14, 2016, at 70. A political science major at Holy Cross, Mr. Butler earned his Juris Doctor degree from George Washington University School of Law. He specialized in education law, representing a number of schools and school districts on Cape Cod. He also served as assistant superintendent and legal counsel for the Barnstable Public Schools, and as interim superintendent for the 2015-2016 academic year. Mr. Butler was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; two sons-in-law; one brother, Christopher L. Butler, M.D., ’77; four grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

Richard L. Dervan Richard L. Dervan, of Tinton Falls, New Jersey, and Palm Coast, Florida, died on March 31, 2016, at 69. Mr. Dervan attended Pace University. His career was in banking in New York City, and he retired as a vice president at JPMorgan Chase in 2007. He is survived by his wife of 44 years, Josephine; three daughters and their spouses; several grandchildren; two brothers; three sisters; and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his father and his mother.

Robert J. Grenier Robert J. Grenier, of Burlington, Vermont, died on Dec. 9, 2015, at 69. Mr. Grenier graduated cum laude from Holy Cross and magna cum laude from McGill University, where he earned

his MBA and LL.B. degrees. He served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam and Germany, receiving three awards of the Bronze Star while attaining the rank of captain. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; one sister; and his cousin, Simon A. Flynn III ’69.

Robert W. Mahoney Robert W. “Bob” Mahoney, formerly of Wellesley, Massachusetts, died on April 6, 2016, at 70. Mr. Mahoney was a member of the litigation department at Wilmer Hale for 35 years, retiring as senior partner in 2007. As a student at Holy Cross, he was a history major and played football. Mr. Mahoney was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association, the class reunion committee and the Varsity Club, and also served as a class agent. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; three children and their spouses; three stepchildren and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and two sisters, one brother and their spouses.

1969

William C. Close Jr. William C. “Bill” Close Jr., of Leominster, Massachusetts, died on April 5, 2016, at 69. A pitcher for the Oakland A’s baseball organization for a few seasons, Mr. Close owned Action Moving and Storage, worked as a manager for Roadway Express and served as a salesman for Allied Van Lines. He is survived by his wife of 46 years, Kathryn; two daughters, including Kristine Close Hogan ’96; two sons-in-law; one son; one daughter-in-law; one sister and her husband; and six grandchildren.

Norman W. Edgerton Norman W. Edgerton, of Lincoln, Massachusetts, died on Aug. 2, 2016, at 69. Mr. Edgerton earned a master’s degree in psychology from Suffolk University; he practiced in both the public and private sectors, serving as a psychologist at Waltham (Massachusetts) Hospital and the Department of Mental Health in Lowell, Massachusetts. He was a U.S. Army veteran, serving during the Vietnam era. Mr. Edgerton studied economics at Holy Cross. He is survived by his wife, Bryn Walsh; two brothers, including Gary R. Edgerton ’74; two sisters-in-law; and four nieces.

Philip J. O’Neil Jr. Philip J. O’Neil Jr., of Worcester, died on June 11, 2016, at 68. A history major at Holy Cross, Mr. Lynch received

his master’s degree in education from Cambridge College. He was a teacher in the Worcester Catholic School System for over 40 years. He played football and baseball at the College; he was a member of the Varsity Club and the Holy Cross Alumni Association. He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Patricia; two sons; one sister; and many nieces and nephews, including Meggan E. O’Leary ’93. He was predeceased by one brother.

Michael R. Scanlon Michael R. Scanlon, of Acton, formerly of Leominster, Massachusetts, died on Oct. 9, 2015, at 67. Mr. Scanlon was a physics major at Holy Cross. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. He was a professional engineer and project manager in the nuclear power plant industry. As an alumnus, he served as a class agent. Mr. Scanlon is survived by his wife of 44 years, Monica; two sons; one sister; and many nieces, nephews and extended family members.

1970

Alan B. Grant Alan B. Grant, of Bridgewater, New Jersey, died Dec. 21, 2015. Mr. Grant was a partner at the law firm Mauro Savo Camerino Grant & Schalk in Somerville, New Jersey, where he practiced for 35 years. He studied sociology and fine arts at Holy Cross and played football. Mr. Grant was also a member of the career advisor network, the Holy Cross Lawyers Association and the Varsity Club. He is survived by one son and his wife; one daughter; one grandson; and two brothers.

1971 Rev. Raymond T. Gawronski, S.J. Rev. Raymond T. Gawronski, S.J., of Los Gatos, California, died on April 14, 2016, at 65. A philosophy major at Holy Cross, Fr. Gawronski graduated magna cum laude and was class valedictorian. He earned an M.A. in world religions from Syracuse University, and in 1977, he entered the Maryland province of Jesuits. He later earned an M.A. in philosophy at St. Michael’s Institute in Spokane, Washington, an M.Div. at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, California, an S.T.L. at the Oriental Institute in Rome and an S.T.D. at the Gregorian Institute in Rome. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1986 and served as a professor and spiritual director at universities and seminaries across the country. He is survived by one brother-in-law; one niece; one nephew; and one cousin. He was predeceased by his parents and one sister.

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 93


IN MEMORIAM Brian J. Higgins

Paul M. Ladouceur

Brian J. Higgins, of New York City, and Wilton, Connecticut, died on April 12, 2016, at 66. Mr. Higgins had a long and successful career as a commercial real estate broker in Manhattan at Jones Lang LaSalle, The Staubach Company and Cushman & Wakefield. He studied political science at Holy Cross and played football. As an alumnus, Mr. Higgins was a member of the career advisor network, the Holy Cross Real Estate Group of New York and the Varsity Club. He is survived by his wife, MaryAnn; one daughter; one son; one daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; one sister; five brothers, including Patrick W. Higgins ’65 and Sean T. Higgins ’70; and a large extended family.

Paul M. Ladouceur, of Westwood, Massachusetts, and Alton Bay, New Hampshire, died on Jan. 8, 2016, at 64. He was a former bank president. Mr. Ladouceur is survived by his wife of 44 years, Diane; three daughters; one son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Christopher J. Lynch, M.D. Christopher J. Lynch, M.D., of Bedford, New Hampshire, died on June 10, 2016, at 67. Dr. Lynch completed medical school at Cornell University, internal medicine training at Albany (New York) Hospital and a rheumatology fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh. He worked as a rheumatologist for 35 years and held numerous leadership positions at Elliot Hospital (Manchester, New Hampshire). Dr. Lynch was a biology major at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude. He supported the College as a member of the 1843 Society and the career advisor network; he also served as an admissions advisor and on his class reunion committee. He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Cheryl; one daughter, Kelly L. Sieper ’04; one son; one daughter-in-law; one son-in-law; one granddaughter; and one grandson.

Caesar J. Weston II Caesar J. Weston II, of Troy, Michigan, died on May 11, 2016, at 66. Mr. Weston worked for Phillips Plastics for over 25 years. He is survived by his wife, Cathy; three children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; six siblings, including Jon Ashley Weston '73, and their spouses; many nieces and nephews; and two aunts.

1972 William F. Ignachuck William F. “Bill” Ignachuck, of Northborough, formerly of Maynard, Massachusetts, died on Aug. 11, 2016, at 65. Mr. Ignachuck was a self-employed carpenter for many years. He is survived by two sons; two daughters-in-law; his former wife, Jean; three grandchildren; one sister; three brothers; and many nieces and nephews, including Alex J. Ignachuck ’08.

1973 Robert M. Duke Robert M. Duke, of Citrus Heights, California, died on Dec. 6, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Lenda Staton; two daughters; and his brother, Alan E. Duke ’68.

1974 James B. Loftus James B. Loftus, of Southborough, formerly of Holyoke, Massachusetts, died on Nov. 17, 2015, at 63. Mr. Loftus earned both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in chemistry at Holy Cross, as well as an MBA at Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts. He worked for Polaroid for most of his career. He is survived by his wife of more than 30 years, Martha; two sons; one daughter; one daughter-in-law; one granddaughter; one sister; and one brother.

1975

John C. Polio, M.D. John C. Polio, M.D., of West Simsbury, Connecticut, died on Oct. 21, 2015, at 62. Dr. Polio graduated from the Boston University School of Medicine and was a gastroenterologist with Connecticut Gastroenterology Associates in Hartford; he also served as a transplant hepatologist with the Yale University Liver Transplant Unit and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Polio studied sociology and premed at Holy Cross, and he was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa honor society and graduated cum laude. He was also a member of the Purple Key Society and the Varsity Club. He is survived by his wife, Beth ’76; two sons, Matthew ’05 and Andrew ’12; two daughters; his mother; one sister and her husband; and two brothers-in-law.

Francis J. Sullivan Francis J. “Frank” Sullivan, of Albany, New York, died on June 24, 2016. Mr. Sullivan also graduated from the

9 4 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

University of New York at Oswego. He was director of operations for the Center for Disability Services. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; one daughter; one son; one son-in-law; three grandchildren; his mother; three sisters, including Gabrielle Sullivan ’79, and their spouses; his mother-in-law and father-in-law; several brothers- and sisters-in-law; many nieces, nephews and cousins; and his dog.

1976

F. Joseph Geogan II F. Joseph Geogan II, of Norwell, Massachusetts, and Little Compton, Rhode Island, died on June 13, 2016, at 61. Mr. Geogan received his Juris Doctor from the New England School of Law, and took over the family law firm, Geogan & Geogan, in Rockland, Massachusetts, where he spent his professional career. He studied economics at Holy Cross. He was a member of the career advisor network and the Holy Cross Lawyers Association; he also served as a class agent and regional club career counselor. He is survived by his wife of 35 years, Amy; two sons; two sisters, including Robyn G. Noble ’79; in-laws; and 26 nieces and nephews.

1977

Richard M. Huber Richard M. Huber, of Westwood, Massachusetts, died on Nov. 9, 2015. He is survived by one son and his wife; and one brother.

Michael F. Lee Michael F. Lee, of Stafford, Virginia, died on Feb. 4, 2016. Mr. Lee studied biology and premed at Holy Cross, and he played lacrosse. He is survived by his wife, Susan.

John C. Trimbach John C. Trimbach, of North Attleboro, Massachusetts, died on July 4, 2016, at 61. Mr. Trimbach was awarded a full football scholarship to the College and was a four-year starter at defensive tackle. Early in his career, he worked as a sales representative for Eastco, and later founded Trimbach Associates, a national manufacturer's representative company. For the past several years he worked in sales management at Niveus Media and Russound Inc. Mr. Trimbach is survived by his wife, Michele; three daughters; two sons-in-law; three grandchildren; his mother-in-law; one brother and his wife; one sister; and extended family members.

1978 Katherine A. Lapierre, M.D. Katherine A. “Kathy” Lapierre, M.D., of Cambridge, Massachusetts, died on July 1, 2016, at 60. Dr. Lapierre was a biology major at Holy Cross and graduated cum laude. She graduated from Tufts University School of Medicine and completed training in psychiatry and psychopharmacology, initially practicing at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Jamaica Plain and the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. She also had a private practice. For the past 20 years she had worked at Harvard University Health Services, the last five years as the chief of Counselling and Mental Health Services. Dr. Lapierre is survived by her husband, Peter; her parents; two brothers; one sister; one sister-in-law; five nephews; one niece; and Peter’s two children.

1979 Frederick R. McGaughan Frederick R. “Fred” McGaughan, of Point Pleasant, New Jersey, formerly of Jupiter, Florida, and Morris Plains, New Jersey, died on July 5, 2016, at 59. Mr. McGaughan was an English and religious studies major at Holy Cross and played soccer. He was the director of admission at Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart in Princeton, New Jersey. He supported the College as a member of the career advisor network and the Varsity Club. He is survived by his wife, Nancy ’79; two sons and their wives; one daughter; his mother; two brothers; one sister; two grandchildren; and his cousins, Brian F. Jackson '73, Richard J. Jackson '88 and William L. Jackson '77. He was predeceased by his father.

1980 Margaret A. Lima Margaret A. Lima, of Canaan, Vermont, died on Feb. 16, 2016, at 58. An English major at Holy Cross, Ms. Lima taught English in Canaan for more than two decades. She graduated cum laude from the College, where she was a member of Alpha Sigma Nu, Phi Beta Kappa and the Honors Program. She also played basketball and was a member of the Rugby Club at Holy Cross. As an alumna, she was a member of the career advisor network and the Varsity Club, and also received the Varsity Club Norton Prize. Ms. Lima is survived by her husband, Harry “Bud,” and three children.


Albert H. Tsai, D.D.S. Albert H. Tsai, D.D.S., of Chappaqua, New York, died on May 29, 2015. He majored in biology at Holy Cross. Dr. Tsai is survived by his wife, Bella.

1985 Christina Capurro Sand Christina Capurro Sand, of San Jose, California, died on Dec. 23, 2015, at 53. Ms. Sand earned a J.D. in 1992 from Santa Clara University and practiced family law; she later became a teacher and earned her M.A.T. in social studies from Santa Clara University in 2013. She majored in classics at Holy Cross and was a member of the crew team. As an alumna, she was a member of the Holy Cross Lawyers Association and the Varsity Club. She is survived by her husband, Duane; one son; three brothers; four sisters-in-law; eight nephews; three nieces; her parents; and her grandmother.

1986 Anne V. Blake Anne V. Blake, of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, died on July 26, 2016, at 52. A history major at Holy Cross, she earned her Juris Doctor from Vermont Law School and practiced law for six years. She later worked as a substitute teacher in Chelmsford, before she began a new career as an ESL teacher and completed her master’s degree in education from Cambridge College. Ms. Blake is survived by her husband of 24 years, John; her mother; one son, John O. Blake '20; one brother and his wife; one sister and her husband; her in-laws; and 11 nieces and nephews, including Andrew P. Cook '15.

1988 Michael J. Leone Jr. Michael J. Leone Jr., of White Plains, New York, died on April 7, 2016, at 49. A mathematics major at Holy Cross, Mr. Leone graduated from Fordham University Graduate School of Business. He was a self-employed CPA in White Plains, and a longtime youth and high school athletics coach. He is survived by his wife, Jane ’88; two sons; two daughters; his mother; four sisters; two brothers-in-law; many nieces and nephews; and his fatherin-law, John E. Cahill Jr. ’61. He was predeceased by his father.

1996 Maria E. Lonergan Maria E. Lonergan, of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, died on Nov. 22, 2015. A psychology major at Holy Cross, Ms. Lonergan worked to improve the lives of children with autism at the New England Center for Children in Southborough, Massachusetts, for 19 years. She is survived by her husband, Mark; two children; her parents; one sister, two brothers, their spouses and their three children; and one sister-in-law, one brother-in-law and their daughter.

1998 Melissa E. Manza Melissa E. “Missy” Manza, of Ashland, Massachusetts, died on Feb. 6, 2016, at 40. A psychology major at Holy Cross, Ms. Manza earned a Master of Social Work degree from Boston College. She worked at the Perkins School in Lancaster, Massachusetts, for 20 years, most recently serving as director of Perkins Behavioral Health. She was a member of the Women’s Forum at the College as a student and was part of the career advisor network as an alumna. Ms. Manza is survived by her husband, David; one son; her parents; one sister, Kristina E. Barclay ’95, and her husband, Justin A. Barclay ’95; one brother, Timothy S. Johnson ’02, and his wife, Kelsey D. Johnson ’00; and nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles, among many family and friends.

1999 Robert D. Schultz Robert D. Schultz, of Goffstown, New Hampshire, died on May 22, 2016, at 38. Mr. Schultz was a music major at Holy Cross; after graduating cum laude, he earned a Ph.D. He is survived by his parents.

2001 Richard T. Desmond Richard T. Desmond, of South Windsor, Connecticut, died on Nov. 6, 2015, at 36. A chemistry major at Holy Cross, Mr. Desmond was a graduate student at Pennsylvania State University and received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Connecticut. He worked as an assistant professor of chemistry at Franklin Pierce University and supported the athletics department at the College. He is survived by his wife, Ashley; his father; one sister; one nephew; one niece; his father- and mother-in-law;

one sister-in-law and her husband; one brother-in-law; many uncles and aunts; and several cousins. He was predeceased by his mother and one brother.

Rosemary Conway ’78; Henry E. " Bobby" Corazzini, retired from the facilities department; Capt. Philip G. Charest, USN (Ret.) 52; Dennis M. Crean 62; Jean Damiata, mother of Maura Damiata Silbo

2002 Kassia E.G. Smith

’91; Nicolas G. Davilas, father of George N. Davilas ’95, Christina N. Davilas ’97 and

Kassia E.G. Smith, of Worcester, died on July 7, 2016, at 36. A political science major at the College, Ms. Smith served as a Gateways orientation leader and a resident assistant. She earned her Juris Doctorate from Suffolk University Law School in Boston and became an assistant district attorney for Worcester County. She worked in the Fitchburg District Court and then in Worcester Superior Court. She ran the Motor Vehicle Homicide Unit and the Gang Unit. Ms. Smith supported Holy Cross as a member of the career advisor network. She is survived by her husband, Christopher; her parents; one brother and his wife; two sisters; one nephew; three nieces; aunts, uncles and many cousins; and her cat.

Angela S. Davilas ’02; Joseph H. Dempsey 54; Rev. Donald F. Diederich 54; John "Jack" F. Donahue, father-in-law of James Murphy ’79 and uncle of Peter Stanton ’79; Marion V. Drennan, mother of Paul F. Drennan ’81, aunt of Robert Shea, Esq. ’80 and sister of the late John F. Shea, Jr. ’42; Ruth M. Foley, wife of the late Lt. Col. Joseph F. Tracy ’38, the late John A. Dowd ’32 and the late T. John Foley ’38, mother of John Dowd ’68 and grandmother of Callie Avis ’01; Carol Freeman, wife of the late James Freeman ’62 and mother of Missy Reingruber ’88; Owen L. Fox, D.D.S., 76; David Garvey, formerly of the transportation department; Jeffrey P. Graham 72; Gregory Gustafson, husband of Robert Allen of ITS; Constance Hanify, wife of the late Francis V. Hanify ’35; Paul Heffernan, father of Lee Heffernan ’78; Richard N. Joseph Sr. 58; Doris M. Kelley, sister of the late Raymond E.

2006 Jesse C. Loubier

Donovan ’51 and aunt of the Reverend Kevin G. Donovan ’83; Forest J. LaValley,

Jesse C. Loubier, of San Francisco, California, formerly of Winthrop, Massachusetts, died on July 2, 2016, at 32. A linebacker at Holy Cross, Mr. Loubier worked at Global Athletics before graduating with an MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He was a principal at the Boston Consulting Group in San Francisco. He is survived by his wife, Saloni Mira Rai; his mother and her partner; his father and his wife; two grandmothers and one grandfather; two godchildren; his mother- and father-in-law; his cousins, aunts and uncles; and his dog.

father of Margaret Rollo, training and employment coordinator for Holy Cross Dining, and father-in-law of Paul Rollo ’82; Charles T. Marcou 55; Paul J. Martin 00, brother of John P. Martin ’91; Charles H. McCambridge Jr., D.D.S., 62; Barbara McGrath, wife of Thomas E. “Ted” McGrath, Jr. ’55; Rose McGuirk, mother of Gary McGuirk ’82 and grandmother of Connor McGuirk ’17 and Ryan McGuirk ’19; Dowlan R. Nelson 59, father of Kristin E. Germain ’89; Mary Walsh Nunes, wife of the late Joseph Nunes Jr. ’51, mother of Joseph Nunes III ’76 and Matthew Nunes ’86; Patrick A. O’Hare 66; Arthur J. Phelan Jr. 56; Charles R. Pielock 56; Margaret

FRIENDS

T. Plante, former secretary in the Dean’s

Shirley Adams, English department

Office and mother of Robert J. Plante Jr.,

administrative assistant for nearly 30

retired from the Holy Cross Post Office;

years; Joyce Atchinson, grandmother

Alfred M. Raffaele 66; C. Howard Russell

of Daniel Atchinson ’05; Anna Bagley,

56; Mario Sannicandro, father of the Hon.

mother of William F. Bagley, Jr. ’73 and

Thomas V. Sannicandro ’78, father-in-law

Thomas Bagley ’75, sister of Laurence

of Mary Anne Sannicandro ’78 and uncle

Maher ’45 and aunt of Kathleen Maher

of Sean Sannicandro ’13; Mary Eileen

’81 and Ann Fahey ’88; William F. Bagley,

Sinnott, wife of John T. "Jack" Sinnott ’61,

father of William F. Bagley, Jr. ’73 and

grandmother of Graham Offerman ’19

Thomas Bagley ’75, brother-in-law of

and sister-in-law of Gilbert J. Sinnott ’57;

Laurence Maher ’45 and uncle of Kathleen

Rev. Msgr. Edward A. Sweeny 53; Andrew

Maher ’81 and Ann Fahey ’88; Rock A.

J. Tivnan 54; John B. Toomey 59; Julia

Barrieau, father of Kathryn Nutting ’17;

Somerville Willis, mother of Leila Philip,

Michael Barrett, father of Seth Barrett,

associate professor of English; Emile Juan

visiting assistant professor in chemistry;

St. James, father of Dana St. James ’77 and

Raymond Biegay, father of Karen

grandfather of Theresa "Tess" St. James '16;

Thornton ’81 and Paula Huggard ’83,

Helen Stempsey, mother of Rev. William

father-in-law of James Huggard ’81 and

Stempsey, S.J., professor of philosophy;

grandfather of Emma Huggard ’14; Peter

John William Sullivan, father of Gieriet

L. Bradley 02; Mary Elizabeth Brennan,

Sullivan Bowen ’86; David Weiner, brother

mother of John Brennan ’83; Frank R.

of Melissa Weiner, assistant professor of

Cannata 53; Robert H. Conroy, father of

sociology; Joseph J. Worst 53.

IN MEMORIAM / ALUMNI NEWS / 95


ARTIFACT

Virgin and Christ Child Mosaic

W

TOM RETTIG

hen John Paul Reardon, Worcester artist and professor emeritus of visual arts, created this Virgin and Child Mosaic, he elevated the use of concrete from a simple grout to a design element.

In doing so, he celebrated this underrated, yet essential substance – much like he did when he co-founded the College’s visual arts department in 1954, highlighting the importance of studio art in the College’s arts programming. The history and appreciation of the arts has always been a part of Jesuit education, and art history courses were taught on campus from the College’s founding throughout the early 20th century. But the actual creation of art was missing. Reardon taught the first studio art courses, in drawing and painting, at the beginning of his 30-year tenure at the College, which included roles as artistin-residence and visual arts department chair from 1971 to 1975. Under Reardon’s guidance, along with co-founder Rev. Joseph S. Scannell, S.J., the department staff expanded from two part-time instructors to eight full-time professors, offering majors in both art history and studio art.

(top) The mosaic in St. Joseph Memorial Chapel (middle) Reardon crafts the mosaic in his studio (right) Rev. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., former College president, and Reardon at the unveiling ceremony, after Reardon donated the mosaic to the College in 1969.

9 6 \ H O LY C R OS S M A G A Z I N E \ S U M M ER 2 017

According to a Feb. 11, 1969 article in the Worcester Telegram and Gazette, this mosaic was originally installed in Loyola Hall, which was then the Jesuit residence on campus. After finding this photo in the Holy Cross Archives, the HCM team went on the hunt to see

BY MAURA S U L L I VA N H I L L where it is located today. Rev. William Campbell, S.J., ’87, vice president for Mission, helped us with our quest and spotted the mosaic hanging in St. Joseph Memorial Chapel, by the side door near the elevator. The mosaic is made of ceramic tiles, colored concrete and copper cloisons, which are dividers used to define the larger areas of the mosaic. The T&G article also described how Reardon created the vibrant mosaic: “The mosaic was constructed on a two-layer free-form marine plywood base. The design was outlined with one-inch strips of copper set vertically and held in place by half an inch of coarse concrete chunks. Then a layer of fine cement was poured on top of this base. Colored ceramic tiles, hand-cut in a variety of shapes and sizes, were set in the cement flush with the copper cloisons. Finally, a thin layer of tinted concrete was used to fill the spaces between the tiles and the cloisons. This differs from standard mosaics where the tiles are set close together and the grout (cement) plays only a small part in the overall design.” Reardon, who passed away in 2003, was also a skilled sculptor and painter, and studied graphic design. In 1985, he established the annual John Paul Reardon Medal and Award, presented to a Holy Cross fourth-year student for excellence in studio art, and this prize is still given to a graduating senior today. ■


THE NEXT ISSUE

LOOK FOR THE FALL ISSUE IN E A R LY OCTOBER

Help Us Tell the Story

N

ow, we want to ask for your input. Check out these story ideas and drop us a line! We always like to hear from you.

On June 21, 1843, Holy Cross was founded. How should we celebrate? We have some ideas, but let us know what you think our coverage should include! We don’t want to leave out any highlights from our first 175 years.

CREATIVE SPACES

Do you know of any faculty or staff members who work in unique spots on or off campus? Are you one of those people? Let us know! We are looking for more people to feature in Creative Spaces, which showcases where Artist-in-residence our faculty and staff work and findPatrick inspiration. Dougherty constructs one of his Stickwork sculptures on Linden Lane.

ALS O Professor Daina Harvey’s Food, Beer and the Environment course in Syllabus • Children of Holy Cross Varsity Club Hall of Fame members take the field

Holy Cross Magazine One College Street Worcester, MA 01610

EMAIL

hcmag@holycross.edu

PHONE

508-793-2419

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

should not exceed 250 words and must pertain to items in the two most recent issues. All letters are subject to editorial approval, and some may appear online.

CLASS NOTES

will only appear in the print version of the magazine, but may be submitted online at holycross.edu/classnotes.

MILESTONES SUBMISSIONS

will only appear in the print version of the magazine, and must meet all of the following requirements:

1) Person submitting the photo must be a graduate of Holy Cross, and include his or her name, email and phone number for confirmation purposes. (For wedding photos, the person submitting must be part of the wedded couple.) 2) Only group photos of alumni and or faculty will be accepted.

R

ecently featured on “60 Minutes,” The Abaarso School is a nonprofit co-educational school in Somaliland that develops the character and intellect of the next generation of leaders in this growing African nation. Two Abaarso School graduates, Sahra Hassan ’19 and Zakariye Muse ’19, study at Holy Cross and plan to take what they learn here on Mount St. James back to their home country and help it prosper.

MAIL

@holycrossmag

HOLY CROSS TURNS 175

The Abaarso School

HOW TO REACH US

ASK MORE.

3) In wedding photos, please identify the couple with first, last and maiden names, as well as class year. The date and location of the ceremony must accompany the photo. 4) Digital images must be hi-res (at least 1 MB in size, with a resolution of 300 dpi or larger). Regular prints can be submitted, but will not be returned.

GREG HREN

HOLY CROSS RINGS

Thanks to all the alumni who shared photos and stories of your class rings to hcmag@holycross. edu. The story is still in the works, and we’re looking for more! Send us photos (high-res, please!) of your Holy Cross class rings and athletic rings (like Freddie Santana’s 2009 Patriot League Champions Ring, above) and any special memories or stories associated with your ring.

5) Please include any required photographer credit. Note: Acquiring permission from professional photographers to print images is the sole responsibility of the submitter.

The editorial staff reserves the right to edit for content, accuracy and length, and cannot guarantee that items received will appear in the magazine. Publication of an item does not constitute endorsement by Holy Cross.

ARTIFACT / THE NEXT ISSUE / ASK MORE. / CLOSING


HOLY CROSS MAGAZINE | ONE COLLEGE STREET | WORCESTER, MA | 01610-2395

The Holy Cross baseball team celebrates after winning the Patriot League Championship in May — a first for the program. The Crusaders beat Bucknell by a score of 11-7 in the final game, sweeping the best two-out-of-three series and winning the title.

MARK SELIGER

Holy Cross Magazine - Summer 2017  

College of the Holy Cross Magazine - Summer 2017

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you