Hawaiian Airlines 2023 Corporate Kuleana Report

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Corporate Kuleana 2023 A N N UA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T



Table of Contents 2

Corporate Kuleana

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Protecting Our Environment

A MESSAGE FROM OUR CEO

39 Caring for Our People and Community 57 Leadership and Governance 74 Appendix

S A S B I N D E X , TC F D I N D E X

2023

H AWA I I A N A I R L I N E S A N N UA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T


Securing our Long-Term Sustainability As the world resumed travel in 2022, Hawai‘i remained a popular leisure destination. We were the carrier of choice for nearly 10 million guests who boarded our flights to, from and within the islands – bringing us to 91% of our pre-pandemic (2019) capacity. In shifting from rebuilding to sustainable growth, we are investing in our people and systems, elevating our guest experience, and strengthening our finances to position us for success. Furthering our Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) priorities is critical to our business, and I am pleased to share some highlights of our work in these areas.

A DVA N C I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N TA L C O M M I T M E N T

This year we detailed our commitment to net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by laying out a more defined roadmap and interim targets. These targets, particularly those within the next decade, are a rallying cry for our organization to act urgently to address our carbon emissions. And we are taking action. We continue to modernize our fleet with fuel-efficient aircraft and explore low-carbon propulsion technologies, including through our equity investment in a battery-electric powered seaglider being developed by REGENT. However, replacing petroleum-based jet fuel with sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) will be the biggest driver to help us reach our 2050 goal. To that end, we have contracted to purchase 50 million gallons of SAF from biofuel company Gevo, Inc., with deliveries to our gateway cities in California expected to start in 2029, and are studying the commercial viability of SAF production in Hawai‘i with Par Hawaii, the state’s largest provider of energy products. As we work to meet our ambitious targets, we must continue to partner with fuel producers, other airlines, as well as states and the federal government, to help accelerate SAF production and distribution at commercially viable prices. Phasing out single-use plastics from our in-flight service by 2029 is another important goal, and last year we carried 7% less single-use plastic per transpacific flight compared to 2021. We also increased locally produced food and beverage items on our Hawai‘i departures to 32% of our spend, up from 29% in 2021 and closer to our 2025 40% spending target. I am proud of the progress we are making, but we have more to do.

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BUILDING A THRIVING, DIVERSE TEAM

C O N N E C T I N G T H E PAC I F I C , SUPPORTING COMMUNITIES

In 2022, we were delighted to welcome 1,371 new

With North America demand fully restored and international

teammates to our ‘ohana (family) – an astonishing 20%

markets recovering, last year we reestablished flights

of our year-end workforce of 7,108 people. We currently

between Hawai‘i and Auckland, New Zealand, and Haneda,

have no amendable labor contracts after completing

Japan, and we brought Fukuoka back to our network this

negotiations with all of our unionized team members and

past April. We are enthusiastic about expanding our Oceania

offering significant improvement to wages.

presence in May 2023 with the launch of weekly service between Honolulu and Rarotonga in the Cook Islands – a

To develop our future workforce, this year we initiated

Pacific archipelago that shares strong cultural ties with

multiple school-to-career pipeline partnerships to increase

Hawai‘i.

opportunities for students, especially those in Hawai‘i, to pursue aviation and technology careers.

Within the islands, we remain a key engine of the local economy, carrying more than 70% of kama‘āina (residents)

Our dedication to diversity, inclusion and belonging is an

and visitors traveling throughout the state, as noted in

important driver of our recruiting and retention strategy.

our 2022 Economic Impact Report, which also showed we

Today, approximately 80% of our employees identify

stimulated $10.2 billion in economic activity in Hawai‘i,

as racially or ethnically diverse, 48% are female,

which generated more than $600 million in Hawai‘i state tax

and we are committed to building an increasingly diverse

revenue.

leadership team. As I reflect on 2022, I am especially proud of how our teams executed on our priorities while showing mālama (care) S T R O N G G OV E R N A N C E A N D S A F E T Y S TA N DA R D S

for our neighbors in need and our natural resources. Over 1,200 employees volunteered a combined 6,795 hours last

Running a safe operation and ensuring a safe environment

year to support 175 organizations in Hawai‘i and across

for our employees is our priority and core to our values of

our network, cleaning beaches, helping food banks and

Malama (care) and Po‘okela (excellence). Earlier this year, in

protecting threatened species and habitats.

partnership with Intelex, we launched a new, modern safety reporting application for all employees to augment our

I am grateful for their dedication to our guests and

robust safety management system (SMS).

communities and inspired by their accomplishments to make Hawaiian a stronger and more sustainable airline.

Turning to ESG initiatives, our Board of Directors, along with Hawaiian’s senior management, remain deeply engaged in assessing our risks and opportunities. For the second year,

Mahalo,

our Corporate Kuleana Report includes reporting aligned with the Task Force on Climate-Related Disclosures (TCFD), in addition to the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) metrics we have provided since 2020.

Peter Ingram, President and CEO

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Protecting Our Environment

2023

H AWA I I A N A I R L I N E S A N N UA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T

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Greenhouse Gas Emissions Our 2022 Carbon Footprint Total Scope 1, Scope 2 and Scope 3 well-to-tank jet fuel: 2.8 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e)

82.7%

SCOPE 1 DIRECT EMISSIONS (99% J E T F U E L )

2.8 million metric tons CO2e

0.2%

SCOPE 2 INDIRECT EMISSIONS PURCHASED ELECTRICITY

17.1%

SCOPE 3 INDIRECT EMISSIONS FROM VA LU E C H A I N ( I N C LU D I N G O N LY W E L L - TO - TA N K J E T F U E L ) 1

1. Scope 3 currently includes only well-to-tank jet fuel; other Scope 3 categories not yet estimated

Scope 1: Direct Emissions ( T R - A L -110 A .1) The vast majority (~99%) of our Scope 1 carbon emissions result from jet fuel consumption on our flights and we have been reporting jet fuel emissions annually since 2019. For our 2022 Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) inventory, we expanded our Scope 1 data to include estimated emissions from ground vehicle fuels, which represent less than 1% of our Scope 1 emissions. These emissions are not included in prior years’ Scope 1 inventory and would not materially change previous reporting.

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Scope 1, Jet Fuel Emissions: As we continued to restore operations in 2022, we increased Available Seat Miles (ASMs) by 29%, Revenue Passenger Miles (RPMs) by 49% and GHG emissions by 33% compared to 2021. However, our 2022 operations were still smaller than pre-pandemic levels in 2019, primarily driven by the slow return of demand for travel from Japan to Hawai‘i. In 2022, as compared to 2019, we had 9% lower ASMs, 16% lower RPMs and 11% lower GHG emissions. As we evaluate our emissions intensity trends, we consider comparison to 2019 to be important in addition to the year-over-year comparison because of the COVID-19 pandemic’s unprecedented impact on air travel. We also believe it is necessary to show our emissions trends both with and without our cargo-only flights to more accurately describe our operations and progress toward decarbonization. In 2020 and 2021, we operated a significant number of long-haul, cargo-only flights as we adjusted our business during the pandemic. This distorted our emissions intensity metrics because cargo flights drove fuel consumption and emissions without generating ASMs or RPMs. We will continue to provide our emissions intensity with and without cargo-only flights for as long as they remain in our reported baseline. In 2022, including passenger and cargo-only flights, our GHG emissions intensity per ASM increased by 4% compared to 2021 (Table B). This deterioration was driven by (1) higher load factors across our network, (2) more long-haul flying, and (3) the impact of air traffic control (ATC) routing changes in our Honolulu hub. However, our emissions intensity per ASM remained about 2% better than 2019, driven primarily by the increase in fuel-efficient Airbus A321neo aircraft flying. Excluding emissions from cargo-only flights operated in 2022, our GHG emissions intensity was lower by approximately 3% compared to 2019. We anticipate that our contracted freight operation for Amazon will begin in the fourth quarter of 2023. We are determining how emissions associated with that operation will be represented in our portfolio and will provide updates in a future report.

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Table A, Operational statistics (‘000s) 2019

2020

2021

2022

2022 VS 2021

2022 VS 2019

ASMS

20,596,711

7,560,486

14,535,425

18,684,642

29%

-9%

RPMS

17,826,887

4,576,623

10,054,062

14,964,500

49%

-16%

RTMS1

2,378,484

695,012

1,343,983

2,018,383

50%

-15%

GALLONS OF JET FUEL ALL FLIGHTS

270,001

106,225

179,494

239,231

33%

-11%

GALLONS OF JET FUEL PASSENGER FLIGHTS ONLY

269,787

96,950

176,253

238,384

35%

-12%

1. RTMs for 2019 through 2021 have been revised to use the 2022 average of 230 lbs per passenger, including bags, in order to present metric on a comparable basis. 2. Jet fuel emissions calculated based on a factor of approximately 9.624 kg CO2 per gallon of jet fuel. MTCO2e stands for metric tons of CO2 equivalent. 3. Ground vehicle fuel emissions were not measured in 2019-2021 but will be going forward.

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Table B, Scope 1 Emissions (MTCO2e) 2019

2020

2021

2022

2022 VS 2021

2022 VS 2019

SCOPE 1 EMISSIONS - TOTAL

2,598,397

1,022,273

1,727,389

2,304,897

33%

-11%

JET FUEL EMISSIONS 2ALL FLIGHTS

2,598,397

1,022,273

1,727,389

2,302,277

33%

-11%

2,620

N/A

N/A

2,294,126

35%

-12%

GROUND VEHICLE FUEL EMISSIONS3

SCOPE 1 EMISSIONS 2 PASSENGER FLIGHTS ONLY

2,596,338

933,014

1,696,198

SCOPE 1 JET FUEL EMISSIONS INTENSITY - ALL FLIGHTS

PER MILLION ASM

126

135

119

123

4%

-2%

PER MILLION RPM

146

223

172

154

-10%

6%

PER THOUSAND RTM

1.09

1.47

1.29

1.14

-11%

4%

S C O P E 1 J E T F U E L E M I S S I O N S I N T E N S I T Y - PA S S E N G E R F L I G H T S O N LY

PER MILLION ASM

126

123

117

123

5%

-3%

PER MILLION RPM

146

204

169

153

-9%

5%

P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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Scope 2: Indirect Emissions from Purchased Electricity Last year, we reported our 2021 Scope 2 emissions from eight properties we track as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Challenge (BBC) program, including our primary corporate office and maintenance facility, various cargo facilities, and an office building we have since sold and now partially occupy in Honolulu (Airport Center). This year we modified our Scope 2 methodology for our 2022 inventory to include all properties, owned or leased, where we have operational control, including corporate and airport offices, and maintenance and cargo facilities. We measure and report our Scope 2 emissions in line with the GHG Protocol using the location-based method. In 2022, our location-based Scope 2 emissions for BBC properties dropped by 4% compared to 2021 and 11% compared to 2019 (Table C). These decreases can be attributed to reduced operations because of the pandemic, efficiency measures implemented at our corporate offices and at the Airport Center, as well as evolving grid emissions factors.


Table C, Scope 2 Indirect Emissions from Purchased Electricity 2019

2020

2021

2022

2022 VS 2021

2022 VS 2019

SQ FT ('000S)

596

N/A

N/A

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION (MWH)

9,164

N/A

N/A

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION PER SQ FT (MWH/SQ FT)

15.4

N/A

N/A

EMISSIONS FROM PURCHASED ELECTRICITY (LOCATION BASED) (MTCO2e)

6,279

N/A

N/A

EMISSIONS INTENSITY PER THOUSAND SQ FT (MTCO2e/SQ FT)

10.5

N/A

N/A

SCOPE 2 - ALL PROPERTIES:

SCOPE 2 - BETTER BUILDINGS CHALLENGE (BBC) PROPERTIES

SQ FT ('000S)

542

542

542

542

0%

0%

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION (MWH)

9,965

9,248

9,177

9,016

-2%

-10%

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION PER SQ FT (MWH/SQ FT)

18.4

17.1

16.9

16.6

-2%

-10%

EMISSIONS FROM PURCHASED ELECTRICITY (LOCATION BASED) (MTCO2e)

7,503

6,962

6,905

6,641

-4%

-11%

EMISSIONS INTENSITY PER THOUSAND SQ FT (MTCO2e/SQ FT)

13.8

12.8

12.7

12.3

-4%

-11%

Table C emissions calculated using GHG Protocol location-based method. MTCO2e stands for metric tons of CO2 equivalent. Note: We have been reporting Scope 2 emissions for BBC properties, including a building we owned in 2022 and continue to partially occupy, since 2019; in 2022, we refined our Scope 2 emissions to include all properties where we have operational control, and allocate emissions from BBC properties based on occupancy.

P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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Scope 3: Indirect Emissions from Value Chain In 2022, we incorporated our Scope 3 emissions associated with the upstream production of jet fuel into our GHG inventory (Table D). While we have not yet performed a full inventory of our Scope 3 emissions, we expect that upstream production of jet fuel will be the largest category. We plan to conduct a more in-depth review of our Scope 3 emissions within the next two years.

Jet Fuel Emissions Intensity Well-to-wake jet fuel emissions intensity: metric tons CO2e per thousand RTM/million ASM

250

2.50

2.00

200

1.55 1.32

1.38

1.50

163 1.00

152 143

150 152

149

149 148 0.50

141

0

0.00 2019

2020

Per Thousand RTM, All Flights

2021

2022

Per Million ASM, All Flights Per Million ASM, Passenger Flights

12

PER THOUSAND RTM

PER MILLION ASM

1.78


Table D S C O P E 3 - U P S T R E A M E M I S S I O N S F R O M T H E P R O D U C T I O N O F J E T F U E L ( M TC O 2e) 2019

2020

2021

2022

2022 VS 2021

2022 VS 2019

WELL-TO-TANK JET FUEL - ALL FLIGHTS

538,485

211,853

357,979

477,118

33%

-11%

WELL-TO-TANK JET FUEL - PASSENGER FLIGHTS ONLY

538,058

193,355

351,516

475,429

35%

-12%

L I F E - C YC L E J E T F U E L E M I S S I O N S ( M TC O 2 e )

WELL-TO-WAKE JET FUEL - ALL FLIGHTS

3,136,882

1,234,126

2,085,368

2,779,395

33%

-11%

WELL-TO-WAKE JET FUEL - PAX FLIGHTS ONLY

3,134,396

1,126,369

2,047,714

2,769,554

35%

-12%

W E L L - TO - WA K E J E T F U E L E M I S S I O N S I N T E N S I T Y - A L L F L I G H T S ( M TC O 2e)

PER MILLION ASM

152

163

143

149

4%

-2%

PER MILLION RPM

176

270

207

186

-10%

6%

PER THOUSAND RTM

1.32

1.78

1.55

1.38

-11%

4%

W E L L - TO - WA K E J E T F U E L E M I S S I O N S I N T E N S I T Y - PA S S E N G E R F L I G H T S O N LY ( M TC O 2e)

PER MILLION ASM

152

149

141

148

5%

-3%

PER MILLION RPM

176

246

204

185

-9%

5%

Well-to-tank emissions calculated using factor of 1.994 kg CO2E per gallon of jet fuel; life-cycle (well-to-wake) jet fuel emissions include jet fuel emissions from both Scope 1 and Scope 3. MTCO2e stands for metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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Emissions Reduction Commitments In line with the broader airline industry, our paramount environmental priority is to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Over the past year, we have been developing a strategy to achieve our long-term net-zero goal, and in March 2023, we published our roadmap as well as interim targets. We have established a 2035 well-to-wake (life cycle) jet fuel emissions intensity target as well as other targets designed to track the progress of specific decarbonization initiatives. We will report annually on our progress in our Corporate Kuleana Report. We understand that our roadmap may need to be updated and could require more aggressive emissions reductions to align with evolving scientific consensus.

Hawaiian Airlines Roadmap to Net-Zero Carbon Emissions by 2050 Projected Base Case Emissions

MTCO2e

9% Fleet Renewal 3% Operational Efficiencies 4% Air Traffic Control Modernization 10% NextGeneration Aircraft

2030: REPLACE 10% OF OUR JET FUEL WITH SAF 64% Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF)

2035: REDUCE EMISSIONS INTENSITY BY 45%

10% Offsets Target Emissions Pathway 2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

Updated March 2023. Subject to change as underlying assumptions evolve. MTCO2e stands for metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

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NET ZERO BY 2050


Our Emissions and Efficiency Targets TA R G E T

YEAR

AC H I E V E N E T - Z E R O C A R B O N E M I S S I O N S

2050

Reduce life-cycle jet fuel emissions intensity per revenue ton mile (RTM) by 45%2

2035

Replace 10% of conventional jet fuel with sustainable aviation fuel (SAF)

2030

Reduce electricity consumption per sq ft in core1 facilities by 20%2

20303

Improve fuel efficiency per ASM by 4%2

2028

Conserve 3 million gallons of jet fuel through operational initiatives

2028

1. Includes properties tracked through the U.S. DOE Better Buildings Challenge program. 2. From 2019 levels. 3. Corrected February 2024. Original publication of this report included incorrect year for this target.

These targets add to our existing pledge to cap emissions from international flights in accordance with the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA). We remain engaged with the Sustainability Business Forum (SBF), a Hawai‘i business consortium that we helped found to spur collaboration toward a sustainable future for Hawai‘i, and Hawai‘i Green Growth UN Local2030 Hub, a public-private partnership committed to advancing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the Aloha+ Challenge. The SBF continues to develop additional localized Environmental, Social and Governance metrics tracked publicly on the Aloha+ Dashboard while collaborating with public and private sector leaders on the role of data and ESG investing within the context of the Pacific islands. Looking ahead, the SBF has committed to two priority areas and launched the Local Food and the Energy Efficiency Working Groups to drive private-sector action within these two spaces and at their intersection. Hawaiian is actively engaged as the co-chair of the Local Food Working Group. In 2022, we joined the Climate Coalition, an initiative of the Hawai‘i Executive Collaborative, which Our commitment to environmental stewardship is outlined in our Environmental Policy Statement.

includes dozens of local organizations committed to reducing emissions and working collaboratively to accelerate climate solutions. The Coalition provides a platform to drive systemic climate progress—particularly on climate policy and increasing investment in equitable climate solutions. The Coalition’s Climate Pledge can be found here.

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy ( T R - A L -110 A .2)

Our long-term decarbonization strategy focuses on five key areas: sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), fleet modernization, nextgeneration aircraft, operational efficiency, and Air Traffic Control (ATC) modernization. Our roadmap outlines how we currently anticipate these drivers will contribute to our decarbonization pathway, and it is dependent on significant advancements in technology over the next two decades. While we will focus on in-sector measures, we expect that carbon offsets or removals may be required to bridge any gap.

Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) Using jet fuel derived from more sustainable sources has the potential to be the most effective way to decarbonize our operations. We are committed to replacing 10% of our jet fuel with SAF by 2030, and our roadmap reflects a significant reliance on SAF to achieve our 2035 and 2050 goals. However, the production of SAF is a nascent industry; there are still very small volumes being produced and the cost of production is currently 2 to 5 times that of conventional jet fuel. Over the long term, the expectation is that SAF will be competitive with conventional jet fuel at scale, but incentives are needed in the short term to drive adoption. We recognize the challenges in scaling up SAF, and we are engaged with our industry partners, SAF producers, states and the federal government to help accelerate its production, availability and distribution at commercially viable prices. We are currently focused on sourcing SAF in California, which is our largest market outside of Hawai‘i and where the state’s regulatory framework incentivizes uplift of SAF. In March 2023, we announced our commitment to purchase 10 million gallons of SAF annually over five years from Gevo, a SAF producer that plans to build multiple SAF facilities in the U.S. mid-west. The facility that will produce our SAF is expected to be completed by 2028 and reach full commercial volumes by 2029. This initial commitment is an important step forward, but we continue to seek additional supply of SAF to meet our considerably larger needs.

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We are also working to develop SAF supply in our home state of Hawai‘i. In 2022, we announced a partnership with Par Hawaii, the largest refinery in the state (pictured above), to explore SAF production. With Par, we are jointly focused on three areas: (1) conducting an engineering study to evaluate the feasibility of converting a portion of Par’s facilities to produce SAF, (2) exploring the potential to grow oil-yielding crops in Hawai‘i as well as import sustainable feedstock, and (3) evaluating the best policy mechanisms to advance SAF in Hawai‘i. We are making progress in all three areas, and are encouraged by Par’s plans to invest $90 million to develop the state’s largest liquid renewable fuels manufacturing facility at its Kapolei refinery. We are excited about the potential to produce SAF in Hawai‘i, which would support the decarbonization of aviation in Hawai‘i, establish a new green industry, and advance the state’s energy independence and economic development goals.

P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) Emissions Life Cycle

2 Convert to SAF

1 Begin with sustainable feedstock

80% Up to

reduction

in life-cycle emissions*

5 Fly aircraft with reduced life-cycle emissions

4 Deliver blended SAF to existing infrastructure at airport for storage and fueling**

* Compared to conventional jet fuel. ** At this stage, the blended SAF is commingled with conventional jet fuel.

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3 Blend SAF up to 50/50 with conventional jet fuel


W H AT I S S A F ? Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) is jet fuel made from sustainable feedstock rather than petroleum. Some examples of sustainable feedstocks include plant oils, waste oils, crop sugars, municipal solid waste, and agricultural residues, among others. As a drop-in fuel, SAF can be used on our existing aircraft and engines, up to a blend of 50% with conventional jet fuel. The blend limit is expected to increase substantially in coming years. SAF is better for the environment because it has a lower life-cycle carbon intensity compared to petroleum fuel. A fuel’s ‘life cycle’ (see page 18) includes all of its associated GHG emissions, starting with sourcing feedstock, through refining, distribution and combustion. Although SAF and conventional jet fuel release the same GHG emissions in the combustion phase, carbon from petroleum jet fuel had been stored underground for millions of years, while carbon from SAF was recently absorbed from the atmosphere by feedstock through photosynthesis, meaning its intensity nets to zero during the combustion phase.

When all phases of the life cycle are included, SAF’s overall carbon intensity is approximately 50 to 80% lower than petroleum fuel, and it can be reduced even further if carbon capture and sequestration are used. P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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Fleet Modernization Ongoing fleet investment is critical to reducing our emissions. In December 2022, we entered into a supplemental agreement with Boeing to finalize the delivery schedule of our initial 10 Boeing 787-9 aircraft, and committed to two additional aircraft, bringing our total firm order to 12. We expect to take delivery of our first Boeing 787-9 in the fourth quarter of 2023, and begin operating the aircraft early next year, with additional deliveries through 2027. The Boeing 787-9 features innovative aerodynamics, modern engines and a composite airframe contributing to an approximately 20% fuel-efficiency improvement over prior-generation, similarly sized aircraft. Our long-haul fleet of Airbus A330s and A321neos is one of the most fuel efficient and youngest in the U.S. industry at an average age of 7.2 years. We continue to use Airbus A330-200 aircraft – which are about 5% more fuel efficient than the Boeing 767-300, our previous widebody fleet type – on our transpacific long-haul, U.S. east coast, and busiest western U.S. routes, and the A321neo – the most fuel efficient and quietest aircraft of its type – to serve our mid-sized U.S. transpacific markets. In 2022, our fuel efficiency per ASM was 2% better than 2019, and we are targeting a 4% improvement in fuel efficiency per ASM compared to 2019 due to the impact of our Boeing 787s and other fuel efficiency initiatives by 2028.

Next-Generation Aircraft Technologies We continue to engage with airframe and aircraft engine manufacturers to evaluate new low-carbon technologies that may become available over our planning horizon. There are several emerging alternative propulsion technologies, such as battery-electric and hydrogen, that have the potential to contribute to our decarbonization goals. The first advances in these technologies will likely be in the nine to 19-seat range for short-haul flights later this decade. At Hawaiian, while we have a robust network of short-haul flights within the Hawaiian Islands that could be suited for these emerging technologies, these short-haul markets see very high traffic volumes. We currently operate about 150 daily flights between the islands with 19 128-seat Boeing 717s and it would be inefficient to operate the same capacity with significantly smaller aircraft. Based on industry forecasts, we expect it will take 10 to 15-plus years before these technologies advance to allow for more than 100 passengers to travel over interisland distances on a batteryelectric or hydrogen aircraft.

P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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While there are no near-term alternative propulsion vehicles to replace our 717s, we are making investments to help advance promising technologies. In 2022, we announced a strategic investment in REGENT, a company developing a battery-electric powered seaglider. We are also acting as design partner for REGENT’s larger, 100-plus seat vehicle concept (rendered below), which is slated to be introduced some time after the launch of its smaller 12-seat vehicle. A seaglider is a vehicle that would operate out of harbor infrastructure instead of airports and uses ‘ground effect’ by flying within a wingspan of the sea. The potential for ground effect could allow for battery-electric powered operations with much larger capacity over the distances between the islands compared to other emerging electric alternatives. While REGENT is still in the early stages of development of its smaller vehicle, we are excited to support the technology through our equity investment and we look forward to evaluating the technology and infrastructure requirements further. While these emerging technologies may allow us to serve our interisland routes and reduce our emissions, they are not expected to be viable on our North America or International routes before 2050. Our roadmap contemplates a next-generation airplane with jet engine technology that incorporates a meaningful efficiency improvement compared to existing generation aircraft arriving in the late 2040s.


P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

Fuel Efficiency Campaign Our Fuel Efficiency Campaign includes dozens of initiatives to conserve fuel, including regularly scheduled engine washes, single-engine taxi-in and out, using cleaner electric power at gates instead of the aircraft’s APU (auxiliary power unit), and minimizing over-fueling to reduce consumption and emissions. We are exploring additional technologies including software tools to continuously optimize our flying. Our goal is to conserve at least 3 million gallons of jet fuel from fuel efficiency initiatives tracked through our Fuel Efficiency Campaign between 2023 and 2028. We strive to reduce our fuel burn and emissions at every phase of the flight. For example, where possible we take the following steps:

BEFORE EACH FLIGHT On our transpacific flights, we utilize state-of-the-art flight planning systems to chart the quickest, most comfortable and fuel-efficient trajectory from take-off to landing.

TAXIING TO AND FROM THE GATE Our pilots taxi between the runway and gates using one engine to reduce unnecessary fuel burn, whenever conditions allow.

DURING THE CLIMB Take-off is the most energy-intensive portion of a flight, and our systems recommend optimum climb paths to reduce fuel use based on specific routes, aircraft and weather conditions to limit emissions.

WHILE CRUISING Throughout the flight, updated atmospheric data delivered to the flight deck help inform our pilots’ decisions to adjust routing, altitude and speed to conserve fuel.

LANDING We monitor airport weather conditions and communicate with Air Traffic Control to ensure our descent follows the best and most fuel-efficient approach.

AT THE GATE During boarding and deplaning, we turn off our engines and APU (Auxiliary Power Unit) and use cleaner electrical power supplied by the airport to keep our avionics systems running and to air condition our aircraft.

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Air Traffic Control Modernization Air Traffic Control (ATC) modernization (also called NextGen) is a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) program to modernize our country’s ATC system, which would bring fuel savings to all airlines operating in U.S. airspace. While not a specific Hawaiian Airlines initiative, we have included an estimate for the potential impact of the NextGen program on our carbon footprint in our roadmap. While material, the potential is lower for Hawaiian than some other U.S. carriers because we operate relatively fewer flights into congested airports where NextGen will have the most impact.

Carbon Offsets While we are focused on in-sector measures to achieve our decarbonization goals, we have also committed to offsetting our employee business travel as well as offering guests the option to offset emissions generated by their Hawaiian Airlines flights through our partnership with Conservation International. Our offset program for 2022 represents an estimated 2,400 acres of forest protected.

Fuel Use Breakdown ( T R - A L -110 A .3) 202 2 F U E L B R E A K D OW N

A N N UA L G A L LO N S (‘000 S )

Jet Fuel

239,231

Propane

173

Diesel

95

Unleaded

75

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25


Energy Efficient Facilities While emissions from flight operations account for the vast majority of our carbon footprint, we are also focused on improving the emissions profile of all areas of our business. As of January 2023, we have lowered energy use per square foot in our facilities by 10% (compared to a 2019 baseline) and we remain on track to cut electricity use by 20% by 2030 – a goal that we committed to achieving as the first airline participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge. Our improvement compared to 2019 is primarily driven by efficiency gains such as the use of motion sensors, LED lighting, and automatic heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) control valves.

We also work with building owners and airports that prioritize sustainability in their operations. In 2022, due to the photovoltaic solar array at our corporate office, we realized $33,000 in energy cost savings and reduced CO2 emissions by 682,000 pounds - the equivalent of powering approximately 60 homes for one year. 26


Sustainable Tourism In fall 2020, Hawaiian Airlines introduced a Travel Pono program to encourage sustainable and responsible tourism as Hawai‘i began to welcome back visitors after its stringent pandemic-related quarantine restrictions. The program, which is still active today, has equipped millions of guests prior to their arrival to the Hawaiian Islands with information on how to experience Hawai‘i safely and respectfully, shared via our pre-trip emails, website, Mana‘o blog, social media channels, and on-board videos.

In addition to the in-flight Travel Pono video, our guests have access to informative content produced by local partners and ranging from ocean safety to cultural education. We continue to engage with the community and policymakers in Hawai‘i to ensure that we build a more sustainable and equitable tourism economy that benefits our people and places and enhances our quality of life.

REDUCE, REUSE AND BE PONO We partner with the nonprofit Sustainable Coastlines Hawai‘i (SCH) to help inspire communities to care for our coastlines, whose mission is global, which means that anyone can be a part of it. Our new “Travel Pono” blog series encourages guests to travel responsibly. C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

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Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures ( TC F D )- A L I G N E D C L I M AT E C H A N G E Q UA L I TAT I V E R I S K A S S E S S M E N T

In 2022, we performed our first impact review of the TCFD-recommended climate change risk categories, and we refreshed our assessment in this year’s report. We gathered input from our senior leaders and a cross-functional team from various departments including Accounting and Finance, Corporate Audit, Investor Relations, Law, Marketing, Operations, Safety, and Sustainability, as well as guidance from aviation industry experts. The output was a qualitative assessment of the top climaterelated risks and opportunities for Hawaiian Airlines over the short, medium and long term, as well as mitigation and adaptation actions we are taking. (See Top Identified Climate-Related Risks and Opportunities on the next page). To arrive at the overall impact-rating of each climate-related risk and opportunity, we assessed the likelihood of an event occurring against the potential business impacts of the event. We identified risks through industry analysis and discussion with our leadership team. Risk impact time horizons were categorized as follows: S H O R T - T E R M : 0-4 Y E A R S M E D I U M - T E R M : 5-10 Y E A R S LO N G - T E R M : 11-30 Y E A R S

Top Identified Climate-Related Risks and Opportunities The following tables summarize the top climate-related risks and opportunities, including the impact, time horizon, and risk management and opportunity realization strategy associated with each. The Risk Management and Opportunity Realization Strategy columns are keyed to the numbered legend on page 31.


Key Transition Risks RISK TYPE

POLICY AND LEGAL

TECHNOLOGY

MARKET

REPUTATION1

RISK

IMPACT DESCRIPTION

IMPACT

TIME HORIZON

LIKELIHOOD

RISK MANAGEMENT

Policy/regulation related to carbon pricing

Carbon tax has the potential to impact operating cost and/or affect demand through higher ticket prices; however, this could be offset through sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) incentives.

High

Short Term

Likely

1, 2, 3

Enhanced emissions reporting obligations

Regulators and lawmakers are placing increased emphasis on climate transparency and accountability.

Medium

Short Term

Very Likely

1, 2, 3, 7

Mandates on, and regulation of, existing products & services

Domestic emission reduction targets for airlines have the potential to limit our ability to grow. Over the long term, domestic policies could favor and/or incentivize smaller, electric aircraft, and SAF mandates could increase our fuel costs.

High

Medium Term

Likely

1, 2, 3, 7

Substitution of existing products/ services with low emissions options

Upgrading aircraft with revolutionary technologies (e.g., electric, hydrogen) may require large-scale changes to infrastructure and operations.

High

Long Term

Likely

4, 5, 10

Unsuccessful investment in new technology

There is a possibility of unsuccessful investment in emerging aircraft and engine technologies, acceleration of SAF, and long-term partnerships, which could impact our ability to meet our sustainability goals and result in financial loss.

Medium

Medium to Long Term

Likely

4, 5, 7

Transition cost to low emissions technology

The base case cost of abatement for SAF or direct air capture is high.

Medium

Short Term

Likely

4, 5, 11

Increased cost of raw materials

Jet fuel may become more expensive, as SAF may be difficult to obtain.

High

Long Term

Likely

4

Shifts in consumer preferences

Larger airlines may have greater funds for sustainability and marketing efforts. There is a risk that consumers and businesses may opt to fly on an airline perceived as more sustainable to reduce their carbon footprint.

Medium

Long Term

Likely

4, 5, 6, 7, 12

1. Corrected July 2023. Original publication of this report omitted this risk type.

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Key Physical Risks RISK TYPE

IMPACT DESCRIPTION

IMPACT

ACUTE

Increased severity of extreme weather events may impact flight operations and increase the potential for supply chain disruptions in Hawai‘i, resulting in decreased revenue and increased costs.

High

High

TIME HORIZON

LIKELIHOOD

RISK MANAGEMENT

Short to Medium Term

Very Likely

8, 9

Long Term

Likely

8, 91

Climate change has the potential to have a major impact on our business as changes in long-term weather patterns result in sea level rise, more frequent and extreme weather, and rising mean temperatures. Sea level rise may impact locations close to the shore, including airport runways and visitor destinations, which could disrupt our flight operations, affect demand, and lower our revenue.

CHRONIC

Hurricanes, typhoons, and other extreme weather events are likely to become more frequent and intense and may impact our flight operations and the resiliency of our infrastructure. Higher average temperatures may result in payload restrictions, as well as increased fuel consumption and cooling costs, which could impact our revenue, flight operations and operating costs. Aircraft engine performance also deteriorates in polluted air, which may result in increased maintenance operating cost over time.

1. Corrected July 2023. Original publication of this report included incorrect risk management legend references for this risk type.

Key Opportunities OPPORTUNITY TYPE

OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION

LIKELIHOOD

OPPORTUNITY REALIZATION STRATEGY

Long Term

Very Likely

10, 11

Medium

Medium Term

Likely

4

Medium

Medium Term

Likely

2, 12

IMPACT DESCRIPTION

IMPACT

RESOURCE EFFICIENCY

Use of more efficient modes of Transportation

Opportunity to decrease operating costs through the use of more fuel- efficient aircraft.

High

ENERGY SOURCE

Use of loweremission sources of energy

Use of SAF will reduce carbon emissions and enhance resiliency through diversification of energy sources. Potential local SAF production may reduce logistics costs and complexity.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

Shift in consumer preferences

Opportunity to increase revenue by bettering competitive position to reflect shifting consumer preferences toward sustainable services.

30

TIME HORIZON


Risk Management and Opportunity Realization Strategy Legend 1

We are proactively lobbying for incentives and tax credits to accelerate SAF uptake, and we continue to evaluate how offsets and other investments will factor into our emissions reduction strategy.

2

We have reported on SASB metrics since 2020, and we incorporated TCFD-aligned reporting in 2022.

3

We monitor regulatory developments, including those related to ESG, and integrate these into our processes and plans.

4

We are currently exploring SAF offtake agreements with providers in continental U.S. markets and working toward developing SAF supply in the Hawai‘i market. In 2022, we established a partnership with Par Hawai‘i to explore production of SAF in Hawai‘i and in March 2023, we entered into an agreement with Gevo to purchase 10 million gallons of SAF annually over five years starting in 2029.

5

We are engaging with SAF producers and airframe and aircraft engine manufacturers to evaluate new low-carbon technologies. In 2022, we made a strategic investment in REGENT, a company that is developing a battery-electric powered seaglider.

6

We continue to enhance our Travel Pono program introduced in 2020 to encourage responsible tourism.

7

We are committed to reducing our carbon emissions in line with industry goals and continue to be transparent about our impact and progress. In 2023, we established interim targets to support our 2050 net zero carbon emissions goal.

8

We perform preparedness sessions and planning exercises with operational leaders to mitigate the impacts of physical risks. Additionally, we can reposition our fleet to mitigate impacts of extreme weather and consider options for relocating or re-routing flights.

9

We coordinate closely with the State of Hawai‘i Department of Transportation on our respective sustainability initiatives to ensure a collaborative approach to addressing potential impacts of climate change on airport infrastructure and possible mitigation measures.

10

Ongoing fleet investment is a critical component of our carbon reduction goal, and we expect to begin operating our fuel-efficient Boeing 787-9 fleet starting in 2024.

11

We pursue fuel efficiency initiatives through our fuel efficiency campaign.

12

We provide guests with the ability to offset their emissions when flying with us, and we continue to make our products more sustainable, including via our commitment to replace 50% of single-use plastics from in-flight service items with sustainable alternatives by 2025, and eliminate single-use plastics altogether by 2029.

31



Our commitment to a more sustainable in-flight product: Eliminate Single-Use Plastics Onboard by 2029 Use Cage-Free Eggs Buy Local Products

Preventing Waste and Sourcing Local Plastic pollution is a significant threat to our environment, especially our marine life and its benefit to the health of the ecosystem of the Hawaiian Islands. In 2022, we committed to replacing 50% of single-use plastics from in-flight service items with sustainable alternatives by 2025 and eliminating single-use plastics completely by 2029. As of December 2022, our total consumption of single-use plastics is higher than our December 2021 baseline due to an increase in volume of flying. However, when viewed on an individual flight basis, our transpacific flights are carrying about 7% less single-use plastic per flight. We are committed to achieving our goals and are working with our vendors to identify potential sustainable alternatives.

2023

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Our ongoing company-wide waste reduction efforts include recycling of cans, bottles and menus, and initiatives to source compostable products for our in-flight service items, such as stir sticks and cutlery, as well as amenity kits featuring paper packaging. In 2022, we partnered with Mananalu to start phasing out plastic water bottles from our cabins and replace them with recyclable aluminum bottles. Over the first nine months of our Mananalu partnership, we diverted almost 360,000 plastic bottles from our cabins.

HAWAIIAN AIRLINES PARTNERS WITH JASON MOMOA’S WATER COMPANY MANANALU, FEATURING INFINITELY RECYCLABLE ALUMINUM BOTTLES We have remained steadfast in our commitment to source more sustainable products for our onboard service, and our Mananalu partnership helps us continue to phase-out single-use plastics and protect our oceans and environment. C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

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Food sustainability is another important issue for us and our home state, and we actively support local food production. Local sourcing of food both supports Hawaii’s economy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions associated with the shipping of products. In 2022, we committed to increasing our share of spend from local sources on in-flight food and beverage products at our Hawai‘i hubs from 29% in 2021, to 40% by 2025. We include Hawai‘i-made products from companies such as Kona Chips, Honolulu Cookie Company and LaTour Bakehouse, among others, in our in-flight offerings. In 2021, we expanded our partnership with local business accelerator Mana Up to support and promote up-and-coming entrepreneurs from across the state, including chocolate makers, coffee growers and honey producers. As of December 2022, our share of spend from local sources increased to approximately 32% as we replaced several liquor items with locally grown and distilled Kohana Rum, and we are also flying more international routes where we offer a higher share of locally sourced items.

Last summer, the Hawaiian Airlines Foundation awarded a $100,000 grant to Kāko‘o ‘Ōiwi (pictured above) to fund the construction of a wash and pack facility that will be used to process crops grown in the Kaneohe region of O‘ahu such as kalo (taro), ‘ulu (breadfruit), ‘uala (sweet potato) and hō‘i‘o (warabi). P R OT E C T I N G O U R E N V I R O N M E N T

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The Ho‘olauana Wash Pack Station is scheduled to be completed this summer on a 405-acre site leased by Kāko‘o ‘Ōiwi, within the He‘eia wetlands (pictured at left). The 4,000-square-foot station outfitted with washing tumblers and wash tubs will allow area farmers to process their produce to the standard required for retail and wholesale distribution. We’ve also committed to providing monthly volunteer service days at Kāko‘o ‘Ōiwi through our Team Kokua program. Last year we committed to source 100% cage-free eggs (shell, liquid, and egg products) for our onboard catering on all flights departing from Hawai‘i by 2025, and on all domestic flights by 2027. As of December 2022, we reached both goals and have transitioned to 100% cage-free eggs on all domestic flights.

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Caring for Our People and Community

2023

H AWA I I A N A I R L I N E S A N N UA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T

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2022 was a banner recruitment year for Hawaiian Airlines as we welcomed 1,371 new teammates – representing approximately 20% of our 7,108 workforce at year’s end. As we grow back our business, we were thrilled to return to in-person career outreach by participating in over 80 events and conferences and visiting college campuses in Hawai‘i and the Continental U.S. to recruit talented people. Last year, we also entered into two new, separate five-year labor contracts that recognize the contributions of our aircraft and ground service equipment mechanics, inspectors, aircraft appearance personnel, as well as more than 1,500 employees in cargo, central reservations control, crew scheduling, guest services, ramp, purchasing, records, and supply; among others within the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) Districts 141 and 142, and Dispatch teammates within the Transport Workers Union (TWU) Local 592. This March, we entered into a new four-year contract with the Air Line Pilots Association that provides significant compensation increases for our 1,000-plus pilots. We are pleased to report that none of our labor agreements are amendable as of the date of this report.

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Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Our commitment to diversity, inclusion and belonging remains an important driver of our recruitment and retention strategy. We continue to expand our searches for qualified veterans, women and other historically underrepresented groups. In 2022, we were proud to once again lead major U.S. airlines in having the highest percentage of women pilots at more than 9.5%, well above the 5.8% 2021 global average.

WORKFORCE

>80% OF OUR ACTIVE WORKFORCE IDENTIFY AS RACIALLY OR ETHNICALLY DIVERSE

>48% IDENTIFY AS FEMALE

7% IDENTIFY AS VETERANS

D I R E C TO R A N D A B OV E

>50% OF OUR DIRECTOR-LEVEL AND ABOVE EMPLOYEES IDENTIFY AS RACIALLY OR ETHNICALLY DIVERSE

>30% IDENTIFY AS FEMALE

13% IDENTIFY AS VETERANS

CARING FOR OUR PEOPLE AND COMMUNITY

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Educational Partnerships To help us achieve our short and longterm staffing needs, last year we invested in innovative school-to-career pipeline partnerships that broaden opportunities for students to consider Hawaiian as an employer and increase our access to talent, especially in Hawai‘i. H O N O LU LU C O M M U N I T Y C O L L E G E A E R O N AU T I C S M A I N T E N A N C E T E C H N O LO GY P R O G R A M We formed an innovative program with Honolulu Community College to graduate more local students as highly skilled aviation maintenance technicians, a field experiencing soaring demand. Starting in the fall 2022 semester, Hawaiian Airlines mechanics began teaching classes for the school’s Aeronautics Maintenance Program – an arrangement expected to help the campus double enrollment by the 2023 fall semester.

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U N I V E R S I T Y O F H AWA I ‘ I L E A P - S TA R T P R O G R A M A student poses in front of an aircraft used in the HonCC’s Aeronautics Maintenance Technology (AERO) program

We are partnering with the University of Hawai‘i (UH) to develop a workforce readiness program for recent or approaching graduates in the high-demand fields of information technology and cybersecurity through part-time internships. In October 2022, we hosted a virtual informational session with UH to share exciting IT opportunities at Hawaiian and selected four students to participate in the Leap-Start program. Students attended an IT bootcamp hosted by UH prior to beginning work with us in March 2023.

A R I ZO N A S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y S C H O L A R S H I P We are encouraging Hawai‘i students to pursue careers in information technology with the establishment of a $100,000 scholarship fund in partnership with Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business. The Hawaiian Airlines New Horizons Scholarship will provide $10,000 awards each year for up to two undergraduate students enrolling in the school’s Information Systems program, starting in the fall 2023 semester.

E M B RY R I D D L E A E R O N AU T I C A L U N I V E R S I T Y We are excited to have joined the Aviation Maintenance Technology SkillBridge program with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and look forward to the opportunity to have veterans and military spouses who have obtained their airframe and powerplant certification join our maintenance team. Service members who live on the island of O‘ahu can learn more about the program in bi-weekly informational briefings at Schofield Barracks.

CARING FOR OUR PEOPLE AND COMMUNITY

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CAREER AMBASSADORS In 2022, 250 of our employees signed up to become Hawaiian Airlines Career Ambassadors.

Under this new program, we train and support ambassadors who represent Hawaiian at various career events in Hawai‘i and North America, where they speak about career pathways and opportunities at our company. Our volunteers engage with their alma maters and connect with students and community members through storytelling and by sharing their journeys working in various roles at our airline.

G I R L S I N AV I AT I O N DAY In September 2022, our Wāhine in Aviation Employee Resource Group (ERG) and the Women in Aviation International Aloha Chapter hosted 40 girls ages 12 to 17 and provided a glimpse into careers at Hawaiian. Sixty employees from across our company volunteered at this event, where the group experienced our flight simulators, and learned about various roles in technical operations as well as emergency procedures.

O B A P AC E AC A D E M Y In July, we partnered with the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OBAP) to host 16 middle-to-high-school students enrolled in the nonprofit’s annual Aerospace Center Education (ACE) Academy. Over 40 employees and OBAP members volunteered to give students a tour of our operations, including our pilot and flight attendant training facilities.

C H I L D R E N ’S D I S C OV E RY C E N T E R S T E M C A M P W I T H WA H I N E ( W O M E N ) I N AV I AT I O N E R G In August, our Wāhine in Aviation ERG was invited back to support the Children’s Discovery Center in Honolulu with a science presentation and hands-on activity with students enrolled in its summer STEM Camp. The children learned about basic physics principles that allow an aircraft to speed up, slow down and change direction, as well as the important role of gravity. Our aviation display at the Children’s Discovery Center has fired the imaginations of children since our maintenance and engineering team redesigned and renovated the exhibit in 2013.

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HAWAIIAN INSPIRES LOCAL YOUTH TO DREAM BIG AT ANNUAL GIRLS IN AAVIATION DAY Working a job in travel and aviation is as exciting as it gets. For the 8th annual Girls in Aviation Day (Sept. 24, 2022), 60 Hawaiian Airlines employees from across the company volunteered to give a group of 40 future female leaders a glimpse into a career at Hawaii’s hometown carrier. C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

Children’s Discovery Center STEM Camp with Wāhine (Women) in Aviation ERG

CARING FOR OUR PEOPLE AND COMMUNITY

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Embracing our Purpose and Values We tell our employees’ stories to build understanding, empathy and inspiration about working at Hawaiian Airlines. A N E N H A N C E D O N B OA R D I N G E X P E R I E N C E We welcome new employees with a two-day, interactive, in-person “Horizons” orientation program that demonstrates mālama (care) and a commitment to employees’ personal and professional backgrounds and growth. We facilitate opportunities for networking and lōkahi (collaboration), and provide the essential tools and resources for success and po‘okela (excellence) at Hawaiian Airlines.

R E I N V I G O R AT E D B U D DY P R O G R A M In March 2023, we hosted our first in-person Buddy Program social since 2020. Launched in 2016, the Buddy Program is a learning and support partnership for new non-contract employees as they acclimate to working at Hawaiian Airlines. It has created a forum for knowledge sharing, guidance and support of what it’s like to live and work in Hawai‘i.

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E M P LOY E E R E S O U R C E G R O U P S We embrace our work ‘ohana’s (family) diversity and interests by supporting the following employee resource groups: ASCEND (A Support Community for Employees Nurturing Diverse Abilities); Ha‘aheo (LGBTQA+); Network for Black Employees and Allies (NBEA); Sustainability; Hawaiian Airlines Veterans Employee Network (HAVEN); and Wāhine (Women) in Aviation. We have established and supported these resource groups – which have a combined membership of over 500 employees – to give them a voice in implementing our company’s vision on diversity and to inform the development of our roadmap and goals. The Hawaiian Airlines Network for Black Employees and Allies ERG led a company-wide celebration for Juneteenth by working with community leaders to host a series of impactful events focused on educating employees and honoring the historical and cultural significance of June 19, 1865.

Officers of the Network for Black Employees and Allies ERG pictured with Black artist Nanci Amaka (center) during the unveiling of the Juneteenth reflection space

CARING FOR OUR PEOPLE AND COMMUNITY

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HAWAIIAN AIRLINES, AWAIAULU DONATE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE BOOKS TO SCHOOLS, SHARE INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE WITH EMPLOYEES Once on the brink of extinction, ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i (the Hawaiian language) is now in an era of revitalization energized by a shared dedication to perpetuating the language and the knowledge it bears. This passing of the torch typically peaks in February, when Mahina ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language month) is celebrated statewide, including at Hawaiian Airlines. C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

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N U R T U R I N G H AWA I I ’S C U LT U R E Our employees are proud to share Hawaii’s culture with our guests and each other. We offer employee-led hula and ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language) classes, recognize those who speak the language and encourage them to use it with our guests and colleagues.

During ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i Month in February, we celebrate and help perpetuate the language through various company and community activities and events. This year, we operated a roundtrip flight between Kahului, Maui, and Las Vegas (LAS) in which our agents made boarding announcements in Hawaiian and English, and our Community and Culture team taught a Hawaiian language class for our LAS airport employees. In partnership with the nonprofit group Awaiau, we also contributed $12,000 to fund a donation of 272 copies of the book “Ke Kumu Aupuni: The Foundation of Hawaiian Nationhood” to 34 Hawaiian language immersion schools.

GENDER-NEUTRAL UNIFORMS We want our teammates to feel comfortable coming to work as their authentic selves. Last August, our uniform committee of unionized and non-unionized employees representing every workgroup joined members of our Ha’aheo ERG to help us remove gender-based distinctions in our uniform pieces and in our grooming standards.

N U R S I N G M OT H E R S M I L K S H I P P I N G R E I M B U R S E M E N T In 2022, the Wāhine in Aviation ERG proposed and secured a reimbursement option for our teammates who are nursing mothers and need to travel for work. Reimbursement for the cost to ship milk back to their children became an approved expense. This policy takes Hawaiian a step forward in ensuring our mothers are supported while pursuing and advancing their careers at Hawaiian.

UPHOLDING HUMAN RIGHTS In early 2022, our Board of Directors adopted our Human Rights Policy Statement to formalize our commitment to human rights and heighten awareness of these issues among our employees. Human trafficking remains a significant issue for our industry globally and we provide our guestfacing employees initial and recurrent training on awareness and response strategies.

CARING FOR OUR PEOPLE AND COMMUNITY

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We Connect and Lift Hawaii’s Economy In 2022, Hawaiian Airlines commissioned an independent study to quantify its economic impact on the people, economy, and communities of Hawai‘i. Titled “No Kākou a Pau” (interconnectedness) to underscore the ways Hawaiian is connected to the economy of our home state, the study found that we stimulated $10.2 billion in economic activity in Hawai‘i – about 11% of the state’s gross domestic product – and were directly or indirectly responsible for 53,500 jobs statewide in 2022 despite enduring challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Impact by the Numbers

$2.4 Billion

#1 in Hawai‘i

I N O P E R AT I N G R E V E N U E

A M E R I C A’S B E S T E M P LOY E R S

Hawaiian Holdings Inc.[Hawaiian Airlines’ parent company]

Forbes 2022 America’s Best Employers

7,158 Jobs ONE OF THE LARGEST E M P LOY E R S I N H AWA I ‘ I

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46,330 I N D I R E C T A N D I N D U C E D J O B S C R E AT E D B E C AU S E O F H AWA I I A N A I R L I N E S ICF Analysis

630 Tons

820 Tons

C A R G O E X P O R T E D W E E K LY

C A R G O I M P O R T E D W E E K LY

For YE Sept. 2022 excludes interisland

For YE Sept. 2022 excludes interisland

9.4 Million

4.7 Million

TOTA L PA S S E N G E R S

PA S S E N G E R S

YE Sept. 2022 period

To/From Neighbor Islands for commercial and charters


Total Impact of Hawaiian Airlines in Hawai‘i STATEWIDE

O‘AHU

MOLOKA‘I, MAUI, LĀNA‘I & KAHO‘OLAWE

KAUA‘I & NI‘IHAU

HAWAI‘I

JOBS

53,500

23,300

15,430

5,740

9,030

INDUSTRY OUTPUT ($ BILLIONS)

$10.2 B

$5.6

$2.3

$0.9

$1.4

TAX IMPACT ($ MILLIONS)

$607.5 M

$388.2

$103.5

$44.7

$71.1

Note: Sums are rounded. Source: ICF analysis.

Multipliers of Hawaiian Airlines-Related Activity STATEWIDE

O‘AHU

MOLOKA‘I, MAUI, LĀNA‘I & KAHO‘OLAWE

KAUA‘I & NI‘IHAU

HAWAI‘I

JOBS MULTIPLIER

x1.52

x1.51

x1.55

x1.52

x1.51

INDUSTRY OUTPUT MULTIPLIER

x1.99

x2.30

x1.70

x1.73

x1.73

Note: Secondary effects in this assessment are summarized throughout as multipliers. For example, $1 of direct activity produces a total effect that is 2.0 times greater than the initial spending. So, every dollar of direct industry output generated by Hawaiian Airlines translates to roughly $2.00 returned to the economy of Hawai‘i. Job and industry output multipliers represent, for every job or dollar in output that Hawaiian Airlines directly supports, the subsequent jobs and industry activity that are supported across the islands. Source: ICF analysis

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Stakeholder Feedback More than 90% of our employees are Hawai‘i-based, live in all of the state’s non-military zip codes and are a part of the fabric of the community. Our employees serve on school committees, neighborhood associations and nonprofit boards. Others volunteer at community and cultural events, coach youth sports and are active members of their religious or spiritual congregations.

We value the diverse perspectives of employees both inside and outside of our home state. Company leaders regularly engage with stakeholders, community and business groups, and nonprofit organizations to share news about the airline and participate in discussions on important issues affecting the state. Each year, our CEO and other senior executives participate in “Talk Story” events with chambers of commerce in Hawai‘i and on the U.S. mainland to share news about the airline and hear from stakeholders. Leaders also serve as guest speakers at business and industry events and have joined panel discussions on regenerative tourism, market trends and sustainability.

L I S T E N I N G TO O U R G U E S T S Our Voice of the Customer program surveys every direct booking guest, receiving about 85,000 survey responses each year, and results are analyzed and shared weekly with operational leaders. Quarterly reviews are held with our CEO and senior leaders to review guest satisfaction and identify areas for improvement and investment. Our Consumer Affairs team corresponds with guests about issues after their travel, and regularly reports their feedback to our management team to help improve our service.

E N G AG I N G O U R S H A R E H O L D E R S We engage with our shareholders formally on a quarterly basis to provide business updates. We also proactively reach out to our investors through a variety of platforms including conferences, roadshows, news announcements and individual meetings.

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HANDS IN THE SAND, HAWAIIAN AIRLINES JOINS THE NEW ZEALAND SEA CLEANERS IN CARING FOR O‘AHU’S NORTHERN COASTLINE In commemorating International Coastal Cleanup Day (Sept. 17, 2022), the Sea Cleaners youth ambassadors gathered at the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, an oceanside system of protected lands, marshes and waters managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The group worked alongside 14 Hawaiian Airlines Team Kōkua volunteers and representatives from Hawai‘i Tourism Oceania, the O‘ahu Visitors Bureau and the Australian Consulate-General. C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

Supporting Our Community Among Our 2022 Contributions: More than 1,200 Hawaiian Airlines employees, along with their families, donated 6,795 hours to 175 organizations in Hawai‘i and the geographies we serve. They supported cultural initiatives, environmental conservation and helped care for our most vulnerable community members. In addition to sweat equity, we supported the equivalent of $833,852 in employee-sponsored donations, ranging from travel and HawaiianMiles to cash contributions, to benefit hundreds of nonprofits in Hawai‘i and abroad.

CARING FOR OUR PEOPLE AND COMMUNITY

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PLANT THE PLANES: AN EMPLOYEE-DRIVEN RESTORATION PROJECT ROOTED IN CULTURE In paying homage to our botanical aircraft names, our Team Kōkua employee volunteer group joined forces with the Ko‘olau Mountain Watershed Partnership, an alliance of public and private landowners committed to protecting native forests on O‘ahu’s Ko‘olau Mountains, to kickstart a new restoration project called “Plant the Planes.” C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

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We continued to sponsor a wide range of community organizations throughout our route network and in Hawai‘i, including: American Heart Association, Bishop Museum, Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, Eddie Aikau Foundation, Hawai‘i Agricultural Foundation, Hawai‘i Agricultural and Culinary Alliance, Hawai‘i Children’s Discovery Center, Hawai‘i Food Industry Association, Hawai‘i High School Athletics Association, Hawai‘i International Film Festival, Hawai‘i LGBT Legacy Foundation, Hawai‘i Opera Theater, Honolulu Museum of Art, Kāhuli Leo Le‘a, Ke Kula ‘o Samuel M. Kamakau (Kai Loa Inc.), Mana Up, Maui Chamber of Commerce, POW!WOW! Hawai‘i, Shidler School of Business at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Special Olympics Hawai‘i, the Maui Farm, and the University of Hawai‘i Athletics.

In 2022, we strengthened our support for the Ko‘olau Mountain Watershed Partnership to better support its efforts to repopulate native forests in O‘ahu’s Ko‘olau Mountain Range.

Through our Plant the Planes initiative, our Team Kokua volunteers hiked O‘ahu’s watersheds and helped restore native plants and trees after which our Airbus A321neo aircraft are named. For a third consecutive year, we encouraged 6,447 people worldwide to holoholo (go out) and prioritize their wellness during the annual Holoholo Challenge. The Hawai‘i inspired fitness experience in October invited participants to track their progress with virtual routes inspired by scenic roads that wind through Hawai‘i Island. More than $33,000 was raised for local nonprofit Friends of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, which protects a 32,830-acre parcel on the Big Island that’s home to 29 critically endangered species, including seven birds, one insect, one mammal and 20 plants found nowhere else in the world.

START STRETCHING! Virtual fitness challenge to inspire thousands to holoholo (go out) while benefiting the nonprofit Friends of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge. C L I C K H E R E TO LEARN MORE

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Leadership and Governance

2023

H AWA I I A N A I R L I N E S A N N UA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T

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The Hawaiian values of Mālama (care), Ho‘okipa (hospitality), Lōkahi (collaboration) and Po‘okela (excellence) guide how we lead and govern at all levels of our company. Our Board of Directors and our management team are deeply engaged in Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) initiatives and climate-related issues.

Board of Directors’ Role I N OV E R S I G H T O F E S G R I S K S A N D O P P O R T U N I T I E S

B OA R D O F D I R E C TO R S Our Board is directly involved in evaluating strategies, programs, policies and communications related to ESG. The Board consists of current and retired senior business leaders who have a wide range of knowledge and experience in governance matters, including those concerning climate and sustainability. Additionally, all Board members are typically present for each Board committee meeting, increasing Board awareness of climate and other ESG-related topics. The Board holds regularly scheduled quarterly meetings. ESG and climate-related issues, such as key priorities, strategies, updates and other related matters, are discussed with the Board on a regular cadence. Additionally, the Board is kept apprised of material regulatory developments, including those related to ESG.

B OA R D C O M M I T T E E S While the Board oversees ESG risks, strategy and performance, the Governance and Nominating Committee of the Board has responsibility for reviewing and reporting findings and recommendations to the Board regarding the company’s ESG strategy and for periodically reviewing our policies and public disclosures related to ESG, as stated in its charter. Our other Board Committees also regularly address ESG issues relevant to their respective oversight areas. For example, the Board Safety Committee has oversight of Safety Risk Management processes and governance, including short-term climate-related physical risks (e.g. extreme weather events).

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Management’s Role I N A S S E S S I N G A N D M A N AG I N G E S G R I S K S A N D O P P O R T U N I T I E S

D E S I G N AT E D E X E C U T I V E S Executive sponsors – the Chief Legal Officer and Chief Marketing and Communications Officer – liaise between management and the Board, oversee climate-related efforts throughout the organization, and present ESG updates to our Board at each quarterly Board meeting.

ESG WORKING GROUP In 2019, we formed an ESG Working Group consisting of representatives from various departments, including Accounting and Finance, Brand, Community Relations, Facilities, Flight Operations, Government Affairs, Human Resources, Investor Relations, Law, Marketing, Safety, and Supply Chain Management, as well as external legal counsel. The ESG Working Group meets regularly to gather information related to the company’s various ESG efforts and reports to and receives feedback from our executive sponsors, who report to and receive input from the Board. In 2021, we created a Managing Director-level Sustainability role with responsibility for sustainability initiatives including completion of a yearly climate risk assessment that aligns with the TCFD framework and program oversight for key sustainability initiatives. We review with our Board’s Governance and Nominating Committee the climate-related risks and opportunities identified through the TCFD assessment.

L E A D E R S H I P A N D G OV E R N A N C E

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Risk Management Integration C O R P O R AT E AU D I T A N D E N T E R P R I S E R I S K M A N AG E M E N T ( E R M ) Our Audit and Finance Committee tasks our Corporate Audit team with conducting an annual enterprise risk assessment, which includes identification and assessment of relevant risks and opportunities across the business.

S A F E T Y R I S K M A N AG E M E N T ( S R M ) We regularly monitor and assess near-term extreme weather risks, including climate change-driven events, using our Safety Risk Management (SRM) process. More information on our Safety Risk Management (SRM) process can be found here. Our Emergency Response and Business Continuity teams perform annual drills to practice responding to material physical risks such as extreme weather events. We use a standard risk matrix to assess the likelihood and severity of risks. We also conduct separate business continuity tabletop exercises periodically through the Safety Risk Management process so that departments throughout the company practice and refine their plans.

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This diagram shows the ways in which various functions within our organization work to support the company’s ESG efforts. We frequently evaluate our corporate governance policies, procedures and committee charters to identify areas for potential improvement with respect to ESG matters. To access our corporate governance documents and for information on the members of our Board and management team, please visit our website.

Board of Directors Our Board oversees ESG risks, strategy, and performance. Sustainability is covered at each regularly scheduled quarterly board meeting, including an annual review of top climate risks and opportunities.

Board Committees The Governance and Nominating Committee reviews ESG strategy and disclosures, and reports findings and recommendations to the Board, as stated in its charter. Other Board committees regularly address ESG issues relevant to their respective oversight areas, including climate–related issues.

P R E S E N T AT E AC H Q UA R T E R LY B OA R D M E E T I N G ( 4 T I M E S / Y E A R )

Designated Executives CHIEF LEGAL OFFICER , CHIEF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER The executive sponsors liaise between management and the Board, oversee climate related efforts throughout the organization, and present ESG efforts at each quarterly Board meeting.

REGULAR REPORTS

Management Committees ESG WORKING GROUP The ESG working group gathers information on ESG efforts and includes representatives from throughout the company, including a Managing Director of Sustainability Initiatives.

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Information Security Hawaiian Airlines understands the importance of protecting both our corporate assets and the personal information of our customers and employees, and strives to comply with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and contractual and other legal obligations relating to privacy, data protection and data security. We have adopted a risk-based approach to cybersecurity that is based upon the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) 800-series security standards. Our information security program is evaluated annually using the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, and we conduct ongoing vulnerability scanning, independent third-party penetration tests, and risk assessments of our technology infrastructure. We also conduct enterprise-wide cybersecurity training for our personnel and regularly test their preparedness using real world scenarios. Our team of certified information security professionals operates our information security program and reports to our Chief Information Officer. Members of our executive management team receive bimonthly updates on our information security. Our Board oversees our cybersecurity risks and receives regular updates regarding our information security program and cybersecurity issues affecting our airline and the aviation industry. We collaborate with our peers on cybersecurity matters and stay abreast of cybersecurity issues affecting the aviation industry as a contributing member to the Aviation Information Sharing and Analysis Center (A-ISAC) and the Airlines for America Cybersecurity Council.

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Public Policy and Political Advocacy Hawaiian Airlines is subject to extensive regulation at the federal, state and local levels, and changes in legislation and governmental policy can significantly affect our business. We seek to inform lawmakers, the public and various stakeholders about issues that are important to our business and that impact our operations, workforce and the communities we serve. We support public policies that: enhance the safety and security of our guests, employees, equipment and facilities; provide federal and state incentives to support reducing environmental impacts; promote efficient ground and air operations; and limit burdensome and unnecessary legislative and regulatory measures that threaten Hawaiian’s ability to grow and effectively compete. We conduct our political activity in an ethical manner and report our political activities as required by applicable law. Our Chief Legal Officer oversees our Government Affairs group and political activity, including HAPAC, and our management team periodically reviews Hawaiian’s public policy priorities and political activity with our Board. Our Code of Ethics sets forth our policy on political contributions and related activities. The Audit and Finance Committee of our Board reviews and oversees the administration of our Code of Ethics. Our stated policies provide that no corporate funds, merchandise or service may be paid or furnished, directly or indirectly, to a political party, committee, organization, political candidate or incumbent, government official or government employee, except if legally permissible and approved in advance in writing by the Chief Legal Officer. We generally do not use corporate funds to contribute to candidates, political parties, political action committees, or for independent political expenditures. In 2022, political donations were made using corporate funds in the state of California, below the level that would be required to be reported under applicable law. We established the HAPAC to provide eligible team members an opportunity to participate in the political process. Contributions to the HAPAC by members of our Board and by company officers are completely voluntary and have no bearing on employment. HAPAC makes contributions on a bipartisan basis to support our public policy goals, and without regard to individual officers’ or directors’ political preferences. Factors considered in making contributions include leadership positions, committee assignments and representation of geographies served on our route network. HAPAC’s contributions are not an endorsement of a candidate’s overall political views. We report HAPAC donations to the Federal Election Commission (the “FEC”), and current and historic reports may be viewed at the FEC website.

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We belong to trade and industry associations and chambers of commerce. While our views may at times differ from their positions, participating in these organizations helps us gain insight into issues affecting the airline, travel and hospitality industries, share operational knowledge and technical expertise, and advocate on a collective basis. Senior leaders approve and oversee our participation in trade associations. Contributions to state and local candidates are reported as required by law. Contributions to Hawai‘i state and local candidates are reported to the Hawai‘i Campaign Spending Commission (the “HCSC”) and may be viewed at the HCSC website. Our lobbying activities are conducted in compliance with applicable law. We submit reports on our federal lobbying activities on the U.S. House and Senate websites, which may be viewed at https://disclosurespreview.house.gov by searching for ‘Hawaiian Airlines, Inc.’ under Registrant Name. We also file lobbying activity reports with state and local agencies, as required by law. We submit reports on our Hawai‘i state lobbying activities on the Hawai‘i State Ethics Commission website annually. Our lobbying activities and HAPAC’s contributions are regularly reviewed by outside counsel for compliance with applicable laws. Our primary trade association memberships in 2022, together with the amount of our 2022 dues attributed to lobbying activities by each organization, are listed below: A I R L I N E S F O R A M E R I C A : $254,400 I N T E R N AT I O N A L A I R T R A N S P O R T A S S O C I AT I O N : $2,744 C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E H AWA I ‘ I : $696 We contribute dues to our trade associations with the understanding that they will not be used for independent campaign expenditures or contributions to federal, state or local candidates or political party committees.

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A Culture of Safety ( T R - A L -540 A .1) M A N AG I N G S A F E T Y We have an unwavering commitment to safety, which starts at the top with our president and CEO, who is the executive directly accountable for safety. The Safety Committee of the Board oversees our commitment to maintain and promote a culture of safety, adopt best practices to produce industry leading safety performance, and to ensure our highest priority is the safety and security of our guests and employees. Our Safety department coordinates safety programs across our operations and monitors safety performance and compliance. Employees at every level – from pilots, flight attendants, dispatchers and maintenance technicians to ground support employees at airports and offices – are responsible for identifying hazards, promoting safety awareness, complying with regulations and adhering to published procedures. We hold a systemwide briefing each morning to review any operational safety matters, and employees across the organization are encouraged to report potential concerns through a confidential system without fear of reprisal.

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H AWA I I A N A I R L I N E S S A F E T Y M A N AG E M E N T SYS T E M ( S M S ) SMS is an FAA-mandated, formal, top-down, organization-wide approach to effectively managing safety risk and controls.

Earlier this year, in partnership with Intelex, we launched a new, modern safety program customized to enhance our safety reporting, safety assurance, and safety data capabilities in support of our robust SMS. SMS gives airlines a set of business processes and management tools to examine data gathered from operations, isolate trends that may be precursors to incidents or accidents and take steps to mitigate risk. Key elements of our SMS are set out below. POLICY Our Safety Policy, which can be found here, is the foundation of our SMS. It is broadly communicated across the company to promote employee awareness of our safety culture and objectives and the methods and organizational structures that make it possible to maintain an effective SMS. STRUCTURE We maintain an internal governance structure for ongoing oversight of safety through an Integrated Safety Review Board (ISRB) and department-specific Safety Review Boards (SRB). The ISRB is composed of the Chief Operating Officer, Chief Revenue Officer, Senior Vice President of Technical Operations, as well as vice presidents and managing directors of all operations Departments, and reports to the Accountable Executive – the CEO. The ISRB is responsible for company-wide safety decisions. The six operational departments – Flight Operations, Airport Operations, Dispatch, Maintenance & Engineering, In-Flight and Cargo – have each established an SRB to provide safety oversight and regularly review risk acceptance, mitigation and prevention. TRAINING We provide crewmembers and operational leaders with the training and tools to maintain the SMS within their area of responsibility. This includes training in change management, safety risk management, risk analysis and acceptance procedures, and specialized SMS leadership training for members of each SRB.

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Safety Risk Management (SRM) SRM is our formal process for assessing risks, including the actions required to mitigate those risks. We use specialized risk analysis tools to evaluate the probability and severity of adverse safety outcomes and determine the resources needed to prevent or mitigate them. Each SRM risk assessment identifies a crew leader or committee to either accept or direct actions to mitigate the risk. Our SRM process also includes procedures for communicating changes throughout the company, notifying key stakeholders and technical subject-matter experts, and identifying hazards related to those changes. Identified hazards are addressed through the Quality Assurance program described below.

Safety Programs: F L I G H T O P E R AT I O N A L Q UA L I T Y A S S U R A N C E ( F O QA ) FOQA is a flight data analysis program that monitors flight and aircraft trends, and screens for significant events requiring further analysis.

S A F E T Y H OT L I N E Our Safety department maintains a hotline staffed 24 hours per day, seven days a week. It is available to all employees for reporting safety or operational issues and to receive assistance.

Q UA L I T Y A S S U R A N C E Our internal evaluation program provides continuous oversight of safety regulations and best practices and reviews hazards identified through our SMS. Quality Assurance reports are made to our Safety leadership and to executives via the ISRB as appropriate.

AV I AT I O N S A F E T Y AC T I O N P R O G R A M ( A S A P ) ASAP encourages voluntary reporting of safety issues and events by pilots, aircraft technicians and dispatchers. Employees who submit reports accepted into ASAP are protected from FAA Enforcement Action.

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I N T E R N A L AU D I T S BY O P E R AT I O N A L D E PA R T M E N T S We maintain several internal audit programs that provide oversight of internal procedural compliance in various departments including flight operations, airport operations, dispatch, maintenance and engineering, in-flight, and cargo. These include the Internal Evaluation Program (IEP), Continual Airworthiness and Surveillance System (CASS) for Technical Operations and a Line Check program for Flight Operations.

E X T E R N A L AU D I T S Our SMS, and the airline, are audited externally every two years by the International Air Transportation Association (IATA) Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) program as well as by the U.S. Department of Defense. Additionally, we participate in annual Codeshare Partner Airline Audits, and are routinely audited through the FAA’s Certificate Management Office.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND BUSINESS CONTINUITY (ERBC) Our Emergency Response and Business Continuity (ERBC) teams maintain the company’s Emergency Operations Plan and continuously assess the company’s overall emergency response readiness. We conduct corporate and department level exercises to ensure our people, technology and processes are capable of responding to aviation, man-made and natural disaster events. Our ERBC teams work with individual departments to develop their business continuity plans, ensuring we are ready to recover from the entire range of possible disruptions, including man-made and weather-related events, with minimal impact to our operations and our guests. Our goal is to ensure that we are prepared to take care of our employees and our guests efficiently and compassionately in any situation.

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Occupational Health and Safety We closely monitor our safety performance through a variety of metrics including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Recordable Injury Incidence Rate. Direct engagement with our 24/7 Clinical Nurse Consultation group, our insurance provider, and weekly departmental oversight enables us to quickly learn the root causes of injury and remediate future incidents.

ACTIVITY METRIC

2019

2020

2021

2022

OSHA RECORDABLE INJURY RATE* *Injuries per 200,000 hours worked

9.12

5.41

6.31

5.41

Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Waste We are considered a small-quantity* generator of hazardous waste according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and we adhere to all county, state and federal regulations concerning our hazardous waste disposal program.

ACTIVITY METRIC

2019

2020

2021

2022

TOTAL HAZARDOUS WASTE** GENERATION (LBS)

6,040

9,405

6,625

3,575

TOTAL NON-HAZARDOUS WASTE*** GENERATION (LBS)

133,558

90,568

80,532

72,237

*categories include very-small, small and large **hazardous waste is defined as waste that appears on one of the four RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) hazardous waste lists (the F-list, K-list, P-list, or U-list) or that exhibits one or more of four hazardous waste characteristics: ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity or toxicity ***non-hazardous waste is defined as any waste that does not exhibit any of the characteristics of ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity or toxicity and is excluded from classification as a solid waste

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Moving Forward Our ESG commitment runs deep and is core to our values. We will continue to:

Build on our initiatives and investments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions Enhance our Task Force on Climate-related Financial disclosures Deepen our engagement with stakeholders and partners to accelerate the development of policy and infrastructure critical to our carbon reduction goals Advance our diversity, inclusion and belonging initiatives 73


Appendix S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y AC C O U N T I N G S TA N DA R D S B OA R D ( S A S B ) – A I R L I N E S

Table 1 S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y D I S C LO S U R E TO P I C S A N D AC C O U N T I N G M E T R I C S

TOPIC

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

LABOR PRACTICES

COMPETITIVE BEHAVIOR

ACCIDENT & SAFETY MANAGEMENT

ACCOUNTING METRIC

CATEGORY

UNIT OF MEASURE

CODE

Gross global Scope 1 emissions

Quantitative

Metric tons (t) CO2-e

TR-AL-110a.1

Discussion of long-term and short-term strategy or plan to manage Scope 1 emissions, emissions reduction targets, and an analysis of performance against those targets

Discussion and Analysis

N/A

TR-AL-110a.2

(1) Total fuel consumed, (2) percentage alternative, (3) percentage sustainable

Quantitative

Gigajoules (GJ), Percentage (%)

TR-AL-110a.3

Percentage of active workforce covered under collective bargaining agreements

Quantitative

Percentage (%)

TR-AL-310a.1

(1) Number of work stoppages and (2) total days idle

Quantitative

Number, Days Idle

TR-AL-310a.2

Total amount of monetary losses as a result of legal proceedings associated with anti-competitive behavior regulations

Quantitative

Reporting Currency

TR-AL-520a.1

Descriptions of implementation and outcomes of a Safety Management System

Discussion and Analysis

N/A

TR-AL-540a.1

Number of aviation accidents

Quantitative

Number

TR-AL-540a.2

Number of governmental enforcement actions of aviation safety regulations

Quantitative

Number

TR-AL-540a.3

Table 2, Activity Metrics

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ACTIVITY METRIC

2022

CODE

AVAILABLE SEAT MILES (ASMS) (IN ‘000S)

18,684,642

TR-AL-000.A

PASSENGER LOAD FACTOR

80.1%

TR-AL-000.B

REVENUE PASSENGER MILES (RPM) (IN ‘000S)

14,964,500

TR-AL-000.C

REVENUE TON MILES (RTM) (IN ‘000S)

2,018,383

TR-AL-000.D

NUMBER OF DEPARTURES

77,011

TR-AL-000.E

AVERAGE AGE OF FLEET

11.4 years

TR-AL-000.F


TA S K F O R C E O N C L I M AT E - R E L AT E D F I N A N C I A L D I S C LO S U R E S ( TC F D ) I N D E X

SECTION

TCFD RECOMMENDED DISCLOSURE

DISCLOSURE LOCATION

Describe the board’s oversight of climate-related risks and opportunities.

Board of Directors Role in Oversight of ESG Risks and Opportunities

Describe management’s role in assessing and managing climate-related risks and opportunities.

Management’s Role in Assessing and Managing ESG Risks and Opportunities

Describe the climate-related risks and opportunities the organization has identified over the short, medium, and long term.

Top Identified Climate-Related Risks and Opportunities

Describe the impact of climate-related risks and opportunities on the organization’s businesses, strategy, and financial planning.

Environmental Sustainability Strategy; Top Identified Climate-Related Risks and Opportunities

GOVERNANCE

STRATEGY

Describe the resilience of the organization’s strategy, taking into consideration different climate-related scenarios, including a 2°C or lower scenario.

RISK MANAGEMENT

METRICS AND TARGETS

Describe the organization’s processes for identifying and assessing climate-related risks.

Qualitative Climate Change Risk Assessment

Describe the organization’s processes for managing climate-related risks.

Risk Mitigation

Describe how processes for identifying, assessing, and managing climate-related risks are integrated into the organization’s overall risk management.

Risk Management Integration

Disclose the metrics used by the organization to assess climate-related risks and opportunities in line with its strategy and risk management process.

Emissions Reduction Commitments

Disclose Scope 1, Scope 2, and, if appropriate, Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the related risks.

Scope 1 GHG emissions; Scope 2 GHG emissions

Describe the targets used by the organization to manage climate-related risks and opportunities and performance against targets.

Emission Reduction Commitments

APPENDIX

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Labor Practices ( T R - A L -310 A .1) The percentage of Hawaiian Airlines employees under collective bargaining agreements for the past four years is as follows:

YEAR

# OF ACTIVE EMPLOYEES

PERCENTAGE OF EMPLOYEES UNDER COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENTS

2022

7,108

81%

2021

6,674

82%

2020

5,278

79%

2019

7,437

83%

N U M B E R O F W O R K S TO P PAG E S A N D TOTA L DAYS I D L E ( T R - A L -310 A .2) Hawaiian Airlines has not had any work stoppages, strikes or idle days in its 94-year history.

Competitive Behavior ( T R - A L -520 A .1) Hawaiian Airlines had no anticompetitive behavior claims or lawsuits in the reporting period (2022).

Accident & Safety Management N U M B E R O F A C C I D E N T S ( T R - A L -540 A .2) In 2022, Hawaiian Airlines had one incident (Airbus A330 pitch trim anomaly) resulting in no injuries or aircraft damage, and one accident (Airbus A330 severe turbulence) resulting in six (6) serious injuries, as defined according to Annex 13 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Convention on International Civil Aviation. G OV E R N M E N TA L E N F O R C E M E N T AC T I O N S O F AV I AT I O N S A F E T Y R E G U L AT I O N S ( T R - A L -540 A .3) Hawaiian Airlines had no material government enforcement actions in 2022 from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) or the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), or equivalent national authority relating to aviation safety events, which cover categories that include but are not limited to aircraft maintenance, transportation of hazardous materials, drug testing, records and reports, training and noise.

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C O R P O R AT E K U L E A N A / 2023 A N N UA L S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T


Articles inside

Appendix

2min
pages 39-40

Safety Risk Management (SRM)

2min
pages 36-38

A Culture of Safety

1min
page 35

Information Security Public Policy and Political Advocacy

3min
pages 33-34

Risk Management Integration

1min
page 32

Board of Directors’ Role

1min
page 31

Supporting Our Community

1min
pages 28-30

Stakeholder Feedback

1min
page 28

We Connect and Lift Hawaii’s Economy

1min
page 27

Embracing our Purpose and Values

2min
pages 25-26

Educational Partnerships

3min
pages 23-25

Caring for Our People and Community

1min
pages 21-22

Our commitment to a more sustainable in-flight product:

2min
pages 18-20

Risk Management and Opportunity Realization Strategy Legend

1min
page 17

Top Identified Climate-Related Risks and Opportunities

2min
pages 16-17

Sustainable Tourism

1min
page 15

Air Traffic Control Modernization

1min
page 14

Fuel Efficiency Campaign

1min
page 13

Next-Generation Aircraft Technologies

1min
pages 12-13

Fleet Modernization

1min
page 12

Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) Emissions Life Cycle

1min
page 11

Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF)

1min
page 10

Our Emissions and Efficiency Targets

1min
page 9

Emissions Reduction Commitments

1min
page 9

Scope 3: Indirect Emissions from Value Chain

1min
page 8

Scope 2: Indirect Emissions from Purchased Electricity

1min
page 7

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Our

2min
pages 5-6

Securing our Long-Term Sustainability

3min
pages 3-4

Appendix

2min
pages 43-44

Safety Risk Management (SRM)

2min
pages 40-41

A Culture of Safety

1min
page 39

Information Security Public Policy and Political Advocacy

3min
pages 37-38

Risk Management Integration

1min
page 36

Board of Directors’ Role

1min
page 35

Supporting Our Community

1min
pages 32-34

Stakeholder Feedback

1min
page 32

We Connect and Lift Hawaii’s Economy

1min
page 31

Embracing our Purpose and Values

2min
pages 29-30

Educational Partnerships

3min
pages 27-29

Caring for Our People and Community

1min
pages 25-26

Preventing Waste and Sourcing Local

2min
pages 22-24

Risk Management and Opportunity Realization Strategy Legend

1min
page 21

Top Identified Climate-Related Risks and Opportunities

2min
pages 20-21

Sustainable Tourism

1min
page 19

Air Traffic Control Modernization

1min
page 18

Fuel Efficiency Campaign

1min
page 17

Next-Generation Aircraft Technologies

1min
pages 16-17

Fleet Modernization

1min
page 16

Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) Emissions Life Cycle

1min
page 15

Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF)

1min
page 14

Our Emissions and Efficiency Targets

1min
page 13

Emissions Reduction Commitments

1min
page 13

Scope 3: Indirect Emissions from Value Chain

1min
page 12

Scope 2: Indirect Emissions from Purchased Electricity

1min
page 11

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Our

2min
pages 9-10

Securing our Long-Term Sustainability

3min
pages 7-8
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