Pō'ai Pili July 2022

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PŌ'AI PILI Kaupō Community Newsletter Volume I Issue 3/Jul-Sept 2022


Table of Contents

3. Editor's Note

4. Honoring a Cultural Master

5. East Maui Food Assessment

6. Nu‘u: In the Nineteenth & 20th Centuries

11. 'Uhaloa

12. Mokulau: The Many Islets

14. He Ho'omana'o Aloha

15. A Hui Hou John Lind

16. Kīpahulu Moku CBSFA

19. Wahine Kai Camp

22. A Message from Councilmember Sinenci

23. Community Calendar

Publisher: Kaupō Community Association, Inc.; Editor: Kamalama Mick; Copy Editors: Tama Starr, Georgia Pinsky; Editor’s Assistant: Kauwila Hanchett; Graphic Designers: Kauwila Hanchett & Kamalama Mick; Contributors: Kaupō Community Association, Inc. (KCAI), Hōlani Hāna, Inc., Ma Ka Hana Ka 'Ike, Andrew Walmisley, Lyons Cabacungan, Aldei Kawika Gregoire, Sheila Roback, Kīpahulu 'Ohana, Kamalama Mick, Councilmember Shane Sinenci. Cover Photo: Kahualaulani Mick. Solstice Sunrise 2022: The rising sun sets the land aglow as rain columns usher in the beginning of summer.

PŌ‘AI PILI SOLICITATION FOR CONTENT: If you have a story, letter, photograph, announcement, or article you’d like to see published in a future issue of Pō‘ai Pili, we’d love to hear from you! Content is due one month prior to our distribution date. For our next issue, please send submissions to poaipili@gmail.com no later than September 1, 2022. The views and opinions expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and contributors of the various articles, and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of KCAI, or the opinions of KCAI’s individual board members. All content is meant to be positive and is not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, or individual.

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter


Aloha Community, Summer is a time to climb a tree, fly a kite, and maybe, if you’re bold enough, roll down a hill! Summer is a time to let yourself be free and have a little fun. As our beautiful cover shows, at the Summer Solstice, the sun rises at its northernmost point, pausing for a moment before it starts traveling slowly southwards again. Summer is here, and the sun, moon, stars, and planets shine down on the earth below. After the sun sets, the night sky is filled with summer stars. The “Summer Triangle” rises in the northeast—formed by the stars Keoe, Pira'etea, and Humu—while in the southeast, Maui’s fishhook, Manaiakalani, dominates the sky with the bright red star, Lehuakona, at its center. Iwikuamo'o—the starline known in Hawaiian starlore as the backbone of the sky—stretches from Hōkūpa'a (the North Star) to Hānaiakamalama (the Southern Cross), while at its heart, Hawai‘i’s zenith star, Hōkūle’a, passes directly overhead, traveling alongside its companion star, Hikianali'a. As the summer night progresses, the Milky Way is a marvelous sight to behold, with its myriads of starclouds and clusters against the dark Kaupō sky. This summer, pay extra attention to nature and the beauty that surrounds you, and let it fill your heart from within! This third issue of Pō’ai Pili contains an article about the Mokulau Islands, as well as the second installment of Andrew Walmisley’s “Nu’u.” It is full of articles and photos, both historical and contemporary, plus announcements and information from community members and organizations. Thank you for reading! Until next time!

Kamalama Mick

Editor’s Note

Kamalama Mick Pō‘ai Pili Editor

Kamalama Mick lives in Kaupō and is the editor of Pō‘ai Pili—the Kaupō Community Newsletter. She is the daughter of Kauwila Hanchett and Adam Kahualaulani Mick and the granddaughter of Mike and Carla Hanchett. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, art, and photography. Contact her at poaipili@gmail.com.

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This summer, pay extra attention to nature and the beauty that surrounds you, and let it fill your heart from within!

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Honoring a Cultural Master Hāna Master Indigenous Architect Named NEA Heritage Fellow Contributed By Hōlani Hāna, Inc.

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uhikuhi Pu'uone (Master Indigenous Architect) Francis "Palani" Sinenci of Hāna, Maui, was recently named one of ten 2022 National Heritage Fellows by the National Endowment for the Arts—our nation's highest honor for folk and traditional artists. Each fellowship includes a $25,000 award and all of the recipients will be featured in a film that will premiere in November 2022 on arts.gov. Through the film, viewers will have the opportunity to visit the homes and communities where the fellows live and work, providing a connection to the distinct art forms and traditions these artists practice. Francis "Palani" Sinenci was born and raised in the Hawaiian village of Hāna, Maui, known for its rich cultural heritage and stunning natural beauty. His childhood playgrounds were the mountains, valleys, and coasts of his island home, where he spent his days gathering food, fishing, learning from elders, or spending time with his ‘ohana (family). After graduating from high school, Sinenci wanted to experience the world beyond his rural home. He spent nearly 30 years in the military, primarily in the U.S. Air Force, where he achieved the rank of Chief Master Sergeant. In 1967, he married his beloved wife Esmenia (“Esse”), a local girl from O‘ahu.

In the early 1990s, Hawai‘i pulled on Sinenci’s heartstrings, and he and Esse moved back home. Little did he suspect this would launch his second career—revitalizing the artforms of kūkulu hale (traditional Hawaiian architecture) and uhau humu pōhaku (masonry). Traditional thatched structures, called hale, evolved over millennia of ancestral experience to be in harmony with Hawai‘i’s unique landscapes. There are many different types of hale, ranging from fully covered sleeping houses to open-walled, multi-purpose structures to A-frame canoe sheds. During the era of cultural degradation that occurred after Western contact, modern buildings replaced traditional structures, and hale became a thing of the past, seen only in black-and-white photos of old Hawai‘i or in movies as “grass shacks.” In 1994, Sinenci was asked to construct a hale at Helemano Elementary School. With no existing practitioners to learn from, he talked to anthropologist Rudy Mitchell, scoured archaeological records, including Dr. Russell Apple’s 1971 Hawaiian Thatched House, and studied the hale preserved in Honolulu’s Bishop Museum. In true Hawaiian style, he learned by doing—pairing research with inherent ancestral knowledge to reclaim this dormant art form for present and future generations. In the mid-90s, Sinenci formed a partnership with respected cultural advocate, Coila Eade, while building Kauhale O Hāna—a traditional Hawaiian village compound at the Hāna Cultural Center. This dynamic duo later created Hōlani Hāna, a five-acre cultural park that became an important training ground for practitioners as well as a focal point for indigenous gatherings and community events. In the late 90s, Sinenci and a crew of local masons restored Pi‘ilani Hale, Hawai‘i’s largest stone structure and a place of deep cultural and spiritual importance. Over the past 26 years, Sinenci has trained a new generation of practitioners, constructed countless hale and restored heiau in communities across Hawai’i, spearheaded the creation of the Indigenous Architecture Building Code, piloted a hale builder certification program, and founded his traditional school Hālau Hale Kuhikuhi. He remains active in his craft training the next generation and running projects throughout Hawai‘i.

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter


East Maui Food Assessment

Designing a Food System from the Ground Up Contributed By Ma Ka Hana Ka 'Ike

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he East Maui Community Food Assessment was a community-based research and planning project led by Hāna nonprofit Ma Ka Hana Ka ʻIke. Beginning in 2019, this project set out to answer the question: “How can we increase and reaffirm food security in Hāna and the greater East Maui?” To answer this question, Ma Ka Hana Ka ʻIke facilitated indepth interviews and community discussions with keiki, ʻohana, educators, local nonprofits on Maui and across the pae ʻāina, and agricultural stakeholders throughout East Maui districts. MKHKI also conducted extensive research pertaining to consumers, farmers and producers, marketing, and distribution. We are happy to share with all of you the East Maui Community Food Assessment here: hanabuild.org/eastmauifood. Collectively, we identified consumer preferences for locally-grown and sourced foods, supply and demand trends, and challenges ʻohana, farmers and producers, and local suppliers face when it comes to accessing, cultivating, and distributing more of these locallygrown and sourced foods. This research project has already begun to evolve and community-based solutions are taking shape. In partnership with Hāna High and Elementary School, where keiki from Koʻolau to Kaupō attend, Ma Ka Hana Ka ʻIke has a plan underway to implement a Garden to Cafeteria Program. Produce grown and harvested on campus—by youth

of varying ages—will be used in cafeteria meals! Ma Ka Hana Ka ʻIke will also launch an East Maui-specific farmer and entrepreneurship development training program to kōkua our young Native Hawaiians in pursuing farming careers. Community voice has been integral throughout the East Maui Community Food Assessment project. Ma Ka Hana Ka ʻIke is grateful to the hundreds of community members, from keiki to kūpuna, who contributed to every phase of this project. Mahalo nui iā ʻoukou. As we look ahead and continue implementing collective solutions to increase and reaffirm food security, we understand and acknowledge the importance of expanding on the community-based data collected so far. If you or your ʻohana have not already, please share your manaʻo through our East Maui Food Choices survey: bit.ly/ EastMauiFoodChoices. This survey is specifically focused on gathering information related to the prevalent subsistence lifeways unique to Hāna and the greater East Maui. We ask for you to share about your food choices, most importantly the foods you consume that are selfgrown, gathered, hunted, or shared without the exchange of money. If you have any questions about, or feedback on, the East Maui Community Food Assessment or the plans that are underway, please reach out to us at kokua@ hanabuild.org.

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Nu‘u

In the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries By Andrew Walmisley (Part 2)

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter


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hen Elia Helekūnihi was born on April 12, 1839, at Kuakini, Nuʻu, the ancient district was still a relatively thriving, well-populated community. Though much depleted by western diseases, warfare, and out-migration to the port towns favored by haole traders, missionaries, and the Hawaiian chiefs, it was not yet the “marginal” district it was to become later in the century.

There were many reminders of the great days of the early 18th century when Aliʻi Nui Kekaulike made his royal center at Mokulau and Nuʻu and the district boasted as many as 20,000 inhabitants.

flourished even in the drier portions of Nuʻu, pili grass used for thatching houses dominated the grasslands, and dryland kalo was still cultivated in the rainier uplands.

The forested upper slopes of Haleakalā received greater rainfall and the landscape was more verdant, with greater surface flows in streams and springs than we see today. The famed ‘uala gardens still

Nuʻu school and Protestant meeting house across the government road from the fishpond was an important community center. Dating from at least 1827, it was founded by the local konohiki under the

Photo Credit: Aldei Kawika Gregoire

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter

Photo from the personal collection of Mina Atai

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The people are very pleasant and kind, working at something or other all day. Making nets, the men; the women making kapas for the native blanket.


direction of Queen Ka'ahumanu, and there is a record of Princess Nahienaena (age 13!) examining the school and preaching sternly to the makaʻāinana in 1828. On the wall of petroglyphs not far away, neatly engraved letters can be seen: testimony to the pride Hawaiians had in learning the palapala. Elia attended the school from 18451847 under the guidance of his uncle Solomona Aki. The school had 110 students, suggesting that Nu’u may have had as many as 500 inhabitants at this time! There was also a sister school at Waiū, which remained a thriving community up to the end of the 19th century.

and talked with the people of Nuʻu “considerable (sic) on the first principals (sic) of the gospel.” A year later, George Cannon visited the Mormon chapel at Nuʻu and stayed with Manu near the spring at Waiū. Cannon “gave them a history of the restoration of the church to the earth in these last days through the ministry of angels to Bro. Joseph Smith, & c., in which they seem very much interested.” It seems that the population was large enough to sustain two Mormon chapels at both Nuʻu and Waiū. This is not surprising because as late as the 1890’s, Josephine Marciel claimed that 100 people still lived at Waiū!

Though Nuʻu was largely converted to the Protestant faith through the efforts of local konohiki, such as Elia’s father Paulo Kū, by the 1840’s many people in Kaupō had converted to Catholicism, possibly as an act of resistance to the rising tide of Protestant American influence. A makaʻāinana of Kahikinui, Helio Koaeloa, spread the Catholic faith in East Maui and built small chapels at least four years before the arrival of the first French Catholic missionaries. It is likely that he built the small Catholic chapel, whose ruins can be seen on a rise mauka of the highway a few hundred yards towards Kahikinui. When the French priest, Modest Favens, arrived in 1846, he found hundreds of newly-converted Catholics eager to be baptized, all of whom had come to the faith through Native Hawaiian agency without the assistance of a priest. Several Catholic schools were established, one possibly on this site, as well as two other churches— one upcountry at Maua and the other where St. Joseph’s stands today.

During the devastating smallpox epidemic of 1853, Canadian economist, John Rae, passed through to vaccinate the people of Nuʻu and kept a diary describing life in the district at the time. He wrote that he stayed with Paulo Kū near the sea at Nuʻu “where dashing lulled me to sleep.” The house was small, but comfortable with “plenty of mats.” Later, he counted a thickness of 12 lauhala mats on the floor of the hale! He describes Nuʻu as “a little hamlet of some dozen houses, some with stone walls." He ate “foul poi” made from ʻuala and in the morning was given ʻopihi to eat. Sadly, he reported that there were “some old women terribly marked with the venereal.”

Another threat to the Protestant establishment at Nuʻu was the arrival of the first Mormons in the early months of 1852. Elder James Keeler arrived in the community “after a hard day’s travel” by canoe and over rough lava “very sharp to the feet.” He stayed in the house of “one Manu who is very friendly”

Rae fell ill and Kū’s wife, Lydia Kalaoa, kindly offered him hospitality and when he offered the family money for their efforts, Kū said that “it would not be right to make a charge as I was helping them.” He continues, “The people are very pleasant and kind, working at something or other all day. Making nets, the men; the women making kapas for the native blanket.” He writes about cultivation in the “very stony soil,” but “when the surface stones are thrown into the form of low rude fences, the intervening spaces cultivated in the native manner yield largely the sweet potato and the onion, with here and there a few heads of tolerable maize.” Rae took a walk

“with the youth,” likely Kūʻs son, Elia, for about two miles mauka in Nuʻu and found about 3/5 of the surface of the land planted in ʻuala in “holes from which the stones were gathered by hand.” He also noted that melons and “the native calabash” thrived in Nuʻu mauka. Paulo Kū took him for a walk to the “puna wai” (spring) at Waiū “where they get their best water for drinking. It is a great stream issuing from the bluff to the N.E. and about a mile distant...It never fails and is very pure and cool and is quite a treasure. It is fenced with care by stone walls and a good road is made to it.” The spring at Waiū, according to other contemporary accounts, had considerable flow well into the 1890’s. The roads described by Rae can still be seen: a well-preserved section of the 16th century Piʻilani trail, as well as an excellent stretch of Governor Hoapili’s 1830 “road that sin built” can be seen running across the lava flow from Nuʻu landing to Waiū. The Hoapili road can be seen continuing up the gulch behind the spring to join the main road on the crest of Puʻumaneʻoneʻo and according to one old map, it also branched to run along the cliff to Kou, connecting the two communities. Major change arrived in Nu’u with the construction of the landing in the late 1850’s. Petitions from the local people in 1856 complained about the difficulty of getting products to market, and by 1858, the landing was in place and Judge John Richardson celebrated the profitability of shipping goods to market in Lāhainā and Honolulu from Nuʻu. In 1862, Nuʻu had become an important landing for both passengers and products, such as pigs, goatskins and dried fish, and later in the century, when ranching began to dominate the local economy, cattle were swum out to the waiting steamboat by paniolo on horseback from the Kahikinui end of the beach, where the old corral can still be seen. The rapidly declining population of Nuʻu, formerly concentrated mauka from the petroglyphs to Hawelewele

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Gulch (wisely, to avoid tsunamis!), shifted to the area back of the landing, where a cluster of American style houses, a small general store, and a hale paʻakai (salt house) stood until the early 20th century. Educated at the boarding school in Hāna and at Lāhaināluna, Elia Helekūni returned to teach at Nu’u in 1859 after the retirement of his uncle. He was alarmed to find that the school population had dropped to 49 children (it was 110 in 1841), demonstrating the rapid demographic decline of the district. In 1861, he wrote of a contagion at Nuʻu, which he called “an illness with red protuberances or bumps,” possibly a re-infection of the smallpox epidemic of 1853. “It started at the school in the last week of October and intensified in the first week of November,” he wrote, “affecting above all the little children.” Most of the children in his school were “completely exhausted” by this illness, which is “truly devastating.” One little girl from his school, named Kahi, died. Shortly after he wrote this letter, painful memories of the passing of

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his own beloved Solomona the year before inspired him to write at Nuʻu in 1861 a beautiful kanikau: In the evening your passing was like the setting of the sun. Yours is the spirit that departs in the evening, With the billowy clouds of Haleakalā, We two shall be in the cold and chill, In the long night of winter, sleeping... The grief of the Nuʻu makaʻāinana at the loss of so many dear ones is poignantly demonstrated by the abundance of burials in the area. By 1880 the school had closed and a Board of Health official requested its use as a “holding facility” for lepers waiting to be sent to Kalaupapa. In the 1870’s Nuʻu passed to King Kalākaua and Queen Kapiʻolani. After the King’s passing, the Queen sold the western portion to James Campbell, who was, incoincidentally, related by marriage to the King and Queen. The great wall that forms the eastern boundary of Nuʻu was constructed by the Queen in 1896 to establish clear boundaries at the time of the transfer to Campbell.

A small community, residing mostly close to the fishpond, farmed and fished at Nuʻu well into the early 20th century and was described by Thomas Maunupau in his famous visit in 1922. It is believed that the devastating tsunami of 1946 finally put an end to the life of this “village.” The National Park acquired the Campbell portion in recent years, and the eastern half, purchased in 1906 from the Kapiʻolani estate by Antone Marciel of Maua Ranch (later Kaupō Ranch), is now divided between Nuʻu Mauka Ranch and HILT, with the makai lands constituting the HILT reserve. The doctoral work of Andrew Walmisley explored nineteenth century Maui colonial history through the lens of the life of one Hawaiian man, Elia Helekūnihi (1839-1896), who was born at Nuʻu, Kaupō, into a lesser aliʻi family in the lineage of King Kekaulike. Helekūnihi was a key player in the major events that defined his people as they struggled to find their way through the painful challenges of that century: depopulation, disease, and loss of sovereignty. Andrew Walmisley received his doctorate in Hawaiian History from the University of Birmingham in the U.K. He is currently doing research for a comprehensive history of Maui.

PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter

Photo Credit: Dawn Jermaill


Waltheria Indica L. By Lyons Cabacungan

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ommonly seen as a weed in most dry zones around Hawaii, ‘uhaloa has grayish leaves with yellow and red flower heads. It is an indigenous plant of Hawaii, which means it was not introduced but occurred here naturally. Bark of the roots, leaves, and stems/twigs are used for a variety of medicinal uses in Hawaii. ‘Uhaloa may sometimes be used to treat upper respiratory problems, asthma, sore throat, and arthritis. Combining ‘uhaloa with other medicinals was a common practice for Hawaiians of the past. One such compound was used to treat itchy skin and rashes. Here in Kaupō, ‘uhaloa has a very different appearance compared to the more common variety found elsewhere. It is a hidden medicine cabinet that is in plain sight. If you do decide to utilize this wonderful plant to treat an ailment, please do your research first. Dosages, preparations, compounds/additives, adverse effects, and so forth should always be considered when doing any type of traditional medicine practice.

Photo Credit: Lyons Cabacungan Lyons Cabacungan is the current Po'o of 'Aha Moku o Kaupō. His connection to Kaupō reaches farther than recorded history. Ancestors from both of his parents originate from Kaupō. The family names that he tends to identify his Kaupō roots with are Charles and Helen Smith. Their eldest son, Charles Jr., is his great-grandfather. Lyons was born and raised on Maui. As a child, he resided in Makawao, and spent most weekends in Kumunui, Kaupō, tending to family land. He is the third of the four sons of Robert and Sonia Cabacungan. They have instilled many values in him that give him strength to be successful in life. He is a 2002 graduate of Lāhainaluna High School. While he was at Lāhainaluna, the Boarding program further developed his love for agriculture; learning hydroponics, landscaping, orchard care, etc. As a senior, he was the President of Future Farmers of America (FAA), Lahainaluna Chapter. Upon graduating high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Army; Aviation Branch. He served nearly 10 years as an Aviation Operations Specialist. Most of that time was spent in Operations, under Battle/Mission Planning, though he has done a few overseas deployments in support of the Global War on Terrorism. The military added different values and skills to his life that still influence him in his day-to-day life. After his discharge from the Service, he returned to Maui. He attended UH-MC and pursued a degree in Agriculture. While working on his degree in Ag, he also enrolled in many of the Hawaiian Studies courses that are offered (Hawaiian Politics, Modern Hawaiian Issues, etc.). Not only does he want to help his family, but all Hawaiians as well. Traditions, protocols, legends, history, and so forth all come into play in life as a Hawaiian farmer, and he tries hard to pass it on. For the past 5 years, he has been the Program Manager and Instructor for the Agriculture and Natural Resource Department at UH-MC. Through the COVID-19 pandemic UH-MC and the Agriculture department have been going through some major changes that he feels will benefit our island community. Lyons would like to thank everyone for their support of 'Aha Moku o Kaupō.


Mokulau The Many Islets By Aldei Kawika Gregoire

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter


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he landscape at Mokulau contains many captivating natural features, but perhaps the most notable is the group of rocks located just offshore. Indeed, the name Mokulau (many islets) specifically refers to these rocks. For the Kaupō residents of old, each of the sea rocks at Mokulau had a specific name as well as associated characteristics and traditions. The most storied of these rocks is Moku Puhi (also called Moku Piko), set directly off the point at Mokulau. In ancient times, this rock was a popular location for depositing the piko, or umbilical cords, of newborns. It was important that piko be protected from harm; for instance, it was believed that a child would grow

up to be a thief if the umbilical cord was stolen by a rat. Being offshore, Moku Puhi offered natural protection for piko. In addition, Moku Puhi is higher than surrounding rocks and protected from waves by Moku Hai (Breaker Rock), a rock just out from Moku Puhi. Moku Hai kept waves from washing over Moku Puhi and sweeping away piko. Aside from these natural features, there was also a supernatural guardian in the form of a giant puhi, or eel, that was reported to protect the rock and its precious goods. Moving beyond Moku Puhi, the names of other rocks generally relate to fishing. Moku Aweoweo, at the northern end of the chain of rocks,

abounded in aweoweo fish. At the southern edge, Moku Ahole was so named for its plentiful aholehole fish. Nearest to shore is Moku Kilena, named after a local fishing method of the same name. A useful technique for catching ulua, kilena involves stringing a line between two points of land with sea in between. A live bait fish was then hung into the water. At Mokulau, a kilena line would be strung from the shore to Moku Kilena. The above information comes from interviews with Kaupō kūpuna Daniel Kawaiaea, Milton Kawaiaea, and Edmund Kalaola in Ka Nohona ma Kaupō ma waena o ka Makahiki 1930-1950, a master’s thesis by Diane Kawaiaea-Harris.

Aldei Kawika Gregoire is the grandson of Sam and Pauline Gregoire of Kaupō, Maui. Throughout his childhood he spent weekends in Kaupō developing a deep connection to place. He has combined his passion for Kaupō’s physical landscape and its associated stories with his interest in photojournalism. His website—www.kaupomaui.com— showcases an invaluable collection of Kaupō’s stories, photographs, place names, culture, and history. Please note that diacritical markings (‘okina and kahakō) have been omitted to remain consistent with original sources.

Photo Credit: Aldei Kawika Gregoire


He Ho'omana'o Aloha By Sheila Mae Uluwehi Roback

Ha'alele i ka lā ka mea mahana He has left the warmth of the sun Ku'u ka luhi, ua maha He has let down his weariness and is at rest Lele ka hoaka His spirit has flown away; the glory of the land has departed

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ast Maui mourns the loss of one of our community’s greatest pillars of strength, aloha, and ‘ike. Uncle John Lind was a loving son, husband, father, grandfather, brother, and friend; a steadfast community advocate and leader; an aloha ‘āina warrior and Hawaiian rights activist; a profound man, wise kupuna, and great teacher that touched, and often shaped, the lives of so many of us who were blessed to know him.

These ‘ōlelo no'eau, wise sayings, express death as found in the heart of life. Life and death are one just as the kahawai (stream) and kai (sea) are one. Rich am I to have been blessed with this day, this place, and these dearly beloved. These days spent among the Kūpuna seem all too brief, and briefer still are the words written to honor them. Their voice must never fade in our ears, nor their love vanish from our memory. Their laughter carried us up to caress the clouds. The tears we shared of joy and sorrow carved a deep and inseparable path to our very being. The lessons they have taught us revealed the fullness of light. We walked together… If we fall, we fall for those behind us and those ahead of us. We walk together… The passion for life they passed on to us is like a flame burning in our souls. May it continue to burn within us, that we may sing and dance and rise above our fears.

John Lind returned home to Ke Akua on June 22, 2022, leaving a profound and lasting legacy—both tangible and intangible—within his ‘ohana, ‘āina, community, and lāhui. Although Uncle John will long be remembered and honored for his impactful work, perhaps our most lasting memories will be of his generosity of spirit; the light in his eyes; his hands turned ever toward the earth; his smile, laughter, and perpetual kindness.

The peace and serenity they have comforted us with has brought healing, compassion and guidance to face whatever storms may come; knowledge in our hearts, a deepening of the spirit. The teachings and values they have instilled in us are of faith, lovingness, forgiveness and understanding. We must sow with love and reap with thanksgiving. The vision they unveiled to each of us are a mystery to another, yet they give us wings to soar and seeds to harvest. The sweetness of their friendship in our bosom dwells in truth; timeless, boundless and immeasurable. The gift of prayer they entrust to us brings fullness of joy and abundance to our days. The legacy they leave for us is nurtured in the depths of our hopes, strengths, desires and dreams. We can begin to climb, for through them we have reached the mountain top. They have spoken. Have we listened? Through their eyes we have witnessed miracles, mysteries, promises, light and truth. Their hearts beat in our hearts, their breath upon our faces. In beholding them, we behold each other. They have given so much, for they gave of themselves. They have inspired the very good in us and sealed our memory with the very best of their yesterdays. They remind us of who we are, where we come from and where we are going. It is our duty to remember and continue in their love. To love as they have loved. The greatest gift we are graced with is love. When love calls…follow. Give thanks for another day of loving. Aloha kekahi i kekahi… Aloha ke Akua!

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter

Photo Credit: Kim Moa courtesy of KUA

Sheila is the Senior Center Director of Hale Hulu Mamo. She grew up in Hāna and graduated from Hāna School. She received an Associate in Arts degree from Leeward Community College. She has two beautiful children and three grandchildren. Sheila considers her ‘Ohana to be one of her greatest accomplishments. In her spare time, Sheila dedicates her time and talents to her church (St. Mary’s Catholic Church) where she enjoys working with youth and is a lector and bereavement leader. Sheila accepts her Kuleana to nurture who she is as a Hawaiian by creating a strong cultural base from which she can better serve the Kūpuna (elders), family, community and world. Working at Hale Hulu Mamo has been a blessing in her life; she cherishes every moment she spends with the Kūpuna of Hāna and appreciates the wisdom and light that they hold.

Uncle John made pa‘a so many of the maka that form the beautiful ‘upena of our community life here in East Maui. He helped to found, alongside his wife Tweetie, the Hāna District Pohaku, Hāna Canoe Club, Hāna Surf Club, East Maui Taro Festival, Kauiki Council, Nā Mamo o Mu‘olea, Kīpahulu ‘Ohana, Kalena Triangle and Kīpahulu Commercial Kitchen, and Kapahu Living Farm. He also served on the Hāna Community Advisory Committee for the Hāna Community Plan update. As the Konohiki of the Kīpahulu moku, Uncle John worked tirelessly to care for the ‘āina, wai, and kai of his ancestral homeland while protecting the precious natural resources that are critical to the well-being of honua and kānaka, and to generations present and those yet to come. Most recently, Uncle John and the Kīpahulu ‘Ohana had been working to


In Loving Memory establish the Kīphaulu Moku Community Based Subsistence Fishing Area (CBSFA), a designation that will safeguard ocean resources by adopting place-based limits and rules in keeping with traditional 'ahupua'a management practices. Uncle John, along with aloha ‘āina colleague and close friend Mike Minn, were driving forces in the movement to reclaim native water rights and ancestral lands throughout East Maui by helping ‘ohana reopen and steward ancient lo‘i kalo. This effort was part of a larger movement across ka pae ‘āina o Hawai‘i, led by a grassroots consortium of native kalo farmers called ‘Onipa‘a Nā Hui Kalo (ONHK). Started in the mid-90s and continuing on through the present day, ONHK ushered in the second wave of the Hawaiian renaissance and helped kānaka maoli to reclaim traditional food systems and water rights. Uncle John was also a key player in the first wave of the Hawaiian renaissance that started in the mid-70s and continued through the 80s and 90s. He supported the Protect Kahoʻolawe ‘Ohana and the movement to end the US Navy Occupation of Kahoʻolawe as a military bombing target. Through these efforts, the bombing was stopped in 1990, and Kaho‘olawe was returned to the State of Hawaiʻi in 1994 as a cultural reserve held in trust for the sovereign native Hawaiian entity when it is reestablished. Uncle John helped ‘ohana of Kīpahulu, Hāna, and Kaupō protect their ancestral land from condemnation during the Haleakalā National Park expansion in the early 80s. He was later instrumental in the creation of a cooperative agreement between The National Park and the Kīpahulu 'Ohana (1995) to support cultural education and practices—including

hale building, kalo production, and native plant restoration. John "Jackie Boy" Crichton Kauiki Lind Jr. was born in Paia, Hamakuapoko, to parents John “Jack” Lind Sr. and Daisy Ka‘eka Mailou, and raised at Wānānālua, and Papahawahawa in Hāna, Maui. He grew up hunting, fishing, and farming from Ko‘olau to Kaupō, mauka to makai. Graduating from the Old Hāna High School in 1966, John married his high school sweetheart Tweetie and moved to O‘ahu, where he became a meat cutter for Parker Ranch's Hawaii Meat Company on Middle Street in Kalihi, O‘ahu. He left Hawaii Meat Company in 1975 and relocated to Makawao, Maui, to work for Maui Meat Company.

John Lind was predeceased by his father, Jack Lind Sr.; and sons, John James Lind and Kimokeo Lind. He is survived by his beloved wife of 55 years, “Tweetie” Lind; mother, Daisy Ka'eka Mailou Lind; 8 children, Leimamo (Paul) Lind-Strauss, Keoni (Trisha) Lind, Ka'uiki Lind, Wailua (Henry) Lind, Wahineholani (Kaniela) Lind-Hapakuka, Kaneholani Lind, Akaneki (Nick) Lind, Pekelo (Kamalei) Lind; his siblings, Jody “Haole” Mailou Jean, Bruce (Veronica) Lind, Greg (Eunice) Lind, Duffy (Doria) Lind, Terry (Anita) Lind; and 17 grandchildren. Visitation will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Saturday, July 23, 2022, at St. Mary’s Church in Hāna; mass will begin at 11:00 a.m.; burial will follow at St. Peter’s Church Cemetery in Pu'uiki and then Pā'ina in Kīpahulu at Kalena Triangle. Aloha Attire.

Several years later, he joined his parents at their home in Kīpahulu. Tweetie and John raised a beautiful family of ten children, and 17 grandchildren, in Kīkoʻo, Kīpahulu. Uncle John’s character and contributions to community were of the highest caliber. A humble man, Uncle John did not seek recognition or praise for his efforts, however, through the years, he received many awards and honors. In 2008, the Hawaii Tourism Authority recognized him with the "Keep It Hawai‘i" award. In 2018, he and Tweetie were the Grand Marshals of Hāna’s Aloha Week parade with a special remembrance of the members of the Ka'uiki Council. In 2019, John and Tweetie were awarded the prestigious Tiny Malaikini Mea Kōkua Award for extraordinary leadership and service to the Hāna community. As Uncle John joins the lei of generations, let us carry together— and lift on high—the torch of aloha that shone so brightly within him, illuminating a future of abundance for the generations to come.

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Kīpahulu Moku CBSFA Protecting our Ocean Resources Contributed By: Kīpahulu 'Ohana

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We seek to honor the traditional practices of our Kūpuna, to protect our resources for our mo'opuna, and to perpetuate our Hawaiian subsistence lifestyle.

PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter

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verharvesting, harvesting out of season during spawning times, and harvesting individuals that are either too small or too large—these are some of the unsustainable activities that led the Kīpahulu ‘Ohana to take action in an effort to protect Kīpahulu’s fisheries. Thirty to forty years ago, local fishers described the abundance of the ocean, noting that fish would “come up to smell your spear” and “papio would come when you snap under water.” Since then, resources have been observed to decline, suggesting room for improved management. With input from kūpuna, fishermen, community members, scientists, managers, and teachers, we developed our Mālama I Ke Kai plan in 2012, identifying species that are most important to our Kīpahulu community, what threats face them, what kind of protection we would like to see happen instead, and a plan of action to reach our goals. One of the priority actions identified in the Mālama I Ke Kai plan was the designation of

Kīpahulu moku as a CommunityBased Subsistence Fishing Area (CBSFA). We’ve been working toward this goal for the last ten years. With site visits, biological surveys, and many community meetings and talk story sessions, we developed a proposed set of rules to protect Kīpahulu’s fisheries. In 2019, we formally submitted the proposed Kīpahulu Moku CBSFA rules and management plan to the Division of Aquatic Resources. Hawaiʻi’s CBSFA designation formally recognizes local communities as valued partners in co-managing natural resources, and is the only state fisheries management designation that reaffirms and protects traditional and customary practices for subsistence and culture. The CBSFA will span roughly 5.7 miles of shoreline from Pua‘aulu‘u Stream to Kalepa Stream (the Kīpahulu moku boundaries) out to a 60-meter depth. The rules will also establish a fish sanctuary in Kukui Bay, and will make the previously voluntary ‘Opihi Rest Area, adjacent to the National Park campground, into a rule.

Our focus is on education and outreach, so that fishers understand the reasons behind these rules—to help protect our fisheries for the future—and will comply because they want to be lawai‘a pono. Because we have continued to seek input on these proposed rules, we are moving closer to the State’s formal administrative rule-making process. On June 7, the Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) held a public scoping meeting, and received some very constructive comments. The next step is for the community and DAR to finalize the proposed rules package and send it to the Board of Land and Natural Resources, who will approve a formal public hearing; then it will go back to BLNR for final approval. We seek to honor the traditional practices of our kūpuna, to protect our resources for our mo‘opuna, and to perpetuate our Hawaiian subsistence lifestyle. We hope to serve as an example for other communities in Maui Hikina and beyond who share similar challenges and concerns and seek to be proactive in protecting their resources and Hawaiian ways of life.

Photo Credit: Kīpahulu 'Ohana

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Some highlights of the Kīpahulu Moku CBSFA proposed rules include: • 10 total finfish bag limit (per person per day) • Adding a maximum size or “slot limit” for ‘ōmilu and moi to protect the largest “prime spawners” with the greatest reproductive capacity • ‘Akule non-commercial take only • Extending the closed season for moi from May to September, to adjust for changing spawning seasons due to climate change • Max 2 lines deployed per person, with max 2 hooks per line • No taking or possession of marine life while night diving To view the complete CBSFA proposed rules package, management plan and other supporting information, please visit kipahulu.org/cbsfa.

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PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter

Photo Credit: Kīpahulu 'Ohana

Follow us on Instagram and Facebook @kipahuluohana.


Wāhine By Kamalama Mick

I Am

By Kamalama Mick

I am from the lei, from the rocks and the heiau I am from Manawainui The laua'e and the hau I am from the determination and stamina of my two clans The ocean The salt And the wind and water I am from the words of my family: “Don’t worry, be happy” And “Be yourself no matter what” The Kaupō pancakes my father makes from scratch And the time my name came to my parents in a song I will become the wisdom, compassion, and generosity of my mother The comfort and belonging of my home and community And the strength of heart to follow the path that I choose for myself The "I Am" poem is a structure of poem used in Kai Camp year after year. Each girl fills in the blanks with things she loves or things close to her, and though every poem follows the same structure, every poem is unique. Photo Credit: Shandelle Nakanelua

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Photo Credit: Anjo Ho'opai-Waikoloa The sun sinks slowly behind the misty hills of Hāna, setting the verdant landscape aglow. The sky is a clear blue, with wispy white clouds drifting across it. The traditional paddling shouts ring out over the waters of Kapueokahi, accompanied by the synchronized splash of paddles. The paddlers are determined; they are strong; they are wāhine; they are in harmony. These young women are from Wāhine Kai Camp. They have come to connect. To learn. To understand. The canoe moves as one…

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eld annually in June, Wāhine Kai Camp is a unique opportunity for young women of East Maui (in middle or early high school) to come together with older wāhine mentors and learn about the ocean, each other, and themselves. Founded by Hāna wahine, surfer, and waterwoman Lipoa Kahaleuahi, as a part of Ma Ka Hana Ka ʻIke's community outreach efforts, the first Wāhine Kai Camp was facilitated in 2018. Lipoa convened a group of amazing, inspiring, and skilled wāhine— Monyca Eleogram, Kaukaʻohulani Morton, and Mikyla Thomas—and together they successfully brought the first camp to life. Wāhine Kai Camp creates a safe and loving space where girls can connect, share, and engage in ocean activities.

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As the camp began this year, the girls indeed found themselves in a welcoming, safe environment where no question was forbidden and they could share their deepest concerns. The older “Aunties,” as they were known to the girls, created an opening circle and passed around a small, local mango; as it reached the hands of each wahine, they shared their name, their home, and the name of a wahine they respected or looked up to. In a way, saying the name of this respected wahine was like bringing her into the circle. Perhaps in other places, this list would be made up of famous singers, celebrities, or online sensations. But here in Hāna, the respected wāhine named were mostly the mothers, grandmothers, and aunties of East Maui. In this way the girls grew to know and understand a little bit about each other. After the opening circle, the girls left Hōlani Hāna (the oceanside cultural campgrounds just outside of Hāna Town that served as camp headquarters) and walked along the coast, alone or in groups, for a beach cleanup. They gathered as much ‘ōpala from the shoreline as they could, then returned to camp with their bags full of trash and their hearts full of joy—a joy that comes from caring for the places we love.

PŌ'AI PILI: Kaupō Community Newsletter

The afternoon was spent paddling canoes and swimming in Hāna Bay. Then while the sun set on their first day at camp, the girls rolled the canoes out of the water, their muscles aching from paddling, feeling satisfied with all they had accomplished. That evening, around a campfire, a “question basket” was brought out, through which the young wāhine could anonymously ask questions about anything. The young wāhine mentors, girls who’ve outgrown Kai Camp’s age limit but wanted to return and kōkua the younger participants, read the questions aloud for group discussion. The topics covered a wide spectrum—from close to home to far away; from day-to-day life to deeply-buried fears; a wide variety of wahine-kine things. With the wisdom of the young and old, the questions were answered or discussed; confusions and hurts were eased. As the sun dawned the next day, the girls chanted the well-known oli to raise the sun, “E Ala E,” thereby deepening their knowledge of Hawaiian culture. As the morning progressed, they left Hōlani Hāna and went to Koki Beach, where one of the camp hosts told the girls a Hawaiian legend surrounding the hill, Ka Iwi o Pele, and the island out in the bay, known as


Alau. Some knew the story; others did not; either way, they were fascinated. Then, as the sun beat down and warmed their skin, they waded into the water and—with the help of many volunteer instructors from Hāna (both wāhine and kāne)—the girls all learned how to surf (or in some cases, added new techniques and knowledge to their previous surfing skills). Throughout the camp, during various activities, wāhine and kāne with professional or local knowledge joined the girls to share their unique expertise and aloha; woven together, their shared knowledge covered a wide range. In the afternoon of the second day, the girls made koko, small wreaths of flowers and ferns for

their hair, printed the bags they were given on the first day, and then experienced a facial massage by Hāna Jungle Spa owner and expert Christy O’Connor. In the evening, fire-dancing by Danielle Comeaux completed the day. The girls watched in awe as the flames whirled through the air, sending sparks flying through the quiet night. On the third and final day at camp, many of the girls had strengthened old friendships and made new ones. The day promised to be filled with as many adventures as the rest of the camp; indeed, the morning was filled with a hike to a special beach nearby. There, the girls explored the tidepools, lay on the sand, swam, or fished, learning even more about each other. As the cliffs stretched overhead, they felt happy that they’d been able to

be a part of the camp…while also bittersweetly sad that it would soon be ending. But they knew that the friends they had made and the things they had experienced would go with them forever. That night at Hō'ike, members of the campers’ families came to celebrate Wāhine Kai Camp together. The girls shared about what they learned; the friends they’d made; the things they'd done at camp. The evening was filled with good food, laughter, closeness, and smiles. And as they left for home that night, these young wāhine were full to the brim with all they had learned and done. The memory of their time at Wāhine Kai Camp will remain close to their hearts for many years to come.

21 Photos by Shandelle Nakanelua


Rural Resiliency

A Message from Councilmember Shane Sinenci

Aloha Kaupo Community, As the East Maui Council representative, I am very proud of the FY 22-23 operating and CIP county budget, and how it represents our focus on rural communities, sustainable agriculture, and fiscal responsibility. In this budget, we were able to fund Feral Animal Relief and Recovery grants, the Kula Ag Park, the Maui School Garden Network, the Molokai Livestock Cooperative, the Maui Nui Botanical Gardens, the Garden and Farm Installation Fund, the Ag Micro Grants program, the College of Tropical Ag & Human Resources, the Maui County Farm Bureau, and the Agriculture Promotion, Tech Education and Apprenticeship programs. We also funded the Maui Invasive Species Committee and Watershed Management practices. For East Maui Nonprofits, we continued to fund the Hāna Youth Center, the Hāna Cultural center, Hāna Arts, the Hāna Business Council, the Festivals of Aloha, Hui Malama Dialysis Home, Women Helping Women, Nā Mamo ‘O Mu’olea, Kīpahulu ‘Ohana, Mahele Farms, and Nā Moku Aupuni O Ko’olau Hui. We also focused on funding efforts for the Pi’ilani Highway in East Maui. It has been many years since paving was done on this rural stretch of highway, and lapsed funding and extended project deadlines has left the highway in dire straits. An average of 600+ visitor cars and local resident traffic traverse this highway daily, and basic maintenance of paving, reflective signage, guardrails and drainage require much-needed funding. We often hear from concerned residents about this at our office and refer them to the County COMConnect website to report these issues. In our budget proposal, we requested additional paving, beyond the regular 2 miles per 2 years formula, to catch up with backlogged projects and to get these roads up to standard. A regular maintenance and paving schedule would be very helpful for this portion of the County roads that has been neglected for so long. During department deliberations on this priority, Public Works Director Molina expressed support and enthusiasm for this priority. He acknowledged the department’s capacity to do the additional paving requested, including 2 miles within the Kaupō district area. The County also continued their funding efforts for the Kalepa road revetment and seawall repairs, the Hāna Fire tanker, and the Old Hāna School renovations. The Council was able to fund the Affordable Housing project at Wākiu as well, and also acquired 17 acres of open space lands in Kīpahulu and Hamoa to be placed in conservation. With this budget plan, we continue working towards providing community driven services and programs for our residents, and we are well on our way to meeting the everyday challenges that the new year may bring.

Ke aloha nui iā ‘oukou pākahi āpau,

Shane Sinenci

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR JUL-SEPT 2022

Bon Dance Festival The Hāna Buddhist Temple Preservation Association will be hosting a Bon Dance Festival at the Hāna Buddhist Temple on September 10th at 5pm. Come enjoy this traditional Japanese event while helping to raise funds for the Temple renovation. The event will feature Maui Taiko performances, ono food, games for keiki and traditional dance. For more information contact hanabuddhisttemple@ gmail.com.

Sunday

Monday =

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Hana Farmers

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Market 3-5pm

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9-12 Church Service Independence Day

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3-5pm

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Full Moon

HFUU Series—Kupu Ka Niu Kupu Ke Kanaka 6:30-8PM Zoom Indrajit Gunasekara & Manu Meyer Register on EventBrite

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14

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16 3-5pm

21 12-4PM

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Easter

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12-4PM 4EverPets-Free Food, Meds, & Vaccines @ Hāna Farmers Market

Mass @ 12 Noon

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3-5pm

First Day of School

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Full Moon

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HanaMaui.com operates as a trade name managed by the Hāna Business Council, a federally recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

3-5pm

To subscribe via email to Hāna Community News and get articles, notices and COVID-19 updates for East Maui delivered to your inbox, send an email to subscribe@hanacommunity. net.

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Primary Election

20 3-5pm

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27 3-5pm

AUGUST

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Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

SEPTEMBER 4

9-12 Church Service

Hana Community Email Newsletter

KCAI Work Day 9-12

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9-12 Church Service

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Manny Domen Memorial Service Noon @ Hui Aloha

JULY

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HanaMaui.com is your portal to Hāna and East Maui, featuring the Hāna Business Directory, Hāna Events Calendar, Road to Hāna information, and Safety and Alerts information.

John Lind Memorial Service 9am Visitation 11am Mass @ St. Mary's

3-5pm

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HILT Nu'u Refuge Work Day

3-5pm

Sunday

HanaMaui.com

KCAI Work Day 9-12

5

Friday

Saturday

1

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3 3-5pm

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Labor Day

Full Moon

3-5pm

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Hāna Bon Dance Festival

Community Mtg 10-12

24 3-5pm

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10

17 3-5pm

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KCAI Work Day 9-12

30 3-5pm


COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION

COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Kaupo Community Association, Inc. POFOR Box THIS 787 PUBLICATION Kula, Hawai‘i 96790

Kamalama Mick

Contact Information: poaipili@gmail.com Makalapua Kaanuha Makalapua Kanuha mekananiaokaupo61@gmail.com

mekananiaokaupo61@gmail.com Kamalama Mick Kauwila Hanchett poaipili@gmail.com

kauwila3@gmail.com

Kauwila Hanchett


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