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Wellington City Council Arts Centre Feasibility Study December 2003


Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Executive Summary Findings A. Wide consultation indicated that there is an overwhelming view that a centralised grouping of arts resources would benefit the city. It was generally agreed that Wellington needs a custom-designed model, which ideally would provide a point of difference for the city. B. Councillors strongly indicated1 that the top priority for an “arts centre” was that it should be focused on developing creativity, with the ultimate aim of economic growth in Wellington. C. The case for investing in an ‘arts centre’ is particularly compelling if it is structured to achieve, first and foremost, two objectives of equal importance, one for the city, the second for arts-talented residents, that will a.

Add to, strengthen and justify investment in the city’s position as the arts and creative capital of New Zealand.

b. Help develop and hone the artistic and creative skills of groups and individuals so they emerge and flourish. D. Both objectives can be achieved best by providing working spaces across genres that function as well-equipped laboratories, enabling the talented to create, experiment, develop and establish sustainable careers. E.

In short, the high level strategy for this initiative is an “ArtsCubator”2.

F.

The ArtsCubator has the best potential to provide material spin-offs, including inward migration of the seriously creative, better potential for third party funding, new specialist job opportunities and spill-over of benefits to the sector as a whole. The strategy should therefore be seen as a long term investment in the ‘Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital’ vision, and in Wellington’s creative people.

G. That the functions forming the key activities of the ‘centre’ and the participants therein, are: a.

To provide working space for artists to emerge, develop and becoming selfsustaining, optimising synergies between artists and across genres and stimulating energies by co-location.

b. To underpin creative capability, by providing supporting infrastructure, including facilities, equipment and formal and informal mentoring to support creative market development.

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1

Councillors’ workshop, 6 October 2003. Consultation notes are provided in Appendix A to this report.

2

Information in a later section of this report will help put this definition into clearer context.

Executive Summary

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

c.

To add a physical presence to the cultural capital and to lever the ‘Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital’ brand, by leveraging and celebrating our key strengths.

d. To provide meeting, advanced teaching and flexible use space for Wellington arts groups and arts programmes, to act as a hub connecting the activities in the city. H. That there should be an element of the laissez-faire about the mix of activities and that the role of the ArtsCubator should be flexible with the aim of encouraging all versions of creative development rather than focusing exclusively sector by sector. I.

Further, that the ArtsCubator could be configured to build on Wellington’s renowned strengths in performing arts, production (screen and music) and design of stage, sets and props, but also to accommodate other genres with potential to assert themselves.

J.

Interest in relocating to a central facility was expressed by the management of some significant organisations, space permitting. Community arts groups, particularly those located at the Band Rotunda, are eager to have more spacious premises. Whatever case may or may not be made to centralise a wider range arts activities, any initiative should first address the needs and interests of Wellington as the Arts Capital and of its emerging artists (points B.a. and B.b. above).

K. Weighting of competing claims for resources can then be considered in the light of space availability and the possibilities of some rationalised use of facilities and neighbourly benefits. For example, office co-location will provide excellent potential for mentoring; providing meeting and teaching spaces for community arts groups will create additional vibrancy in the centre. L.

The ‘centre’ should avoid duplicating functions of existing providers (e.g. in vocational education).

M. Preferably the ArtsCubator should be within a single site or building. a.

It should be no less than 1,200sqm minimum to provide for a mix of activities, but preferably should be more spacious.

b. Council will probably need to provide some financial input. c.

Even if a single, all-encompassing location is possible there is general support for a cluster or ‘Precinct’ concept to be identified and branded.

N. The majority favour a ‘central’ location, the term ‘central’ meaning on the waterfront or in the Civic Square region.

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Executive Summary

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

O. In the course of the consultation process, a number of other possible developments within the arts sector were mentioned. They are noted here in the context of a possible Arts Precinct and include: a.

The Mayor's proposal for a new art gallery in Wellington.

b. The potential for an arts and crafts centre/market. This concept is well aligned to the intention of Wellington Waterfront Limited (“WWL”) to have a high level of public activity in the Waitangi park and Overseas Passenger Buildings areas. c.

The possibility for a centre that displays contemporary Maori art, across a range of genres. This could be investigated within the ambits of the developing relationship between WCC and Toi Maori.

P. One governance model to consider is a Council Control Organisation (e.g. Charitable Trust) which would (a) Retain overall Council governance (b) Assign some responsibilities to occupants and (c) Qualify for external financial assistance.3 Q. Any meaningful assessment of risks and the drafting of financial projections will depend on strategic policy decisions. R. This initiative is unlikely to become a reality as quickly or effectively without Council leadership, involvement and some financial commitment.

3

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Recommendations for governance would be formalised in a Stage 2 Feasibility Study.

Executive Summary

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Recommendations 1

ArtsCubator Concept

We recommend that Council agree to the concept of the ArtsCubator. By providing convenient, accessible physical working space for emerging artists, the Council will be supporting creative development and incubating emerging talent, and maintaining creative energy in the central city, in accordance with its strategy for economic development.4 The following issues provide support for investment in the concept: 1. Pressures on physical space in Wellington city could mean that any form of physical arts centre could become increasingly difficult over time. 2. The ‘centre’ provides visible support for Council’s vision of creative Wellington, in particular, for developing and cutting edge art forms. 3. The ‘centre’ provides support for festival and events-based organisations, adding to vibrancy and quality of life in the city. 4. The ‘centre’ provides additional venues for temporary exhibitions, performances and other facilities for community use. 5. The ‘centre’ may free up the Band Rotunda for other uses. 6. The ‘centre’ will encourage business and marketing capability and as such, programmes could be supported by BizInfo or by the Ministry of Economic Development. 7. The ‘centre’ will encourage small business development through ‘clustering’ in the arts centre and the wider precinct. 8. The ‘centre’ will promote retention of talented people in the city. 9. The ‘centre’ will promote Wellington tourism objectives. 2

Stage 2 Feasibility Study

We recommend that the Council approves the preparation of a Stage 2 Feasibility Study. The Stage 2 Feasibility Study would provide Council with an implementation model for the ArtsCubator and would provide further detail regarding costs. 5 The report would refine and formally detail the physical resources required for the ArtsCubator. A quantity surveyor may need to be contracted separately to estimate building expenses.6

4

WCC Economic Development Strategy 2003, adopted in September this year. It is aligned to the Creative

Wellington - Innovation Capital strategy, and outlines 5 key elements, two of which are directly relevant to the Artscubator concept. Firstly, attraction, retention and development of talented people and talented jobs, secondly, workforce development.. 5

Estimated cost of the Stage 2 report in two parts, 1) building requirements notification ($40 - 50k), 2)

business planning and financial projections ($50k). 6

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Estimated cost of quantity surveyor $20 - $30k.

Executive Summary

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Other deliverables of Stage 2 would include: Securing a key location Design implementation processes Formal business plan Capital cost Operational cost Funding options Required return Governance recommendations Obtaining financial commitment for the business plan from Council. If the next step is to make progress and produce an implementation model, it may be difficult to do this satisfactorily and completely in a wholly generic sense. Council may therefore decide to eliminate some location options before progressing. We have identified four possible locations for the Arts Centre, which are outlined in the Location Options report.7

3

Arts Precinct

We recommend that Council agrees to progress with establishing a branded arts precinct, and advance ways to achieve immediate traction on that concept.

7

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This report has been produced separately because of the confidential nature of the material.

Executive Summary

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

WCC

Table of contents

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Introduction

7

2

The parameters of this project

12

3

Prime strategic function

13

4

Productive occupiers

17

5

Incubator space – the detail

19

6

Underpinning capability

22

7

Community arts

25

8

Gearing for external impact

27

9

Recommendations

29

Table of contents

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Introduction This report is a high level examination of the feasibility of an arts centre in Wellington city to be supported in some way by the Wellington City Council. It reviews and discusses key strategic directions for an “arts centre” and introduces options for an arts centre in Wellington. It: presents a high level strategic direction outlines physical space configurations recommends next steps to Council. A review of the consultation process is contained in Appendix A to this report; a preliminary assessment of space requirements is contained in Appendix B to this report.

Project history This feasibility study is one consequence of a New Initiative report to the Arts and Economy Committee, November 2002. This was followed by a report by Arts Access Aotearoa, “Wellington Arts Centre Feasibility Study, A Way Forward” in July 2003. Council subsequently agreed to fund a feasibility study as part of its long term Council Community Plan 2003/04 and in support of its “Creative Wellington : Innovation Capital” vision.

Motivating forces PricewaterhouseCoopers and Leisurenz Ltd were contracted jointly to inform the Council about the feasibility of an arts centre and its possible shape. The following motives were identified as the drivers: The desire to have a significant physical manifestation that would showcases the artistic and economic components of the city’s vision Interest expressed by various components of the Wellington arts sector to pursue a creative cluster approach The need to relocate the Community Arts Centre from Oriental Bay Various other needs in the arts community Suggestions to accommodate a permanent collection.

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Introduction

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Councillors strongly indicated8 that the top priority for an “arts centre” was that it should be focused on further developing creativity (building on what’s already happening), with the ultimate aim of generating economic growth in Wellington. The Centre should be of value to the city and symbolic of Creative Wellington : Innovation Capital.

Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital Evidence is mounting that as the knowledge-based economy grows, issues of location become increasingly relevant. Equally importantly, a lively arts and culture scene enriches the environment for residents, and attracts visitors. Wellington City Council (“the Council”) has adopted the ‘Creative Wellington – Innovation Capital’ vision because it recognises that the city’s economic future depends on creative and innovative people. Core strands of the vision are to promote: initiatives that attract and retain creative, innovative entrepreneurial individuals and businesses initiatives that position Wellington globally as a centre of creativity. The Council has come a long way towards giving substance to its vision. It supports a range of arts and culture activities, training in culture and the arts, museums, galleries, theatres, The New Zealand Festival, Creative HQ, the film industry, Mäori art, live events and recently, fashion and music clusters. The vision is reflected in WCC economic development strategies.

8

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Councillors’ workshop, 6 October 2003. Consultation notes are provided in Appendix A to this report.

Introduction

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Council spending on arts and culture Wellington City Council spends up to $13.7 million each year supporting arts and cultural activities.9 The majority (69%) of funding is allocated to the Wellington Museums Trust ($5.26 million), Te Papa ($2 million) and the Wellington Convention Centre ($2.2 million). Other key spending initiatives involve the arts and culture and community grants ($529,000), the New Zealand Festival ($600,000), and Wellington City Council Archives ($1.16 million). Operational expenditure on Community Arts (including the operation of the Community

$35 $72 $89

TOTAL ARTS AND CULTURE EXPENDITURE 2003/04 ($000)

$142 $200 $205

Galleries and Museums

$216 $600

Wellington Convention Centre Te Papa Grant

$529

$925

$5,260

Archives Community Grants New Zealand Festival Arts and Culture Grants Arts Partnerships Art in Public Places Venues Subsidies

$1,163

Community Festival Civic Square Events/Marketing

$2,005

Access to the Arts

$2,223

Maori Arts Grants

Arts Centre at the Band Rotunda) is $206,000 in 2003/04 budget Figure 1 WCC Arts and Culture Expenditure

9

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This compares to around $19 million (operating) and $2.4 million (capital) for Recreation and Leisure.

Introduction

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Additional support for arts and culture An arts centre would act as an additional signal of Council’s support for the Creative Wellington – Innovation Capital vision. Other projects currently under investigation by the Council include: developing a gallery to house a permanent visual arts collection for the city creating a Maori arts advisor position funding to implement the Public Arts policy support for arts marketing in Wellington establishing four Absolutely Creatively Wellington Awards to recognise innovative individuals, organisations or businesses in the technology, arts and culture or economic development fields initial work has been done on establishing arts and crafts markets (examined with a retail, rather than arts and culture, lens). Further, waterfront development plans have specifically identified arts and cultural activities as being potential public space activities on the waterfront. We are also aware of plans by the Wellington Tenths Trust to build a wharewaka / waka house near the boat club, which may include carving and weaving displays and Maori contemporary art. Also in that vicinity, a bridge is to be built connecting the waterfront to Civic Square. Council is also undergoing a process aimed at enlivening Civic Square. These activities in combination make for an exciting new era and reflect that Wellington is indeed an innovative, creative and cultural centre.

Wellington’s strengths in arts and culture Wellington is already widely known as the arts and culture capital of New Zealand. The city offers an abundance of arts and culture experiences, from performing arts through to visual arts. There are more than 300 sporting and cultural events held in Wellington every year. Activities such as visiting art galleries and museums, and attending performances of theatre, dance, opera and musicals are more popular in Wellington than any in any other region in New Zealand.10

10

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Source: Statistics New Zealand 2002 Cultural Experiences Survey.

Introduction

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

One of Wellington’s special strengths is in performing arts, which include dance, theatre and a wide range of music. Among its key strengths11 are: The full range of performing arts: The city is home of the Royal New Zealand Ballet, Footnote dance, and the national dance and drama schools, all of whom perform. A biennial highlight of significance is the International Festival of the Arts. The city’s four professional theatres, Circa, Downstage, Bats and Taki Rua offer New Zealand and international productions. Wellington is home to a number of amateur theatre groups and children’s theatre at Capital E. Actors with national and international credits include Dame Kate Harcourt, Miranda Harcourt, Ray Henwood, Ginette McDonald, Jonathon Hendry, Jacob Rajan, the Flight of the Conchords and Grant Tilly. Musicians: The city is home to the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra and Wellington’s Symphonia. Musicians and Composers include Gareth Farr (and his alter ego, Lilith), La Croix, David Farquar, John Psthasis, Ross Harris, Jack Body, Shihad, Fur Patrol, a broad base of urban / electronica / jazz musicians and members of the NZSO, Symphonia and the New Zealand string quartet. Film and TV production, and the associated aspects of graphic design and set and props design. Film makers include Peter Jackson (“The Lord of the Rings”), Geoff Dixon (Silver Screen) and Cloud 9 (The Tribe, Enid Blyton series). The TV show “The Strip” is also filmed here in Wellington. There are a number of film support industries beginning to locate in Wellington; the most notable of these is Weta Workshop. The city is was also host to the world premiere of “The Lord of the Rings: Return of The King”. National organisations: these organisations distinguish the city as the creative capital of New Zealand. National organisations include the NZSO, the Royal NZ Ballet, the NZ School of Dance, the Institute of Fine Arts, the NZ Film Archive, the NZ Centre of Photography, the NZ Film Commission, the NZ Festival of the Arts, the NZ Fringe Festival, DANZ, Creative New Zealand, Chamber Music New Zealand, Arts Access Aotearoa and Toi Maori and the Arts Foundation of New Zealand.12

11

Any list risks missing out the many important contributors to arts and creative activity.

These paragraphs illustrate strengths. 12

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Source: http://www.wellingtonnz.com/ (Positively Wellington Tourism).

Introduction

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

The parameters of this project Feasibility study deliverables PricewaterhouseCoopers and Leisurenz were contracted to assist Council with the following: Consultation, leading to a vision for the Arts Centre Development of options that reflect the arts centre vision Advise on the mix of arts related activities Options for facility configuration and size Timing options Possible locations Ownership and management options High level feasibility analysis. As such, this report does not include: Detailed business planning or financial impact analysis Detailed recommendations on building or location Architectural planning. The report provides the background for further investigation of the options and for detailed business planning. A separate report containing possible location options for the ArtsCubator has also been prepared, and should be read as a compliment to the recommendations made in this report.

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The parameters of this project

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

The prime strategic function Wide consultation13 indicated that there is an overwhelming view that a centralised grouping of arts resources would benefit the city. It was widely agreed that Wellington needs a custom-designed model, ideally distinguishing this city from others in the country and worldwide. Replicating foreign concepts is unlikely to be suitable or possible. There is less unanimity in the arts sector about functional priorities. The case for investing in an ‘arts centre’ is particularly compelling if it is structured to achieve two objectives of equal importance, one for the city, the second for arts-talented residents, that will: 1. Add to, strengthen and justify investment in the city’s position as the arts and creative capital of New Zealand. 2. Help develop and hone the artistic and creative skills of groups and individuals so they emerge and flourish.

The prime strategic function Both objectives can be achieved best by providing working spaces across genres that function as well-equipped laboratories, enabling the talented to create, experiment, develop and establish sustainable careers. In short, the prime strategic function is arts incubation. This function will be termed the ‘ArtsCubator’. Other functions may be accommodated in the ‘Centre’, but the key raison d’etre for the Centre is to act as an incubator. Incubation is primarily about building on the energy that already exists in talented and creative people; supporting their growth by providing resources to underpin capability. The ArtsCubator provides the greatest potential for spin-off benefits for Wellington including inward migration of creative people, more private arts sector patronage, the creation of job opportunities and possibly some new space and resources for community arts.

13

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Notes from consultation are detailed in Appendix 1.

The prime strategic function

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

What is incubation? Incubation relies on an existing level of energy, talent and a will to succeed. Wellington has a large base of talented and energetic people in screen and music production, design, visual and performing arts, all of whom could be combined within the Centre to generate energy and create momentum. The Centre will leverage the synergies between different art forms, including motivating new and progressive art forms. For example, film production is enhanced through graphic design, jewellery, set design and music technology, and mixing these activities can result in new techniques and practises for film production. It is important that a high level feasibility study is not overly prescriptive about function. For the ArtsCubator to be successful and dynamic, it must have the freedom, once initiated, to develop its own character and rationale. Therefore, with this in mind, we suggest that the activities of the Centre should incorporate an element of laissez faire. The high level functions of the ArtsCubator, required to implement and gear this strategy are outlined below. These functions, at least in the short to medium term, will form the key activities of the Centre and the participants therein: 1

To provide working space for artists to emerge, develop and becoming selfsustaining, encouraging synergy between artists and artistic forms and creating energy through co-location.

2

To underpin creative capability, by providing supporting infrastructure, including facilities, equipment and formal and informal mentoring to support creative market development.

3

Where possible, to provide some meeting, teaching and flexible use space for Wellington arts groups and arts programmes, and to act as a hub connecting the activities in the city. *

4

To add a physical presence to the cultural capital and to develop the ‘Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital’ brand, by leveraging and celebrating Wellington’s key strengths.

* Although the case may or may not be made to centralise other arts activities, there is no doubt the first priority should address the ArtsCubator function. However, we recognise that the ArtsCubator function is supported by related functions. For example, office colocation will provide excellent potential for mentoring; providing meeting and teaching spaces for community arts groups will create additional vibrancy in the centre.

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The prime strategic function

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Foundations for the functions These functions come out of our understanding of the key strategic aims of both the Council (in relation to economic development, attraction of creative people, and external impact), and of the arts sector in Wellington. The driving strategic goal in common is to develop and grow artists and enable creativity to flourish in Wellington.14 Underlying that goal is to leverage the arts centre for external impact and give a physical presence to Council’s vision. As such, the ArtsCubator should be seen as a long term investment in the ‘Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital’ vision. Resources are required to focus the energy and motivation of an existing base of passionate and talented people in the city. A physical centre generates energy by accommodating a range of creative users: professional actors, dancers, designers, film makers and musicians, teachers and students.

Figure 2 Functions of the ArtsCubator Centre The main strategic goal is to develop and grow artists…

Workspace Incubating creative expression …and create a name for Wellington by building on our creative strengths…

External impact

Underpinning capability but in order to do that, resources are needed…

14

Arts base …and a mechanism for generating creative activity and interest

A summary of consultation feedback is provided in Appendix One. This summary

includes responses from the Council and the arts sector about the core principles.

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The prime strategic function

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

The ‘centre’ can be housed in different buildings, within a precinct or within close proximity to each other. For ultimate impact, it is preferable for the centre to be located in one building if suitable premises in a central and connected location are available. Close proximity creates energy and synergy between activities and co-located groups. It also has greater potential to act as a ‘hub’ of creative activity, including community arts activities. Eventually, the ArtsCubator centre has potential become the hub of an arts precinct, which symbolises Wellington as cultured, creative and innovative. The myriad of other arts activities in the city would be linked to the centre in a number of ways, including: co-ordinated planning, promotion and marketing clustering within the arts precinct use of centre resources, including meeting rooms, performance areas and equipment teaching and programming email and web linkages. Virtual linkages from the centre are discussed in Chapter 6 Underpinning Capability.

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The prime strategic function

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Productive occupiers The ArtsCubator concept will only be successful if it attracts creative people to use the space and allows the individuals involved, the sector and Wellington itself to all gain from its existence. Without limiting the scope of the ArtsCubator, the functional users of the incubator function will most probably have the following characteristics. They: are resident in Wellington and are committed to living here have primary talent and have achieved some successes in their art form already demonstrate a commitment to creative development and moving art forward wish to build from the talents of other functional users of the centre wish to support themselves economically through their art. One suggestion to attract such people is to encourage applications for space(s) within the centre, by way of ‘scholarship’. There is potential to create such a scheme by developing linkages between the ArtsCubator and the tertiary education providers in Wellington. The applicants would be selected by a review board, and would attract financial support as well as a subsidised or free space in the arts centre. The selection process will assist ArtsCubator managers to refine the activities of the centre according to the key needs of participants. Another suggestion is a formal structure where people with primary talent are accepted into the ArtsCubator as ‘apprentices’. Rather than being formally taught, the ‘apprentices’ would be provided with an assigned space, may be paid a small salary and would develop through formal and informal exposure to the other tenants of the arts centre. The focus would be slightly different from existing incubator programmes in Wellington, as it would focus solely on arts and creative expression. Another suggestion is to advertise the spaces as spaces for license exclusively to artists. The advertisement would say that the spaces are available at low cost, perhaps for a fixed term, with a renewal clause. This would have the result of attracting a range of artists or creators who can self-subsidise the spaces. The license may also state that licensees have access to shared spaces and facilities, subject to competing requirements.

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Productive occupiers

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Financial sustainability The concept of financial sustainability encompasses a number of concepts. From the Council’s perspective, financial sustainability means that financial support for the centre is not disproportionate to the economic and social return to the community that the centre generates. Ultimately, the centre has to demonstrate, on an ongoing basis, that it is worthy of investment of public funds. From the centre’s perspective, financial sustainability means there is sufficient revenue to cover all the costs (including overheads) it incurs in meeting its functions. It means not having to struggle from day to day to meet its expenses; yet understanding the limits of its functions so that resources are allocated to projects which best achieve the aims of the centre. User charges, rental payments from sub-leases and license fees all contribute to the financial sustainability of the centre. Other activities, such as running a bar or café, and commissions on exhibitions or shows, may also contribute to the ArtsCubator’s financial sustainability. Allocating charges to spaces is likely to be a challenging task for ArtsCubator managers. On one hand, user charges send a signal that the facility is valuable and worth protecting. It also sends a signal that the centre was designed for achieving outcomes and development (rather than a place for just hanging about). One the other hand, the ArtsCubator needs to reflect the market it serves, where, despite the perceived value of co-location and shared resources, potential occupiers of the space may have access to cheaper locations. It is important that the focus on gaining sustainability does not exclude those who may not be able to pay competitive rates for facilities at this stage in their career. Arts centres in other locations have implemented a variable rent scale, whereby some groups pay more than others for facilities. This could be one option for the ArtsCubator. It, however, involves a judgement about the financial viability of the individual or group and may not be perceived as fair. Ultimately, pricing will be a judgement call for ArtsCubator centre managers, and may take time to get right.

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Productive occupiers

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Incubator space – the detail Co-location of artists and creative people in one physical location is a strong way of developing ideas and capability. Emerging artists require a place where they can express themselves, hone their skills, experiment, make mistakes and interact with the other creative people. Providing people with the space and resources to grow their talents is an essential ingredient in the creative process. Experimentation and co-location is a happening thing on its own and does not necessarily need Wellington City support. Currently, however, it tends to happen in small, disjointed pockets (generally, for practising artists, in inexpensive locations). Increasingly, spaces for such activity in Wellington city are at a premium, particularly those which combine space with other shared resources. Anecdotally, high rentals and the development of apartment space in the central city is making it more difficult for arts practitioners to locate in the central city. Therefore, by providing convenient, accessible physical working space for emerging artists, the Council will be supporting creative development and incubating emerging talent, and maintaining creative energy in the central city. Specifically, in support of Wellington’s performing arts focus, the working spaces would include at least one ‘black box’ rehearsal space, with flexible configurations for rehearsal and performance. a mixing studio or equipment for simple film and music production and computer graphic design. affordable access to technology like computers, mixing equipment and photocopiers (items which are seldom affordable to buy by emerging artists). smaller multi-purpose spaces are a key need for emerging groups, in particular, for rehearsals, workshopping, meetings and discussions. A next step for this project is to invite and receive expressions of interest in participating in the ArtsCubator / ‘centre’. These expressions of interest assist in defining explicit user needs, for example, the level of investment required in a mixing studio. Some potential key occupiers are unlikely to commit until they know what the ‘centre’ will offer. To achieve the best result a process of mix and match planning and management is crucial.

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Incubator space – the detail

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Characteristics of the working spaces for incubator The arts and culture sector is dynamic, and in order to encourage experimentation and innovation, the working spaces need to be flexible and user-friendly. Therefore, the physical spaces provided in the ArtsCubator for emerging arts groups would be configured for maximum flexibility. In a sense, the arts centre needs to be like ‘Lego’, with each piece flexible and multi-functional, but also consistent and reliable. Certain spaces, like meeting rooms and rehearsal spaces could be shared by a number of participant groups, including teaching programmes for wider community groups. It is important, however, that some spaces are assignable to particular groups or interests, at least for set periods of time. In particular, workshop spaces for props building or set design should be able to be reserved so that the users can be sure that their work cannot be compromised by other users while it is being developed.

Working space - critical success factors 1

Access to physical spaces to develop capability

1. Black box space (i)

High stud

(ii)

Able to be reconfigured into a smallish theatre: seats, lighting rigs and stage

(iii)

Sound proofed

(iv)

Not too precious, has to be able to be used with a variety of props, sets and people

(v)

Wired

2. Rehearsal Spaces 3. Recording, mixing and computer-aided design studio(s) (i)

Studio equipment for recording, mixing and producing, with user charges that are sensitive to the emerging artist market

(ii)

Computers and design equipment, with broadband access

4. Rentable / assignable workshop space (i)

For building / painting / other individual activities

5. Photography dark room (optional) (i)

To be managed by the Wellington Photographic society, following a similar model to the darkroom at the Band Rotunda facility

6. Meeting and teaching rooms 7. Galleries (i)

Multi-purpose, for exhibitions, installations, design exhibitions and small functions

(ii)

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Rentable.

Incubator space – the detail

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

2

Flexibility for multiple uses

1. The physical make-up of the centre should be flexible, with the ability to convert large spaces to smaller ones and the ability to accommodate different mixes of arts activities 2. The technical facilities should encourage experimentation : they should not necessarily be the most expensive or exclusive. 3

Location

1. Accessible after hours 2. Central and well-connected 3. Close to amenities, including cafés and bars 4. Accessible by car / delivery vehicles 5. Doesn’t need to be highly visible or on expensive real estate if not geared for external impact; but should be presentable if to be used for theatre events. 4

A trust structure / umbrella organization and a permanent and effective manager

1. the Manager’s role is to effectively co-ordinate the space(s) and the activities 2. the activities of the umbrella organization should be separate from Council.

Other activities The rehearsal spaces will be able to be configured for small - medium audiences, and as such, may provide an additional venue for experimental performances, readings, dance and so on. In addition, a performance café or venue may be part of the offering on lower levels of the building.

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Incubator space – the detail

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Underpinning capability Linking the arts A key feature of the ArtsCubator is that it will give traction to the energy and momentum that already exists in the region. The ArtsCubator should act as an inspired mentor for the whole of Wellington arts and be dedicated to advancing the capability of Wellington arts as a whole. It will advance rather than duplicate what is already there – motivating the sustainability of other arts services by providing a staircase for development. It should be a centre for information and advice, where people can access advice about other arts activities including, arts education, venues and other rehearsal spaces. People should also be able to access formal and informal advice about developing their business, applying for grants or finding facilities in the centre or in other locations in the city. As such, there is a role for an arts publicist who co-ordinates a Wellington arts website and combined arts activities (for example, festivals which happen in the arts precinct). A co-ordinator could establish linkages to equipment suppliers in the city and to rehearsal and performance venues outside of the physical centre.

Sub-tenanting and co-location Interest in relocating to a central facility was expressed by the managements of some significant arts organisations, space permitting. Co-location is an important facet for developing capability in emerging artists and for motivating synergy amongst art forms. Therefore, to a certain extent, housing arts organisations (ie, providing a limited amount of permanent and temporary tenanted spaces) supports the key strategic goal of incubating emerging artists. It also provides a source of rental income for the centre.

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Underpinning capability

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Sub-tenancies could include, for example:15 Radio Active The Festival16 The Fringe Festival Wellington International Jazz Festival Young and Hungry youth theatre Other festival or events groups Shows or arts groups DANZ Arts Access Playmarket Sounz The Arts Foundation Creative NZ Taki Rua Toi Maori Creative HQ or similar incubator. For maximum leverage for smaller arts groups, tenanted office spaces should be supported by shared equipment and facilities, like computers, photocopiers and scanners. Tenancies could be decided through an application process. Tenants should represent a mix of arts activities and should support the primary function of incubation for emerging artists. Other groups who are not sub-tenanted at the ArtsCubator would be encouraged to make use of meeting rooms and equipment, at a small charge, similar to the model used at the existing Wellington Community arts centre. This could provide an additional source of income to the centre.

15

Some, but not all, of these organisations have indicated that they would be prepared

to re-locate to an arts centre as tenants. One of the processes for establishing the arts centre would include receiving formal expressions of interest. 16

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Note: may not share space with another commercial festival.

Underpinning capability

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Critical success factors 1

Central repository for resources for developing performance and marketing capability in emerging artists

1. Resource co-ordinator role, linking activities and resources inside and outside the centre 2. Informal and formal mentoring 3. Seminars and programmes regarding marketing and business development in the arts. 2

Mechanisms to connect the many creative activities happening in Wellington

1. Websites / newsletters 2. Branding 3. Resource co-ordinator role 4. Events 5. Teaching and programming. 3

Provision of office space

1. Offices for permanent arts co-ordinator position(s) and the ArtsCubator manager 2. One or more permanent tenants to provide rental stability 3. Offices for clustering arts organizations who may have variable space needs throughout the year or may only be in existence to support a certain show or event. 4

Shared facilities such as meeting rooms

1. Affordable rates (but charged at higher rates than the current community arts centre) 2. Including, or near to, cafés. 5

Shared equipment

1. Photocopiers and rent-to-use computers, scanners, videos and other equipment. 6

A trust structure / umbrella organization and a permanent and effective manager

1. the Manager’s role is to effectively co-ordinate the space(s) and the activities 2. the activities of the umbrella organization should be separate from Council. 7

Location

1. Central and connected 2. Doesn’t need to be highly visible 3. Doesn’t need expensive fit-out.

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Underpinning capability

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Community arts Weighting competing demands Consultation identified that community arts groups, particularly those located at the Band Rotunda and in Victoria Street, are eager to have access to larger or more permanent premises. Whatever case may or may not be made to centralise other arts activities, there is no doubt the first initiative should address the ArtsCubator function. The physical requirements arising from that function and the building chosen will therefore determine whether space is available for other objectives, such as community arts. The weighting of competing claims for resources should hold the ArtsCubator function as the priority, recognising that the ArtsCubator function is supported by related activities. Regular community use of the facilities will create energy on the premises and will allow the wider arts community to be part of Wellington’s vision for creative development. The community arts co-ordinator, who has considerable experience with supporting creative development, would add value through accommodation in the centre.

Meeting and teaching rooms It is possible that the centre can accommodate some or most the groups who are currently located in the Band Rotunda, provided the chosen premises have spatial and configuration capacities. Specifically, spaces in the ArtsCubator may provide meeting and teaching rooms (including a large community / exhibition room). Teaching / tutoring space may become an important addition to the ArtsCubator offering. Given the availability of affordable commercial opportunities elsewhere in the city, however, teaching should be limited to approximately the same level of provision currently available at the Band Rotunda. In principle, there is no need for Council to compete with other providers of vocational teaching services. Some lockable storage space on the premises for equipment and props for works in progress increases the building’s usefulness. Potential community users of the ArtsCubator facilities may include: The groups that are currently located in the Band Rotunda, eg Wellington Embroiderers Guild, Photographic Society, Folk Society, private tutors etc arts classes meetings small exhibitions.

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Community arts

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Providers of arts or technology education eg Erskine College in Island Bay private tutors schools groups. Other arts-related groups located throughout the city.

Community arts - critical success factors 1

Teaching space and facilities

1. 2 – 3 teaching rooms, including paint zones, for arts classes 2. use of meeting rooms, particularly in the evenings and weekends 3. larger community room, which can be configured as an exhibition gallery 4. Other facilities like a small kitchen and equipment cupboards. 2

A reliable manager who can co-ordinate the space and the activities.

3

Reasonably central location

1. May be in city fringe locations, but still close to the centre 2. Doesn’t need to be highly visible, but does need to be accessible for parents, and the elderly 3. Close to amenities 4. Good, inexpensive parking.

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Community arts

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Gearing for external impact Increasingly, branding is becoming a key driver of successful countries and cities. Wellington’s arts offering could build on this by gearing for external impact. The main focus being to exploit the Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital concept domestically and beyond. The vision critically depends on being able to promote an image of Wellington as a hot-bed of creative activity, in order to encourage economic growth and attract creative people. Therefore, the ArtsCubator and the Creative Wellington concept are inextricably linked. The ArtsCubator adds to Wellington’s image and to the Council’s economic development aims in the creative sector. Yet, the ArtsCubator’s long term success depends on the operation a range of other cultural, creative and innovative activities happening in the city. Branding the ArtsCubator successfully requires that the centre is housed in a unique or architecturally interesting building; or that it represents characteristics unique to Wellington. The ArtsCubator, as part of a branded precinct, should also be promoted through logos, websites and tourist literature. Structured effectively, the ArtsCubator may become an additional tourist offering for Wellington, offering a commissionable experience. It could be a place to purchase arts products, to see programmes, participate in discussions or acquire information about Wellington arts. Tourist product should fit with the strategic plan for tourism development, in particular, appeal to weekend visitors and free and independent travellers and offer an ‘experience’. Gaining a name for the arts centre will take time, as the activities within the centre will define its branding and its presence.

Creating a name for Wellington Wellington has a number of arts and culture activities already happening in a concentrated area. So it has the characteristics of an excellent base for branding and celebrating a precinct. A successful arts precinct is defined by the activities that happen within it. It is busy, active destination, where people know they will find museums, theatres, shops, cafes, busking, galleries and events. It can include special zoning, coordinated signage, and perhaps be supported by a calendar year of events. It is marketed and becomes well-known to visitors and locals alike.

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Gearing for external impact

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Wellington’s culture precinct The consultation indicated considerable support for creating a cultural precinct in Wellington, which would incorporate the full range of cultural activities in Wellington, including museums, galleries, creative retail shops and public sculpture. By locating the ArtsCubator within this precinct, it would form one of the activities that is happening within that precinct and be energised by the other activities happening there. Rather than acting to exclude activities that do not fit with the geographic boundaries of the precinct, the precinct would provide a focussed direction for those seeking arts and cultural activities. The precinct would extend from the Museum of Wellington City and Sea at one end to the Overseas Passenger Terminal at the other, with its apex at Civic Square, running along Wakefield Street. As such, the cultural precinct would incorporate: The Museum of Wellington City and Sea The writer’s walk on the waterfront Waterfront sculpture The bridge between Civic Square and the waterfront, which could incorporate sculpture The Tenth’s Trust Wharewaka development, which is likely to include carving, weaving, contemporary Maori art and teaching facilities Capital E City Gallery The visitor information centre in Civic Square Te Papa Developments on or near Waitangi Park, which may include arts and crafts activities Several existing galleries and specialty retail shops And would link to Cuba St and Courtenay Place. Figure 3 Wellington's cultural precinct

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Gearing for external impact

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Recommendations We recommend that the Council:

1 Agree to the concept of the ArtsCubator The prime strategic function of the ArtsCubator is arts incubation. Building on the energy that already exists in talented and creative people and supporting their growth by providing resources to underpin capability. The ArtsCubator will provide working spaces across genres that function as well-equipped laboratories, enabling the talented to create, experiment, develop and establish sustainable careers. The ArtsCubator will be housed in a physical location to encourage the formation of creative clusters. By providing convenient, accessible physical working space for emerging artists, the Council will be supporting creative development and incubating emerging talent, and maintaining creative energy in the central city. We recommend that the Council supports the development of a centre, with the primary objective of arts incubation (“the ArtsCubator”) in principle, for the following reasons: 1

Pressures on physical space in Wellington city could mean that any form of physical arts centre could become increasingly difficult over time

2

The ‘centre’ provides visible support for Council’s vision, in particular, for developing and promoting cutting edge art forms

3

The ‘centre’ provides support for festival and events-based organisations, adding to vibrancy and quality of life in the city

4

The ‘centre’ provides additional venues for temporary exhibitions, performances and other facilities for community use

5

The ‘centre’ may free up the Band Rotunda for other uses

6

The ‘centre’ will encourage business and marketing capability and as such, programmes could be supported by BizInfo or by the Ministry of Economic Development

7

The ‘centre’ will encourage small business development through ‘clustering’ in the arts centre and the wider precinct

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8

The ‘centre’ will promote retention of talented people in the city

9

The ‘centre’ will promote Wellington tourism objectives.

Recommendations

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

2 Agree to a Stage 2 Feasibility Study The Stage 2 Feasibility Study would provide Council with an implementation model for the ArtsCubator and further detail about costs. 17 The Stage 2 study would refine the ArtsCubator concept, so that the physical resources in the centre are defined with explicit user needs in mind. Refining the ArtsCubator concept is an iterative process, requiring further consultation. For example, a recording studio in the centre could be of international recording standard or practise standard, depending on further responses from the arts community. If the next step is to make progress and produce an implementation model, it may be difficult to do this satisfactorily and completely in a wholly generic sense. Council may therefore decide to eliminate some location options before progressing. We have identified four possible locations for the Arts Centre, which are outlined in the Location Options report.18 The four locations are the result of a comprehensive search within the waterfront and central areas of the city, including advice from commercial property agents. The Stage 2 report would formally detail the physical resources required for the ArtsCubator and the likely costs thereof. A quantity surveyor may need to be contracted separately to estimate building expenses.19 Subsequent deliverables of Stage 2 would include: Securing a key location Design implementation processes Formal business plan Capital cost Operational cost Funding options Required return Governance recommendations Obtaining financial commitment for the business plan from Council. The report should be provided to Council in February, to allow any capital requirements of the ArtsCubator to be included in WCC annual financial planning.

17

Estimated cost of the Stage 2 report in two parts, 1) building requirements notification ($40 - 50k), 2)

business planning and financial projections ($50k).

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18

This report has been produced separately because of the confidential nature of the material.

19

Estimated cost of quantity surveyor $20 - $30k.

Recommendations

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Following the Stage 2 Feasibility Study Once the Stage 2 Feasibility study is completed, the following next steps, in time order, need to be taken to turn the concept into reality: 1. Establish a steering group. The steering group should incorporate Council officers, one or more Councillors and people from the wider arts community (PwC/LNZ can recommend appropriate members). The role of the steering group is to represent the Council in leading the ArtsCubator vision. The group will maintain ongoing connection between the Council and the arts community throughout the implementation. 2. Develop a communications strategy, including nominating spokespersons, to inform the arts community about the ArtsCubator concept and to clarify the Council’s goals and leadership role in relation to that concept. 3. Invite and receive expressions of interest in participating in the ArtsCubator / ‘centre’. These expressions of interest assist in defining explicit user needs. Some potential key occupiers are unlikely to commit until they know what the ‘centre’ will offer. To achieve the best result a process of mix and match planning and management is crucial. 4. Establish the legal entity under the recommended governance structure ($15k). 5. Appoint a ‘Centre’ manager. 6. Begin building / refurbishing work. 7. Establish branding for the ArtsCubator ($20k).

3 Agree to progress the establishment of a branded arts precinct We recommend that Council agrees to progress with establishing a branded arts precinct, and advance ways to achieve immediate traction on that concept.

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Recommendations

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Appendix A - Consultation feedback During the period 9 September – 3 November, the team of PWC/LNZ met with several groups of active participants in Wellington’s arts sector. These groups include: Councillors and Council officers Positively Wellington Tourism Wellington Museums Trust (including City Gallery and Capital E) Wellington Waterfront The Arts Foundation of New Zealand The New Zealand Festival Toi Maori The Tenths Trust Property developers Arts Access Aotearoa Te Papa Arts Organisations, including Arts Arms, Wellington Artists Collective Trust (WACT), MIDI and the Artists Collective The WCC Community Arts Centre. We also sent out over 200 questionnaires by email to arts groups and organisations, including the Arts Partners, and hosted a public meeting with attendance of around 70 people. The following paragraphs synthesise the responses of these groups.

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Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Feedback From Councillors and Council officers The following themes emerged from discussions with Councillors: The overall impression was that the project should be focussed on developing creativity, with the ultimate aim of economic growth in Wellington. The arts centre should encourage innovation and development, and that a focus quality, while highly important, should not define or restrict the activities of the centre. That the development should be uniquely Wellington; exhibiting Wellington creativity. That there is public use space on the waterfront, particularly in Waitangi Park, that may be suitable for the development. That while relocation of the Community Arts Centre in Oriental Bay is important, community arts should not necessarily be the principle driver of this project. At the Councillor’s workshop on 6 October 2003, it was agreed that the top five driving principles of the development should be: a.

Of value to the city, a civic amenity and symbolic of “Creative Wellington, Innovation Capital”.

b.

Provides working, display and sale space for practising and professional artists.

c.

Attractive to tourists and a unique selling proposition for Wellington.

d.

Is financially sustainable in the long term.

e.

Develops new and upcoming artists and art forms (moves art forward and challenges boundaries) AND, equally, Creates synergies between different arts and creative forms.

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Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

From Positively Wellington Tourism Positively Wellington Tourism’s role is to increase visitor numbers and their spend, as a way to support economic growth and contribute to a vibrant lifestyle in Wellington. Positively Wellington Tourism has identified arts and culture as a key brand strength for Wellington, and is committed to building on that brand and supporting the development of new tourist products falling within that brand. The Totally Wellington Strategic Plan 2001 – 200620 identifies the following brand essence: “Wellington is the arts and culture capital of New Zealand offering a unique Pacific urban experience nestled in a stunning harbour environment.” Therefore, Positively Wellington Tourism supports the development of an arts centre, as a possible tourist product, in furtherance of its strategic plan. Its preference is for any arts centre to include an element or elements that are commissionable – that is to say, that can be sold to visitors as a package. The arts centre would act as an additional attraction for Wellington, and would attract a source of revenue.

From Wellington Museums Trust The Wellington Museums Trust controls Wellington’s largest grouping of cultural and heritage attractions, receiving the majority of its funding from the Council. The Museums Trust is supportive of any strategy that encourages tourists to stay longer in the city. It is particularly supportive of developing tourist infrastructure in the arts and culture sector to give a variety of active experiences for tourists. The Museums Trust has identified a strategic priority of developing a cultural precinct anchored at three points by Te Papa, Civic Square and Queen’s Wharf. Capital E, as an organisation for children falling under the Wellington Museums Trust banner, is supportive of an arts centre. The centre should work to cultivate creative ideas among young people; (this is one of the current functions of Capital E, including the highly successful Children’s theatre). There was some concern among the wider group that the commitment to the arts centre would need to be long term, to allow it to develop. Currently, the market for arts products is predominantly a local market. There was concern that an art centre would be difficult to support commercially without ways to attract the tourist dollar.

20

Totally Wellington / Positively Wellington Tourism, Totally Wellington Strategic Plan

2001 – 2006.

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Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

From Wellington Waterfront Wellington Waterfront, as independent developers of the waterfront area, are keen to have public use spaces represented in the waterfront development and in buildings bordering Waitangi Park. An arts centre may form one of those spaces. This option will be discussed in the final report in December.

From The International Festival of the Arts The International Festival of the Arts is one of Wellington’s defining events, held biannually. It is the largest and most successful cultural event in terms of ticket sales in Australasia. It presents to New Zealand audiences a programme of accessible, diverse, innovative and exciting events from around the world. During the 2002 Festival more than 1300 artists from 25 countries performed. Comments from festival directors were that the arts centre must have a key concept and a key point of difference. Other arts centres have had the experience where they have tried to please everyone, with the result that quality has been sacrificed. To simply create a space is not sustainable and can create funding dependence from participants, so it is important to be clear about the roles and functions of the centre from the outset. A key role of the arts centre would be to facilitate knowledge-sharing and production support, through co-location of arts organisations with variable accommodation needs. Key needs in Wellington: a middle sized theatre (600-800 seats), a multi-function theatre and rehearsal space. The Festival may be interested in being a key tenant of an arts centre, part of their contribution to which might include production expertise and marketing/ ticketing advice to other organisations. They could not, however, share a space with another commercial festival. They are currently situated in Anvil House.

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Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

From Arts Foundation of New Zealand The Arts Foundation of New Zealand is an independent charitable trust established in September 1989, which promotes excellence in all art forms for the benefit of the people of New Zealand by distributing funds and awards to artists. The foundation supports the concept of an arts centre, and of an arts and culture precinct. The arts centre: Will act as the head office of Wellington arts, connected to the other activities going on in the city Will enhance connections between technology and the arts, as progression is very important for the sector. Will create collaboration and synergies, to create “business between arts”. The arts centre could be an addition point of difference for Wellington arts. It should therefore build on Wellington’s image as the home of creative industries. Practical considerations for the arts centre are that it needs to be multi-purpose and have flexible configurations, to accommodate changing needs. This is particularly important for the arts sector, because creativity is dynamic. The arts centre should be inclusive; if spaces are configured to say ‘we’re open to all creative people’, they will come! In addition, the arts centre should be a space for shared resources, eg desk space, photocopiers. It should also include informal meeting spaces, like a café, because people meet in cafés.

From Toi Maori Toi Maori is a national organisation, developing and promulgating all forms of contemporary Maori art, and providing advocacy for Maori art and artists. The organisation supports the concept of an arts centre in Wellington, and sees it as a place where local and national and international artists are exposed to a mixture of public and more intimate workspaces. It should work to grow the market for artistic product, including contemporary Maori art. Primarily, growing the market means growing the tourist and offshore market. Toi Maori believes that experimentation and adaptation are important for artists, so the space should support dynamic and changing art forms. Therefore, the arts centre could focus on innovative and international art forms while showing the creativity of Wellington and its diverse cultures.

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Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

From Tenths Trust The Tenths Trust agreed with us that there was a current gap in Wellington for display of Iwi-based arts. The focus of the discussion, however, was on the Trust’s plans for development of a wharewaka building near the boat club on the waterfront. This development may include display and working spaces for weavers and carvers, and also Maori contemporary art. There was general agreement that an arts centre would be an important addition to the Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital brand, and that the creative precinct would give focus to that vision.

From Arts Access Aotearoa Arts Access Aotearoa is a charitable trust whose objectives are to ensure that people and communities of New Zealand have unhindered access to the arts, and opportunities to create, perform and develop their own arts. In particular, Arts Access Aotearoa works with organisations in the social service sector, and communities of people with limited access to the arts, to stimulate them to undertake arts projects, develop their own arts activities independently and develop partnerships with funding organisations and art groups. The key message was that an arts centre space should encourage engagement for people on the margins, and that that goal could reasonably be located within a development which met a number of other goals also. Above all, the arts centre should not exclude community artists and artists on the margin. In particular, the arts centre could accommodate sale space for saleable work of community artists and artists on the margin. Professional presentation of the work is key, and it is important not to sacrifice quality. One point that was made was that recreational artists may feel threatened by the people who attended Arts Access programs, and so the spaces for those purposes may need to be separated. Immediate needs identified include space for Vincents, ROAR! and Alay.

From Te Papa Te Papa is New Zealand’s national museum. In the year to 30 June 2003 it attracted 1,344,500 visitors, 41% from overseas.21 Its collection policy is based on a strategy to actively engage with those attending the museum. While Te Papa is a national museum, the activist, creative strategy of the museum is consistent with Wellington’s creative city image. The arts centre should be unique to Wellington, and the image of Te Papa will help promote the arts centre concept.

21

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Source: Te Papa Annual Report 2002/03

Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

From arts organisations PWC/LNZ met with a number of arts organisations and representatives, including ARMS, the MIDI Trust, Businessis Ltd, WACT and Soapbox Productions. The general feeling is that artists should be encouraged to help themselves, and that there is merit in recognising that artists are also business people. Artists want to succeed and be commercially viable. Artists noted that in order for the business side to develop, they need access to advice and infrastructure. Therefore, it is recommended that one of the functions of the arts centre will be to act as a source of information and connection. The arts centre is an opportunity to do something innovative, maybe in film or design. However, a lot of the groundbreaking developments in arts ‘happens in the cracks’, especially in Wellington, which has less of a visual arts focus and more of a performing arts focus. Therefore, arts organisations cautioned against creating a ‘castle’, where only a few are allowed, because this may exclude the people who by developing, contribute to progressing the whole.

From Wellington Community Arts Centre The Community Arts centre in the Band Rotunda in Oriental Bay hosts a range of activities, funded by the Council and through user-charges. There are generally between 15-20 different art-based courses each month, offered as part of the Arts Centre's term courses. Participant numbers can range between 2 or 3 and a dozen or so (as the Arts Studio will not seat more than about a dozen). There are also two weekly Life Drawing sessions, with usually 5-10 people participating. The Community Room is used by one-off events and workshops (about 3-6/month) as well as by clubs, yoga, musical babies, and groups on a monthly basis (about 8). Size is limited to about 75 participants. The Wellington Photographic Society has a darkroom space in the centre, which could be re-located to the new arts centre. Community arts centre staff believe that depending on location, parking, staffing/support, and physical facilities, a new arts centre could be projected with a much higher, active course/participant base. A larger, more adaptable community use room should be a feature in the new arts centre, and would attract a number of users. The community room could be used for a number of arts and crafts groups, and should include potential for displays of work (hanging system and lighting). A key need for the arts centre is to provide ‘hot desk’ space for about a half dozen smaller, emerging groups. By including groups such as the Wellington International Jazz Festival (about 3-4 full-time staff) and the emerging Wellington International Poetry Festival (2 parttime staff), the arts centre would be actively occupied.

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Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Feedback from arts and creative industries questionnaire As part of the consultation process, a questionnaire was sent out to participants in the arts and culture sector in Wellington City. The questionnaire was designed to get an indication of the level of support for the arts centre, what the guiding principles for development might be and begin to get details about the particular requirements of the sector. The survey was sent out to around 250 people across various organisations in the arts sector in Wellington. We are still receiving responses from various organisations, so the results below provide a summary of the responses to date: Of the 58 responses received: beyond doubt there is an overwhelming feeling that Wellington would benefit from an ‘arts centre’. There is less unanimity in regard to its strategic priorities. most favour a ‘central’ location, the term ‘central’ being meaning on the waterfront or in the Civic Square region general acceptance of alternative definitions such as ‘Arts Centre’, ‘Arts Hub’ and ‘Arts Precinct’ indicates there is a relatively relaxed and non-prescriptive attitude on these issues There was strong support for an arts centre as part of Wellington's future as "Creative Wellington: Innovation Capital" There was a pervasive feeling that an arts centre should encourage collaboration and connectedness amongst Wellington artists It should be a visible 'hub' for all the creative activities happening all over Wellington, where people access information about those activities The spaces should be accessible to people in the arts sector, and not prohibitively expensive to use Around 60% of respondents replied that they were interested in relocating to the arts centre or using it regularly Performing arts rehearsal space was strongly reinforced as a need. The survey responses indicated that the key principles to guide the development, for artists or arts organisations, are: a.

Central and connected to the city's arts community

b.

Creates synergies between different arts and creative forms

c.

Space and facilities for co-location of arts organisations

d.

Of value to the city, a civic amenity and symbolic of "Creative Wellington, Innovation Capital"

e.

Develops new and upcoming artists and art forms (moves art forward and challenges boundaries).

Two additional key principles, from a wider, 'Wellington' perspective, are:

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f.

Attractive to tourists and a unique selling proposition for Wellington

g.

Part of a precinct and a wider development plan.

Appendix A - Consultation feedback

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Appendix B - Building requirements The table below provides a preliminary assessment of the building requirements. We estimate that the centre should be no less than 1,200sqm minimum to provide for a mix of activities, but preferably should be more spacious. The minimum requirements are broken down as follows: Office spaces (including shared resource rooms) = 98 sqm Technology suites = 40 sqm Meeting and teaching rooms = 80 sqm Darkroom = 18 sqm At least one rehearsal / performance space = 180 sqm Individual workshops =180 sqm Galleries / community room = 180 sqm Reception = 30 sqm Retail spaces (if required, for income generation) = 200 sqm Kitchens / bathrooms / changing rooms / filing/ storage = 194 sqm We note that these estimates have not been prepared or reviewed by a quantity surveyor, and that further investigation needs to be done to confirm these estimates. ITEM

DETAIL

SQUARE METERAGE

Office for the Arts Centre

- Computer, printer, office

Director

equipment

Office for arts co-ordinators

-

Computers, printer

WCC Community Arts

-

Photocopier

Co-ordinator

-

Office equipment

-

Around 16 sqm Around 25 sqm

WCC public Arts Co-ordinator

-

Arts Centre Technical manager

-

Recording suite manager Around 10 sqm

Office kitchen Technology resource suite for

-

4 x computers with email

arts groups’ use

-

Scanner

-

Photocopier Min 2 separate offices

Around 16 sqm

-

Rental areas

each

-

eg Arts Arms

= 32 sqm

-

eg Fringe Festival

Rented / temporary office spaces -

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Around 25 sqm

Appendix B - Building requirements

40


Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Office bathrooms

-

Male and female, 2x each

Around 10 sqm x2 = 20 sqm

-

Data projector

-

Whiteboards

-

Microphones

-

TV

-

DVD / Video

-

Mixing equipment

-

Fully sound proofed

Other technology suite

-

Fully sound proofed

Around 20 sqm

Meeting / workshop room 1

-

10-12 people

Around 20 sqm

Teaching room 1

-

For arts and drawing classes

Around 25 sqm

-

Vinyl floors

-

10-12 people working

-

For one-on-one teaching

-

Piano

-

Table and chairs

-

For larger meetings,

Tech store room

Small mixing suite / film suite

Teaching room 2

Community room

Around 10 sqm

Around 20 sqm

Around 16 sqm

About 80 sqm

presentations and lectures

General use kitchen General use bathroom

-

Carpeted

-

Seating for up to 60

-

Zip / tea and coffee facilities

-

Adjoining community room

-

Male and female, 3x each

Around 25 sqm Around 12 sqm each = 12 x 2 sqm = 24 sqm

Darkroom Rehearsal space(s)

- Leased and managed by

Around 3mx6m

Wellington Photographic society

= 18 sqm Around 180 sqm

-

Black box

-

Lighting rigs

-

Good acoustics

-

Dance floor

-

Portable stage

-

Can be configured into a performance theatre, seating around 100 - 120

-

Stage area: 10m x 8m (approx)

-

Basic sound and lighting equipment

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Appendix B - Building requirements

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Wellington City Council – Arts Centre Feasibility Study

Backrooms

-

Dressing room space for 12 (approx)

Storage room for equipment

Bar and foyer areas for

sqm

-

Private toilets

-

Chairs

-

Ladders

-

Scaff

-

Tool kits

-

Extension cords

-

Could be a multiple use for

Approx. 25 sqm

the community room.

rehearsal/performance area Larger gallery

10m x 8 = 80

-

Gallery space for hire /

100 sqm (10x10)

commissionable -

May also be used for performances, recitals

-

Room for about 60 people standing, 40 sitting

Large workshop

-

Multiple uses, including set

60 sqm

design Working spaces

-

Lockable

-

For exclusive use by

Around 120 sqm

working artists Welcome area / receptionist /

-

Bright and welcoming

Say 5 x 6 =

ticket office / tourist centre

-

Computer, reception

30 sqm

equipment needed Retail space(s)

-

For general retail use

80 – 100 sqm

(could be café, dealer gallery,

-

Sub-leased

each

bookshop, music shop, etc)

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Appendix B - Building requirements

42

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Wellington Arts Center Final Report  

Final Planning Report presented to Wellington City Council, December 2003, to begin development in full for Toi Poneke for the creative comm...

Wellington Arts Center Final Report  

Final Planning Report presented to Wellington City Council, December 2003, to begin development in full for Toi Poneke for the creative comm...

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