The Impact Issue

Page 1

Celebrating Diversity In The Entertainment Industry

®

THE IMPACT ISSUE

JOHN DAVID SNYDER & NIKI SHADROW SNYDER FOUNDERS OF

PROJECT POP DROP

The New Influencers Are The Givefluencers Photo By: Michael Bezjian @TheArtistProjectLA

WELCOME TO 2021 AN ISSUE FILLED WITH:

THOUGHT LEADERS MOVING THE NEEDLE IN

ENTERTAINMENT, MIND, BODY, SPIRIT & STYLE

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH GARY REEVES CREATOR OF THE

“GIVE”

TV SHOW ON

OPRAH’S OWN NETWORK


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR W

elcome readers to a truly dynamic issue of Hollywood Weekly Magazine. We’re calling this our “IMPACT ISSUE.” We are honored to have on our cover the one and only Power Couple of John David Snyder & Niki Shadrow Snyder. If Aldous Huxley had known this wonderful couple would be been born he never would have written “Brave New World.” He would have realized we’d soon be in good hands. John & Niki have created a “Love Algorithm,” a “Beautiful Blueprint” for society that I’m convinced will empower the world. I know it’s a bold statement but that’s what Hollywood Weekly is known for. Insight. Foresight. The ability to recognize greatness at any stage. When you read about what this loving family is doing -- in real time -- you will see a bright future ahead for all of us. “Project Pop Drop” is a Game Changer. We also have an exclusive interview with Gary Reeves, creator of the series “GIVE” on Oprah’s OWN Network, and many other “Influencers” who have now become “Givefluencers.” Remember that word: Givefluencer, because it’s what we are all capable of becoming. As always we thank you, our readers. We are who we are because of you...

Anthony Ewart

PUBLISHER/EDITOR IN CHIEF Prather Jackson VICE PRESIDENT Bernice Harris Michael D. Coxson SENIOR BOOK CURATOR Jane Ubell-Meyer ASSOCIATE EDITOR Anthony Ewart LIFE & STYLE EDITOR Niki Shadrow Snyder MARKETING & SALES Launy Rhem CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Anthony Ewart Alex A. Kecskes Jenny Werth Ike Sinha GRAPHIC DESIGNER Denise Chavez ILLUSTRATOR/ DIGITAL MEDIA Jonathan Clark INNOVATION EDITOR@LARGE Jaymes Hines AFRICA OPERATIONS Meredith Beal, Africa Editor meredith@lastingvalue.com Kenya +254.715.508.964 USA +1.512.537.2116 UK +44.7700.083.475 Gambia +220.297.6482 BRAZIL OPERATIONS Fabio Glingani Rico@lapenda.net (310) 567-3333 INDIA OPERATION Ike Sinha Country Director Art4Peace Awards Hollywood Weekly Magazine B1/1565 Vasantkunj New Delhi-110 070 Mobile +919599068592

Associate Editor

ASIA OPERATION Bench Bello HWM Asia Operations hollywoodmagazineusa@gmail.com Mobile +639273895559

Visit: Hollywood-Weekly.com Call: (424)371-9900 2 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

Email: HollywoodWeekly@gmail.com

DISTRIBUTORS CoMag MADER NEWS @ HOLLYWOODWEEKLY @ HOLLYWOODWEEKLY


®

THE IMPACT ISSUE

JOHN DAVID SNYDER & NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

JOHN DAVID SNYDER & NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

The Givefluencers_________4-7

GARY REEVES

Creator of GIVE____________8 _

GIVEFLUENCERS

Q&As________________9-34 HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY IS A PUBLICATION WHOLLY OWNED BY PRATHER JACKSON HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY MAGAZINE LLC. © 2020 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION OF ANY CONTENT WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSSION OF THE PUBLISHER IS EXPRESSLY PROHIBITED. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR MAY BE SENT TO: PRATHER@HOLLYWOODWEEKLYMAGAZINE.COM. 8345 RESEDA BLVD #117, NORTHRIDGE, CA 91324. FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES CALL: (424) 371-9900 HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 3


Enlightening, Educating & Empowering THE WORLD TO BE GIVING WHILE MAKING A LIVING PROJECT POP DROP & THE CREATION OF GIVEFLUENCERS BY ANTHONY EWART

“Once Upon A Time...I Know” This is the story of a beautiful fairy tale we’ve all been living in for a decade. 2021 officially makes it a decade but you always round up in fairy tales. If you truly don’t know the date then you begin with “Once Upon A Time.” But this is a modern fairy tale so we do know the date. Our story begins in 2011 when John David Snyder and his beautiful wife Niki Shadrow Snyder created Project Pop Drop. If you have a roof over your head, a refrigerator with food and a warm bed to sleep in you haven’t been affected “directly” by the fairy tale of Project Pop Drop, but you most certainly have been affected “indirectly.” As Carl Jung explained, “We live in a collective unconscious. All of our minds pool together like sweet raindrops in a sun shower and form an invisible ocean of consciousness”. This is how ideas are spread around the world. So when a jolt of happiness and love is infused in the material world it spreads through the immaterial world of our collective unconscious. When a homeless mother and her children receive food, blankets, personal hygiene products, socks, underwear, 4 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

sleeping bags and toys from Project Pop Drop the love experienced by that family resonates through our collective unconscious like electrons through copper wires. Instantaneously. You may have gone to sleep the previous night feeling slightly depressed about conditions in our world. And while you slept John Snyder and Niki Shadrow Snyder were in the dark streets of downtown Los Angeles feeding our homeless brothers and sisters. So, when you woke up the next morning you had a strange sensation of joy. Happiness. A feeling that something good happened in the world in the few hours your body rested. Human suffering was eased. This vibrant, unexplainable sensation of love stays with you all day. It affects the way you interact with everyone you encounter. They, in turn, of course, do the same. Project Pop Drop has created a ripple effect of compassion and caring in the world which gives birth to understanding. The roots to love and peace. This is the fairy tale that Niki Shadrow Snyder and her husband John Snyder have immersed the world in since 2011 when the intense love they felt for each other produced an idea for the greatest social revolution the world has ever known: the concept of a “givefluencer”.


John David Snyder, Ava Snyder, Chloe Snyder, Dylan Snyder, Levi Snyder & Niki Shadrow Snyder I Hope of The Valley Rescue Mission I Check Presentation Ceremony I Photo By: Ken Craft/ Hope Of The Valley Rescue Mission

“John & Niki” There are three characters in this fairy tale: Niki, John... and the world. Throughout both of their lives John and Niki have been consumed with helping the world. Helping people. Sharing love and understanding. We have enough resources in the world that no child should ever go hungry. But children are hungry. And some children die from starvation or malnutrition in this country. John was only in junior high school when he realized the world he witnessed in real life was much different than the world in the media. John may have been thirteen when his father took him to a Lakers game at the Forum in Inglewood. Amidst the dazzling excitement of seeing the Lakers firsthand (those images the TV captured correctly), John was bothered by the other images he never saw on any television network. It was the sight of homeless people John saw sleeping in boxes or on the sidewalk as he drove with his father to the Forum. Those images never left John. Every Project Pop Drop delivery John makes with Niki is a cathartic experience; he’s not only helping people in the material world, he’s healing the homeless people of his memories he saw as a boy that night by the Forum. As Anthony Hopkin’s would probably tell John, he’s “Silencing the Lambs” of his childhood.

Niki Shadrow was a celebrity stylist extraordinaire in Hollywood. Niki’s aesthetic sense was and is palpable. Just talking to Niki, you’re hoping somehow through that osmosis some of her fashion artistry will rub off on you. Niki uses color in her styling the way Matisse used colors on his magnificent paintings and collages.Or the way Ravel infused all of his musical orchestrations with vibrant colors, most notably in his “Ma mère l’Oye (Mother Goose Suite).” But Matisse and Ravel both knew true art is steeped in real love. Just as nuclear fusion fuels the sun, love is the nuclear fusion for creativity. It is why there’s a clear difference, between the beautiful sarcasm and wit of Andy Warhol’s art before “The Factory,” and after, when sincere love was forgotten as Warhol slowly fell in love with (and extended) the “15 minutes of fame” line he originated, believing that everyone was entitled to at least that. Niki was able to circumvent the narcissistic traps of fame in Hollywood because, like her future husband John, she was aware of the real world. Niki excelled in Hollywood because she never worshipped it. It was never real. It was art. It was fashion. It was fun. It was not real life. For Niki and John people suffering in this world was a real problem that had to be solved in real time. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 5


make a living “Weby what we get.

We make a life by what we give.

WINSTON CHURCHILL

“Givefluencers” John and Niki created the word “givefluencer” and a community for “givefluencers” called, The “Givefluencer Network”. A “givefluencer” is a person that is influencing the world by what they give back. Before John and Niki found each other they were two strangers in Los Angeles busy with their careers while simultaneously trying to figure out how to save the world. Everyone who knew them, their friends and family, said they’d never get married. How could they? They were always busy. Between their careers and volunteer work there was just no time for dating. People around them in our City of Angels were hurting and hungry. This was a real battle for Niki and John, and this is what writers don’t understand today. An antagonist in a story doesn’t have to be an actual person. Niki and John are the protagonists of this fairy tale, the antagonist is hunger. The villain is poverty. The monster is homelessness. There can be engaging, thrilling stories where all the people are good and what they are fighting to overcome are situations. Good news for filmmakers, stories like this require no CGI, just heartfelt emotions, love, courage and humanity which are the essential ingredients and components for immortal stories that bind and bond human beings together. The story of Niki and John is a story of this caliber; it is a fairy tale that connects us all through compassion and love for humanity. 6 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

If you’re inclined to think Niki and John spent their entire first date discussing ways to change the world you’d be right. But that’s the point here. You don’t need twenty matching points on a dating site to fall in love with someone, just a common, worthy goal that you both spend all your time together pursuing. It was on that first date that John and Niki created Project Pop Drop. That was over a decade ago. Now they’re married with four kids and the philanthropic organization they dreamed of on their first date is a reality. Project Pop Drop delivers life saving supplies every month from coast to coast. The foundation helps contribute to facilitating more than 90,000 meals to individuals and families experiencing homelessness. They are well on their way to helping feed millions with their initiatives. But here’s the best part, the entire organization is funded through John and Niki’s parent company “Platinum International Products And Services .” This was the blueprint that Niki and John came up with all those years ago. “Giving” should not be something we only do every Thanksgiving or Christmas (sometimes both), it must be a concept woven into the fabric of your organization or business so you can give back to the community not just once a month but make an impact three hundred and sixty five day a year. John and Niki believe you should always lead by example. Their own children, Chloe, age 7 and their natural triplets, Ava, Dylan and Levi, age 3, all participate


in giving back with the program as they personally deliver the donations with their parents on the last Saturday of every month 12 months a year. Can you imagine if every business in Los Angeles contributed a small portion of their profits every month to the homeless or hunger situation in our city? It would transform LA into a city of the future where happiness is shared by all, and we would defy the predictions made of our fate by great dystopian writers like Aldous Huxley, Philip K. Dick and George Orwell. “Giving” as an agenda, what a concept. Becoming, as Niki and John frame it, a “givefluencer”. Their day job is Platinum International Products And Services, an office supply company with a private label brand of toner and ink cartridges. All of their clients understand that when they do business with Niki and John they are also giving to their sister company Project Pop Drop. Their Clients are their partners. In fact they call their clients their “pop drop partners.” Their customers are partnering with Niki and John to support Project Pop Drop. They are printing with a purpose. They are giving while making a living. Downtown Los Angeles has a homeless population somewhere between seven and ten thousand. The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority released the results of the 2020 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count, which showed over 66,436 people in Los Angeles County experiencing homelessness, This represents a 12.7% rise from last year’s point-in-time count. This number is rising every day. Niki and John work closely with the homeless shelters, missions and food pantries all over greater Los Angeles and in Orange County, which has been described as the “shadow of Disneyland” since such a huge population of homeless people have been forced financially to live there. John and Niki coordinate food, clothing, toiletry and toy drives with numerous businesses throughout Los Angeles under the umbrella of Project Pop Drop. In 2017 Niki and John, along with the COO, Jeff Korell, inaugurated a school program with middle schools and high schools all over Los Angeles with the mantra “Teach the youth of America to give back.” Their mission is to enlighten, educate & empower their student partners. They’ve taught students about the plight of the homeless and how we can all help in our own way. Niki and John show students how they can implement food and clothing drives for the homeless in their school. Several teachers and student partners have accompanied Niki and John on Project Pop Drop deliveries to homeless shelters so they can see first- hand the impact of their efforts.

Platinum International Products And Services has embraced the concept of an ethics driven company and redefined Cause Marketing by helping all companies and organizations give back even if their business itself doesn’t have a compelling (motivating) backstory written into their marketing. All businesses and individuals can be “givefluencers” by simply caring about people on a daily basis and creating a system for helping those less fortunate and sticking to it. Make it a part of your daily life and routine. Becoming a “givefluencer” is a state of mind achieved by understanding all human beings are connected. As a society we can only function correctly when we’re all taking care of each other. “The Secret” (2006) dramatically illustrated the power of the “Law of Attraction,” so with Niki and John generating this much love in Los Angeles they were bound to be drawn to other loving souls. It is not surprising that there is now a connection with Oprah Winfrey, the “Queen of Compassion and Giving. Project Pop Drop will be a featured with their Project Pop Drop team on an episode in the Emmy Award winning TV show on Oprah’s “OWN” network for the TV show, Give coming up next month. We’ll keep you updated on that news because John and Niki Snyder are going to become regular features in Hollywood Weekly. John and Niki run their philanthropic foundation on both the West Coast and on the East Coast, with their national headquarters in Los Angeles and a regional office in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. They have also produced events for the homeless in South Carolina, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Washington, DC In every state, Niki and John chant their motto “Give and Receive.” Project Pop Drop was recently awarded a gold medal and the “Presidents Volunteer Service Award” in recognition for their commitment to strengthen our nation and communities through service. This was a Presidential Honor for their great work in the community. It was accepted by their Regional Vice President, Sharon Edwards. John and Niki were personally inspired by Steve Jobs in his iconic commercial that referenced, “Here’s to the crazy ones, the ones crazy enough to think they can change the world, because they are the ones that usually do”. All this from two people who only had two wishes in life. One wish was to help the world, the other wish was to find personal love. I’m happy to say this is a fairy tale where they accomplished both wishes, and in doing so John and Niki have included all of us in their. John and Niki look forward to showing the world that becoming a “givefluencer” is a sure way to achieve not only your life’s purpose but your own personal happily ever after. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 7


Q&A Gary Reeves WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? GR: I’m a community service provider and social impact entrepreneur. I am the Founder of GIVE To Change Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the Daytime Emmy Award-winning television series GIVE on the OWN network. I am deeply committed to creating values-based, positive content centered on service and community involvement.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? GR: I inspire healthy social and emotional change, through my actions toward others. I create content across media platforms with producing partners like Blair Underwood, Anthony Melikhov and our collaboration with Unite 4 Good Foundation. Together we help create a global movement.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? GR: I feel stress is derived from unfiltered or unrealistic expectations. So I try to balance both by paying attention to what I empower in my daily activities.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? GR: Don’t be afraid of your imperfections, because that’s when God shows up.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? GR: My passion is to be a better provider of wisdom to my children and loved ones.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? GR: My biggest disappointment in 2020, is seeing people suffer, because we still don’t have enough empathy being exercised by those in power. 8 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

Photo Credit: Gary Reeves & Sydney Nycole

07I

09I

08I

10I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? GR: The best part of 2020 is the fact I can still enjoy my children and those that mean a lot to me. NS: What does success mean to you? GR: Success to me is being able to live peacefully with your own truth. It also means collaborating with people I love. A perfect example is my collaboration with my daughter, Sydney Nycole who wrote and performed the theme song for the GIVE TV series.

NS: What causes are important to you? GR: I think it is more my purpose than a cause. I want to continue to be fearless in sharing empathy and the power of social healing by giving forgiving love. NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? GR: I believe celebrating others sets a healthier climate for equality and social inclusion.


Q&A Jason FEIFER WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? JF: I help people find opportunity in change. I’m the Editor In Chief of Entrepreneur magazine, host of three podcasts, book author, and more.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? JF: This was a year of massive change. People felt lost, spun around, and unsure of what was in their control. So I stepped up to help them feel oriented. With my team at Entrepreneur, we doubled our efforts to offer a steady hand to people trying to control their own destiny. I reinvented my media products and social media to meet the moment, developed a book that will help people embrace change, and more.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? JF: Two ways. First, I found a clarity of purpose in my work. And two, I made sure I was stepping away from work regularly. I have a ton of responsibilities, as well as two small kids, so finding even little ways to get away were valuable. For example, I started taking regular bike rides in the middle of the day, something I’d never done before!

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? JF: Don’t worry about the destination, because you can’t control it. All you can control is what you’re learning now, and whether you’re still in an environment where you can learn. Absorb everything you can, move on, repeat. That’s the path.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? JF: It’s happening as I write these words! Some projects I’ve spent a long time developing are

about to become real. I can’t talk about them yet, but you’ll see them begin in 2021.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? JF: Watching my 5-year-old son struggle with isolation. Those early days of the lockdown were very hard.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? JF: I’ve been juggling a lot of disparate projects these past few years, and in 2020 I figured out a way to bring them all together. You won’t really see it until 2021, but I have a lot lined up!

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? JF: Success means that I’m better than I was yesterday.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? JF: Obviously, there are issues that concern and engage me along with

so many others, equality, climate, and others. But here’s where my day-to-day work really aligns. I’m passionate about encouraging innovation and pushing back against people’s fears of the new. I thought the documentary The Social Dilemma was a low point of 2020, a hysterical piece of fearmongering that had no practical or constructive purpose. Our dialogue about technology and innovation has to become much smarter than this, and I’m working hard to foster that.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? JF: Both. Obviously, we want everyone to be focused on how they can help others. But there’s nothing wrong with spotting opportunity in crisis, because that often means you’re identifying problems and figuring out solutions, and that’s what entrepreneurs do best. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 9


Q&A Alexandra WITH

HAGGIAG dean BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? AHD: I’m a documentary director.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? AHD: I directed a new film about Paris Hilton called “This is Paris” that explores the real reason Paris Hilton created her famous persona and became an early influencer. She was locked in solitary confinement, drugged and abused, and suffered childhood trauma in a reform school in Utah. When she was released, she wanted to become so rich and famous so nobody could control her again. The film will hopefully alert American viewers to the terrible drugging and beating children suffer in reform schools across the US.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? AHD: I dealt with the stress of this difficult year by retreating to my parents’ house in the country with my husband and two young boys. We have been baking and gardening and we succumbed to the ultimate Covid cliché. We bought a pandemic puppy. He’s called Archie McScruffers. He is overconfident, has an underbite and untamable hair, and we are mad about him.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? AHD: Be bold. Believe in yourself. Don’t listen to rubbish about what you can’t do, or what is impossible. Take that leap. Realize that too many of your heroes are men, and that means much of what you want to achieve will seem out of reach. Look for women 10 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

who are doing what you dream of doing, and realize, if they did it, you just might reach for the stars, too. Be kind to yourself and others. It sounds simple. It isn’t. The world conspires against you, and so does your ambition. To counter that, practice kindness every day. It’s a muscle. Don’t take it for granted. And in the end, know this: love is all that matters. Love well. Love better than that. And tomorrow, try to love a bit more. How well we love is the real mark we make on the world.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re the most passionate about? AHD: I can’t reveal much about this, because it’s a

work in progress, but in the early days of lockdown I started interviewing a bunch of women who represent the most beautiful, and powerfully sexy women in our society, and I began to realize that they had all suffered trauma that was hiding in plain sight. Quite by accident I discovered a new story that I’m absolutely passionate about directing, and that, God willing, will become a series on A&E starting next fall.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? AHD: I’ve been very lucky and we haven’t lost any loved ones or suffered from the disease yet, so this feels like an entry I shouldn’t even fill in. But if we need to, I guess the worst part of


2020 was missing out on the Tribeca Film Festival opening night of our film “This is Paris” in March. We were planning an enormous screening and party for over 600 people, so laughable when I think about it now! But God, it would have been fun. Also, I would have loved to see the audience reaction, and I’m still a little heartbroken that I never will.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? AHD: The best part of 2020 has been spending all this time with my family. I used to wish that the merry-go-round of my life would spin a little slower and I could get off and smell the roses from time to time. Well, that has finally happened. I don’t know if I smelled many roses, but I definitely smelled a lot of freshly shampooed kid hair when we did our evening hugs, I dried a lot of puppy fur wet from the rain, and pulled piles of vegetables from the loamy soil in our garden. That was pretty good.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? AHD: Success means getting to work on my dream projects. Success is the incredible sensation that people believe in me and will give me a bigger canvas upon which to splash my dreams.

SUBMIT YOUR FILM GET REVIEWED

(424) 371-9900 HollywoodWeekly@gmail.com

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? AHD: Women’s rights and gender equality are very important to me. I want to see a society that is more balanced. I think many of our problems stem from having a hyper-aggressive, hyper-competitive, hyper-masculine society. I think we have forgotten the quieter, softer powers: collaboration, caring for others and for our environment, supporting the structure in which we live so it cares for everyone in need.

10I

NS: Do you think the world needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic. AHD: A thousand times over, what they can give.

HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 11


Q&A brianne manz WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? BM: I had been a fashion showroom owner and then I became a mom and a blog writer. I live in New York City with my husband, my three children, and my new puppy, Cooper. My blog Stroller in the City boasts about city living, family travel, fashion and all things ‘mommy’. I also launched a clothing line called In the City, which is a mini capsule collection of “mommy and me” pieces. I’m also the co-host of Us Weekly’s “Moms Like Us”.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? BM: In 2020, our needle took a complete 360! We quickly listened to the times and what our readers needed from us to properly adjust. We changed the tone of some of our campaigns while providing sensitivity to the difficulties we all faced as Americans and citizens of the world. We went from talking about trips around the world and fashion week to home schooling your kids, what we’re cooking for dinner, and listed so many helpful online resources parents were looking for.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? BM: This year hasn’t been easy for any of us. As a family of 5 in a New York City apartment, there were definitely stressful moments, but ultimately, we recognize how lucky we all are just to be healthy! Like many others, we slowed down and enjoyed the extra time together that we wouldn’t have normally had. We’ve learned to appreciate the magic surrounding us and to never take anything for granted.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? BM: I would tell my younger 12 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

self to trust my instincts. A woman’s instincts will always lead her onto the right path. There have been so many turns in my career and motherhood where trusting my instincts helped me to the next step.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re the most passionate about? BM: I learned to get really comfortable with slowing down. As a working mother of three, who is born and raised in New York City, I tend to stay very busy and on the go. This year showed me that it’s okay to be less busy and more present. Another passion project of mine was launching a clothing collection called In the City. I decided to go back to my fashion roots and create pieces I love, and something that can be worn by mothers and daughters to have those matching “mommy

and me” moments. We, of course, postponed the launch back in the spring, but I’m excited to share that we just shipped out our second collection! I’m not sure how it even happened, but I am a co-host for Us Weekly’s newest YouTube show and column “Moms Like Us”. My co-host Christina Garibaldi and I talk all things motherhood with glimpses into celebrity parents’ lives! It’s been so much fun being able to shoot this on a weekly basis. Videoing in front of the camera and reading the script each week really has taken me out of my comfort zone and allowed me to face the challenge I’ve always struggled with, which is speaking publicly!

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? BM: I think


seeing my children go months on end without seeing their friends. I know for us adults, it was emotionally heavy to not be able to connect with others and socialize with the ones we love. I can only imagine how this year will impact all our children.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? BM: The best part of 2020 was definitely the extra time with my family. We normally keep such an active busy schedule that doesn’t always allow for real quality time. This year I got so much closer to my children and their unique little personalities. We created memories that will last us a lifetime.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? BM: Success to me means being happy in whatever it is you need to do to be happy. Whether you’re career focused, or you prefer living simpler, I want us all to find that sweet spot where we live our most passionate authentic and best selves.

Req's separate subscription/login for HBO Max,

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? BM: Breast cancer awareness is a cause close to my heart. Whether I’m hosting a fundraiser, advocating for awareness, or donating, I’m always so inspired by those directly affected. No Kid Hungry and Every Mother Counts are other organizations that I am deeply invested in and try to raise awareness whenever possible.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? BM: I think however we can offer empathy and kindness is very important right now. This has been an incredibly hard year and we have all had to face adversity in some shape or form. Coming from a place of understanding that, and respecting it, will allow for business and relationships in general to move forward in healing. So I think we all need to be influenced by how we can help one another and giving is key!

SAY HELLO TO

Watch your favorite entertainment in one place. Plus,

CHOICE ™ PACKAGE

included for a year.

64

$

99 MO.

For 12 mos. plus taxes & Regional Sports Fee.

• Stream on your phone, tablet and TV - anytime, anywhere.

Available only in the U.S. (excl. Puerto Rico & U.S.V.I.). Req’s compatible device & data connection. Limited to 3 concurrent streams.

• Access HBO Max, Netflix and more on Google Play.

Req's separate subscription/login for HBO Max, Netflix. Google login required. Google is a trademark of Google LLC.

HBO Max Offer: Access HBO Max only through HBO Max app or hbomax.com. HBO Max also includes HBO channels and HBO On Demand on AT&T TV. Data rates may apply for app download/usage. AT&T TV: *$19.95 ACTIVATION, EARLY TERMINATION FEE ($15/MO.) FOR TV FOR EACH MONTH REMAINING ON AGMT., EQUIPMENT NON-RETURN & ADD’L FEES APPLY. Price incl. CHOICE AT&T TV Pkg. 1 AT&T TV device included for well-qualified customers; otherwise $120. New residential customers only, excluding DIRECTV and U-verse TV customers. Restr’s apply.

Get AT&T TV Today!

1-877-351-8753 AT&T TV: AT&T TV requires high speed internet. Recommend minimum 24 Mbps for optimal viewing (min 8 Mbps per stream). Limit 3 concurrent AT&T streams. CHOICE: Ends 1/16/21. 1st & 2nd year Pricing: $64.99 for first 12 mos. only. After 12 mos. or loss of eligibility, then prevailing rate applies $110/mo. for CHOICE Pkg, unless cancelled or changed prior to end of the promo period. Includes: CHOICE Pkg. Req’s 1 AT&T TV device, included for well qualified customers; otherwise $120. Add’l devices avail for $120 each or on installment; non-qualified customers must purchase additional devices up front. Additional Fees & Taxes: Price excludes Regional Sports Fee of up to $8.49/mo. (which is extra & applies to CHOICE and higher Pkgs), and certain other add’l fees & charges. AT&T TV: Subject to AT&T TV terms and conditions. Avail. in the U.S. only (excludes Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands). AT&T TV service will continue monthly at the prevailing rate charged to your payment method on file, unless you cancel, subject to any early termination fees. If you cancel in the first 14 days of order, you must return the included AT&T TV device within 14 days of order to avoid $120 non-return fee. Additional devices purchased on installment agreement subject to additional terms and conditions. See cancellation policy at att.com/help/cancellation-policy-att-tv.html for more details. Once you’ve canceled, you can access AT&T TV through the remaining monthly period. No refunds or credits for any partial-month periods or unwatched content. Compatible device req’d. Residential customers only. Pricing, channels, features, and terms subject to change & may be modified or discontinued at any time without notice. Some offers may not be available through all channels and in select areas. Regional Sports & Local Channels: Not available in select areas. Channels vary by package & billing region. Device may need to be in billing region in order to view. GENERAL: Limit 3 concurrent streams per account. Programming subject to blackout restrictions. Taxes may apply. See your Order Confirmation email and att.com/legal/att-tv.html for more details. HBO Max: Access HBO Max through HBO Max app or hbomax.com with your AT&T log-in credentials. Compatible device or browser required. Use of HBO Max is subject to its own terms and conditions, see hbomax.com/terms-of-use for details. Programming and content subj. to change. Upon cancellation of your video service you may lose access to HBO Max. Limits: Access to one HBO Max account per AT&T account holder. May not be stackable w/other offers, credits or discounts. To learn more, visit att.com/hbomax. HBO Max is only accessible in the U.S. and certain U.S. territories where a high-speed broadband connection is available. Minimum 3G connection is requiredfor viewing on mobile devices. HBO Max is used under license. Offers may not be combined with other promotional offers on the same services and may be modified or discontinued at any time without notice. Other conditions apply to all offers. ©2020 AT&T Intellectual Property. AT&T and the Globe logo are registered trademarks and service marks of AT&T Intellectual Property. All other marksare the property of their respective owners.

HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 13


Q&A Dean WITH

GRaziosi BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? DG: I’m a multiple New York Times bestselling author, entrepreneur, investor, father of 3 amazing kids, Breanna, Brody and Luca, and husband to my amazing wife Lisa. For over 20 years, I’ve been dedicated to delivering self-education to those seeking transformation and success outside the normal path of traditional education.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? DG: From being a completely “in person” entrepreneurial company for the last 20 years, the pandemic hit so fast and hard to so many people, I was fortunate enough to help our company pivot and turn all my companies completely virtual in record speed. My team of 70+ and I are now completely virtual, working more efficiently than ever. We also converted our in-person education experiences to online and I believe they are better than ever. We also did the same for my dear friend and partner Tony Robbins. We helped convert in person events to virtual for even his most signature events and the results have been mind blowing. Touching over 500,000 lives in over 150 countries just since the pandemic started.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? DG: By knowing people around me needed the best version of me. The world needs leaders, role models and those focused on what we have and what we can create. Knowing my kids, my wife, my team and those students around the world were looking to me for guidance made me step up and practice what I 14 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

preach at the highest level. “This too shall pass”, and who we will be after this depends on who we are when things get tough.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? DG: To model those playing the game at the highest level possible. That you don’t have to do everything yourself. I hustled night and day, doing everything I possibly could and it worked, but I know now there’s an easier path through self-education that could have helped me tremendously. That’s why I’m so passionate about my Knowledge Broker Blueprint movement with my dear friend and business partner Tony Robbins showing people how to extract what they know for massive impact and profits both virtually and in person. Truly a future proof industry.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? DG: In 2020, we donated $600,000 to Operation Underground Railroad, passed 7 million meals through Feeding America, and built a school in Africa through Village Impact and their awesome team. Those that say money can’t buy happiness simply

have not given enough away to those who need it.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? DG: Not being able to spend time with those that I love. My newest baby boy Luca was just born and not being able to share him with my parents, my wife’s parents, and our entire family hasn’t been easy on anyone. Plus watching so many people being uncertain about their future is hard and why we work so hard to help give them a path.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? DG: The best part of 2020 for me has been seeing the innovation from people, companies, and everyone pivoting. It’s been a year of hurt, pain, and struggle for so many people, but there has also been so much good that has come out of this year due to people being forced to step up and fight for what they love, and it’s shown. It’s brought a new-found energy to so many business owners and entrepreneurs. Plus, the birth of my son Luca.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? DG: Success means control to me. To be able to


spend time with my wife and kids when I want to. To be able to live life on my terms. Help those I want to help and be the father, leader, husband, and friend that makes me know I’m being the best version of myself.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? DG: Like I mentioned before, Feeding America has been an amazing charity I’ve worked with for many years, providing meals to those in need. We are on track to bring 10 million meals in 2021, with our next goal in mind of 100 million meals. I also love the charity Village Impact with my good friends Stu and Amy McClaren, who provide access to community-led education, leadership, and economic opportunities for thousands of children in rural Kenya. Along with our local partners, we’re passionately committed to empowering kids to dream big and to gain the skills and know-how they need to lead transformed lives, free from poverty, for the long term. And Operation Underground Railroad, that saves kids from slavery, just landed in my heart and my wife and I decided to go all in to help as much as we could.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? DG: It has to be both. Giving doesn’t come without earning and without giving, some-times you don’t know why you are earning. I had a few opportunities to spend time with Richard Branson and one morning when we were out sailing, he said something to me that stuck with me forever. We were all blessed with different gifts, if you have the right mindset, the right tools, the right capabilities and opportunities to make money, you have an ethical obligation to make as much as you can to be able to give it away and help serve people you love on the highest level possible.

Q&A ARIANNA WITH

DAVIS BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

Tell us about yourself and what you do? AD: I am the Digital Director of O: The Oprah Magazine and author of the new book What Would Frida Do? A Guide to Living Boldly.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? AD: In 2020 I released my first book, What Would Frida Do? Inspired by the life of Frida Kahlo, it’s part-biography, part-self-help, a look at the lessons we can learn from Frida, a feminist, boundary-breaking artist who lived her life so far ahead of her time.

the coronavirus pandemic and not knowing what the future holds while also constantly worrying about my own health as well as my loved ones.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? AD: I tried my best to be gentle with myself and listen to my body. On the days I just wanted to be in sweatpants and feel the weight of the world, I let myself do that with a Netflix binge on the couch. But other days I tried to stay active and find a new routine. A new normal!

07I

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? AD: Don’t be afraid to use your voice. You have so many important things to say!

09I

05I

10I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re the most passionate about? AD: Definitely, releasing my book What Would Frida Do. It was a labor of love, and one that I hope readers will be passionate about while reading it!

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? AD: Definitely, the anxiety around

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? AD: The extra time, space, and quiet to get to know myself again.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? AD: Being able to use my platform to inspire other women, and particularly women of color, to go after their dreams. NS: What causes are important to you? AD: Any cause that fights for inclusivity and diversity and reminds the world of the importance of amplifying all voices. NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? AD: I think one thing that’s become clear in 2020 is how much we all need each other, so I hope one of the great lessons we all take away from this upside down year is to take a little less and give a little more. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 15


Q&A DR. DEEPIKA WITH

CHOPRA BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? DC: I am known as the Optimism Doctor®. I hold a doctorate in clinical health psychology and I study the science behind optimism, joy and resiliency. I specialize in helping people and companies or organizations cultivate practical tools while blending together holistic practices with evidence based science. I consult with individuals, hold workshops, speak, write, provide media expertise, and collaborate on intentional, mental health focused, well-crafted products with happiness in mind. I am the founder of the Things Are Looking Up™ brand and the creator of the Things Are Looking Up Optimism Deck of Cards. I am also the host of the newly launched “Looking Up With Dr. Deepika Chopra” podcast. (Available on Spotify, Apple, and any place podcasts can be subscribed to)

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? DC: I have been committed to helping people find their own sense of optimism and hope during 2020. I have been using my practice to help bond people together through collective resiliency building through this time of collective trauma, uncertainty and struggle. I also have devoted a large part of this year to building a free, mental health resource for our frontline healthcare workers, called “The Things Are Looking Up: Heroes Helping Heroes” project.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? DC: Well, I am still dealing 16 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

with it. It’s an ongoing, every day process. Even though I am an Optimism Doctor, and helping to alleviate stress, cultivate real mindset shift, and increase resiliency is what I do for a living, I am first and foremost a human on my own journey as well, and I think it’s important to share transparently my struggles and anxieties along the way and how I use the tools and even the times where I feel stuck. I am trying to practice more of what I am teaching… more self-compassion, more time outdoors, more getting comfortable with my full range of emotions, the not so great feeling ones included, more introspection, more using my breath intentionally, and more using my own “Things Are Looking Up” card deck, to go through the science based prompts every day to keep my brain focused on resilience and hope.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? DC:

How you are feeling right now, is not going to last forever. So if you are feeling joyful and elated, revel in the moment more, make it count, remember how it feels, tastes, sounds, looks like, smells like, and if you are feeling sad, angry, worried or overwhelmed, find some solace in that this moment will shift, look for the learning and growth and light in it, but allow yourself to feel however it is you’re feeling without shame.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re the most passionate about? DC: We welcomed in our second baby boy just a month ago. He has been our light in 2020 and being a mom again has been the best thing I have done and I continue to do!

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? DC: Just one thing? Ha ha, just kidding. Well, kind of. Well, I am counting my


blessings and working very hard to stay healthy. I am thankful that my family and I have been able to be safe at home during this time. But, I think the worst part has been not being able to expose my toddler to the things I know used to make him so happy, going to parks, preschool, being around other kids and people and just generally socially interacting. I think the worst part has been not being able to be with family, not being able to hug and see my grandparents, and witnessing the devastating losses of so many to Covid and social injustice.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? DC: My second son’s birth and seeing so many young people mobilize and take optimistic action towards what they believe in.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? DC: Success to me means, growing from struggle

and mistakes, being able to celebrate small and big wins, being able to live a life with a strong sense of purpose, to do small things every day that bring me joy, challenge me, are directly related to my core values, and seeing my children healthy and happy.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? DC: I believe in human justice and supportive mental healthcare. I am very passionate about dismantling the stigma that surrounds mental illness.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? DC: Definitely by what people can give. I know at the start of this pandemic, I was just struggling to find a way to serve and offer guidance in a significant way. A friend who’s an anesthesiologist

on the frontline at a major institution, reached out to me towards the end of March asking if I could help her team by providing effective emotional support tools during their fight against this pandemic. Eager to serve and to find a sense of purpose, I created the “Heroes Helping Heroes” project, a free emotional health resource for all our frontline workers. It greatly improved my mood and emotional state, to just find ways I could give. I have been inspired by so many people’s giving spirit and the coming together of humanity during this year, from marching for justice, helping to buy groceries and essentials for the elderly, to joining in collective prayer for someone hospitalized, to donating food and protective supplies to those in need, and so many supporting small businesses. Research actually shows that acts of kindness is a strong indicator of personal growth.

when you’re against the clock fund with newrock. If you can't get a line of credit we can provide you with working capital within a 24 hour time frame with minimal stipulations. We are our own lender, every step of the way you communicate with our highly trained representatives and underwriters. This is an unsecured product and there is no collateral needed. newrocklending.com FUNDING SPECIALIST Nicholas Paci • Call: 917-201-8874 HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 17


Q&A Nisha Anand WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? NA: I am the CEO of Dream Corps. I lead a remarkable team that brings people together across racial, social, and partisan lines to create a future with freedom and dignity for all. Their mission is to close prison doors and open doors of opportunity, by advancing solutions that inspire action, servant leadership, and soul.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? NA: In the wake of a pandemic and the George Floyd protests, Dream Corps quickly pivoted and swung into action — demanding justice, new legislation, new opportunity, and a country that is better than it was before. In 2020 we rallied behind vulnerable communities impacted by Covid-19. Our call to action was to implement safety protocols for individuals impacted by the spread of Covid behind bars, an equitable green economy to uplift those hit hardest by the pandemic into well-paying jobs in the future, and a tech sector committed to investing in the genius that already exists in communities of color and low-income neighborhoods, by creating opportunities for these historically marginalized groups.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? NA: First, I am the proud mom of two teenagers who have been stuck at home since March. Helping them navigate their ever shifting world kept my own stress at bay. But I am also able to parent through these times because I believe in our Dream Corps team. Our team was built to both execute on plans and switch gears in order to do what the moment demands. We rely upon the leadership of impacted communities to guide us through the stress and challenges that come along with progress. Knowing that 18 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

our dedication to equality and justice fuels our drive during uncertain times, means I don’t have to stress. We were built for this.

04I

NS: What advice to you have for your younger self? NA: The advice I’d tell my younger self is not to go it alone. For so long I thought that every problem I encountered was mine to solve. If only I was smarter, better, faster, I could fix it. What I was missing, and perhaps the lesson hardest for me to learn, is that nothing can be fixed without a deep understanding of the problem. Listening to and truly empathizing with other people opens up new possibilities and pathways to solutions that would not exist on my own. I failed many times before I learned to find the value in empathy and even daring to find common ground with people that have opposing views.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re the most passionate about? NA: Before the world turned upside down, I gave a talk entitled The Radical Act of Choosing Common Ground at TEDxBerkeley in February of 2020. I knew that, no matter the election outcome, our country would be even further divided. Although I could not predict the impending crisis, I knew my perspective on unity

and community building with unlikely allies would be needed. TED chose to release and feature my TED Talk during election week and it could not have been more timely. My talk reveals the secret behind what we do at Dream Corps: large-scale change requires large-scale movements and when we come together, we can create massive change that both helps and heals at the same time. Now is the time to build a unified coalition that is big enough to take on the challenges we face. I know it is possible because we have done it before. On December 20, 2020 we celebrated the two year anniversary of the First Step Act — the bipartisan criminal justice reform legislation that has brought more than 14,000 people home from prison already.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? NA: 2020 showed the world that we are a nation divided. We reckoned with the legacy of a society built on inequality and violence against black people and communities of color. We are now experiencing a double shock, first from the Covid-19 pandemic, and secondly from the tipping point murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others. Either we allow polarization to block progress on all the things we care about, or we dare to step out of our comfort zone. The election is over but there is still work to do. My great fear in this moment is that


America could slowly slip more fully into the division and anger that has been bubbling up for the past decade. But I also have great hope. I believe we can walk through this darkness together, and emerge better than before.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? NA: If there’s one thing we’ve learned last year, it’s that none of us can predict the future. In a year where showing up for your country meant staying at home, it’s easy to lose sight of the hope found in the American dream. But the truth is, democracy has never been easy. It has always relied on We The People coming together across divides and differences, and fighting for a future better than before. Hope is very much still alive around us. It’s alive in the determination to press on by those who have lost loved ones to a deadly pandemic. To persevere past cancelled plans and postponed milestones. To wear a mask to protect a stranger, and drop off groceries for a neighbor in need. To stop worrying about the success of only our own kids, and start fighting for solutions for all kids. To open our doors to people escaping fiery terror and our hearts to families who have lost everything. To show up however we can—in the streets, around our dinner tables, and in conversations online—to address the failures of our past and resolve to move us closer to equity for all.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? NA: Success, for me, means Dream Corps will continue to be a soulful voice for solutions and work with unlikely allies. For 2021, it means building on the success of the First Step Act by doubling the size of our Empathy Network, which empowers people directly impacted by the broken criminal justice system and equips them to influence policymakers and promote restorative justice. Success this year equates to federal funding for weatherization and energy efficiency upgrades for 1 million low-income homes; securing a massive investment in low-carbon transportation for underserved communities; and making bipartisan connections for climate action that benefits low-income and communities of color. Success gets really tangible when we see 120 participants for our job training cohorts and when we launch our app in mid 2021 to connect BIPOC individuals in the tech industry; when Dream Corps offers more than 150 scholarships to new diverse faces seeking a tech sector education; and when we fight for universal broadband access.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? NA: Twenty-two years ago I risked my life to fight for democracy abroad. I stopped taking democracy for granted the day I was imprisoned by a military dictatorship and sentenced to five years hard labor. That was in Rangoon, the largest city in Myanmar. Today I am a mother This election was not the first nor the last step in our fight for a better future. of two, run a nonprofit organization, Dream Corps, and live a comfortable There will be more protests, more petitions, more phone calls, and more life in the Bay Area. Yet as I look policies to push for that bring us closer around at my own country today, I am transported back to Rangoon. toward our common goals. But voting is the foundation for every other victory The disinformation campaigns that we the people make possible. around election fraud belong in dictatorships, not democracies. Voter We know from generations who have suppression is on the rise. Those in been here before that with every step power regularly and routinely attack forward, there will be obstacles and the free press and sought to politicize challenges waiting along the path. the Center for Disease Control in But with every obstacle and every the midst of a pandemic. Citizens challenge comes the opportunity to lob death threats at journalists and bend the arc of the moral universe toward justice, and shape a future with launch plans to kidnap, try, and execute a sitting U.S. governor. freedom and dignity for all.

My fear for America flows not from partisan loyalties, but from my experience of a cold jail cell in Myanmar. The ugliness and terror of a pro-democracy movement being crushed is something I will never forget. Where once I could use my freedom — and America’s profession of faith in democracy — as a shield, today that shield is crumbling. I risked my life fighting for democracy abroad. I won’t let it die in my own home.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? It is easy to imagine the chaos of 2020 continuing into next year. But, right now, we have the opportunity to decide the future and reimagine what type of world we wish to leave for the next generation. Instead of wildfires, imagine major investments that accelerate America’s transition to a more inclusive green economy. Instead of growing police violence, imagine building on the First Step Act and bringing more people home from behind bars. Instead of a school-to-prison pipeline, imagine a school-to-tech industry pipeline that changes the face of Fortune 500 companies. Instead of chaos in our streets, our communities, and at our dinner tables, imagine solutions that unite without leaving anyone behind — and finding common ground without sacrificing our values. The challenges of the last four years could be followed by four years of healing community. But only if we come together, recognize our common pain, and seek common purpose. We decide whether black and brown communities bear the brunt of our failed legacy of mass incarceration and climate inaction, or if those same communities lead the way to something better for all of us. We decide whether America lives up to its beautiful founding dream, or slides back to its ugly founding reality. We invite you to join our bipartisan approach to change as our country unifies behind leaders that are fighting for a future where opportunity exists for everyone at thedreamcorps.org. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 19


Q&A jenNa kutcher WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? JK: I am the host of the Goal Digger podcast and an online educator, expert marketer, and your BFF next door. I have a baby on one hip and a business on the other and I imperfectly empower women and teach them how to live a life that is enriched and filled with dream chasing.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? JK: If I could choose a “word of the year” for 2020, it would be “pivot”. A lot of this past year was about adapting and being resilient as we navigated the unprecedented year. This meant creating resources and adding value for our followers, listeners, and subscribers, and walking through the year with them, equipping them for the next step. We had two main priorities. Use social media to serve as the handshake for what we do and then convert those followers into email subscribers where we can serve, serve, serve them and then invite them into a paid offer or opportunity.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? JK: Prioritizing self-care and fresh air. I think one of the biggest things that grounded me this past year was making sure I was able to move my body and get in a few deep breaths every day. We live in northern Minnesota along the shores of Lake Superior so we adopted new hobbies like road biking and trail hiking in order to stay moving and exploring.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? JK: Trust your gut! Your intuition is strong and it will guide you more than any blueprint or system will. Always 20 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

be a lifelong learner, but in your learning, understand what is meant for you. Take what serves you and let the rest fall away.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? JK: I really focused on relationships and connection through my podcast, the Goal Digger podcast. It was amazing to be able to digitally connect with incredible, powerful women with the internet and a microphone and being able to interview leaders I look up to is such a gift! We released our 400th episode and surpassed over 40,000,000 downloads on the show, numbers that astound me!

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? JK: Not being able to be with my family. A few years ago we moved back to Minnesota to be closer to family and with all of the distancing and quarantining, it was so hard to be apart from the people I love the most. It’s so sad thinking of your loved

ones missing your kid’s milestones or celebrating holidays virtually. While I am so grateful for things like FaceTime and Zoom, getting to hug and be in the presence of loved ones is such a gift and something I will no longer take for granted.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? JK: The best part of 2020 was the forced invitation to slow down and be more present. How many times have we set aside things we want to do for when “life slows down” and in many ways, the minutes got fatter as we stood still last year. My word that I chose for 2020 was “present”. As a mom and a CEO, I wanted to focus more on being fully present whether I was in the “mom” role or working on my business. Having to slow down, halt travel, and just be safe at home with my family really made that word a practice for me. We explored our own backyard more, made our home a haven, and spent so much time together as a family.


08I

NS: What does success mean to you? JK: Success to me means feeling peace in the everyday moments. I operate out of the belief that very few things in life, or work, are urgent. I pursued entrepreneurship so that I could have that freedom and be my own boss, whatever that looked like for the season I am in. I want to be at peace in my life and wake up not dreading what I’m about to do and that’s the life I have built. I want the freedom to have slow mornings and to put my daughter to bed every night. I want to be able to say “yes” to a middle-of-the-day walk with my family. I became an entrepreneur so I could leave behind my “9 to 5” and not work 24/7 and I’m proud of the life that I lead.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? JK: There are so many incredible organizations and causes out there! On a global level, I love Healing Waters, a non-profit that helps build water filtration systems in developing countries. In the US, I am a huge supporter of Feeding America to help end food insecurity. And in my local community of Duluth, Minnesota, I love to support Safe Haven, a shelter for women, children, and all survivors whose lives have been affected by physical, emotional, sexual, and economic abuse.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? JK: The world needs to be influenced by what they already have in their life and to lean on being resourceful versus having the right resources. The truth is that you have a gift and the world needs it, so be resourceful, be bold, and get that gift out into the world. No one wins when you play small!

Q&A

WITH

DR. Lois Lee BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

06I

02I

07I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? LL: I am the Founder & President of Children of the Night. NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? LL: I increased our client base 90%. I created a unique mobile case management and Zoom online tutoring to young sex trafficking victims in the US, as well as to children at risk of sex trafficking in Africa, Nepal, Southeast Asia and the Philippines. And we accomplished all of this without allowing Covid to interrupt our services.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? LL: Eating too much. Watching lots of television. Outdoor dining when possible.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? LL: There must have been an easier way to accomplish everything I have accomplished. I don’t know what that would be, but there must have been, and I would have looked for it.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? LL: 90% increase in clients and going global with our Zoom tutoring to young children vulnerable to sex trafficking.

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? LL: Restrictions of working out, masks, restrictions of eating out, restrictions of travel. NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? LL: The best part was being able to pull my staff through, and to increase staff, so we are fully staffed and fully operational and we did not let Covid stop us.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? LL: Helping the most number of children and young people who are struggling with sexual exploitation, educating them, and helping them become successful adults.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? LL: Sex trafficking.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? LL: I think the world needs to stand up and tell all of the politicians, you don’t know how to do this, and we are going to resist your policies that only apply to us and not you! I think the world needs to turn off the news and let the ratings drop to the lowest of the lows so our voices are heard. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 21


Q&A DREW HERIOT WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? DH: I’m an Aussie film director best known for The Secret (2006) and The Power of the Heart (2015).

prise because it’s nothing to do with filmmaking, but if an idea hounds you all day and night, it’s worth listening to. So I’m really looking forward to launching that next year too.

02I

06I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? DH: I like to think I helped move the needle in 2020 by sucking air through folded fabric, resisting the urge to hug the people I love and lathering my hands in sanitizer like the rest of the population here in Victoria, Australia. It’s now been 32 days without a single case of coronavirus. Needle. Officially. Moved.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? DH: Well, I believe in perfect polarity, meaning that everything has its opposite in perfect balance. So whenever things appear out of kilter, I hunt for the balance. As psychopathic as coronavirus appears to be, it’s equally been humanity’s savior, guiding us to slow down, live simply, love more fully and reduce our emissions. My favorite meme of the year is, “If 2020 was a drink, it’d be bong water”, but it’s also true that many of us will look back on 2020 as one of the best years of our lives.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? DH: So much! But I’m not sure it’d do any good because we learn through experience. So I’d probably just say, “Have fun and let’s share stories when you’re my age.”

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? DH: I put the finishing touches on the pilot and show,“Bible”, for my next project and, out of the blue, I had a torrential two-week download of a new invention. It took me by sur22 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? DH: Probably watching some of my friends and relatives get sucked into conspiracy theories. The interesting thing about people of faith is that they don’t want or need evidence to validate their beliefs. This year I feel like we witnessed the dark side of faith with so many people now believing things that, perhaps, don’t ultimately serve them. But again, I’m hunting for the balance.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? DH: Project development aside, I’ve started beekeeping as a hobby. In my last movie, Mark Nepo, an extraordinary poet, said, “Touching life directly restores whole-heartedness”. So beekeeping is one of the ways I’m endeavoring to touch life directly. Last week, my wife and I were trying to find the queen bee amongst 30,000 other bees, which is like playing an animated version of “Where’s Waldo”. After a while, we both naturally fell silent, the sun was sparkling on the honey in the cells, the bees were whirring around and my heart opened a little.

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Many people don’t realize that Covid and past pandemics have been caused by microbes jumping from animals to humans, mostly through food. Mad Cow Disease, Swine Flu, Bird Flu. They’re zoo-notic diseases. So humanity eating plant-based greatly reduces the odds of that occurring AND helps solve climate change AND deforestation AND extends our lives in the process. Hallelujah!

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? DH: Neither. Giving and getting are always in NS: What does success mean to you? DH: Fully giving perfect balance. If you want to give money, someone will have to get it, or your gifts, whatever they may be. “receive” it from you. And you earned that money by someone giving it to NS: What causes are you. So you can’t have one without the important to you? DH: other. That said, we often feel more Eating plant-based. It’s not really a connected and abundant when we’re “cause”, as such, but it addresses giving consciously because we realize the “cause” of this pandemic. All how much we already have, whereas year, we’ve heard about potential “getting” tends to remind us of all the solutions. Masks. Vaccines. Social distancing. But as Ben Franklin said, things we don’t have yet.

08I 09I


Q&A Leon Logothetis WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? LL: I am a traveler, producer, motivational speaker, and seeker.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? LL: I would like to think that I moved the needle by inspiring people to be kind. We live in a topsy-turvy world and more often than not, we are bombarded with negativity and hate. What would happen if we disavowed the hate and instead concentrated on the good? And there is so much good out there, we just have to stop and connect to it.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? LL: I meditated a lot! And I also reminded myself, that people throughout history have suffered and bounced back. Think of World War II. The holocaust. Rwanda. If they can do it, then so can we.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? LL: Everything will work itself out. Please keep on going and I promise that if you surround yourself with good people, they will lift you up when you don’t feel like you have the strength to go on. And one day you will use that newfound strength to help others to be their most magnificent selves!

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? LL: Kids need us. They have most definitely needed us during these past 9 months of seeming despair. So I would say that I am most passionate about the free online speeches and fireside chats that I have done with kids across the country and the world. Inspiring them, in my own small way, to look at the good in our world.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? LL: The worst part of 2020 was most definitely the increasing polarization that is occurring in American society. I was hoping that one silver lining of the pandemic was that people would come together in the face of this existential threat that affects us all the same way. Unfortunately it seems to have had the opposite effect and that’s worrying on a societal level.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? LL: Remembering to love. Remembering to live. And most importantly, remembering that we are all in this together. All of us.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? LL: Success means waking up in the morning with a purpose and a direction. Success means taking that purpose and direction and using it to effect lives positively.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? LL: As a kid, I was bullied mercilessly and felt profoundly alone. These experiences shaped the way I see the world and how I want to be in it. With that said, I am deeply committed to making people, and especially kids, feel like they have value and that they matter. Because they do.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? LL: A wise man once said to me, “Leon, if we live without serving others, we are not truly living”. I have never forgotten these words, and although I personally don’t follow them all the time, they are a constant reminder to us all, that to give is the truest of wealth.

HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 23


Q&A john holland WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? JH: I am a professional psychic medium, spiritual teacher, author, as well as an animal advocate.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? JH: Due to all the restrictions, I quickly realized that the format of my spiritual work would have to change, so I set about transferring all the live in-person events, which were scattered around the country into online events. This is a complex process requiring a lot of hand holding for those who are less digitally aware. I also had to adjust my personal life from the constant rushing back and forth to airports, forever packing and unpacking. Every morning I made a commitment to start every day with a positive affirmation, and made a list of the ten things I am grateful for, followed by my usual daily meditation. Adding those simple things assisted me personally in setting a calming, grounding, and thankful tone for the day. It helped me greatly and those around me also benefitted. I’ll continue to do it for the rest of my life.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? JH: Know what you are in control of, and know what you are not in control of. For me to be strong for my followers, I needed to be sure that I took care of myself first and pass on the same advice the therapist gave on television to my followers. I devoted quality time to my community, creating supportive video blogs, writing Covid specific newsletters to generate a feeling of calmness and lessening the fear factor, and to let them know: they were not alone and we truly are all connected.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? JH: That you do matter. What you are going through now as a child will pass as you get older, and the people in your life will come and go, change and evolve. How you live your life and how you think will be exactly what is drawn to you. Always be kind, be generous, and try to do kind acts, because one 24 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

kind act can create a ripple effect that reaches farther than you could ever imagine.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? JH: 2020 saw the launch of a new project, which I’ve been working with my team for the last two years, to create an online community. I launched “My Soul Community” (MySoulCommunity.com) in October 2020. It was a labor of love, and as it grew and took shape, I realized that it was more pertinent at this time than I would ever have thought. I created a community on a global basis of like-minded souls, who could come together under my mentorship to spend 12 months together, learning, sharing, experimenting, and above all, growing spiritually, no amount of words can justify what we created.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? JH: Besides having to quickly and

dramatically change how I work on a personal level, bearing in mind that I’m such a people person, and being raised in an Italian home, where hugs are big, unable to be intimate with my family, friends, and not to be in the wonderful energy of an audience was the worst for me.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? JH: The best part for 2020 was that the pandemic brought right to the surface, everyone’s insecurities, fears, and worries. Just like me, I am sure many of these might have been pushed down or ignored. If you look at that from a positive perspective, it forced all of us to feel them and if people chose, to deal with them, so they could be cleared and out of your energy. This makes room for new and more positive opportunities and people to enter your life. I may be a spiritual teacher, but I am also human like everyone else. I cleared some things that might have taken much longer to surface.


08I

NS: What does success mean to you? JH: I teach my students, audiences, and my community that we’re spiritual beings having human experiences and as spiritual beings, we are always connected to each other. As a soul we are born with gifts, talents, and abilities that are meant to be used to help one another. Success to me can be summed up like this. If you are using one of those things to help another person, or animal, in need, then that to me is success!

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? JH: Feeding the hungry, helping children with cancer through the St. Jude Foundation, care of our planet and the climate, stopping domestic abuse, and one that’s very important to me, the care and saving lives of animals in need. I got involved with a local charity when my dog Koda was a puppy. He has so enhanced my life and brought me so much joy, I wanted to give something back. I approached the local NHSPCA (New Hampshire Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and asked if there was anything I could do to help raise money for the animals.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? JH: No matter what color you are, where you are born, your sexual orientation, financial status, or your political views, we are, and always will be, connected to each other. We are souls first, made up of the same exact energy, no matter what you are on the outside. By giving without wanting anything in return, helps us to grow, evolve, appreciate, and love one another, as FilmColumbiaShuswap.com • film@csfilm.ca • 250-833-5947 • film@csfilm.ca • 250-833-5947 well as Mother Earth,FilmColumbiaShuswap.com and will greatly assists the collective consciousness of us all.

Columbia Shuswap Film Commission Columbia Shuswap Film Commission

HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 25


Q&A KEN HONDA WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? KH: I’m known as the “Happy Zen Millionaire”, and I am a Japanese bestselling author and speaker who writes mainly about money and happiness. I’ve published over 120 books in Japanese, but just recently I published my first major English work called Happy Money. It’s my dream to help people heal their unhappy experiences and beliefs about money in order to live more satisfying, joyful lives, not just in Japan but in every country in the world.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? KH: I think the biggest impact I had in 2020 was made possible by moving most of my speaking events online. Up until this year, the majority of my speaking events were all offline. However, after I started sharing my content online through platforms like YouTube and Facebook, I reached more than 10 million new viewers and I feel like it gave me the opportunity to inspire many more people with the message that we can get through this together.

crisis, the other is a great opportunity to start showing kindness and love for one another.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? KH: Actually, I’ve always been fairly good at managing stress, so this year wasn’t much different. If By moving to an online platform, I was I had to say one thing in particular, I able to encourage more people to do think that interacting with people more more acts of kindness and be more frequently online probably helped me willing to share what they have with feel relatively less stress than oththose in need. Thanks to my commuers during this year. This is because nity and the messages I was able to although we may be so far apart and share with them, millions of dollars unable to meet in person, I am still have been raised for those in need. able to feel so deeply connected, People who were at a loss for what to especially with friends overseas. In do are now starting to help one anoth- fact, I think I’m talking a lot more with er. For example, many in my commu- family members and friends than I did nity started crowdfunding to help small last year. This is the best stress-relief I businesses, stores, and restaurant could ask for. owners. All of these acts of kindness were so beautiful and touching to see. NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? The biggest impact I had this year KH: Don’t worry so much. Your life was to remind people that while one will show up all on its own, whether side of the 2020 coin looks like a you worry or not.

04I

26 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? KH: This year my family and I were passionate about supporting the economy as much as possible, so one fun way we did that was by shopping and buying many different things. Actually, we spent a lot more money than usual. For example, we renovated our house and office and tried to take every opportunity to spend money so more businesses and people would benefit from the extra flow. I also started supporting individuals financially, too. I made arrangements with many people who were having an especially hard time that I will keep wiring enough money for them to make a living as long as they need it. Since I happen to make enough for my family with enough left over to support other families, it’s only natural that helping others in this way brings me a deep sense of peace. Now I feel even more joy in every cent I earn because I know that it will all go


out to support as many people as possible.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? KH: Missing out on connecting in person with my friends. I especially miss hugging people. I have always been a huge hugger, but hugging strangers right now could be a lethal offense, punishable by law. So that would be the worst part of this year for me, not being able to touch, shake hands, and hug people anymore.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? KH: I found myself again as a leader to inspire people. I am so happy that I am capable of doing so through both writing and speaking. This year, doing more international work and events in English and other languages was also so fulfilling.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? KH: Success means doing what I love, with the people I love, where I love to do it, all at the perfect timing.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? KH: Supporting people to find their life purpose is the cause closest to my heart. This is my personal mission in life. I don’t know how global it is as a movement overall, but I believe finding your life purpose is very important and can make a huge difference in the quality of life for both you and everyone you love.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? KH: Life exists in balance of both giving and receiving. Both are necessary. For those who have more than enough, they can influence best by sharing what they have. For those who are struggling, they can influence best by learning how to receive better and accept help from the outside. None of us are in this alone.

Q&A nancy WITH

Lieberman BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? NL: I am a Basketball Hall of Famer, a two time Olympian, a former NBA Assistant Coach with the Sacramento Kings, and the current Head Coach of Team Power. My team was the BIG3 - 2018 League Champions and I was named the Coach of the Year.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? NL: With the pandemic, we didn’t stop helping those that needed us. My charity’s doors were always open. As soon as everything shut down, I led a spring and summer at home workout series via social media to help keep our youth active while quarantined. We also did a virtual summer basketball camp through social media where campers could send in questions about basketball or really anything and I would send a personalized video response to each question.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? NL: Helping people who have been left behind. Providing college scholarships, technology, and mentorship to youth across the country. We are “hope givers”, not “dream stealers”.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? NL: Loss of friends who died from Covid in New York City.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? NL: More quality time with my son, TJ, and using my resources to help the underserved community. My partnership with Hamilton Community Health Network as their new ambassador to support under resourced families is a real honor as well.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? NL: Success is love and equality. Lifting others when you rise.

My charity, Nancy Lieberman Charities, also donated over 75,000 masks to underserved areas and NS: What causes are distributed over 1,000 meals and important to you? NL: grocery sacks to first responders, Children in need. Serving others who front line workers and families in need. need us, whether through mentorship, technology to attend school, college NS: How did you deal with scholarships, or physical and the stress in the world in educational programming. 2020? NL: Faith and encouragement of the underserved. NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be NS: Do you have any advice influenced by what they can get or for your younger self? NL: what they can give in the middle “Never stop working, wanting, and of this pandemic? NL: It’s always dreaming” and to “Be a giver not a about what you can give to help taker”. others who are scared, in need, and feeling the effects of Covid-19.

09I

03I 04I

10I

HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 27


Q&A Blake Mycoskie WITH

and Pat Dossett BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourselves and what you do? BM/PD: We are the co-founders of Madefor.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? BM/PD: We grew our families, launched a business, and began helping thousands of our members at Madefor live better.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? BM/PD: One day at a time, trying to never lose sight of the most important parts of our lives that remained within our control.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? BM/ PD: Never miss an opportunity to be kind or enjoy the journey.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? BM/PD: Whether it was spending more time with family, investing in our friendships, serving our Madefor community, or simply just taking care of our own physical and mental health, we are most passionate about finding ways to grow closer to the things we love and care about, no matter the circumstance.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? BM/PD: We both have young children. Not being able to surround them in person with family has been hard. Despite the restrictions, we probably talk to family now more than ever, which has been a nice benefit of 2020.

28 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? BM/ PD: Being forced to slow down. It’s helped us affirm what’s most important and recognize that there is simply no substitute for presence.

We’re passionate about anything that helps others unlock their unique path towards a better life. Ultimately, we believe a better world begins with the best you. It’s why we created Madefor.

08I

10I

NS: What does success mean to you? BM/PD: To us, success isn’t something to be attained, but rather a way of being. We find that when we are serving things bigger than ourselves, we make ourselves and those around us better. That’s success.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? BM/PD:

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? BM / PD: There is no better way to grow through adversity than to focus on what you can do to serve others. Doing so makes you more resilient, connected and capable.


Q&A MARLO ANDERSON WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? MA: I am the Founder of National Day Calendar.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? MA: Consistency is key to success. Of course, when you are trying to figure out ways to keep your business open, staff in and out of quarantine, and the other many challenges that we all faced in 2020, being consistent in delivering our message to celebrate every day was a significant challenge. That is how we moved the needle. Making sure that people knew we were still celebrating, meant that it was okay for them to celebrate as well. Many people did not go to their favorite coffee shop for National Coffee Day, but they still found a way to celebrate the day.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? MA: Understanding history is my way of dealing with the stress of 2020. Imagine what the impact of the Spanish flu pandemic was in 1918. Now imagine no way to really communicate with others long distance. The news you did hear was weeks old. Most were still traveling by horse. No possibility of a vaccine and so on. We are very fortunate to live in the times we live in. Better technology, opportunities to work remotely or on a gig basis, significantly better food distribution. I am grateful to live at this time.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? MA: Surround yourself with people who are ethical and grateful. You will enjoy life more.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? MA: Working

more closely with the team at National Day Calendar. We continue to build a better culture in our work space and always find ways to celebrate every day.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? MA: The isolation. Technology doesn’t replace a handshake or a hug that we all use to take for granted. The mental health of the world has suffered significantly in 2020.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? MA: The new opportunities that presented themselves. The world received the largest shipment of lemons ever in 2020. But that means that we have the opportunity to make more lemonade. Our team is really looking forward to rolling out all the new things we created for National Day Calendar and the impact that these opportunities will have on people and communities across our nation! Also, spending less time traveling meant more time with close friends and family.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? MA: A smile, whether it is amongst friends and family, or someone on the other side of the globe. If I am the reason why that person smiles, the world is a better place.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? MA: Anything that uses technology to improve the human condition. A great example is creating low cost 3D printed limbs.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? MA: What you can give during the pandemic is the best way to go. Drop off a meal to someone who is isolated or open the door for a stranger: Again, we are in a mental health crisis and these small acts of kindness can mean a world of difference for people.

HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 29


Q&A

WITH

Matt Peterson

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? MP: I am the CEO of OPTE.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? MP: I think that is a complicated question. On the business side, we launched our company, OPTE. After 13 years, OPTE is finally available and it is an exciting time. Launches are always hectic, but forming our company, planning and executing a launch, all remotely, has been an interesting challenge. But honestly, the way I moved the needle the most was through family and friends. It is all about personal connection and reaching out. We all need connection so I have been really making an effort to instigate conversation and check in. I know it is important to me and for those around me.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? MP: In times of stress, I need two things. Physical activity and getting into nature. Sometimes I can get both, if I’m lucky. Lately, I have been running a lot in the Santa Monica Mountains, and that has been a huge stress reliever. 2020 has taught me to appreciate time in nature more than ever before. I have had the pleasure to visit both Joshua Tree and Death Valley National parks during this hectic year and found that time spent in both locations reinvigorated me and brought me some much needed peace.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? MP: I would tell him so much. Most importantly, slow the hell down! Why are you in such a rush all the time? But seriously, I think that the main lesson is that relationships are the 30 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

key to life and to happiness, so the advice would be to really focus on those things. Also to invest in tech stocks earlier.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? MP: A commitment to family and friends and really taking the time

to slow down and talk more with them and stay connected. This year has made me realize how much I love my home and how grateful I am for what I have around me. I have become much more passionate about my time and not focusing on things or people that are not bringing value to my life. It has really made life more rewarding.


06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? MP: This year has been hard for so many and seeing all of the inequality that is happening because of Covid-19 has been by far the worst part. I am increasingly disturbed by the fact that the poor are getting crushed by this disease and the chasm between the wealthy and the rest grow bigger by the day. I feel real empathy for those who have been put into a tough situation that is no fault of their own.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? MP: I used to travel to the Silicon Valley every week for work and so I was on a plane every week for two years. I can say that now I truly don’t see how I could go back to living that type of life. I am also the healthiest I have ever been, so that’s a major plus. I have not gotten sick once in 2020. So in a way, with everything

that is going on, I feel the healthiest and most vibrant I have felt in years, being home with my family.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? MP: I used to think it was about keeping score, meaning it was about winning, and that success was viewed outside of me and versus others. Now I realize it is internal and it is the journey as much as the result. I know that OPTE will be successful from a business point of view, however, the personal success my team and I will have is related to building the company, establishing our values, and going through our journey will be as valuable as the end financial result.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? MP: Having kids of my own and realizing how important it is to be there for

them in every way possible has made me passionate about helping other kids who might not receive as much support. Some charities that I have been involved with, that are really making a difference, are LA’s Best and The Harold Robinson Foundation.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? MP: It’s all about your point of view. There are so many people that need help and they need to get that help to get by. I think whether it is through their government, their community, or their friends and family, it is important that those who need help receive it. Those that can give, should be giving. It is our responsibility as citizens to help others when they need it. So giving back, in whatever way you can, becomes important as well. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 31


ASHLEY AND MIKE LEMIEUX Q&A

WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourselves and what you do? A&ML: Ashley is a bestselling author, speaker, and owns an online media company for women. Mike owns a consulting firm that empowers business owners to scale through social media strategy.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? A&ML: We kept showing up even when we felt like we were drowning. Learning how to really trust ourselves to make the next right choice when it felt impossible to move forward, has brought a lot of power and insight into our lives.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? A&ML: This year exploded for everyone, and also gave us an invitation to sit still and not run away from the stress or the pain, because there was nowhere to go. We got very intentional with creating things that brought us joy. That would also help ease the burdens of other people. We started slowing down and incorporated tools like yoga, journaling, and hiking into our lives. 2020 gave the world permission to slow down, so our greatest focus was finding peace and healing in the stillness.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? A&ML: Life won’t look like you thought it would, but it will be even better if you keep showing up through the heartache. You’ll get through what’s coming, I promise. 32 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY


05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? A&ML: Ashley wrote two more books with Harper One, and the stories and tools inside of the books are the greatest work she feels like she’s ever done. Mike helped a lot of small businesses pivot during the pandemic, during the peak of their stress, so that they not only didn’t go under, but were able to create new revenue streams in their company during what originally felt like an impossible time.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? A&ML: Losing our baby boy at 16 weeks pregnant. Ashley suddenly went septic and was rushed to the hospital on the very same day hospitals closed to outside guests because Covid-19 was hitting the United States. She endured days in excruciating pain, all alone, and then unexpectedly, had a miscarriage and delivered our baby all by herself. The pain of being separated from each other during that time, and then losing our son, Jayce, rocked our worlds. Ashley spent months recovering from how sick she got, and we are grateful that she is still with us.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? A&ML: The best part was having the opportunity to meet our son, Jayce. Even though his life was short, and his loss has brought a lot of pain, the joy and healing he has brought has changed our lives. We wouldn’t trade that for anything.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? A&ML: Success means that we all rise together. If you’re at the top alone, something went wrong along the way.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? A&ML: We are very passionate about advocating for children and youth in foster care. We are both on the board of directors for National Angels, a nonprofit organization

that supports children and their caregivers, who are in the foster care system. So many of these kids face so much trauma, and they need love and support.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? A&ML: I think people need to get really still, and listen to what is best for them at this moment. There was a time this year where Ashley was so physically sick,

that she needed all of the help she could re-ceive. We didn’t turn any help down. Now that she’s better, she’s able to serve hundreds of thousands of people around the world with her work and writing. Life ebbs and flows, and there are seasons where we are called to show up for others and give, or sit still and receive. We can’t give on an empty well, and making sure that we’re all taking care of our mental and emotional well beings, so that we can be in a position to impact and serve, is really, really important. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 33


Q&A SoCAL HONDA DEALERS WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? DJ: I am Destin Judy, Public Relations representative for the SoCal Honda Dealers’ Helpful Honda campaign.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? DJ: Throughout 2020, “Helpful Honda” teams have traveled across Southern California every week volunteering at non-profits, picking up litter, loading groceries for shoppers, and fulfilling personal requests from residents. Since COVID-19, the “Helpful Honda” people have continued their helpful efforts, volunteering where they were needed most at local food banks and resource distribution centers in Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, Ventura and Riverside Counties. This year, the SoCal Honda Dealers donated thousands of face shields to healthcare workers at local hospitals, delivered meals to seniors, and gifted critical supplies to teachers and students to support remote learning. To help make the holidays a little brighter, they are also hosting free gas events to put money back in peoples’ pockets, and surprising deserving families with dream Christmas gifts they cannot afford due to this challenging economic year.

Dealers donated 20,000 face shields to help keep frontline healthcare workers safe at local hospitals. Working in conjunction with Honda’s U.S. manufacturing operations in Marysville, Ohio, where the face shields were mass produced using plastic injection molding technology ordinarily used in the production of vehicle components, the Helpful Honda Dealers were able to lend a hand in their local communities.

05I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? DJ: We always wish we could help even more people.

03I

06I

04I

07I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? DJ: The SoCal Honda Dealers adapted quickly to the needs of 2020 by being helpful where it was needed most. Helpful efforts pivoted immediately to assisting food banks, local hospitals, seniors, and families needing a helping hand. NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? DJ: Amid the Covid-19 crisis, the Helpful Honda 34 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? DJ: In a year when help was needed more than ever, the SoCal Honda Dealers are honored to continue spreading so many meaningful “Random Acts of Helpfulness” to so many deserving people and organizations this year. NS: What does success mean to you? DJ: Simply, we aim to bring a smile to people’s faces. Being able to spread “Random Acts of Helpfulness” to

children, adults, and elders in the community is our core mission.

08I

NS: What causes are important to you? DJ: “We love helping those who help others,” including food banks, nurses, teachers, animal shelters, fire fighters, hard working moms and dads, and those who do good in the community! We host special events throughout the year to honor those who give back. On our “SoCal Honda Dealers” Facebook page, you will find details about how we’re “Helping the Helpful”.

09I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? DJ: Our motto is “To Be Helpful,” no strings attached. By giving to residents in the smallest and largest of ways, we are able to spread joy and bring a smile to peoples’ faces when they least expect it. It’s our honor to help the residents and organizations across Southern California throughout this challenging year and into the future.


Q&A RaymonD pang WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourselves and what you do? My name is Raymond Pang, the founder and vice president. Kidzone is one of the key brands of the company.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? RP: Personally, I changed my work, turning it into an event that brings joy to me. Work is not stressful. It is something I enjoy as I can see the smiles from my customers who appreciate my ideas. I sound like a workaholic, but it’s worth it when you receive all this wonderful feedback.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? RP: The pandemic made 2020 stressful. Change of daily patterns or habits can help relieve stress mentally and physically while you stay at home. I work out at least 30 minutes every day to stay healthy and strengthen my mind. Every morning and on weekends, I go to nature to get some fresh air and inspiration for my projects with my family. We also share everything, no matter if it’s happy or sad, with each other.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? RP: Be creative and trust yourself. You might face a lot of failures but don’t be afraid of it. Fear will be the biggest obstacle of your success. You will never know what will come next or the result if you are afraid of failing.

was worrying about their lives to protect themselves and their families. The entire world suddenly stopped for months because of it.

07I

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? RP: The best part of 2020 was the sale of my brand products was far beyond my expectations. I am thankful for the NS: What did you do in 2020 support from our customers. So glad to read the great feedback on it and that you’re most passionate see how much joy those ride-ons about? RP: As the leader of a kids brand, I am passionate about creating bring to kids and their families. The appreciation meant a lot to me and fun and safe toys for parents to keep my team. their kids entertained at home and creating memories for the families. I NS: What does success am also very grateful to see my brand mean to you? RP: We do product can bring hope and joy to see our brand rising, but we still kids with medical issues. have a long way to go to success. NS: What was the worst part We are working our best to provide happiness to the kids and their of 2020 for you? RP: The worst part of 2020 is the pandemic. It families. Even when we face a hard affected our normal lifestyle due to the time, we still need to keep moving on as we know bringing happiness to lockdown. It is heart breaking to see how the number of cases and deaths everyone is the most important goal to us. kept going up every day. Everyone

04I

08I

06I

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? RP: My team and my family are very important to me. Team power is very important to Kidzone. My team fights with me. We have been working toward the same goal. We spent time on inspiring ideas and trying different new ideas together. After work, the support and encouragement from my family means a lot to me. They cheer me up and back me up, no matter what. They are my motivation.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? RP: It has been a tough year because of the pandemic. There is too much negativity in the world. Everyone in the world needs to be united to fight back against the pandemic. We have to build a society full of positive attitudes, and to be considerate, to help people around you. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 35


Q&A ERIC NEE WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? EN: I’m the editor in chief of Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), a media organization at Stanford University that publishes a magazine, online articles, webinars, podcasts, and convenings. We use these different media to bring together leaders of social change organizations from around the world to share their ideas, research, experiences, and learnings.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? EN: Despite Covid, in 2020, I helped SSIR reach more than 2.5 million social innovators across the globe, a record number.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? EN: I was one of the lucky people who did not lose their job. In fact, my workload increased in 2020 and I have been working from home since the second week of March. The way that I have handled the stress is to take frequent breaks, get out and walk for an hour almost every day, and say “no” to new projects almost as often as I say “yes”. NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? EN: I would advise my younger self to pay as much attention to creating and nurturing friends as I do to working and building my career.

04I

07I

05I

08I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? EN: I’m most passionate about helping us reach agreements with partners in Japan, Mexico, and the United Arab Emirates who will publish SSIR in Japanese, Spanish, and Arabic, joining our existing partners in China and South Korea.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? EN: My son (Alex Nee) celebrated his Broadway debut last winter in “A Christmas Carol,” only to suddenly have his acting career put on hold until well into next year.

36 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? EN: In the spring, I completed two years of hormone therapy for stage four prostate cancer, and I am still cancer-free. NS: What does success mean to you? EN: Success for me means being healthy, having a loving family and close friends, and having a meaningful job.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? EN: There are so many causes that are important, but two that stand out for me are creating an equitable economic system so that everyone has a job with sufficient pay and benefits to provide for a good standard of living, and creating an environmentally sustainable society

so that we stop climate change and protect natural ecosystems.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? EN: I believe that the most important thing that people can do during the pandemic is to give. That doesn’t have to be money. It could be the gift of time by volunteering at a food bank, the gift of kindness by being nice to people you meet and work with, the gift of caring by wearing a mask and maintaining distance from others even if you don’t think you will get Covid, and the gift of being humble and listening to others instead of thinking that you have all of the answers.


TOM WARD

Q&A

WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? TW: I write for Forbes about influencers, and also host The Tom Ward Show, a YouTube channel podcast. I’ve also just launched the Brand Aid podcast, with TikTok star Griffin Johnson.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? TW: The biggest needle mover for me was creating the Brand Aid podcast with Griffin Johnson. It’s a business podcast about branding. He picked me to co-host it with him, which was a great opportunity. He has a following of 20 million plus across social media, so it’s been great exposure for me.

and the viewers have loved them! I’m also very passionate about the BLM movement and I used my platform, this year, to inspire change.

06I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? TW: I’m a big believe in meditation. I meditate twice a day, for 20 minutes each session. Exercise is also a huge stress reliever for me. We built a gym in our garage and I’ve been seeing my boxing trainer. He takes all precautions, every week, and I look forward to it all week.

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? TW: Just being isolated from everyone. And every week looked the same. The most depressing thing was seeing my oldest daughter start kindergarten online. The first year of school is supposed to be a fun and exciting time for a kid. Now, she has to take the classes online and is stuck at home with her parents all day. She doesn’t get to play with any kids. At least she has a little sister to boss around!

04I

07I

03I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? TW: To use your time wisely. You will never have this much free time ever again, so use it to learn and develop new skills.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? TW: My YouTube interviews. They’ve gone really well and the views are way up. I focused almost exclusively on interviewing TikTokers

NS: What was the best part of 2020 for you? TW: Spending time with my family. We’ll never get to spend this much time together ever again. My wife works in an office, but now she works at home with me. So I get to hang with her every day, which is awesome. My oldest daughter is home with us every day, which is a blessing. I’ll never get to spend every day with her again, once she goes back to school.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? TW: Getting paid to do what you’d do for free.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? TW: BLM. I’ve been very involved with the causes this year. I love BLMLA. They’re incredible and really inspire you to get more involved. And drug abuse treatment and mental health care are two causes that I’m very involved with.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? TW: I think both. It’s always important to give back and there are ways to give, even while you’re stuck at home. But it’s also important to look at what you can get during this pandemic. Instead of being depressed about being at home, look at all the ways you can use your time. You can “get” all kinds of things. You can use the time to learn a new instrument, to start meditating, to spend more time with your family, to exercise, etc. There’s a lot of things you can get by staying at home. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 37


Q&A Tommy didario WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? TD: I am a TV host & an on-air lifestyle contributor, seen on The Rachael Ray Show, The Today Show, Entertainment Tonight, and more.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? TD: I started my Instagram Live show, #LetsStayTogether, back in March because I wanted to create something that would spread some joy during times when people so badly needed it. The show is about celebrity guests talking about a variety of different fun and inspiring topics, as well as the projects that their fans love in an intimate one-on-one conversation. Cut to 75 plus interviews later, the show has really turned into a place where people can come and just feel good. The show brings home the idea that we are all in this together.

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? TD: The number one way I deal with stress is through working out. Fitness is a huge part of who I am and it’s truly the only time in the day that I feel like I can tune out the world, and focus on my mental and physical health and wellbeing. I also started looking at social media in a different way. I think surrounding yourself, including on social media, with people who genuinely create joy for you, is so important and we should curate our digital networks to reflect that.

04I

NS: Do you have any advice for your younger self? TD: Don’t try to be someone that someone else wants you to be. As a young gay kid, coming to terms with my sexuality, I often tried to cater who I was according to what “group” I was talking to. And it really really sucked because for a long time, I 38 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY

didn’t know who I was. I think that’s why I fell in love with New York City. I moved here to attend NYU and never left. It allowed me to be my true, authentic self and discover who Tommy is. So it may not always be easy, but know that you, as yourself, is enough.

05I

NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re most passionate about? TD: Two things come to mind. First is my Instagram Live show, #LetsStayTogether. I’m proud to book, produce, and host a show that puts out feel-good, inclusive conversation. Second is a story I did on The Rachael Ray Show. I found an incredible young mom who is battling Leukemia, contracted Covid, and lost her mom all in the same year. I did a segment with her that showcased her incredible strength, resilience, and beautiful heart, and having that bond between her, Rachael, and myself is something that I will never forget.

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? TD: I don’t look at 2020 like that because people tragically lost their lives this year due to this pandemic. Families couldn’t even say goodbye to each other properly because of Covid. That just breaks my heart. I think of everyone affected by this terrible disease often and just hope that all of those going through loss are surrounded by love.

08I

NS: What does success mean to you? TD: Success is waking up every day and being proud of the work that you do. You may not always be happy. Every person in every career and industry has bad days. But when you can honestly look in the mirror, and say that you are proud of the person staring back at you because of the effort, quality, and hustle you put in, then that is success.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? TD: Visibility is so important to me, especially because growing up as a gay closeted kid, I didn’t have role models to make me feel less alone. So I am incredibly passionate about promoting visibility and organizations that help the community like the Trevor Project and the Celementi Foundation.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? TD: I think this year has shown many people’s true colors, in the most beautiful ways, and in some not so great ways. We most NS: What was the importantly need to be clear on what best part of 2020 for it is we stand for, because we all have you? TD: Spending so much been tested this year. For me, I stand time with my husband. He is a for kindness, love, creating joy, and correspondent for ABC News and inspiration through my work, unity, since we both work in TV, our schedules are usually so spontaneous, visibility and acceptance. And I hope that I have put that out this year and and lots of travel is involved. I can have helped to make people feel a honestly say I have enjoyed every little more seen and a little less alone second quarantining with him and he during a tough year. is forever my rock.

07I


Q&A BREE JACOBY WITH

BY: NIKI SHADROW SNYDER

01I

NS: Tell us about yourself and what you do? BJ: I am the CEO of BREE JACOBY. We’re a luxury membership based personal shopping service with members across the country who want to transform their wardrobe. I am also the host of Undressed, a podcast about business moguls and entrepreneurs personal style.

02I

NS: How did you personally move the needle in 2020? BJ: 2020 was about pivoting quickly and becoming a virtual styling company in addition to in-home services. I had to reconfigure our company structure into a smaller styling team and focus on our Los Angeles growth in order to restructure the growth of our business so we can run smoother and be more effective with onboarding new members. I became savvy and smarter!

03I

NS: How did you deal with the stress in the world in 2020? BJ: Lots of working out, meditation, energy healing and personal self-help. Also, not getting involved in other people’s drama. I keep my focus sharp and my goals clear.

04I

06I

NS: What was the worst part of 2020 for you? BJ: When March hit, everyone was so scared of shopping that we had the worst month in company history. Also, not seeing my family the first two months of the pandemic wrecked my heart. I am very close to my parents and not seeing them was a heartbreak.

07I

NS: Do you have any advice NS: What was the best part for your younger self? BJ: I of 2020 for you? BJ: Slowing would tell my younger self to not be so down to focus! I got in over my head reactive and take a calmer approach quick and everything was stressful to everything. before I had to slow down and restructure my life and my goals. NS: What did you do in 2020 that you’re the NS: What does success most passionate about? BJ: mean to you? BJ: There are EASY! Changing the lives of new a few things that would make me feel members who sign up and completely successful. For one, in my business, transforming their life through their it’s about building us to being a wardrobe. To me, there is no better global brand known for transforming feeling than helping serve people wardrobes and a trusted place to through looking and feeling good. shop. I will feel like I have made it when people can correlate my

05I

08I

name with the concept of retail experiences. Second, success to me is my relationships. I want to look back on my life and see the amazing friendships I have created in personal and business life. I feel successful when I have a support system.

09I

NS: What causes are important to you? BJ: Women’s charities, such as Visionary Women, that empower women to help others. I was a part of National Charity League from age 12-17 and I’ve been involved in volunteering at many organizations.

10I

NS: Do you think the world right now needs to be influenced by what they can get or what they can give in the middle of this pandemic? BJ: GIVE!!!!!! Give back because you care and you will receive two fold. Right now, it’s not about being selfish. Help other people any way you can. HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY • 39


40 • HOLLYWOOD WEEKLY