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your news, your views April/May 2016 issue 52

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AUSTRALIA’S HIGHEST CIRCULATING LIQUOR INDUSTRY MAGAZINE


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CREDITS PUBLISHER the drinks association

Editor’s Note

www.drinkscentral.com.au

WELCOME TO THE APRIL/MAY EDITION OF DRINKS TRADE – ISSUE 52.

All enquiries to: the drinks association Locked Bag 4100, Chatswood NSW 2067 ABN 26 001 376 423 The views expressed in drinks trade are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily those of the magazine or the drinks association. Copyright is held by the drinks association and reproduction in whole or in part, without prior consent, is not permitted.

Other drinks association publications include: drinks bulletin drinksbulletin.com.au drinks guide drinksguide.com.au drinks yearbook

EDITORIAL PUBLISHING EDITOR Ashley Pini .......................... ashley@hipmedia.com.au ASSOCIATE EDITOR Hannah Sparks...................... hannah@hipmedia.com.au EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Mary Parbery.................... mary@hipmedia.com.au INTERN Michelle Manus INTERN Sage Speaks CONTRIBUTORS Catherine DeVrye, John Field, Ken Gargett, Mal Higgs, Peter Cox, Ray Jordan

DESIGN ART DIRECTOR Evelyn Rueda ................................ evelyn@hipmedia.com.au SENIOR DESIGNER Ryan Salcedo ......................... ryan@hipmedia.com.au

ADVERTISING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Eoghan Hennessy ......................eoghan@hipmedia.com.au NATIONAL SALES MANAGER Chris Wheeler.......................chris@hipmedia.com.au PRODUCTION MANAGER Sasha Falloon ................ sasha@hipmedia.com.au

Produced and contract published by:

Director: Ashley Pini ACCOUNTS: accounts@hipmedia.com.au 169 Blues Point Road, McMahons Point NSW 2060 Ph: 02 9492 7999 | www.hipmedia.com.au | facebook.com/ drinksmedia ABN: 42 126 291 914

A

ADVANTAGE australia

WELCOME

ar&nks'· association

Tell us what you think and have the chance to win a $100 David Jones Gift Card.

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here are just five months to go until the fourth instalment of the Australian drinks Awards on September 7 at the SCG; the competition is heating up just as the days begin to cool down. There have already been a record number of entries received, but (for all the brand managers out there) there is still time to get your brand involved. Entries close May 13. The Australian drinks Awards are the pinnacle of recognition for the world class talent in our industry; celebrating the expertise, flair and smarts behind the scenes, growing small and large brands alike, and helping create the industry we find ourselves fortunate enough to be involved with. The brands that enter the awards are often the very brands that help grow your business, showing innovation and exceptional market performance both in the on and off-premise trade. Talking about exceptional performance, our ‘Insight’ series – those articles that take a closer look at the businesses that are outperforming the market - this month gets inside the doors of Australian Vintage Limited (AVL) and Pinnacle Drinks. First up is AVL, which is sometimes recognised more for its iconic McGuigan brand. However, the Australian wine business has undergone a period of change over the last ten years and as a result, has grown strongly against a backdrop of rationalisation and fluctuating export market conditions. We sat down with AVL General Manager, Cameron Ferguson, to find out how this business has turned a corner and powered into an enviable position. Our second Insight for April is with Pinnacle Drinks GM, Chris Baddock, who dispels some Pinnacle ‘myths’ and gives us a unique view from inside the business. Of course, we haven’t left you short on features, including Craft Brewpubs, in which we ask how important it is for a beer brand to have a home; the ABC of rum with Ken Gargett; and Ray Jordon explores Western Australian wine. Plus our tasting panel searched through 85 premium chardonnays ($20+ RRP) to bring you our pick of the best. Our fitness guru, personal trainer and drinks industry brand ambassador, John Field, was due to bring us his 40K check up article when events overtook and, sadly, instead has focused on early intervention and the passing of Martin ‘Marty’ McCormack, known to some of us as the Bundy Brand Manager, based out of Melbourne. Turn to page 46 for some really important suggestions on remaining healthy in the drinks industry. Cheers, Ashley Pini Publishing Editor – Hip Media

The drinks association and Advantage Trade Survey is your chance to provide clear feedback to Australia's largest liquor industry suppliers. This is the only official survey operated directly by the drinks association and therefore is used by all association members.

It takes just 5-10 minutes to fill in this confidential survey and on completion, your name will be entered into a prize draw to win one of 25x $100 David Jones Gift Cards.

Enter now at

www.drinkssurvey.com.au For further details contact Tel: 02 8282 0000 Leigh Wulff: lwulff@advantagegroup.com Lisa Shelley: lshelley@advantagegroup.com


CONTENTS

Contents

April/May 2016 PROMOTE 06 Australian drinks Awards 14 Mi Casa Su Casa 28 Pinnacle Drinks 30 New Business 79 Trade Activity 82 Eye

INFORM 12 News 19 Wine Senate

What’s the secret to turning shoppers into buyers? BluestaR DISPLAY

20 Special Report: Australian Vintage Limited 36 Megabrands 42 Rum 50 Craft Brewpubs 58 Wine: Western Australia

CONNECT 64 Tasting Bench 70 Wine New Products 73 Beer New Products 75 Spirits New Products

STRENGTHEN 33 State of Affairs: NSW 46 Health & Fitness

10|drinks trade

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THE DRINK of CHOICE THE DRINK of CHOICE THE DRINK of CHOICE THE DRINK of CHOICE. THE DRINK of CHOICE

12|drinks trade

THE DRINK of CHOICE


INFORM

NEWS

PENNY’S HILL WINS BEST AUSTRALIAN RED WINE

FIGURES AND FACTS, PEOPLE AND POLICY, CORPORATE & COMMUNITY

Penny’s Hill winery in the McLaren Vale has won Best Australian Red Wine at the esteemed Mundus Vini international wine competition in Neustadt, Germany. The title was taken by the winery’s 2014 Footprint Shiraz, which also won the top ranking Grand Gold award. Penny’s Hill 2014 Edwards Road Cabernet Sauvignon and 2014 Skeleton Key Shiraz also took home some of the glory, each awarded Gold.

CALLINAN REVIEW RECEIVES 1,856 SUBMISSIONS

INNOCENT BYSTANDER CHANGES HANDS

MOËT HENNESSY TO CLOSE E-COMMERCE SITE

On May 5, Brown Brothers will acquire Innocent Bystander from Giant Steps. Giant Steps and Brown Brothers will be working closely together during the transition. Currently there are plans to open a new Innocent Bystander cellar door within the old White Rabbit brewery site. Giant Steps will continue to sell Innocent Bystander wines at its winery and cellar door until May.

Moët Hennessy Australia will close its direct-toconsumer website, Moët Hennessy Collection, on April 28. In its place, the company will launch a Digital Customer Experience Division, which will work in collaboration with Moët Hennessy’s trade partners. Many retailers complained when the existing website launched two years ago, saying it was in direct competition with their businesses. The company has begun contacting key customers about the new digital strategy and says it has received positive feedback so far.

12|drinks trade

The Callinan Review into the existing lockout laws and liquor restrictions in NSW has received 1,856 submissions. The formal submission period for the independent review by the Hon. Ian Callinan AC QC opened on 5 March 2016 and closed April 4. The submissions addressing the 1.30am lock out, 3am cease alcohol service restriction and 10pm take-away liquor restrictions will be posted on the independent review’s website after April 18. The review will consider all submissions before providing a final report to the NSW Government in August.


MARGIN MANAGEMENT – IS IT UP TO THE RETAILER OR THEIR COMPETITION? By Mal Higgs, Project Manager for the ALSA Retail Insights Project www.alsaretailinsights.com.au

LAUNCESTON JOINS TASSIE WHISKY BOOM A group of five backers led by Chris Condon, former Boag’s brewer and Chief Distiller at Tasmania’s Nant Distillery, have progressed their plan to open Launceston Distillery in a heritage-listed aircraft hangar at Launceston Airport. Production at the distillery began late last year and Condon has since applied to Tasmania’s liquor regulator for permission to sell spirits on-site. “Our casks are predominantly American oak (ex bourbon) and French oak (ex port or sherry) and will all be matured in our bond store in the hangar,” Launceston Distillery said. “Our flagship product will be Tasmanian Single Malt – we will not compromise the quality, as such, the hand crafted single malt will be produced exclusively from Tasmanian malted barley.” Launceston Distillery is the city’s first whisky distillery in 175 years, but Tasmania’s fifth distillery to apply for a liquor licence in the last 12 months. Since March 2015, the Commissioner for Licensing has granted applications to Redlands Distillery in Kempton, Corra Linn Distillery in Relbia, Hellfire Bluff Distillery in Boomer Bay and Nonesuch Distillery in Forcett.

In an extremely competitive retail environment like the liquor industry, it is often assumed that market ‘forces’ determine retailers’ gross profit margins. It is also assumed that the trade considers newspaper advertising of liquor products as the ‘official’ market price for a product or category of products. As a result of these assumptions, it would be easy to expect that these market forces would determine a retailer’s margin. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth. At the end of the day, each individual retailer has an expectation of what gross profit margin he or she will want or need to achieve in a day, week or year. Most now have a computerised point of sale system that allows them to accurately track their sales and profit from individual SKU right through to category and even supplier if necessary. Gross profit margins these days can range from lows of near 15 per cent to highs of well over 30 per cent. The factors that influence these outcomes range from the quantity of full cartons of beer sold – traditionally extremely low margin when sold at competitive prices, through to an outlet that sells larger quantities of single bottles of wine, which generally speaking would be at a much higher margin. We are now seeing many more retailers adopt a far more strategic approach to margin management by managing their ‘mix’ of business in such a way as to improve their GP, while still remaining competitive in the market. This is, undoubtedly, the ‘skill’ of the retailer and something we often ignore in the cut and thrust of the competitive set. ALSA has developed the Retail Insights program to assist in the process of professional development. Margin Management is an upcoming module on the program. Suppliers can also play an important role by providing information to their retail partners on the latest trends and innovations occurring in the market place. It is this partnership between retailers and suppliers that will ensure a sustainable alcohol industry in the longer term.

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PROMOTE

Tequila Herradura kicks off second season of

‘MI CASA SU CASA’ IN AUSTRALIA MI CASA SU CASA 2016 VENUES QLD Eleven Rooftop, Brisbane Blackbird, Brisbane The Met, Brisbane Prohibition Bar, Brisbane

NSW

Tequila Herradura has kicked off the second season of its unique activation ‘Mi Casa Su Casa’ in Australia. The program was the first of its kind when it launched in April last year and a major success, offering independent venues the opportunity to purchase a share of a personally selected barrel of ultra-premium tequila from Casa Herradura in Mexico.

O

livia Preston, Brand Manager for Casa Herradura, Chambord and Vodka at Brown-Forman Australia, told this year’s partnering venues, “Mi Casa Su Casa is our way of getting you guys closer to our brand and our brand’s story.” Herradura is the only tequila brand to offer multiple, smaller Australian bars the chance to collaboratively purchase a hand selected barrel directly from the distillery. A total of 13 venues and 29 bartenders are taking part in this year’s activation, now tasked with coming up with new cocktails and materials to support Tequila Herradura in venue over the following eight weeks. Those who meet their sales targets by the end of the activation will then win a place on a once in a lifetime trip to Casa Herradura and be part of the multi-venue collaboration to select a unique barrel of Double Barrel Reposado. In Mexico, winners will head to the barrel room within the Herradura Hacienda, where a number of singlebarrel reposado tequilas will be presented and tasted with Maria Theresa Lara - the world’s only female master distiller of tequila - and collectively the group will decide which one they like the most. The chosen reposado will then be aged for a further month before being bottled and shipped home to Australia. “We have to change our production to meet demand, but we still keep to the same traditional processes that were used in 1870 – natural fermentation, stone and clay ovens, while staying innovative in order to move with the times,” said Grant Shearon, Casa Herradura National Brand Ambassador. “Just because we are doing things big, doesn’t mean we are cutting corners. You can do things on a large scale, but still do them really well,” added Stuart Reeves, Business Development Executive for Herradura.

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Palisade, Sydney The Eastern, Sydney Mejico, Sydney Tio’s, Sydney

VIC

Los Hermanos, Melbourne Ms Collins, Melbourne

SA

Lucky Lupitas, Adelaide

WA

Bar Lafayette, Perth

ACT

Molly’s, Canberra Winners will be announced in the August/September issue of drinks trade, along with full coverage of the Mexico trip. Good luck to all participating venues. SALUD!


INFORM

WHETHER SERVING CUSTOMERS OR TENNIS ACES, KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE BALL IF YOU WANT TO BE A WINNER By Catherine DeVrye, author of the No.1 best seller ‘Good Service is Good Business’ and seven other books that have been translated into over a dozen languages. The former Australian Executive Woman of the Year and Keynote Speaker of the Year speaks internationally on customer service, managing change and resilience for results. www.greatmotivation.com The drinks industry is a big sponsor of sporting events, so might there be some lessons on customer service?

NAB CHIEF ECONOMIST TO SPEAK AT MAY NETWORK BREAKFAST Ivan Colhoun is Chief Economist, Markets for National Australia Bank and is responsible for the Australian Economics function within the Global Markets Research team. The Global Markets Research team has specialist researchers across the world covering macroeconomics, credit markets, foreign exchange and fixed income markets. Ivan has a long and varied career in economics, having worked for Reserve Bank of Australia; Deutsche Bank finishing as Chief Economist for Australia and Head of Global Markets Research for Australia/NZ; Qantas as Chief Economist and most recently as Chief Economist for Australia for ANZ Bank. DATE: Wednesday 18th May 2016 VENUE: Steve Waugh Room, Sydney Cricket Ground, Moore Park Road, Paddington, NSW 2021 TIME: 7.15am – 9.15am Book online at: www.drinkscentral.com.au/ drinksPayments

Let’s look at the acronym of the word ‘service’ to find out. S elf-esteem How often have you played doubles with someone and when a tricky situation arises they call “Yours?” It’s time to step up to every customer situation and call “Mine!” E xceed expectations Consumer expectations are ever evolving, meaning that we need to meet and exceed them. It’s not always the number one seed who wins Wimbledon, but the up and comers who go that extra mile. R ecover It’s not uncommon to make mistakes, but fortunately studies show that if you satisfy a customer complaint quickly they will become more loyal. Just like missing a first serve in tennis, most customers give second chances. V ision It costs five times more to attract customers then retain them, so you need to keep your eye on the ball and keep in mind a long-term vision, because games are won in the preparation before. I mprove An amateur tennis player will practice until they get something right, while a professional will practice until they never fail. Every provider of customer service has the ability to become a pro! C are A coach cares for a player the same way a service provider cares for their customers and team… a little love can go a long way both on and off the court. E mpower John Akers CEO of IBM once said: “If you always get your first serve, you’re not trying hard enough.” While customer service can be hard, it will be game, set and match to those individuals who recognise that empowering your customers will result in increased net profit.

It’s the candidates we reject that make us the best. Call: Chris Anstee Mob: 0418 627 937 chris@wineandvine.com.au www.wineandvine.com.au


INFORM LEGAL DISPUTE OVER ‘NO.3’ TRADEMARK Australian importer and distributor of Flying Dutchman No.3, Savant Spirits, was recently ordered to cease and desist trading the rum brand by a Sydney-based law firm representing Berry Bros. and Rudd. The law firm argues that the name of the rum breaches the UK wine and spirits supplier’s international trademark of ‘No.3’, which is used for its London Dry Gin. The law firm has requested that Savant Spirits sends them all of its stock of the rum, pulls existing stock from retail and stops importing the product. Savant Spirits says the law firm has also contacted the distillery in Holland that makes Flying Dutchman No.3 and is pursuing the case in the EU. But both Savant Spirits and the Zuidam Distillery wonder why Berry Bros. and Rudd hasn’t taken legal action out on other brands that have used the trademark. “You have to wonder why a large company like Berry Bros. and Rudd is pursuing a craft, small-batch distiller, but hasn’t addressed Bundaberg, Jack Daniel’s or Pimm’s, who have all used the No.3 on their products,” Savant Spirits cofounder Ben Luzz told drinks trade. “It really feels like a case of David and Goliath, where the big company is picking on the little company. It seems ludicrous.” Savant Spirits has spoken with TradeMarks Australia, which says that Berry Bros. and Rudd owns the international trademark to No.3 within gin, but not rum. Savant Spirits and the distillery are hoping this may help them in their fight to keep the name Flying Dutchman No.3. “Even though we have a leg to stand on, if we have to pursue court action, it could just cripple the business,” Luzz continued. “We’re just trying to get good booze to consumers and we can’t believe that something as silly as this, where the average person wouldn’t assume if they asked for a No.3 that they would get Flying Dutchman, could have such an impact.”

SALE OF CARGO BAR & LOUNGE The Keystone Group is planning to sell one of Sydney’s most popular venues. The group has decided to reinvest capital from the sale of Cargo Bar & Lounge into other opportunities. Cargo Bar & Lounge will follow Keystone’s sale of The Newtown Hotel, which took place in February. Executive Chairman, Richard Facioni said, “The sale of Newtown showed us there is currently a strong market for wellperforming, iconic venues. We have also received recent approaches, both formally and informally, in relation to Cargo, so the board decided now would be an opportune time to explore a sale of the business.”

16|drinks trade


NSW: (02) 9478 2727 VIC / TAS: (03) 9249 2700 QLD: (07) 3253 1800 SA: (02) 9478 2700 WA: (08) 9347 2600 NT: 0488 236 262 General Enquiries: 1300 856 759 DRINK RESPONSIBLY


INFORM

THE KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS IN HOSPITALITY By Peter Cox, a CPA with over three decades of experience in financial management for the hospitality industry. His website www.petermcox.com.au has a host of free financial management tools to increase the profitability and cash flow generation in your venue. What is the real key indicator of financial performance for your venue? The most important calculation is not sales per person or even return on investment. They are important, but to get a quick gauge on how your business is performing, you should measure risk. That is, the “Margin of Safety” ratio. It is calculated as follows (go to your profit and loss statement to get the numbers)… $Net Profit divided by $Gross Profit x 100. This simple calculation can allow you to check how risky your hospitality venue is. The result gives you the percentage of sales you can afford to lose before you cannot cover your overheads. In simple terms, it is the benchmark for your survival. The great thing about this ratio is that it can be calculated monthly. So where should your venue be placed? With my two decades of experience, I would look for a result between 20 per cent and 30+ per cent. If your result is less than 20 per cent, it is important that you begin to plan to improve your result. In reviewing the calculation, the result is driven by $Gross Profit and $Net Profit, therefore any strategies to improve margin and control expenses will improve your Margin of Safety. Gross Profit Strategies 1. Reduce customer and staff theft through technology and checking stock levels; 2. Ensure you only pay for what you receive; 3. Check the freight bills; 4. Pick up settlement discounts when you can; 5. Increase staff product knowledge and selling skills to make the addon sale and on selling other venue profit streams; 6. Reduce uncontrolled and unauthorised discounting; 7. Reduce damaged stock;

WILD TURKEY MULTI-MILLION CAMPAIGN Wild Turkey recently launched a new, multi-million campaign in Australia, telling consumers “Greatness isn’t pretty” through a series of below-the-line and above-the-line advertisements. The brand says the campaign aims to emphasise “substance over style”, drawing attention to the quality of the liquid in the bottle and the craftsmanship of the brand’s Master Distillers, Jimmy and Eddie Russell. The campaign also includes sponsorship of NRL Friday Night Footy and the Wide World of Sports on the Nine Network, AFL broadcasts on the Seven Network, Fox Footy broadcasts and ESPN’s multi-sport platform.

WFA APPOINTS ACTING CEO The Winemakers’ Federation of Australia (WFA) has appointed Tony Battaglene as Acting CEO while the board looks for a permanent replacement for Paul Evans who resigned in February. Mr. Battaglene is usually General Manager of Strategy and International Affairs at WFA. WFA has said that Mr. Battaglene will ensure WFA’s conversation with government on its support for the industry and the WET rebate reform continues in the lead up to the May Federal Budget and election.

8. Check your pricing. Your venue is in an industry that has long been recognised as highly competitive and in some locations, over serviced. The Margin of Safety is the most important statistic for your business, especially in a changing market where price is used as a weapon against you.

Whether it’s down the road or across the globe - we move food & beverages, worry free

Air & Ocean | Warehousing | Transport Wine Advert filmstrip 2016.indd 1

mainfreight.com.au/drinks 26/02/2016 5:21:11 PM


INFORM

CALLS FOR CHANGE

The grape and wine industry could see major changes to the way the Federal Government legislates things like tax and funding in the next year, if a new report submitted by the Senate Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Committee is approved. The report, released in February, contains 12 recommendations made by the Committee on topical issues such as the supermarket duopoly, Wine Equalisation Tax rebate, private labels and export grants. By Hannah Sparks

T

he Committee called for submissions and held three public hearings to take evidence in Adelaide, Launceston and Swan Valley last year. More than 40 organisations and individuals took part, to help pinpoint the changes necessary to improve the demand for Australian wine and its competitive stance globally. Between 2014-15 IBISWorld estimated that Australia’s grape and wine industry contributed $1.6 billion to the economy, with wine (excluding the Northern Territory) now produced in all states. Yet figures also suggest that the effects of the supply and demand crisis of 2005-06 are still being seen. The Committee heard consistently of industry downsizing due to recent challenges, including falling profits for winemakers. The Winemakers’ Federation of Australia reported that at the beginning of 2014, the number of producers still not able to cover their variable costs was up to 84 per cent.

Recommendations Met with Disappointment While industry and the Committee point to the same issues concerning how the demand for Australian wine could be improved, not all agree on how each should be addressed, and the Committee’s 12 recommendations have been met with disappointment from some winemakers and grape growers. The national representative body for Australian winemakers, WFA, has submitted its own recommendations and detailed recovery plans for the wine industry to the inquiry. The recovery plan has been endorsed by WGGA and state wine organisations. WFA says it’s most disappointed with the Committee’s recommendation to “phase out” the

“We think the report’s most important role will be to emphasise to Government the need for them to act; to show that the industry is complex and it’s doing it tough, and that the Government has a real distinct role to partner with industry and help it recover” - Paul Evans. current WET rebate. “I think the report and all the reports agree that we need a recovery and the adequate funding to make that happen,” Paul Evans, who was CEO of WFA at the time of print, told drinks trade. Evans explained: “The reports also all agree that the WET rebate needs reform, which is good, however the majority report argues that the rebate should be abolished altogether, which is not our position. We want measured reform.” WFA is asking Government to gradually phase out WET rebate eligibility for bulk and unbranded wine by changing the legislative definition of ‘rebatable’ wine. WFA also wants to see the separate New Zealand scheme abolished, saying it affords NZ producers a commercial advantage over Australia. To support these changes, WFA would like transitional rebate measures for merged claimants introduced, encouraging industry consolidation and benefitting small and medium wine businesses by enabling merged entities to continue to claim the rebates. It is then hoped that the Government would work with WFA and its sister organisation Wine Grape Growers Australia to offer support to affected grape and wine businesses. Evans said that the Committee’s recommendation to end the WET rebate would impact small and medium sized businesses the most. “Those who are out there in the regions, playing a very important socio-economic role in their local

communities. It was the original intent of the rebate to support those businesses and we believe there is still a very compelling argument for it to remain,” Evans said. “Abolishing the rebate without any sort of strong plan B for that part of the industry is not something we could support,” Evans said. The Government will respond to the Senate report later this year. Keep up to date on any changes at www.drinksbulletin.com.au

To view the Committee’s recommendations, visit: www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_ Business/Committees/Senate/ Rural_and_Regional_Affairs_ and_Transport/Australian_wine_ industry/Report To view WFA’s recommendations, visit: wfa.org.au/assets/ submissions/WFA-Senate-InquirySubmission-Sep-15-Final.pdf drinks trade|19

WINE

Wine and Grape Industry


SPECIAL REPORT

INSIDE:

Australian Vintage Australian Vintage Limited is one of Australia’s largest wine producers and the architect of some of the country’s most recognisable brands, including McGuigan, Tempus Two and Nepenthe. But despite brand notoriety and years of award-winning winemaking under the belt, some confusion remains around just who Australian Vintage Ltd is. So, Ashley Pini sat down with General Manager for Australasia and North America, Cameron Ferguson, to set the record straight.

1

TEN THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT AUSTRALIAN VINTAGE 3

Crush up to 8% of the nation’s grape supply

8%

7 Wines are available in

50+ countries 20|drinks trade

The maker of Australia’s number one selling bottled red wine by volume (Black Label Red) - and recently the third (Black Label Cab Merlot) - and fifth best selling bottled red (Black Label Merlot).

International Winemaker of the Year three times

Aztec MAT 14/2/16

4

5

A publically listed company – many people don’t know this – originally listed in 1992

8

2

Owner of the third largest winery in Australia, with an annual crush capacity of

150,000 tonnes

9

Owner of a broad portfolio of Australian wine brands, including McGuigan, Tempus Two and Nepenthe Australian Vintage’s footprint spans diversely across Australian business, from bulk wine supply and concentrate to bespoke packaging and labelling and contract processing

6

10

Fourth biggest global brand in the UK (McGuigan)

The second largest vineyard owner/operator and leasee in Australia


E

ight years on from the McGuigan Simeon Wines transition to Australian Vintage Ltd (or AVL as it is sometimes known), what many people don’t know about the business is that the foundations were built on passionate winemaking families – led by the McGuigans, who have been involved in winemaking since 1869, when Owen McGuigan first started growing grapes in the Hunter Valley. “Sometimes it’s nice to fly under the radar, but it does get a little perplexing when I meet with the liquor store managers and they stare back at me blankly when I say I’m from Australian Vintage. The minute I say the words ‘McGuigan Wines’, there’s a warm nod of recognition,” said Ferguson. Ferguson added, “I always talk a little bit about fact and fiction with our customers. Yes, we are a company that was born and bred in the Hunter Valley, but over the years we have become much more than that, and thanks to rapid expansion and rejuvenation we are now one of Australia’s largest – and fastest growing – wine companies.”

A Branded Shift Australian Vintage’s historical market position can leave you with the perception that the core business is bulk wine with branded wines taking a back seat. Not the case says Ferguson, and a misconception he has come across on a number of occasions. “Over the past ten years, we have been

drinks trade|21


NEW

See life through RosĂŠ coloured glasses Please contact your AVL representative on 03 5051 7999 to take advantage of one of the fastest growing segments in still wine (+19.6% value MAT)* OFFICIAL WINE PARTNER

#tempustwo *Source: Aztec, AU Liquor Scan, Dollars (000s), MAT 13/03/16

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R

TIMELINE Acquire Yaldara Barossa Valley

Acquire Miranda Wines

MAJOR AWARDS • International Winemaker of the Year – IWSC London • Australian Producer of the Year – IWSC London

MAJOR AWARDS • International White Winemaker of the Year – IWC London

2011

2013

Simeon Wines Limited founded

McGuigan becomes fourth largest global wine brand in the UK market

1994

1992

2008 1997

1999

2002 2003

The company transitions from McGuigan Simeon to Australian Vintage Limited McGuigan Wines founded by Brian McGuigan

Tempus Two brand is launched

Merge with Simeon Wines to create Australia’s 4th largest wine group – McGuigan Simeon

strategically growing our branded business both domestically and internationally. In the first six months of FY06, branded bottled sales across the entire AVL portfolio represented 39 per cent of total sales. In the first six months of FY16, that number is 82 per cent,” said Ferguson. There has clearly been a significant increase in contribution to the business from Australian Vintage’s core brands. So what’s driving this change and where is future growth going to come from? “This is coming across the board, both domestically and through export,” explained Ferguson. “Last year, our core brands grew 18 per cent globally and we expect to see this continue as we push to grow our portfolio above AUD$12. We have particularly seen a branded shift in growth for McGuigan Wines.” “We resurrected the Black Label range, which has given us three SKUs in the top five selling red wines nationally – our Cabernet Merlot, Merlot and famed Black Label Red. At the same time, we are continuing to move the anchor point of the McGuigan brand upwards through innovation of a premium portfolio, supported by our first major investment in above-the-line activity and some

2015

2007

Acquire Nepenthe Wines

2014 2009

2012

MAJOR AWARDS • International Winemaker of the Year – IWSC London • Australian Producer of the Year – IWSC London • International White Winemaker of the Year – IWC London

MAJOR AWARDS (IWSC/IWC London) • International Winemaker of the Year – IWSC London • Australian Producer of the Year – IWSC London • International White Winemaker of the Year – IWC London

very unique positioning of our brand, which is unconventional for the wine industry.” Following a successful trial campaign in selective channels last year, the above-the-line activity will appear Australia-wide this coming May, representing the largest investment from the McGuigan brand ever. Why now and how will this help to move the price point up when everyone is feeling price compression? “All of our brand research shows that McGuigan could exist across all price points. Consumers see McGuigan as a brand that has heritage, quality and trust, so we know that any issues we have aren’t necessarily with the consumer, but those that think McGuigan cannot exist outside of Black Label. We call this the ‘gatekeeper perception’”. “We have been working hard to change this gatekeeper (trade) perception and the positioning of our business. It’s been a journey for us over a number of years now. A big part of our focus initially was selecting some key leverage points that we knew we could do really well, and the strategy worked. We’ve dynamically broadened what we want to be known for and a big part of this is really opening up our true capability as part of a global,

Sold Yaldara Winery

“In the first six months of FY06, branded bottled sales across the entire AVL portfolio represented 39 per cent of total sales. In the first six months of FY16, that number is 82 per cent.”

drinks trade|23


SPECIAL REPORT

BELOW: Cameron Ferguson LEFT: Neil McGuigan

fully integrated wine business, of which step changing innovation and support will continue to play an important part.” “The introduction of The Philosophy in 2014 – a super-premium Cabernet Sauvignon Shiraz – was also a game changer, giving us our first ever product over AUD$100 and ensuring we had a quality wine at every price point for our customers.” Lifting the price point of McGuigan through the introduction of The Philosophy and other premium ranges has given a greater value perception for this well-loved and iconic Australian wine brand. Coupled with a raft of gold medals and, in particular, the International Winemaker of the Year Award at the IWSC in London (International Wine and Spirit Competition) in 2009, ‘11 and ‘12, the McGuigan brand took off. Not that it wasn’t already popular, but the timing was particularly good – getting consumers and trade on board for McGuigan wine with a larger price tag. So how did this work outside of the McGuigan brand? “We purchased Nepenthe wines in 2007, which was significant in terms of helping to shift the gatekeeper perception across the rest of our business. We were no longer just producing quality wines, but we were producing quality, boutique wines out of the Adelaide Hills. Nepenthe is a brand that withstood the ‘avalanche’ of NZ sauvignon blanc and has grown 57 per cent in the last five

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years. Such is the strength of the brand. As a business we have managed to retain and strengthen that position since its acquisition, and it has had a halo effect on the rest of our business. Nepenthe Ithaca Chardonnay also won ‘Best Chardonnay in the World’ at the IWSC in 2013.” Looking back on where AVL began, what would you say is the company’s biggest achievement? “I’d have to say taking our business on a journey from bulk to branded. There is now diversity in our business, and we are incredibly proud of that.”

Ways of Working When visiting the AVL offices in the backstreets of Balmain, your first challenge is to make sure you can find it. AVL is tucked away in a nondescript building without signage; slotting into the residential buildings opposite, almost camouflaged by its lack of big corporate office identity. Once inside however, it becomes clear that all is possible at AVL, despite appearances. Brick walls house an open, well lit and spacious office. In terms of staffing, the team is

not large, rather closely-knit, consisting of dedicated people who care about building their brands. “One of the key differentiators for Australian Vintage is the fact that we do not have as many human assets as some of our competitors,” acknowledged Ferguson. “What I mean by that, is that we like to keep things nimble, because it makes for quick decision-making. We can turn around NPD at incredible speed, while still operating within commercial and quality frameworks and keeping in close contact with our customers.” “At Australian Vintage, no one is bigger than the job and that is demonstrated right from the top down with Neil McGuigan. Neil


is without a doubt the hardest working CEO in the industry; he knows most, if not all of our customers intimately and his time in the trade and overseas, living and breathing the brands, far outweighs the time he spends at home,” said Ferguson. “Though we are one of the largest wine producers in the country, we are also one of the quickest to step away from the corporate image. Ties and suits are a rarity in our office, and we pride ourselves on presenting a relaxed front with our stakeholders.” Ferguson is confident that this is the way to go - the “right way of working”. Backing up his confidence are the better than expected results, and the vitally important ratings from their customers including the Advantage Survey Report. “Our goal is to be a top five overall liquor supplier as rated by the Advantage Survey, and we’re not

stopping there. We know right now that we’re exceeding this across 80 per cent of our customer base. Everything we do in our company stems from the importance of meeting our customer needs - if you aren’t serving a customer, make sure you are serving someone who is,” Ferguson summarised.

Vision It is of course a leader’s imperative to have a vision and a clear pathway in terms of growing the business. Ferguson’s vision is clear and defined. “We have to act and behave relative to the size and scale of the biggest players in the industry, because we know that if we can do this it will have a positive impact on everything in our business.” “Our vision is to be a wine culture company; to be Australia’s most responsive and efficient producer of quality brands, private and exclusive label wines. And I think we are well on the way to reaching this vision.” “There’s a lot of talk out there about private label, and as far as we are concerned it’s not a ‘dirty’ word. Understanding the industry demand, we have set up a model that is highly geared to deliver low cost and quality, and that is one thing we pride ourselves on - a high differentiating value versus our competitors,” said Ferguson.  

Thinking Global, Looking Forward

McGuigan Wines continues its long-standing partnership with acclaimed celebrity chef, John Torode of UK Masterchef fame.

While the domestic market continues to be a priority for the AVL business, there is continued focus on developing new and emerging markets, particularly the UK, China and US. “We have a powerhouse business in the UK, and it hasn’t taken too long to build. McGuigan is the fourth largest global wine brand in the UK market, the number two selling global wine brand in Ireland and has just entered the top 20 alcohol brands by value in the UK, ahead of brands such as Peroni, Baileys and Guinness. This is on the back of 23.2 per cent growth MAT.” So what of China? Every wine business nowadays talks about the importance of China as a market, yet AVL hasn’t publically focussed on this market until relatively recently as there were other priority markets at the time, such as the UK.

“Whether it is right or wrong, our focus wasn’t on Asia in the beginning. It has really only been the last three years that we’ve committed to growing our footprint in the region. Over the last 12 months, we have been able to establish a strategic partnership with one of China’s largest food companies, and with Australian exports we grew 30 per cent last year.” The partnership with COFCO Wine & Spirits Co Ltd – part of China’s largest food processing, manufacturer and trader - has AVL as the strategic partner for Australian wine throughout China within the newly established International Wine Division of COFCO. “Am I totally satisfied with what I’m getting out of China now? Not particularly, but that’s why we have a partner that has one of China’s biggest wine brands (Great Wall Wine) and who knows the landscape intimately. They themselves have recognised that the future of growth in China is going to come from imported wine brands, not local. This insight has helped drive the growth of their separate International Wine Division, and the fact they’re backed by one of the biggest companies in China instils us with nothing but confidence,” said Ferguson. AVL’s core markets are growing and the plan for China is coming together; the last horizon it would seem is the huge US market - a stage upon which Australian brands have exceeded when the right distribution set up is put together. “We have a fairly significant business in Canada, which

drinks trade|25


SPECIAL REPORT

has been there for a number of years and we are outperforming the market there. Year to date we are up about 28 per cent in Canada and that’s well above the Australian category which is in low, singledigit growth. We’re taking a bit of a position where we are talking about the Australian category and the benefit in our business is coming from that, and we have some really good people working that market.” “We are ready to re-enter the US market after more than a ten-year hiatus due to some contractual arrangements. I’m happy to say that two of our brands will be launched with a major US importer in the next 12 months. With the dollar and the US general view of the Australian wine category starting to shift gear for the better, the time is right to take in Tempus Two this year and McGuigan in 2017.”  

Bring a McGuigan

“Our mission is to be among the top five wine brands in each market that we are in, and we know we’re not going to just get there by being a trading brand.”

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This month sees the launch of the ‘Bring a McGuigan’ above-the-line campaign nationwide; a first for AVL and an investment that is a reflection of their ambition to move McGuigan into the top five brands in the wine category. ‘Bring a McGuigan’ will run from May through to September. “The last 12 months have proven challenging and exciting for Australian Vintage, with the launch of our first ever above-the-line campaign – ‘Bring a McGuigan’”, Ferguson says. “Our mission is to be among the top five wine brands in each market that we are in, and we know we’re not going to just get there by being a trading brand.” “One of the biggest opportunities to address this is consumer awareness; from our product range and quality at every price point message, to how to pronounce the brand name ‘McGuigan’. You’d be amazed how difficult some people find it to pronounce our name, I’ve had ‘McGoogan’, ‘McGeegan’, you name it,” finished Ferguson. What AVL is aiming for is not your typical style of wine advertising. “We wanted to engage wine consumers in a more relatable way, breaking the traditional mould and venturing away from the ‘vineyards, grapes and winemakers’ to bring sociability to the wine category. We wanted the campaign to perfectly mirror what the McGuigan brand stands for – fun, authenticity, playfulness and approachability. Check it out!” www.youtube.com/user/McGuiganWines


5 14/02/2016


PROMOTE

INSIDE PINNACLE DRINKS A LOOK AT THE UNIQUE BUSINESS BEHIND WOOLWORTHS LIQUOR GROUP AND SOME OF AUSTRALIA’S MOST SUCCESSFUL ALCOHOL BRANDS AND PARTNERSHIPS. Perceptions could be that Woolworths Liquor Group (WLG) has long kept quiet about Pinnacle Drinks and what it does. Indeed, many will refer to Pinnacle Drinks as a manufacturer of a long list of owned label brands stocked on shelves at BWS and Dan Murphy’s, the truth however, reveals an incredibly clever and complex arm to WLG that does more than just that. Behind the scenes, Pinnacle has been establishing partnerships across the industry and building exclusive brands which drive loyalty to the retail banners. Here’s Chris Baddock, General Manager of Pinnacle Drinks on how the business works to support its retailers and how its vision is to do the same with its suppliers.

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drinks trade: How does WLG perceive what trade think of it and the Pinnacle business? Chris Baddock: It’s important to Woolworths Liquor Group for us to be involved in the industry and this is best demonstrated through our signing up to the Australian Wine Industry Code of Conduct. You’ll also see many of our team at industry events, including drinks association events and breakfast talks. This is about us showing more faces to the industry, because too often people think of Woolworths Liquor Group as a big corporation and don’t see or interact with the people behind it. DT: You have only recently joined Pinnacle. What’s attractive about the business to you? CB: Pinnacle is a serious player within the industry; it acts as a conduit for exclusive suppliers to form a relationship with Woolworths Liquor Group. Unfortunately, because Pinnacle hasn’t widely communicated its reason for being, people misunderstand what we’re about. DT: How does Pinnacle work with Woolworths Liquor Group? CB: We are a supplier embedded in the business and have two reasons for being. One of the reasons is entry-level brands. Every retailer has them and customers want them, so we need to compete. We call our value brands our anchor brands - the brands that we know we need in order to compete - but I wouldn’t say these are our core brands. Our core brands can be both owned brands, such as Minchinbury and John Boston, and the brands we develop or distribute with suppliers, which is the second reason why we exist. It is to drive brands which over-deliver for customers and, in turn, create loyalty to the retail banners. So the way that Pinnacle works is to see what the category needs are. Pinnacle then supplies into Dan Murphy’s, BWS and The Wine Quarter with the brands that it believes meets those needs. But there is no guarantee the products we source will be ranged. Because at the end of the day, the buyers, business managers and the heads of the categories have the final say on what the category make-up is. DT: Pinnacle has an interesting mix of brands. What percentage is agency and Pinnacle owned brands? CB: One third of the portfolio Pinnacle manages is our owned and two thirds are others – our exclusives. This is something we’re quite proud of. The majority of our time is spent dealing with suppliers, building and co-creating exclusive SKUs and brands. Our international portfolios are a great example of where we are able to offer brands distribution in up to 1,500 stores with access to millions of customers every week. Pinnacle also acts as custodian of the brand, which means the company doesn’t have to employ its own

managers here. Domestically, we have very strong relationships with a number of small Australian wine producers. Some of the brands we own and others are owned by the winemaker, but then we have the exclusivity to sell the brand.

“PINNACLE IS A SERIOUS PLAYER WITHIN THE INDUSTRY; IT ACTS AS A CONDUIT FOR EXCLUSIVE SUPPLIERS TO FORM A RELATIONSHIP WITH WOOLWORTHS LIQUOR GROUP.”

DT: What’s the vision for Pinnacle? CB: The Pinnacle business is diverse and our strategy is driven by what our customers want as well as delivering them the best possible value for high quality products. We want to give them a reason to visit our stores and try new ranges. WLG Managing Director, Martin Smith says, “Woolworths Liquor Group and our banners are buying agents for the consumer, not buying agents for the supplier.” And when a supplier understands that, it’s amazing how well we (Pinnacle) and the supplier can work together. Our vision is also to enable innovation through co-creation. Yes, we crush fruit in the wine category, but we don’t own any manufacturing facilities when it comes to the spirits and RTD categories; that’s all done through suppliers. And yes, we own 25 per cent of Gage Roads Brewing Company, but again we don’t always brew through them. We will choose the supplier based on what’s best for the product and customer. DT: How do you think Pinnacle can turn around its perception in the industry? CB: By giving an open invitation for all suppliers to have a conversation with us about how we can bring their brands to life. I wouldn’t say that we get it right every time - that’s the risk in creating a brand - but we will always work closely with our suppliers to deliver the right outcome for all parties.

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PROMOTE

In the background, over the last 12 months, two new businesses have been growing within the liquor industry. Now, over the next few pages, we find out what Nick Blair, Michael Every and Fred Siggins have been building and how these three – who many will recognise – have gone out alone to bring something new to the industry and share their experience to help drive it into the future.

Vision Wine Partners Vision Wine Partners is the new, specialist wine sales and consultancy business, being run by familiar faces, Nick Blair and Michael Every.

M

ost will remember Blair from when he worked at Pernod Ricard. Blair held a variety of senior sales and marketing roles with the company, including global marketing responsibility of Australia’s number one wine brand at the time, Jacob’s Creek. Blair has worked in wine both here and overseas, and was based in the UK for a while, where he was Sales and Marketing Director for Pernod Ricard UK. Every was head of sales for Peter Lehmann Wines, starting out as National Sales Manager, before being promoted to Director of Sales. Every’s market intelligence and strong results have yielded him a highly regarded name within the Australian liquor industry. “Together, Mike and I have about 50 years of experience in the liquor industry. And actually if you look at total experience, it’s probably close to 80…but let’s not get into that!” Blair jokes. When selecting a name for the business, Blair and Every wanted something that would embody their expertise in wine, while creating a platform for a unique and proactive consultancy with sales and distribution execution as its objective. “The name of the business is something we thought about quite a lot. It represents our partnership – Mike and I – and that we are open to bringing in other partners to the business in order to service our clients’ needs,” Blair explains. “We chose the word Vision, because we have a very sound view of the past and we have a very clear view of where we think the industry can go.” Specifically, Vision Wine Partners’ role will be to act as a third party to help wine brands find their best route to market. From retail to online, distribution and pricing strategy – Blair and Every will use their experience and contacts to develop a plan that will get a brand exactly where it wants and needs to be in the market. Every says, “Unlike where a traditional consultant would tell a business what the problems are, come up with some

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recommendations and then walk away, our role is to actually help brands activate the plans we put in place.” Blair adds, “What we’ve identified, is that there’s numerous brands out there that have the opportunity to make great wine, with great looking packaging - all of the things that get you to a certain point - but a lot of businesses get lost between there and actually getting the product to market. “With our contacts, our network and our experience, we can either go to distributors or directly to consumers; we can even go via retail, it really depends on what the brand wants to achieve.” While wine is the focus for now, spirits and beer could be on the cards for Every and Blair in the future, as could aiding international brands. “I think the services we offer in Australia are equally valid internationally or to international brands looking to come into the Australian market,” Every says. “As for beer and spirits, the principles are the same.” Blair adds, “The other interesting thing is, if you look at wine and the traditional way it has been marketed and sold, it’s all about who made it, where it came from and the people behind it. While the model for spirits and beer used to be totally focused on big brand stories, both categories have since evolved from that. Beer, cider and spirits are actually following a wine model nowadays.” “We also know that consumers are becoming far more engaged in how they buy wine, where they buy it from and how much they’ll pay for it,” Every continues. “Our opportunity is to find those brand principals and get them directly to the consumer. We are attacking it from both ends.” www.visionwinepartners.com


Pith & Vinegar Pith & Vinegar is the new bar and beverage consultancy that’s quickly making a name for itself on the Melbourne scene. The new venture is being headed by well-known, former senior bartender of The Black Pearl, Fred Siggins, who has hung out his shingle to help the independent brands of the south. From marketing advice to brand advocacy, Fred has the know-how and the in with Melbourne’s trade and its punters, plus oodles of experience.

F

red has experience working with the likes of Diageo, Bacardi, Beam Suntory and William Grant & Sons, helping with everything from training, creating drinks lists, consulting on bar design, judging cocktail competitions and putting together industry events. The business officially launched mid-way through last year and Fred’s experience on both sides of the industry has already attracted several clients to the Pith & Vinegar stable. “The idea came about when I started doing consulting style work a couple of years ago as a Diageo Bar Academy trainer,” Fred told drinks trade. “That role then branched out and I began doing events for Diageo and other companies. People then started asking me to judge cocktail competitions and after that a couple of venues asked me to train their staff, write cocktail lists for them, design their bar…and the work just kept growing.” Fred has also been behind the whisky appreciation movement in Melbourne over the last few years, working with business partner The Humble Tumbler to promote and engage members of the public with the famous spirit, through courses, masterclasses and corporate events. “This was all the stuff that inspired me to hang out my shingle and start saying this is what I do - I’m a bar and beverage consultant. Whether it’s from a brand perspective or an education and training perspective, I’m available to help people as somebody who’s been around in the industry for a while,” Fred said.

Current clients of Pith & Vinegar include importer and distributor of South American piscos, The Pisco People, as well as whisky producers Pure Scot Whisky and Melbourne Moonshine. Fred also continues to consult to Diageo, Bacardi and a number of other major distributors and private clients. “My big thing is brand independence. I think that’s really important, because there aren’t many people in the industry that offer that type of advice,” Fred explained. “I think pisco has huge potential as a category, as people start to see the diversity and quality in the style, and as Peruvian food takes hold as a wonderful global trend. “I also think the way we drink whisky is changing, as a younger and more diverse group of people start to take it on as a drink; we’re mixing it more and drinking it more often. Pure Scot and Melbourne Moonshine - among the many other excellent whiskies out there - are both great examples of brands that are championing a new generation of whisky drinkers. “All of my clients know that I’m brand independent and my philosophy is that everybody that sells good booze, makes good booze – we’re all on the same page. “So if I’m working for one client, I don’t have to pretend that theirs is the only product in the world in that category. What I want people to understand is why you would reach for that product in particular, when to use it and how to get the best experience out of it.”

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T H E RA C E T O T H E FI N I S H EN T ER N OW

Entries will close on 13 May 2016

www.australiandrinksawards.com.au #drinksawards

ENTRY IS OPEN TO ALL MANUFACTURERS AND DISTRIBUTORS

PMS 877 (Silver) & PMS 3005


VODKA, GIN, OTHER LIGHT SPIRITS: MAKE 2016 YOUR YEAR! In the Australian drinks Awards’ three year history not one vodka, gin or other light spirit has taken home a Major Award from the event. Could your vodka be this year’s Most Loved Brand? Which gin can take home the Best Advertising Campaign and what Other Light Spirit has been making all the social media headlines to take out Best Presence in Social Media. Cider, Vodka, Gin and Other Light Spirits, it is time to recognise your brands and reward the teams behind your products. Make sure your entry is submitted to be in the running for this year’s awards.

W H AT A B O U T T H E J U D G E S : W H AT A R E T H E Y LOOKING FOR? Nielsen is the Australian drinks Awards’ independent assessor and is responsible for monitoring the submissions, assembling and overseeing the judging panels and process to ensure an unbiased assessment of the submissions. Two panels are tasked with reviewing and assessing the submissions. The panels are an industry judging panel and a consumer survey based panel. Each year the people that make up the two judging panels change. Nielsen has already begun the invitations to the industry judging panel with 20 judges confirmed to date. In 2015, there was a total consumer sample of 3500 respondents across the five categories.

THE WINNERS CIRCLE The awards have some stand out performers in the Hall of Fame.

Lion has won supplier of the year twice

Jim Beam / Jim Beam Devil’s Cut has won 5 awards in the last three years, including Brand of the Year twice.

Penfolds Wine stand out as 2 x winners of Social Media

The beer category has won Best Sales Achievement every year

CIDER- IT IS YOUR TURN! According to industry statistics, the cider market is booming. Did you know that cider products have only taken out two of the 21 major awards in the past three years? 2013 Best Innovation – Rekorderlig 2015 Best Ad Campaign – Somersby Cider Will 2016 be the year of all things cider? hallenge your beer cousins and take out the big one - Supplier of the Year. It is cider’s for the taking.

Dark Spirits have won Most Loved Brand every year

Dark spirits and beer have dominated the Major Award winners for the past three years.

RACE TO THE FINISH

ENTER NOW

2016 is flying and so is the time remaining to enter your brands and products in the Australian drinks Awards 2016. Entries for these hotly contested awards close on 13 May 2016.

Entries are now open for the Australian drinks Awards 2016. Entry is online via www.australiandrinksawards.com.au With the launch of the new website, entry is simple. Once you are registered you will be able to submit your entries through the Australian drinks Awards 2016 website. All of the awards and subcategories, more information and selection criteria can be easily accessed on the new website www.australiandrinksawards.com.au, or entrants can contact the drinks association directly on 02 9415 1199 for any enquiries.

If you took advantage of the early bird entry rate and have registered your entry for an award, it is essential that you complete your award submission by 13 May 2016 deadline.

www.australiandrinksawards.com.au


STRENGTHEN

State of Affairs NEW SOUTH WALES

New South Wales - home to one of Australia’s top destinations for food and drink, Sydney. Headquartered here is Accolade Wines, Bacardi-Martini, Campari, Coca-Cola Amatil, Diageo, Lion, McWilliam’s, Moët Hennessy, Spirits Platform and William Grant & Sons. Drive for three hours north and you’ll reach the country’s oldest wine region, the Hunter Valley, where you can stop in for a glass of wine with two of Australian Vintage’s brands, McGuigan and Tempus Two.

REPS IN YOUR AREA ACCOLADE WINES OFF-PREMISE DAVID DIROU – AREA MANAGER NORTHERN RIVERS Tel: 0478 319 138 Email: david.dirou@accolade-wines.com PETER ALCHIN – AREA MANAGER REGIONAL NORTH COAST Tel: 0438 460 875 Email: peter.alchin@ accolade-wines.com CATHY JOHNSON – AREA MANAGER - METRO INNER WEST/UPPER NORTH SHORE Tel: 0418 891 653 Email: cathy.johnson@ accolade-wines.com SCOTT DORMAN – AREA MANAGER - NEWCASTLE/CENTRAL COAST Tel: 0458 900 344 Email: scott.dorman@ accolade-wines.com PAUL MOUTZOURIS – AREA MANAGER - SOUTH WEST SYDNEY/ PARRAMATTA/CAMPBELLTOWN Tel: 0412 686 220 Email: paul.moutzouris@ accolade-wines.com LINDA BUTTON – AREA MANAGER NORTHERN BEACHES Tel: 0408 318 909 Email: linda.button@accolade-wines.com

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SHANE CONNOLLY – AREA MANAGER - ACT/SOUTH WESTERN REGIONAL Tel: 0429 602 384 Email: shane.connolly@ accolade-wines.com MONIQUE SORGE – AREA MANAGER WOLLONGONG/SUTHERLAND SHIRE Tel: 0439 814 940 Email: monique.sorge@ accolade-wines.com JIM SEVIL – AREA MANAGER REGIONAL CENTRAL WEST Tel: 0418 653 017 Email: jim.sevil@accolade-wines.com LLOYD CRESTANI – AREA MANAGER - REGIONAL SOUTH COAST Tel: 0419 854 618 Email: lloyd.crestani@ accolade-wines.com BRUCE MACAFEE – AREA MANAGER - ACT/SNOWFIELDS Tel: 0411 366 658 Email: bruce.macafee@ accolade-wines.com

ON-PREMISE CAROLINE BUTER – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER - CITY FRINGES Tel: 0402 424 071

Email: caroline.butler@ distinctionwines.com JONATHAN MOLLOY – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER - METRO CBD Tel: 0478 883 498 Email: jonathan.molloy@ distinctionwines.com

AUSTRALIAN VINTAGE LTD NICHOLAS YAP – STATE MANAGER - NSW/ACT Tel: 0434 472 089 Email: nyap@australianvintage.com.au

ASAHI PREMIUM BEVERAGES WAYNE DEWBERRY - NATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGER Tel: 0412 162 406 FRED JONES - GENERAL MANAGER SALES - NSW/ACT Tel: 0428 122 510 LEAH SKILLING - STATE SALES COORDINATOR - NSW/ACT Tel: 0459 750 400 TODD COLMAN - STATE SALES MANAGER - ON-PREMISE Tel: 0409 480 978

BACARDI-MARTINI AUSTRALIA TODD WARNER – STATE BUSINESS MANAGER Tel: 0438 170 763 Email: twarner@bacardi.com

CAMPARI AUSTRALIA JORDAN BERGER - SYDNEY CITY/INNER WEST/EASTERN SUBURBS Tel: 0408 594 220 Email: Jordan.Berger@campari.com BEN REID - NORTH SYDNEY/ CENTRAL COAST Tel: 0403 244 356 Email: Ben.reid@campari.com MARK JUNKIEWICZ - WESTERN SYDNEY/GREATER WESTERN SYDNEY Tel: 0488 236 558 Email: Mark.junkiewicz@campari.com ANGELA SPENCER - SOUTHERN SYDNEY/SOUTH WEST SYDNEY Tel: 0488 236 476 Email: Angela.spencer@campari.com LAURA HOLDSWORTH WOLLONGONG/SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS/SOUTH COAST Tel: 0419 718 287 Email: Laura.holdsworth@campari.com


JASON HARRISON - NEWCASTLE/ NORTHERN NSW Tel: 0488 097 663 Email: Jason.Harrison@campari.com PETA HEMPHILL - KEY ACCOUNT MANAGER - NSW/ACT Tel: 0488 235 712 Email: peta.hemphill@campari.com DANIELE PIROTTA - BRAND AMBASSADOR - NSW Tel: 0409 729 187 Email: Daniele.pirotta@campari.com

COCA-COLA AMATIL JOHN HUMPHREYS – STATE MANAGER NSW – LICENSED DEPARTMENT Tel: 0400 377 047 Email: john.humphreys@ccamatil.com DARREN PRESSLEY – SALES MANAGER CLUBS - LICENSED DEPARTMENT Tel: 0407 052 526 Email: darren.pressley@ccamatil.com GARETH PARKER – SALES MANAGER OFF-PREMISE – LICENSED DEPARTMENT Tel: 0400 546 068 Email: gareth.parker@ccamatil.com JEREMY DE VRIES - STATE SALES MANAGER FIELD SALES - LICENSED DEPARTMENT Tel: 0418 692 971 Email: jeremy.devries@ccamatil.com

DE BORTOLI WINES WARWICK BROOK – STATE MANAGER - NSW /ACT Tel: 0417 219 768 Email: warwick_brook@debortoli.com.au

DIAGEO AUSTRALIA OLIVIA GUEST – STATE MANAGER – NSW/ACT Tel: 0431 657 289 Email: Olivia.Guest@diageo.com

LION LION CONNECT Tel: 1300 550 295

MCWILLIAM’S WINES BRIAN COLES - SALES MANAGER NSW Tel: 0458 504 393 Email: bcoles@mcwilliamswines.com.au NATHAN FITZGERALD - KEY ACCOUNT MANAGER - NSW Tel: 0417 250 894 Email: nfitzgerald@mcwilliamswines. com.au

MOËT HENNESSY AUSTRALIA BENJAMIN SMITH – STATE MANAGER - NSW Tel: 0409 669 714 Email: benjamin.smith@ moethennessy.com

SPIRITS PLATFORM RORY KENNEDY – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER – NORTHERN BEACHES/EASTERN SUBURBS/CBD AND INNER WEST Tel: 0437 929 406 Email: rkennedy@spiritsplatform.com.au KYLIE EVANS – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER – WESTERN SYDNEY/ SUTHERLAND SHIRE/WOLLONGONG/CANBERRA/ NSW SOUTH COAST Tel: 0403 244 352 Email: kevans@spiritsplatform.com.au JOHN LEE – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER – CENTRAL COAST/NEWCASTLE/ HUNTER REGION/NSW MID NORTH COAST/CENTRAL NSW Tel: 0425 308 301 Email: jlee@spiritsplatform.com.au MATTEO FABBRIS – NSW BRAND AMBASSADOR – SELECT ACCOUNTS IN CBD/SURRY HILLS/EASTERN SUBURBS Tel: 0402 258 366 Email: mfabbris@spiritsplatform.com.au

TREASURY WINE ESTATES AMANDA JACKSON – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE – ONPREMISE, SYDNEY CBD Tel: 0414 596 442 Email: amanda.jackson@tweglobal.com ANNMAREE CAREY – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE – ARMIDALE/NORTH WEST NSW Tel: 0458 784 335 Email: annemaree.carey@tweglobal.com ANTHONY FISHER – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - ACT/ SNOW FIELDS Tel: 0408 848 496 Email: anthony.fisher@tweglobal.com SHARON KNIGHT – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - ONPREMISE, ACT CBD/SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS Tel: 0409 454 988 Email: Sharon.knight@tweglobal.com BEK SMITH – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE – PENRITH/WESTERN SYDNEY Tel: 0406 313 318 Email: bek.smith@tweglobal.com BEN SHIEL – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE – HILLS DISTRICT Tel: 0467 777 057 Email: ben.shiel@tweglobal.com CHARLOTTE SCOTT – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY Tel: 0411 046 378 Email: charlotte.scott@tweglobal.com CORINNE BANBURY – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE SUTHERLAND SHIRE Tel: 0437 593 157 Email: corinne.banbury@tweglobal.com DARREN BOWER – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE – WOLLONGONG Tel: 0418 111 962 Email: darren.bower@tweglobal.com

DAVID ANDERSON – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - COFFS HARBOUR/NORTH EAST NSW Tel: 0409 749 853 Email: david.anderson@tweglobal.com DAVID LANDRIGAN – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE – NEWCASTLE/HUNTER VALLEY Tel: 0419 255 821 Email: david.landrigan@tweglobal.com JACINTA NORTON – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - RETAIL, NORTHERN BEACHES Tel: 0409 183 087 Email: jacinta.norton@tweglobal.com JO BENNETT – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE WAGGA WAGGA/CENTRAL WEST Tel: 0400 467 624 Email: joanne.bennett@tweglobal.com LISA HINGLE – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE CENTRAL COAST Tel: 0409 429 068 Email: lisa.hingle@tweglobal.com SHANE THOMPSON – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - SOUTH COAST Tel: 0488 498 541 Email: shane.thompson@tweglobal.com SHANNON MCCAULEY – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - ONPREMISE, EASTERN SUBURBS Tel: 0407 062 182 Email: shannon.mccauley@ tweglobal.com TIM PEEK – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - RETAIL, EASTERN SUBURBS/INNER WEST Tel: 0407 062 182 Email: tim.peek@tweglobal.com

WILLIAM GRANT & SONS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD PHILIP MENDI – STATE SALES MANAGER - NSW/ACT Tel: 0458 603 361 Email: philip.mendi@wgrant.com

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INFORM

MEGAbrands - The World’s Biggest Beverage Brands The name ‘megabrand’ has an uneasy positioning in the alcoholic beverage market, and while many look on with envy at brands holding market leading positions, a mixture of Australia’s infamous tall poppy syndrome and nationals choosing the best known and most loved brands to price lead with, can cause even the world’s largest brands to feel the pinch. That being said, when a leader gets behind its own category, the benefits are felt by many - including savvy and astute retailers. Shoppers navigate by brands they know and understand; good store layout recognises those category leaders and uses them to draw in traffic. Sometimes however, megabrands can throw in a surprise or two, most notably when you consider the global nature of the drinks business.

C

oca-Cola is one such megabrand and with pull over consumers not only in bottle shops, bars and clubs, but in grocery as well, it’s not surprising that it continues to dominate the global beverage market. The soft drink brand is currently valued at US$34.2 billion (that’s approximately AUD$45 billion), making it the most valuable drinks brand globally. Topping that, Brand Finance also places Coca-Cola as one of the top 20 brands in the world, sitting alongside the likes of Apple and Google on the Global 500 list. Key to Coca-Cola’s success has been its iconic contour bottle and unmistakable red and white logo, which have remained the brand’s trademark credentials for over 100 years and can be seen on shelves in 200 countries today. Yet the brand no longer pulls the same ranks as it did back in 2007, when it was considered to be the most valuable brand in the world across all industries. According to analysts, growing health concerns over the effects of sugar and artificial sweeteners have had a substantial impact on consumers’ perception of the brand. The same can be said for rival Pepsi and energy drink Red Bull. In an attempt to protect its image, last year Coca-Cola released a naturally sweetened option named Coke Life, but critics question the extent of its success. Brand Finance quoted in its latest report, “The problem lies with its positioning. It is marketed as a more natural, low sugar version of Coke

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however, though lower in sugar than Coke, with 89 calories per can it is still very sweet.” The outlook for alcohol brands seems more positive however, and in particular for those being made in China. Both Moutai and the country’s top-selling beer brand Snow Beer are quickly growing scale outside of their home market. In fact, Moutai is now rated as the most valuable alcoholic drinks brand globally, up 90 places from last year on the Global 500 scale. Recognised as the best brand of baiju (a traditional Chinese distilled spirit), Moutai has a long and rich history in China, considered to be a luxury item and consumed as a celebratory drink. And over the last few years, consumers across the world have become acquainted with the unique flavour of Moutai. In fact in Australia there now exists an entire store dedicated to the spirit. China also lays claim to the world’s best selling beer brand with Snow Beer, which was recently picked up exclusively by Dan Murphy’s in Australia. But while Snow Beer may be the world’s best selling beer brand, it is the States’ Budweiser that continues to edge out competition as the world’s most valuable beer brand year-on-year. What began as an American original 139 years ago, is now a global brand today. Key to the positioning and exposure of the brand has been its long alignment with the Super Bowl. Reaching 160 million consumers on average each year, Budweiser’s emotive Labrador puppy


Moutai shop opening in Sydney

advertisements have quickly become one of the biggest topics of conversation surrounding the game. Not far behind Budweiser is the Netherlands’ Heineken, which is now ranked as the seventh most valuable brand among both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Established in 1873, Heineken has an enduring history and heritage as an independent global brewer. The Dutch beer has become recognisable the world over with its signature green bottle and red star, and is now sold and enjoyed in more than 170 countries globally. Asahi too made the Global 500 list again this year, coming in at number 12 within beverages. The Japanese company has continued to expand its global footprint and grow its share of the beer market over the last few years. Just in February this year, Asahi made public that it had proposed to acquire Peroni, Grolsch and Meantime beer brands from the world’s largest brewer, Anheuser-Bush InBev. The offer followed a rise in Asahi’s Oceania financials and could be accepted if AB InBev’s acquisition of SABMiller is successful. For nearly two centuries, Johnnie Walker has led the rise and popularity of Scotch whisky around the world and is now among the highest-ranking beverages. The iconic square bottle, stamped with the silhouette of the man himself, has become synonymous with quality Scotch and is collected by many a whisky aficionado today. Interestingly enough, for most of the brand’s history, Johnnie Walker has only offered a few staple blends, but in recent years the brand has released several special and limited edition bottles, including Johnnie Walker Black Label and Blue Label.

Room of Johnnie Walker

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INFORM

Australia and New Zealand This year, Penfolds was named as the World’s Most Admired Wine Brand in Drinks International’s annual poll, toppling two-time winner Torres. Penfolds was also the only Australian wine brand to make it on to the list, as voted by almost 200 global industry experts. Penfolds is one of the oldest and most prestigious wine brands in Australia, established in 1844 in South Australia, and is recognised locally for raising the benchmark for Australian wine. Penfolds’ Grange in particular has become synonymous with superiority among aficionados and is collected by many across the globe. Just last year in Australia, Dan Murphy’s sold a bottle of Grange for a staggering $65,000. MW Dawn Davies told Drinks International why she voted for Penfolds. “It is one of the few brands to be able to span many price brackets but that has managed to keep its image as a premium brand,” Davies said. “It keeps consistent quality on the wines and ambassadors such as Peter Gago have worked tirelessly to keep the brand fresh in people’s eyes.” For the second year in a row, Villa Maria was also recognised by the list as the World’s Most Admired ‘New Zealand’ Wine Brand. The winery placed eighth, above wine brands Château D’Yquem and Tío Pepe; a remarkable achievement considering the youthful age of New Zealand’s wine industry. Nevertheless, Villa Maria fit the bill, with Christian Davis, Editor of Drinks International calling it: “a flag bearer for everything that is good about New Zealand.” Villa Maria is, “a brand virtually everyone admires, respects and, most importantly, drinks,” Davis added.

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Australian Success Stories Noble One is truly one of the sweetest success stories in Australian winemaking history. Thirty years have passed since the De Bortoli family first crafted its flagship wine and it can still be said that it is one of the most recognised dessert wines in the world. The first vintage was created by Darren De Bortoli in 1982 and since then, Noble One has been regarded as Australia’s benchmark dessert INTERESTING FACTS: wine. Darren and his father Deen • Noble One is served at 5 star were admirers of the French dessert and Michelin restaurants wine sauternes, and recognised the around the world. potential to replicate a similar style • Pope Benedict, a fan of of wine from grapes affected by sweet wines, received Noble botrytis cinerea or ‘Noble Rot’ in the One as a gift from the Prime Riverina, where the family-owned Minister of Australia, Kevin wine company is based. Rudd. Noble One’s worldwide success • With 136 trophies and 423 has arguably single-handedly gold medals won around the put Australia on the map for the world, Noble One is the most production of premium awarded wine in history. sweet wines.


“My Grandfather told me each pursuit in life should be a noble one.� -Darren De Bortoli


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SPIRITS & LIQUEURS

INFORM

The Curious

Spirit of Rum Rum is a curious spirit. In Australia we swim against the tide, with dark rum far more popular than the white category. And few countries see a single brand as dominant in the market as Bundaberg Rum has been for decades. Spiced rums are emerging, but whereas gin, whisky and a few other spirits have seen serious interest in their craft offerings - and those of what might be termed the second tier distilleries - rum seems slower off the mark. Even more puzzling is that the great premium rums, which prove more than a rival for most of the top malts and Cognacs (and usually available at a fraction of the cost), seem to be the beverage world’s best-kept secret. By Ken Gargett

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ven in a state as obsessed with Bundy as Queensland, it comes as a surprise to many lifelong fans of the rum that Bundaberg Rum produces not just their favourite - the massively popular Original, and a few others - but serious premium rums matching it with the best. None of this is made any easier by the fact that - perhaps even more than most beer and spirit drinkers - rum drinkers are intensely loyal. You’d have more of a chance getting a Maroon fan to back the Blues than a Bundy drinker to swap rums. The emergence of rum as a more premium spirit, with devotees trying a range of styles and producers, might be a little further down the track than one might wish. It is coming. Where to for rum, is anyone’s guess, or perhaps the $64 million question. Currently, rum sits fourth in overall sales behind whisky, bourbon and vodka. Bundaberg Rum’s recent success in the 2016 World Drinks Awards, held in London, might change a few opinions as to whether it is simply a mass blender or that it can be a premium spirit. Bundy’s ‘Blenders Edition

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2015’ was named Best Rum in the World; its ‘Small Batch’ had already taken Best Golden Rum. As Jodi McLeod, Bundaberg Marketing Manager says, “Australians aren’t drinking more, but they are drinking better…Rum waits patiently for its moment to step into the spotlight.” CEO of island2island Beverage Company, distributor of Angostura Rum, Allan Shearer notes, “Australians have always loved rum and, traditionally, have been very parochial in their tastes. However, we’ve been seeing a steadily increasing interest in rums from around the globe in recent years, with category growth driven by spiced rums, aged rums and premiumisation. Consumers are being educated by the on and off-premise trade, be it a knowledgeable bartender or a hand-sold bottle of rum in a retail outlet, and premium rums are now viewed in a more similar way to Cognac, Scotch or whisky.” It does suggest promising times ahead and that there will be rewards for those who persist. For decades, rum in Australia has meant Bundaberg, and still does to a


SPIRITS & LIQUEURS

large extent, but there have always been small distilleries nipping at their heels and overseas producers developing their own following – most obviously Bacardi with their white rum. Even New Zealand has hopped on the bandwagon with Stolen Rum. A few years ago, spiced rums were sold in one in five venues and accounted for around 0.5 per cent of spirit sales. That has now increased to two in three venues and 3.6 per cent of sales, largely driven by names such as Captain Morgan, Kraken and Sailor Jerry. Stolen has arrived in the market with a number of rums, but it is its Spiced Rum that attracts interest as the world’s first smoked rum, one of those, “so simple, why did no one else think of it” ideas. The makers liked the smoky notes of certain malts so decided to replicate that with rum. To do so, they used a process of smoking/infusion of a number of ingredients, including Columbian Arabica coffee beans, Moroccan fenugreek, Madagascan vanilla and smoked American hardwood. One cannot but feel that this is the beginning of a new chapter in the book on rum. James France, owner/founder of Vanguard Luxury Brands, which imports the Nicaraguan rum, Flor de Cana, had some interesting thoughts on this sector of the market, noting that the “real growth we’re seeing in the rum market is in spiced rum, which is becoming a real threat to the bourbon market. Most of the traditional rum producers, including Flor de Cana, have decided to leave this sector of the category to the larger, more commercial brands with big promotional budgets.” Offshore, if one thought of rum, it was the Caribbean which immediately came to mind; yes, pirates and treasure and all that entails (perhaps the finest and rarest rum ever made is the extraordinary Cuban rum, Isla del Tesoro, which Castro had made for visiting dignitaries. Meaning ‘Treasure Island’, it came in a small treasure chest with a pirate map). It would surprise many to learn that the world’s largest selling rum is actually from India, McDowell’s No.1 Celebration (18.3 million cases). Bacardi is a smidge behind at 18 million, followed by Tanduay (17 million cases) from the Philippines. Those three rank ninth, tenth and twelfth in world spirit sales (still a long way behind the number one, Jinro soju, a Korean rice spirit with sales of 71 million cases). All that aside, most rum lovers would gravitate to the sunny Caribbean when it comes to the great sipping rums (and plenty of much larger volume styles as well). What promises to be most interesting over the coming decade is the opening of Cuba and where that takes us. Havana Club aside, it is currently rare to see the island’s rums beyond its borders, but there are many fine

producers, plenty of bargain priced rums and some of the finest aged spirits on the planet. One thing is for sure - there will be a monumental battle between Havana Club and Bacardi over the former’s name. It will make a lot of lawyers very rich, but anything we could suggest now as to how it might play out would be nothing more than speculation. With sales around four million cases, and rums of the quality of their ‘Máximo Extra’, not to mention being part of the Pernod Ricard empire, they will be serious players in the market whatever happens. The Cuban ‘style’ of rum is described by Pernod Ricard Spirits Education Manager, Ben Davidson, as becoming defined “in the late 1860s as having an aromatic and dry intensity that was accentuated by the use of copper column stills and the ageing of ‘aguardientes’ to create intense ‘flavour bases’ to be blended with the ‘ron frescos’ and then barrel aged further.” Of course, rum in the Caribbean comes from many different sources. As France says, “Flor de Cana is enjoying renewed growth, having been in this market for nearly eight years now. The aged rum market is growing strongly, and Flor de Cana’s flagship rum, Seven Year Old Grand Reserve, is leading the charge, up 60 per cent on a MAT basis (Feb 2016). Flor de Cana is the market-leading rum, not only in its native Nicaragua, but also across all of Central America. So when Aussie travellers return from that part of the world, they look for Flor de Cana Seven YO Rum.” Closer to home, we have seen some challenges to the Bundy dominance. The recently revived Beenleigh Distillery has had its ups and downs, but now, under the stewardship of Vok Beverages, is producing a range of impressive rums that should give the local market a shake. This is the oldest registered distillery in Australia and follows one of the great, long-forgotten stories of our past. The distillery opened, following the closure of the ‘SS Walrus’, a boat acting as a distillery (in order to sail up and down the Albert River to avoid officials) – an Aussie rumrunner! The distillery also makes one of our most famous rums, Inner Circle. Once

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Always reading on the go?

your news, your views February/March 2016 issue 51

S: HTSR NKINSIGIN BEE I R & G

D RES THIN G S TU T BI CU A E EX FO

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AUSTRALIA’S HIGHEST CIRCULATING LIQUOR INDUSTRY MAGAZINE

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rind, caramel, richness and a nice spirit lift on the finish, which is ideal for balancing the gentle sweetness. A good finish, which lingers impressively. The rum heralding a new era.

Angostura ‘No.1 First Fill Bourbon Cask’ Rum – Citrus and

the preserve of the CSR inner circle, a prized bottle would be given to members of the board and valued clients (from a personal note, my father would occasionally do legal work for CSR and was accordingly rewarded. As he was not a drinker, there was an annual battle between my mother who wanted it for the Christmas pudding and Dad’s fishing buddies. Fortunately, a few bottles snuck through and I’m able to confirm that it is simply more evidence that Australia can make exceptional rum). These days, it is more widely available. The distillery’s position on the highway between Brisbane and the Gold Coast makes it a major tourist destination and the new management is taking full advantage of this. Bundy and Beenleigh are not the only producers offering premium rums. Most Caribbean producers have rums at differing levels and we have finally started to see products to match the great Cognacs and malts. Angostura has the amazing Legacy (some twenty bottles released worldwide, at $25,000 each), and they have the much more affordable, but still excellent new Cask Collection. The first is the ‘No.1

First Fill Bourbon Cask’, a blend of selected rums, aged ten to twelve years and then given an extra year in first fill Bourbon casks, while the second, to be released later in the year, is the ‘No.1 Cask Collection 2, Once Used French Oak’ - a 16-year-old blend, aged for a minimum of ten years in once-used American oak casks, re-casked into French oak that was used for ageing Cognac and then left to mature for six years. Others will follow. This is in addition to their current premiums, ‘1824’ and 1919’. So where to for rum? It will remain a very popular spirit in this country for the foreseeable future. Spiced rums will continue their push, but to what extent will probably depend on the quality, and even more on their marketing. Local producers will continue with their popular rums, but expect to see more and more premium offerings. Craft rums? The difficulty is that they take so much longer to produce than spirits such as craft gins, but they will come. More and more top notch offshore rums will appear on the shelves. In time, premium rum will be seen as the equal of any fine spirit.

nuts, a gentle touch of oak. Some dark chocolate. Has real complexity. There is plenty of sweetness, but nicely balanced. Very hard to find malts and Cognacs of this quality for anything near the price. And that goes for all of these rums. Stolen ‘Spiced Rum’ – I am not a fan of spiced rums in general, but I very much like this one. The slight smokiness is immediately apparent. Then some really intriguing notes of salami and sweetbreads emerge. The subtle smokiness persists throughout. Distributor: Think Spirits  

Flor de Cana ‘Grand Reserva 7 YO’ Rum – Easy to see why this premium rum is so popular. A mature, soft and complex rum with pleasing sweetness. Hints of marmalade and dark chocolate. A lovely sipping rum.

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SPIRITS & LIQUEURS

Beenleigh ‘Port Barrel Infused’ Rum – Orange


STRENGTHEN

Men’s Health

OVER 40

On writing my first article back in December, I received some fantastic feedback from Dave Knox from Liquor Barons in Nedlands, Perth WA. He said he loved the idea of a health article appearing in an alcohol industry magazine. The article resonated with Dave as he had just lost a close friend to cancer. Dave asked me if I would consider mentioning the importance of men’s health over 40 in one of my future articles and I promised him this would be that article. In an incredibly sad twist of fate, at the time of writing this article, I was on a flight from Sydney to Melbourne to pay my respects at the passing of a very close friend of mine - a friend that I had worked with from 2001 to 2006, during my Diageo days. He passed away on Monday, 7 March. The cause was bowel cancer. By John Field, Field Goals Fitness

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artin ‘Marty’ McCormack worked as the Bundaberg Rum Brand Manager in Melbourne when I started with Diageo back in 2001. My first memory of Marty was at my own house-warming party. From memory, I was only a few weeks into my new job at Diageo, but I had made some close working friendships early on, so it felt natural to invite a few work colleagues. I didn’t really expect anyone to say yes however, to my complete surprise, Marty rocked up by himself to join me for a few beers. That was the night I realised the lengths Marty went to for his friends; he was loyal to a fault. Over the following five years at Diageo, our working relationship grew to a close friendship and one that I will continue to treasure for the rest of my life. For those reading this article that have either been touched by the passing of someone close due to cancer or perhaps dealing with it right now, your own stories of heartache or loss will resonate in your own way. It is the disease that does not discriminate by race or age, and while we can’t cure cancer yet, we can do more for ourselves to hopefully detect cancer in its early stages. Put simply, the earlier we detect cancer, the better the chances of survival.  Let’s start with the obvious. Why don’t guys get checked out more often? Because we’re men and generally speaking, our attitude to seeing a GP is, “If I’m not sick, there’s no problem.” But the, “She’ll be right, mate” response simply isn’t ok when you’re over 40. You see the problem with cancer is that it rarely makes you sick straight away. It’s not like having the flu. Any early signs of what might be cancerous could still allow you to function as normal in your daily life. These early signs can also come and go, leaving you to believe that everything really is ok. I’m not trying to be a hypochondriac here, but what I am saying is pay attention to your body; if it’s telling you something, listen to it.

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So, what are the signs? This excerpt is straight from the Cancer Council website. In it’s early stages, bowel cancer often has no symptoms. However, some people with bowel cancer do experience persistent symptoms. These can include: • A change in bowel habit, such as diarrhoea, constipation or smaller, more frequent bowel movements; • A change in appearance of bowel movements; • A feeling of fullness or bloating; • Blood in the stool or on the toilet paper; • Unexplained weight loss; • Weakness or fatique; • A lump in the rectum or anus; • Abdominal pain or swelling. Not everyone with these symptoms has bowel cancer. Other conditions, such as haemorrhoids, diverticulitis (inflammation of pouches in the bowel wall) and some foods or medications, can cause these changes. 

That’s a quick outline of the signs to look out for and the process you’ll go through to detect cancer. What else can we do for ourselves to limit the risks of getting cancer in the first place? Since Adam was a boy, we’ve been told that moderation is the key to our long-term quality of life. So, if you’re over 40 and you’ve had a fairly large social life over the past 20 years, might I recommend two things? 1. Go see your GP. Just go and do it. 2. Slot in a couple of alcohol free days into your week.  I’ll finish on this note. Of the many feelings I went through in the weeks after Marty’s passing, one of the most impactful memories I had was attending his wake. It was at the New Bay Hotel in Brighton, Victoria. The hotel was full. Full of the lives that Marty had touched and that had come to pay their respects. Cancer doesn’t just affect the person who has it; its reach is far and wide. If an early detection from a visit to your GP means you can avoid a room full of people struggling to come to terms with a life cut short, it’s got to be worth it. RIP Martin McCormack. My friend.

Short-term changes in bowel function are very common and usually do not indicate a serious problem. However, if you have any of these symptoms for more than four weeks, see your doctor for a check up.

So now you know what to look out for, what’s the process for getting checked out? This is where I believe most guys choose to take the tough guy approach and avoid getting a check up as it suggests an invasive or intrusive process. I’d like to put blokes’ minds at ease by listing what a check up looks like. It is done in three stages, depending on what needs to be checked. In most cases, it will simply end with a general test.

1. GENERAL TEST

2. SCREENING FOR BOWEL CANCER

3. TEST TO FIND CANCER

This is done via a physical examination by your GP and can include a DRE (digital rectum examination). For those blokes out there that think this may be uncomfortable, I’d ask you to Google Pap smear for females who, by the way, accept this as part of life. You may also have a blood test to determine your red blood cell count.

Screening is the process of looking for polyps or cancer in people who don’t have any symptoms. It is particularly important for bowel cancer, which often has no symptoms in its early stages. This process is a blood test called a FOBT (faecal occult blood test). A FOBT does not diagnose cancer, but it can help your doctor decide whether to do further tests, such as a colonoscopy. 

See ‘colonoscopy’, ‘virtual colonoscopy’ and ‘barium enema’ - all varying degrees of the process to locate cancer in the bowel or bowel walls.

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Whole hop flowers,

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INFORM

BEER & CIDER

CRAFT Brewpubs Brewing beer in Australia has been a part of the landscape since early settlement, when the governors of the time recognised the importance of a local brewing industry for, among other things, the lower alcohol content beer possessed; a welcomed difference to the more readily available rum and other spirits at the time. The early success of local brewing was ‘patchy’ at best but, nonetheless, by the late 19th century there were over 300 breweries scattered around the country. That number reduced to just 30 in the 1940s however, but again today there are over 140 craft breweries, and craft beers in particular are enjoying a renaissance in popularity. Putting the argument of ‘what defines craft beer’ to one side, drinks trade popped into a few breweries to check out their beers (of course) and see what they’re all doing differently this time round. Oh, and every brewery had to have a bar.

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n early trailblazer for boutique beers (and brewpubs) was Philip Sexton, founder of Matilda Bay Brewing Company and the Sail and Anchor pub in Freemantle, in 1984. His efforts proved to be exceptionally popular and a public listing ensued, leading to a takeover by CUB and the eventual closing of the brewpub in 2010 (while no longer operational, you can still see parts of the brewery at the pub today). But what was clear from the success of brands such as America’s Cup Ale and Redback was the brewpub itself. Western Australia has continuously proven to be a hotbed of craft brewing with highly successful (and awarded) outfit; Feral Brewing opened in 2002 and the iconic Little Creatures still hosts thirsty customers at its Freemantle brewery. Having brought to life two of the best-known craft breweries in Australia, the rest of the country needed to get on board, and while there were some high quality offerings opening from the mid-eighties, it was the early 2000s that saw a sharp increase in craft breweries and brewpubs.

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Above: Little Creatures Below: Sail and Anchor


Rocks Brewing Company

Young Henrys Brewed with conviction. A unique craft beer brand, developed from the creative mind of founder Mark Fethers and within Head Brewer Scotty Morgan’s garage. But in 2008, the team moved into larger pastures with the opening of The Brewery and Brewery Bar, two essential elements to bringing the beer - just like the kind your “grandfather’s, grandfather drank” - to the community. Located in Alexandria, New South Wales, Rocks Brewing Co. has created a special, comfortable home, open to all of the public to enjoy. Morgan says the long, wooden picnic style tables are the perfect setup for families and large groups of friends to get together and guzzle down some Hangman Pale Ales. Yet, the beer and the brewery would not be the same without the game-changing Brewery Bar. The mix of Australian craft beer and the best of American-style cuisine is what seasoned foodies might call irresistible. The style of beer home-brewed just a few metres away pairs perfectly with the mouth-watering, smoked beef brisket and fall-off-thebone, Louisiana style hot wings. Marketing and Sales Assistant Sally Turki says it’s all about that unique experience. “It’s all these different things, that people don’t think about,” Sally says. 160 Bourke Rd, (Driveway J) Alexandria, NSW 2016 02 9669 3600 Opening hours: Monday – Sunday 7.30am - late

Named after co-owner and founder Oscar McMahon’s son, who is only one year older than the budding brewery itself, Young Henrys has not only entered the thrilling playing field of craft beer but has added a new twist, separating itself from all the others. Based on the concept of blending the local community’s style with its distinctive artistic culture, taking a sip of a Young Henrys Newtowner or Natural Lager is equivalent to the feeling you get when sitting front row at your favourite local venue, listening to the latest and greatest musician strum away on his guitar. At least, that was what the founders hoped their audience would feel. In order to create this ultimate experience, the owners put their heads together and decided that there was no better way to get the people through their door than to offer their beers directly on site at the brewery. Thus was born the ‘tasting bar’. Marketing Director Andy Miller says the tasting bar was the key ingredient needed to get the people on their side. “It was an opportunity to involve, especially the local community, in the goingons of the brewery and, on top of that, to have a space where we can bring people together around a lot of the collaborations that we do,” said Miller. The results of the tasting bar proved that people wanted music, art and culture to be at the heart of the beer and, at Young Henrys the people get what the people want. 76 Wilford Street, Newtown, NSW 2042 02 9519 0048 Opening hours: Monday - Saturday 10am - 7pm Sunday 12pm - 7pm

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Bridge Road Brewers pioneered the way for many craft beer breweries in Australia by braving the odds and becoming the first of its kind to bring craft beer to the typically wine-dominant location of Beechworth.

Two Birds Brewing Inspired by the volume of craft beer and amount of breweries present in the United States, Jayne Lewis and Danielle Allen trekked forth relentlessly to open Australia’s first female-owned brewing company, Two Birds Brewing. The venue resides in a historical canning facility, maintaining an industrial atmosphere, and is the only craft brewery in Melbourne’s western suburbs. The two ‘birds’ and long-lasting friends came together in pursuit of incorporating the different flavours and food they eat along their travels, paired with approachability. Although their fresh brews are distributed across Australia, such favourites as the Golden Ale and Taco Beer are renowned locally as well. Murals in Two Birds Brewing identify key points in Two Birds’ journey, such as the Melbourne City Skyline, the West Gate Bridge, which connects Melbourne’s CBD to the western suburbs, and a sign pointing to Perth where Jayne and Danielle originally met and grew up. Two Birds Brewing Tasting Room nests in the front of the brewery and is open Friday through to Sunday, when you can stop in for “good food to have with good beer” by London’s own chef Matt Beard. 136 Hall Street, Spotswood, VIC 3015 03 9762 0000 Opening hours: Friday 4pm - 11pm Saturday 12pm - 11pm Sunday 12pm - 8pm

Owner and founder Ben Kraus could see the potential for a booming craft beer market when nobody else could. In fact, Kraus and the brewery initially struggled with explaining the concept to restaurants and pubs who were less than eager to jump on the craft beer train. On rare occasions though, they came across some who were desperate for something new and fresh on their shelves. So, he took advantage of this gap in the market and thus was born Bridge Road Brewers. Right from the start, the business decision was made that the commercial brew house, known by locals as the cellar door, would include a bottling facility and a signature bar for tastings. The ability to teach people about the beer and allow them to taste each brew was crucial in building his brand and developing a name for his craft. “It’s much easier to tell a brand story when you’ve got people in front of you and you can talk to them, get feedback and educate as well,” said Kraus. Today, the vibrant venue attracts a mix of all people. Whether you’re local or foreign, aged 18 or 92, alone or attending a massive family reunion, all is welcome to walk through the cellar door. Old Coach House Brewers Lane, 50 Ford Street, Beechworth, VIC 3747 03 5728 2703 Opening hours: Monday - Wednesday 11am - 4pm Thursday 11am – 5 pm Friday - Sunday 11am – 10pm

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BEER & CIDER

Bridge Road Brewers


LION ON O N0 0079 7 /T /TP //TP/ TP/RC T R


From banking to brewing, Denham D’Silva discovered his passion for beer while studying economics at university in America during the height of the craft beer revolution. Denham took the inspiration he found in the USA and brought it back to his home country of Australia, to the ever popular Barossa Valley wine region. “I knew that the culture of the people in Barossa Valley were the type that appreciated good beverages and experimentations, making them the perfect clients for what I was trying to do,” said Denham. What he was trying to do, exactly, was something no Aussie had done before. Denham was one of the first of his kind to bring about the idea of pairing exquisite craft beer with delicious food. With this advanced discovery came the creation of his restaurant, The Brasserie, which features an outstanding list of local beers and local produce.

Shambles Brewery “Brew great beer and share it with people,” has always been creator and Bar Manager Cornel Ianculovici’s main ambition. Cornel had always dreamed of opening a brewery in Hobart, Tasmania and has succeeded in bringing quality beer to locals in the area. The cosy, warm-lit venue is a warehouse with a brewery in one corner and an internal beer garden surrounding it; although, this has not always been such an attractive place to spend an evening. Shambles gained its name from the original structure of the building, which was an old meat warehouse full of accumulated objects.

When customers walk through the threshold of this one-of-akind brewpub, they can expect to find beer not only on tap, but also incorporated into the food itself. Through hard work, extensive creativity and a little bit of bravery, Denham and his team were able to accomplish the ultimate dream of bringing their craft beer to Australia and their experiences to its people. 2A Murray Street, (next to Heinemann Park) Tanunda, NSW 5352 08 8563 0696 Opening hours: Thursday - Sunday 12pm - 10pm

Cornel and his team came together to create a building with a lasting impression, keeping the original industrial nature of the building. Today you’re greeted with handsome amounts of wood throughout the brewery to keep the flame burning in the giant fire pit at its base. At Shambles, the root of concern rests in experiencing beer at its source and learning just how it’s made. With plenty of beer on tap and a communal tennis table, Shambles is just the place for a tasty local brew where quality is at the core. 222 Elizabeth Street, Hobart, TAS 7000 Opening hours: Wednesday - Thursday 4pm - late Friday – Sunday 12pm - late

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Barossa Valley Brewing


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EVER WONDERED HOW CIDER IS JUDGED? Cider Australia’s main aim is to develop and promote the production of cider and perry in Australia. This is achieved by providing a forum for learning, development, information sharing and comparison; all of which takes place at the Australian Cider Awards. These awards combined with associated masterclasses, tastings and festivals provide a suitable opportunity for the expertise of the appointed international judge to be shared with the wider audience of cider makers and enthusiasts. Jump behind the scenes and immerse yourself in the world of cider judging; the way it’s done by Australia’s biggest annual show. By Warwick Billings

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or the judging process, Cider Australia selects and invites five experienced cider tasters to form a panel. One of these tasters is a respected international judge – which brings global insight to our national competition – and there are also two associate or trainee judges, who are there to gain experience at the prestigious awards. Their makers enter the ciders into a category or class, which is explained in detail in the ‘Style Guide’ – available from cideraustralia.org.au. It is important that each cider is entered appropriately, otherwise it becomes difficult for judges to assess them. For example, a modern sweet cider going up against a traditional dry cider will create a deep contrast and thus, one cider may bias the result of the other. On the day, the ciders are organised and poured by a team of stewards. In order to ensure a ‘blind tasting’ they are only referred to by their numbers, which are assigned randomly. Between each class of ciders, the judges leave the room to discuss them. While the panel is out of the room, the stewards take this time to reset the glasses and re-pour them. The Chief Steward will then notify the panel that it is okay for them to return. With entries only referred to by their class and number, the process is completely impartial and thereby fair. Once the judges have finished tasting, they score the ciders and make some notes about each of them. At the end of the class, the judges give

their scores to the ‘Chair of Judges’ or the ‘Panel Chair’ if there is more than one group of judges. The chairperson then invites some discussion on each of the entries, particularly if there is some variation in the scores given. A final score for each judge will then be agreed on. However, if there has been a large degree of discrepancy between the scores, the chairperson may ask for a re-pour and for the judges to assess again. For example, if two judges have given a cider a gold medal and another two have awarded a bronze, then the judges will be asked to reassess. If they still cannot come to a conclusion, the associate judges opinion may also be considered, but not their score. Once everyone has come to a decision, the judges notes are collated to produce a “feedback comment” reflective of the general consensus. This is seen as an important feature, as it details the specifics about where the cider went right and/or wrong. For example, a typical comment might read: “nice colour, lifted green apple aromas, balanced palate and good length,” or highlight the fault or reason for not scoring well if that information is relevant. At the end of the day, the best scoring ciders in each trophy category are re-judged. This is also done blind in order to determine which of the ciders is the best of the best and as such, deserves a big, shiny trophy.

A SHORT HISTORY The first Australian Cider Awards took place in 2011, in the provincial city of Orange, New South Wales. Developed as a response to the growing interest in cider and the rapid and revolutionary growth of the market, it seems as though there had never been a more appropriate time to see the best of the best go head to head at a national show. Since then, the Australian Cider Awards have grown to around 160 entries and are now judged in Melbourne.

ENTRY IS OPEN TO ANY CIDER THAT IS COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE IN AUSTRALIA AND AS OF LAST YEAR, KEG CIDERS MAY ALSO ENTER, ALONG WITH BOTTLES AND CANS. ENTRIES OPEN 17 JUNE, 2016

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A Powerhouse for Premium Wine

Western Australia It has been 50 years since a small vineyard was planted near Mount Barker in the mid ‘60s, followed the next year by another at Margaret River, heralding the start of the modern era of winemaking in Western Australia. By Ray Jordan

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ig companies in the east were looking with considerable interest at what was happening in the west with representatives from Seppelt, Yalumba and Penfolds seeing the significant potential even then for the new regions south of Perth. Even the legendary Maurice O’Shea, who never visited, believed that areas near Albany should be well suited to viticulture based on climate data. In the half century since, WA’s wine industry has grown to be a powerhouse at the premium end for wine in Australia, and it is little wonder that bigger companies still look to the west – but now of course they look with compelling evidence that what started as an experiment and an idea has turned into a triumph. Accolade Wines, through a sequence of acquisitions - which started when Hardys bought

Houghton many years ago - has considerable interest in the state, with wines under the Houghton and Brookland Valley brands consistently among the best released. The recent release of the Jack Mann 2013 is further evidence of the quality of wines being made by Ross Pamment and his team and strong endorsement of Hardys’ original decision to invest in the state. Other releases include the fabulous Thomas Yule Shiraz and the highly awarded Gladstones Cabernet, which provides redundant evidence of how good Margaret River cabernet sauvignon can be. Treasury some years ago also recognised the potential when it acquired Devil’s Lair. In recent years, the group has ramped up the range with considerable focus on the development of new era, super premium chardonnays and cabernets

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But along with winemakers in the rest of the country, WA producers also recognised consumer preferences were changing to slightly lighter and less robust wines of greater elegance and refinement.

under the 9th Chamber range. The initial releases have been outstanding and point to the refinement in style based on high quality fruit and tweaks in winemaking. Rathbone Group some time ago acquired Xanadu from the ashes of its failure as a listed entity and has turned it into one of the most exciting producers in the state. With winemaker Glenn Goodall at the helm, the range of chardonnays and cabernets in particular have been outstanding and pushed it into the top echelon of the state’s producers. The good thing is that despite all the success at wine shows and critical acclaim from wine scribes and the industry in general, the state’s winemakers have not been content to rest on their laurels. And sharper focus on raising the bar even higher has resulted in consistency and quality across the board

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that even the most optimistic early pioneer in the 60s might have been hard pressed to imagine. Chardonnay has been the variety where new thinking on style has made the most impact. For many years, WA chardonnays, led by Leeuwin’s formidable Art Series, consistently rated among Australia’s best. Others such as Cullen, Vasse Felix and Moss Wood were also in the mix at the very top of the tree.

But along with winemakers in the rest of the country, WA producers also recognised consumer preferences were changing to slightly lighter and less robust wines of greater elegance and refinement. The trap could have been stripping the inherent power of


cooler days are a precious commodity when making great Wines. [ Stirling rangeS - WeStern auStralia ]

In winemaking, time, patience and weather are precious commodities. Ferngrove Wines, in Frankland River, is one of the world’s most isolated wine regions and estates. While this isolation makes the logistics of winemaking tough, it is also what makes Ferngrove wines distinctly different. Our isolated setting, growing conditions, distance from the coast and gravelly soils are perfect for producing cool climate styles. Mild days and cool nights help the grapes to ripen slowly; encouraging intense flavours, fine acid and tannins, resulting in wines that reflect the true character of Frankland River.

WWW.ferngrove.com.au


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these wines back too far, but it is reassuring to see that in general they have refined their chardonnays, introduced more wild yeast ferments, less new oak and sometimes earlier picking, to create wines of subtle elegance that lose little in terms of power. This is especially the case in Margaret River, where the strength of the region has always been its power and intensity. Even the great Leeuwin chardonnay has been refined albeit subtly in recent years, while others such as Cullen, Xanadu and Vasse Felix have consistently lifted the standard to new level. Of course, it is not just Margaret River where this has been evident. Other producers such as Howard Park in the Great Southern, Ferngrove and Fogarty have also joined the party and the state’s chardonnays have never been better. Another significant development has been with shiraz. For many years, shiraz was considered – mistakenly – as something of a second class citizen to cabernet sauvignon. It is clearly evident from tastings over the past few years that winemakers across the state are putting additional work into achieving more with this great workhorse variety. In the Great Southern, the shiraz from Frankland River in particular and also Mount Barker have wonderful velvety richness. Wines from Cherubino, Houghton, Ferngrove, Howard Park and many others from these regions are demonstrating how good this

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variety can be. Some exceptional recent vintages also help. But perhaps the most exciting development has been in Margaret River, where a different less opulent style has emerged. Because of the significant variability of soils in Margaret River, the winemakers have had to choose the sites carefully. The results are superb, with producers such as Deep Woods from Fogarty Wine Group, Cape Mentelle, Vasse Felix and Leeuwin Estate, where the variety was introduced relatively recently after a long hiatus, producing some truly exceptional wines. When it comes to refinement, the king of varieties, cabernet sauvignon, hasn’t missed out either. While the wines from Margaret River stand supreme even on a world stage, those from Frankland River and Mount Barker are showing what they can do. Producers such as Ferngrove, Forest Hill, Howard Park and Cherubino have released a number of excellent wines where the inherent softness and suppleness is evident. In Margaret River, the cabernets simply go from strength to strength. Recent releases from Fogarty, Cullen, Moss Wood, Xanadu and Devil’s Lair have been stunning. And the most recent Gladstones Cabernet from Accolade is a fitting testament to the many whose name it carries. Another more recent development has been further refinement at the top end into the super

premium category. For instance, last year Cullen released the Vanya Cabernet 2012, which with a price of $350 is the most expensive current release tale wine ever in WA. Winemaker Vanya Cullen said the decision to make the wine and keep it separate from the flagship Diana Madeline – a cabernet blend – was not made until the blending stage when the quality of the wine was clearly evident. Vanya Cullen might be the first to take Margaret River wines into unchartered high priced territory, but if a tasting of other wines in the region is any indicator this won’t be the last. It is a sign of a maturing region as winemakers and vignerons understand more about getting the best from their fruit and refine their wine styles.


Ferngrove Winery

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Premium

Chardonnay $20+ Chardonnay - the world’s most popular white wine varietal as well as the most widely planted in Australia. As for the $20+ segment, it is the segment driving all categories of wine currently, with the average purchase in retail priced at $21.82 RRP. CHARDONNAY AND OAK

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Chardonnay is naturally a neutral grape variety, with flavour shaped instead by terroir and the winemaker. In Burgundy, winemakers have traditionally added flavour to chardonnay by fermenting and maturing the grape in new oak barrels. As the grape made its way around the world in the 1970s, winemakers in other markets also adopted this method, but the influence of oak increased. So much so, that by the 1980s chardonnay was known as a wine that tasted - for better or worse - like oak. More recently however, the pendulum has swung back, with some winemakers going as far as to not use any oak at all. These more varietal and regional driven styles have their following, as do the styles abundant with oak,

but good oak handling is gaining more merit. In this tasting, judges gave points to the wines where oak was present but not overpowering; where the wine displayed depth of flavour as well as varietal and regional character. The chardonnays on the following pages highlight regions across Australia and NZ, including the Adelaide Hills, Eden Valley, Margaret River, Mornington Peninsula, Orange, Tasmania, Tumbarumba, Yarra Valley and Marlborough. Chardonnays from the warmer regions present tropical fruit flavours, while the cooler climate wines are crisp and full of citrus and minerality. There’s a good mix here of winemakers using the local environment to diversify flavour, and those still taking note from the great chardonnays of Burgundy.


ANNA MANTCHAKIDI Anna Mantchakidi is Taylors Wines National Sales Support Manager, charged with coordinating the Clare Valley winery’s growing sales team. Her interest in wine began during a role with Vintage Cellars Wine Club, while she was studying to become a Forensic Psychologist! When Anna isn’t enjoying a glass of riesling (her favourite drop) she’s getting back into one of her favourite hobbies – classic cars from the 50s to the 90s.

CLIVE HARTLEY Educator Clive Hartley has been involved in selling and promoting the virtues of wine for over 30 years in both the UK and Australia. He is Director of the Sydney Wine Academy, as well as author of the Australian Wine Guide. Clive is also an Honorary Life Member of the Australian Sommeliers Association and a member of the Wine Communicators of Australia.

KATHERINE CANDY Katherine has over twenty years’ experience across sales, trade and brand marketing in both the Australian and New Zealand liquor industries. In her current role as National Wine Specialist for Pernod Ricard Australia, she regularly hosts tastings for wine journalists, buying panels and educators. She is on the committee of the Wine Communicators of Australia and holds the Wine & Spirits Education Trust Level 3 certificate.

BEN MOECHTAR Many will know Ben Moechtar for his record of achievements, including being named Dux of the inaugural Court of Master Sommeliers ‘Certified Sommelier’ course (Australia). Ben was also the first President of Sommeliers in Australia and has a career in wine spanning 25 years. Today, Ben owns and operates Delicado Foods and Delicado Wines in Sydney.

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CASSEGRAIN WINES 2015 EDITION NOIR CHARDONNAY

BROKENWOOD 2015 FOREST EDGE VINEYARD CHARDONNAY

RRP: $28 Distributor: Cassegrain Wines Region: Central Ranges and New England A warm, spicy oak wine with a tropical fruit nose. The palate is wellbalanced, lending to a clean finish.

RRP: $55 Distributor: Samuel Smith & Son Region: Orange A very pleasant wine with a stone fruit nose. Subtle oak highlights and good texture give it a great finish.

LOBETHAL ROAD 2014 BACCHANT CHARDONNAY

BROCKENCHACK 2015 SINGLE VINEYARD EDEN VALLEY CHARLI JAYE CHARDONNAY

RRP: $45 Distributor: Chace Agencies (SA), Lobethal Road (NSW & ACT), Liquorious (QLD) and Bentley Wine Company (VIC) Region: Adelaide Hills Notes of buttery ripe stone fruit and spicy oak. Its warm minerality and good length give it a great finish.

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RRP: $36 Distributor: DeVine Cellars (WA), Wine Wise Consulting (SA), Secret Barrel (VIC), Select Cellars (NSW), AIWW QLD (South East QLD & Tweed Coast) and Brockenchack Wines (rest of QLD and Australia) Region: Eden Valley Lovely notes of tropical fruit on the nose. This well-textured wine has a warm stone fruit finish and nicely integrated oak.

MCWILLIAM’S WINES 2013 842 CHARDONNAY RRP: $70 Distributor: McWilliam’s Wines Region: Tumbarumba A crisp wine, with fresh stone fruit and wellbalanced minerality. Refreshing.

HILL-SMITH ESTATE 2014 ADELAIDE HILLS CHARDONNAY RRP: $30 Distributor: Samuel Smith & Sons Region: Adelaide Hills Very nicely integrated oak and a hint of apricot on the nose. The tropical fruit highlights make for a lovely finish.

MOUNTADAM 2015 HIGH EDEN CHARDONNAY

PIPERS BROOK ESTATE 2013 CHARDONNAY

RRP: $41 Distributor: Mezzanine Region: High Eden A well-balanced wine with a perfumed nose of stone fruit. Its oak flavour and nice length give it a great finish.

RRP: $38 Distributor: red+white Region: Tasmania A savoury wine with notes of ripe, tropical fruits. A very well balanced finish with fresh acidity.


BAY OF FIRES 2014 CHARDONNAY RRP: $42.99 Distributor: Accolade Wines Region: Tasmania A lovely nose of ripe, stone fruit oak. Its spicy oak and warm, tropical fruit flavours make for a great finish.

WILLOW BRIDGE ESTATE 2014 G1-10 CHARDONNAY RRP: $32 Distributor: red+white Region: Western Australia A fine, linear wine with a rich and meaty nose. A little spice on the palate and hints of fresh lemon.

BRANCOTT ORMOND ESTATE 2010 CHARDONNAY RRP: $27.99 Distributor: Pernod Ricard Australia Region: Marlborough Notes of passionfruit and a touch of lemon on the nose. This wine has great ripeness and texture.

BROKENWOOD 2015 INDIGO VINEYARD CHARDONNAY RRP: $55 Distributor: Samuel Smith & Son Region: Beechworth A pleasant nose of white flowers and grapefruit. A very fine mineral palate with well-integrated oak.

FOUR ACES 2014 CHARDONNAY RRP: $35 Distributor: Distinctive Vintners Region: Manjimup Notes of peach and melon on the nose of this generously flavoured wine. The palate is nicely balanced with an oak finish.

HARDYS 2014 HRB CHARDONNAY RRP: $29.99 Distributor: Accolade Wines Region: Pemberton, Margaret River and Adelaide Hills A fine and lively wine with honeyed popcorn and nutty notes. Its juicy palate has tones of fruit and oak.

HANDPICKED COLLECTION 2013 CHARDONNAY

COLDSTREAM HILLS 2014 CHARDONNAY

RRP: $49.99 Distributor: DMG Fine Wines Region: Mornington Peninsula Notes of lemon and green melon, and a touch of vanilla on the nose. A beautiful wine with a sleek, creamy palate.

RRP: $34.99 Distributor: Treasury Wine Estates Region: Yarra Valley An elegant and varietal wine with lemon and buttery notes. This wine has an oak and nectarine finish.

BROOKLAND VALLEY ESTATE 2014 CHARDONNAY

FERMOY ESTATE 2015 RESERVE CHARDONNAY

RRP: $47.99 Distributor: Accolade Wines Region: Margaret River A nose of cashew and lemon gives this wine a complex profile. Hints of nectarine lend to a harmonious palate.

RRP: $50 Distributors: Fermoy Estate (WA) and Twelve Bottles (QLD, NSW & VIC). Region: Margaret River An elegant and vibrant wine, with nectarine and white peach aromas. This wine is mineral driven and has a light oak finish.

HARDYS 2014 EILEEN HARDY CHARDONNAY RRP: $94.99 Distributor: Accolade Wines Region: Tasmania and Yarra Valley *Available from May Notes of buttery lemon tart and apple cider make this an especially nice wine. The palate is well textured with citrus accents.

drinks trade’s Tasting Bench will be tasting alternative reds and rosé in the June/July issue. Contact hannah@hipmedia.com.au if you would like more information or to enter your wine.

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CONNECT 821 SOUTH MARLBOROUGH SAUVIGNON BLANC

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Distributed by: Treasury Wine Estates RRP: Contact TWE for pricing

THE OLD BLOKE & THE THREE YOUNG BLONDES + THE ATHAZAGORAPHOBIC CAT Distributed by: Young & Rashleigh Wine Merchants (ACT), Empire Liquor (SA), Thomas Chin (NT), The Wine Company (VIC), The Wine Tradition (QLD), Inglewood Wine Merchants (NSW), Off The Vine (WA) and David Johnstone & Associates (TAS) RRP: $200 d’Arenberg has released two new, ultra-premium wines to the market and they are no exception to the brand’s quirky naming convention. The Old Bloke & The Three Young Blondes is a shiraz dominant blend, with roussane, viognier and marsanne, while The Athazagoraphobic Cat is made from a blend of sagrantino and cinsault, varieties native to Italy and Southern France. Some might joke that the old bloke is Chester and the three young blondes are his daughters - the fifth generation who will carry on the d’Arenberg tradition - while The Athazagoraphobic Cat is named in memory of a plain tabby called Audrey Hepburn, nicknamed Ordinary. Suffering from the fear of being forgotten, Audrey was often seen around the winery trotting close to Chester’s heels. The pair are individually packaged in paper wraps and unique letterpress labels that explain the story behind the name and d’Arenberg’s iconic red stripe.

WOLF BLASS 2016 LUXURY COLLECTION Distributed by: Treasury Wine Estates Wolf Blass has released its 2016 Luxury Collection. The collection features five of the most premium and best Wolf Blass wines, including the White Label Piccadilly Chardonnay 2015 (RRP $33.99), Grey Label McLaren Vale Shiraz 2013 (RRP $44.99), Grey Label Langhorne Creek Cabernet Shiraz 2013 (RRP $44.99), Medlands Vineyard Platinum Label Shiraz 2012 (RRP $199.99) and the 40th vintage release of Black Label. The Black Label Cabernet Shiraz Malbec 2012 retails for $129.99 and is being hailed as the finest Black Label yet, inspired by the 40 remarkable vintages that precede it. True to style, the 2012 vintage is a sophisticated, multi-layered wine with a complex composition of intense fruit and magnificent structure.

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Named after a vast mountain range in the Southern Alps of Marlborough, 821 South is a crisp wine that is ripe with citrus and tropical fruits. The wine has been released exclusively to the on-premise. Made using grapes from some of the most sought after vineyards in Marlborough in addition to state of the art winemaking facilities, Angus McPherson, TWE’s Managing Director for Australia and New Zealand, said, “You’d be hard pressed to find a wine of similar quality at its price point.”

2015 PARINGA ESTATE CHARDONNAYS Distributed by: Paringa Estate RRP: $27 (Peninsula) & $40 (Estate) The first vines of Paringa Estate were planted in 1985 in the classic cool climate sub-region of Red Hill at an altitude of 140 metres. From the first vintage in 1988 with three tonnes of fruit, now an average season processes around 200 tonnes of fruit using a distinctly unique Lyre trellis system. 2015 Peninsula Chardonnay: The bouquet is floral and fruit driven with citrus and stone fruit aromas. The palate has rich stone fruit flavours, good texture and a persistent long finish. While this wine has been made for current drinking it will build further complexity over the next three to six years. 2015 Estate Chardonnay: The bouquet has a complex floral lift of citrus and stone fruit, with some secondary barrel ferment lees aromas. The palate has cool climate white fleshy stone fruits, citrus and savoury nutty barrel ferment flavours. The wine has good palate weight and fine natural acid that leads to a long and persistent finish. Six to eight years bottle age recommended.


Most Admired Wine Brand in New Zealand. & in the Top Ten Most Admired Wine Brands of the World Villa Maria fits the bill perfectly. A brand virtually everyone admires, respects and, most importantly, drinks. A flag bearer for everything that is good about New Zealand. CHRISTIAN DAVIS Editor of Drinks International

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CONNECT LONDON GLORY ENGLISH PUB ALE

Following a welcomed reception in the United Kingdom, Beer Importers & Distributors has introduced London Glory to the Australian market. A traditional English Pub Ale from the Master Brewers at Greene King, London Glory combines Crystal malt with English and American hops to create a rich and fruity flavour. London Glory is currently available in 330ml x 24 bottles and will be rolled out in kegs in the coming months.

THE ROGUE TRADER INDIA PALE ALE Distributed by: Lion RRP: Contact Lion for pricing The Rogue Trader is a new India Pale Ale from the brewers of James Squire. Available at James Squire Brewhouses, this seasonal ale has been made using big and brassy hops to produce a refreshing IPA with big hop flavour and warm rounded malt. This is accompanied by a cleansing finish and the trademark bitterness that fans of the Squire range are fond of. As for the name, The Rogue Trader pays homage to James Squire himself, who always took the road less travelled.

QUIET DEEDS LIMITED EDITION LAMINGTON ALE RETURNS! After the sell-out success of the first release, Quiet Deeds has brewed a second batch of the Limited Edition Lamington Ale. Contact Red Island Group for stock and pricing info.

Distributed by: East 9th Brewing RRP: Off-trade: $18.99 4x330ml bottles On-trade: $9.00 per 330ml bottle Following the launch of two category-breaking products – Lick Pier Ginger Beer and Fog City Red Sangria – East 9th Brewing is set to release Australia’s first Alcoholic Root Beer in April. Future Memoirs Of A Root Beer will aim to introduce and attract Australian consumers to the new movement of acoholic root beers worldwide; the category valued at $111 million USD last year. Made from a blend of sassafras, vanilla, cinnamon and ginger, Future Memoirs Of A Root Beer will provide an interesting and sessionable alternative to traditional root beer.

MALT FICTION SESSION ALE Distributed by: Peter Lynn, Director of Sales and Distribution – peter@majellawines.com.au RRP: $70 per carton Following the successful launch of its ‘13’ brew, South Australian brewing company Malt Fiction has released Session Ale, its second release and first in can. Made from all natural ingredients, the brewery has added Amarillo hops to make the brew slightly bitter, fruity and appropriate for lengthy drinking. As for the 375ml can, Malt Fiction brewers Jared Birbeck, Peter Lynn, Antony Tropeano and new recruit Jarrad Hyde say it’s to help increase the quality and quantity of their brews, with plans in place to release several limited edition beers in the coming months.

drinks trade|73

BEER & CIDER

FUTURE MEMOIRS OF A ROOT BEER

RRP: On-trade: 24.99 per sixpack Off-trade: $8-9 per bottle Distributed by: Beer Importers & Distributors


CEDILLA COCKTAILS

AOX SPRITZ 60ml Cedilla Acai Liqueur Club soda Method: Add Cedilla to a glass with ice. Fill to the top with club soda and stir well. Garnish with a lime wedge or twist.

AMAZONI 30ml Cedilla Acai Liqueur 60ml Gin 30ml Campari Method: Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass with ice. Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass or serve on the rocks in a rocks glass. Garnish with a citrus twist.

CEDILLA SOUR 60ml Leblon Cachaca 45ml Fresh lime juice 30ml Simple syrup 15ml Cedilla Acai Liqueur 15ml Egg white (optional) Method: Combine all of the ingredients, except the Cedilla, in a mixing glass and add ice. Shake well and strain into an ice filled rocks glass. Garnish with a float of Cedilla on the surface of the drink.


CONNECT BEENLEIGH CANE CUTTER VODKA

SPIRITS

Distributor: Vok Beverages RRP: $55 Beenleigh Artisan Distillery isn’t just making rum anymore; it’s now also making vodka. Using Queensland cane, water and yeast, Beenleigh has developed an artisan vodka that has smoothness, full body and residual sweetness. Beenleigh Cane Cutter Vodka is also gluten-free, making it both allergy-friendly and unique to the market.

THE PINK PIGEON SPICED RUM Distributor: Samuel Smith & Son RRP: $58 Samuel Smith & Son has partnered with Berry Bros. & Rudd to bring the Mauritius rum, The Pink Pigeon to Australia. The spiced rum is named after the rare bird found on the island and is made from the oldest distillery in Mauritius. It is unaged to secure a smooth, light and elegant taste as the canvas for the natural botanical infusions of bourbon vanilla, orchid petals and orange peel. The Pink Pigeon has floral honey notes and hints of white flower and gentian, while ried orange peel from Reunion Island gives The Pink Pigeon an extra zingy lift and a fresh, lively edge.

VDKA 6100 Distributor: Artisan Spirit Merchants RRP: $69 (750ml) and $85 (1 Litre) New Zealand’s VDKA 6100 is now available in Australia. The ultra-premium vodka is sourced from the natural environment of Reporoa on the North Island near Lake Taupo and has reached critical acclaim in the US since it launched eighteen months ago. VDKA 6100 is fermented using seasonal whey and a strain of yeast that has been cultivated in Reporoa for over 30 years. It is then finely distilled and filtered through a complex filtration system that includes carbon dosing and rockets to strip out any remaining impurities. The result is a smooth and creamy vodka that has hints of citrus and pepper. VDKA 6100 is gluten, sugar and additive free. 76|drinks trade

FLYING DUTCHMAN NUMBER 3 Distributed by: Savant Spirits RRP: $79.95 Flying Dutchman Number 3 is a new, three-year-old, premium dark rum that’s bucking the trend in production…This is a rum, made for whisky drinkers. The rum is made from pure cane molasses sourced from Barbados and then aged in three types of barrels, including re-coopered Oloroso Sherry and Pedro Ximinez butts and virgin American Oak casks. Together, the pot distillation, high quality molasses and mix of wood have created a rum that blends the sweet, caramel notes of rum, with the woody, spicy, oaky nuances of whisky. On the nose, there’s banana, wood, spice, creamy toffee and dark chocolate notes, while the palate leads to mellow flavours of oak, caramel sweetness and citrus. The new release follows on from the Zuidam Distillery’s successful launch of Flying Dutchman White Rum and Flying Dutchman No. 1.

JIM BEAM RELEASES NEW PACKAGING Jim Beam announced a global packaging redesign in March, aimed at giving the portfolio a unified and more premium look and feel. The new Jim Beam bottle has a bolder structure and features premium finishes, refreshed distiller portraits and a refined “rosette” logo. Jim Beam Devil’s Cut and Jim Beam Rye feature a bolder, more rectangular bottle structure with premium label enhancements, including extra fine detailing, crafted borders, real gold foil finishes, refined embossing and matte paper stock. The redesign also includes a matte finished shrink sleeve along the closure. Details of the Australian launch are expected to be confirmed later this month. Contact CocaCola for more information.

EAST IMPERIAL CHANGES DISTRIBUTION East Imperial has changed distribution from Neat Spirits to Think Spirits. The new agreement became effective April 1 and includes the full East Imperial premium mixers range. Email: sales@thinkspirits.com Tel. 02 4577 7800


Australian Bitters Releases Orange, Grapefruit and Barrel Spice Australian Bitters is now available in three new flavours. The full range includes the original Aromatic Bitters, Orange, Grapefruit and Barrel Spice. Each has been locally made from natural ingredients, including orange and grapefruit peel, herbs and spices. The flavours are extracted from the botanicals by the Australian Bitters Company and then added to a high proof alcohol. The mixture is further macerated until the ideal balance of flavours is achieved. Australian Bitters are designed with leading bartenders and made to compliment any cocktail. Grapefruit Bitters can be added to a gin and tonic for a refreshing citrus twist on the classic or a Hemingway Daiquiri, while Orange Bitters make a great addition to an Old Fashioned and Barrel Spice Bitters to a Whiskey Sour. Contact Coca-Cola Amatil for pricing and stock information.

ORANGE BITTERS Old Fashioned

60ml Rye whiskey 10ml Sugar syrup 2 Dashes Australian Bitters Co. Aromatic bitters 2 Dashes Australian Bitters Co. Orange Bitters Garnish: Cherry and orange peel Method: Add all ingredients to an ice filled old fashioned/rocks glass. Stir until sufficiently chilled and diluted.

GRAPEFRUIT BITTERS Hemingway Daiquiri

60ml White rum 7.5ml Maraschino liqueur 20ml Grapefruit juice 15ml Lime juice 7.5ml Simple syrup 4 Dashes Australian Bitters Co. Grapefruit Bitters Garnish: Lime wedge Method: Add all ingredients to an ice filled cocktail shaker. Shake hard until sufficiently chilled and diluted. Double strain into a chilled martini glass.

BARREL SPICE BITTERS Whiskey Sour

60ml Bourbon 30ml Lemon juice 30ml Sugar syrup 3 Dashes of Australian Bitters Co. Barrel Spice Bitters Garnish: Orange peel Method: Add all ingredients to an ice filled cocktail shaker. Shake hard until sufficiently chilled and diluted. Strain into an ice filled rocks glass.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CCA REPRESENTATIVE ON 13 2653


CONNECT

THE GIN ADVERTISING LANDSCAPE IN 2015

SPIRITS

FOUR PILLARS DISTILLER SERIES Four Pillars has released the first gin in its all-new Distiller Series, which will feature gins made in collaboration with a number of other distilleries. The first gin has been made in collaboration with Spanish distiller Santamania to combine Australian botanicals with the flavours of the Mediterranean. Cousin Vera’s Gin, named after Santamania’s ‘Vera’ still, has savoury and slightly citrus aromatics. On the palate, there are flavours of juniper, olive, rosemary, crushed coriander, pine needle, olive leaf and almond. There are only limited supplies of the gin, which can be purchased either from the Four Pillars Distillery or online at www.fourpillarsgin.com.au RRP $85

FUEGO Distributed by: Bacardi-Martini Australia RRP: $49.99

78|drinks trade

Bacardi has released its newest rum in Australia. Fuego – meaning ‘fire’ in Spanish – is a premium, spiced rum and the second of its kind to join the Bacardi portfolio. What makes this product unique is that it can be served neat. Like other Bacardi rums, Fuego is bold yet smooth and its premium quality and fiery nature make it enjoyable over ice or, as recommended, half and half with ginger beer and lime. Aged for a minimum of two years in charred oak barrels, Fuego is red in colour and has flavours of vanilla, pepper and cinnamon. Ray Noble, Marketing Director at BacardiMartini Australia says, “Bacardi Fuego has received an incredibly positive response from the on-trade. Coupled with strong marketing support to drive awareness and trial in the right channels, we expect Fuego to bring more drinkers in to this exciting category.””

Advertising within the gin category in 2015 saw brands move away from promoting the classic Gin & Tonic and focus on inspiring audiences with premium mixers and craft gin. The top spending campaign’s core focus was on reinventing the use of gin and enticing audiences to get creative with their mixers. Over 75 per cent of the total gin category spend was dedicated to associating the brand with a mixer. Another key point within the gin market within the past 12 months is the presence of Australian brands, Melbourne Gin Company and Four Pillars. The other brands dominating the category included Scotland-based Hendrick’s and UK-based Gordon’s London Dry. The current gin advertising landscape reflects Australia’s gin appreciation, with executions that span from portraying sophistication to revamping the classic drink that is Gin & Tonic. Tanqueray spent half a million dollars across three separate campaigns throughout 2015, all of which positioned the brand alongside mixers. Schweppes and Tanqueray teamed up in 2015’s highest spending campaign, ‘The Cocktail Revolution: Let’s Mix’, which promoted untraditional mixers in a series of upbeat TV and press ads, accounting for two thirds of the entire gin advertising spend in 2015. The campaign injected youth and vibrancy into the classic blend of Gin & Tonic, while emphasising the London heritage of the Tanqueray brand and acting as a call to sophistication within an Australian summer. This campaign launched in 2014 and has since accumulated almost 1.5 million dollars in advertising expenditure - 46 per cent of this spend was dedicated to the Tanqueray Gin TV executions with the remaining spend shared SUMMARY OF TOP across Pimm’s, Johnnie CAMPAIGNS Walker and Smirnoff. The executions positioned 1. THE COCKTAIL Tanqueray alongside REVOLUTION Schweppes mixers such as Schweppes/Tanqueray - $.5M Tonic Water, Agrum Citrus, 2. A BRAZEN ACT Orange Grapefruit and Bitters OF IMAGINATION using Tanqueray Gin in a Hendrick’s - $160K series of TV instalments that encouraged audiences to experiment with their concoctions.

3. WELCOME DRINK Gordon’s - $28K

Data based on main media captured by Ebiquity’s Ad Monitoring Service


PROMOTE

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY LUNCHEON 2016 INDIVIDUALS FROM THE DRINKS INDUSTRY GATHERED AT SYDNEY CRICKET GROUND (SCG) FOR THE 2016 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY LUNCHEON IN MARCH. THE ANNUAL EVENT IS HOSTED AND ORGANISED BY ‘WOMEN IN DRINKS’ – AN INITIATIVE OF THE DRINKS ASSOCIATION – AND THIS YEAR FOCUSED ON EMPOWERING WOMEN TO LEAD. The Women in drinks Board was founded in March 2014 by the association to provide networking and growth opportunities for women within the drinks industry. The forum has grown significantly since then, and this year two new members joined the board - Sally Byrne from Coca-Cola Amatil and Julie Ryan from Accolade Wines. “Personal empowerment involves developing the confidence and strength to set realistic goals and fulfil your potential,” Sandra Przibilla, CEO of the drinks association said. “When women adopt leadership roles, they contribute a unique set of skills, ideas and life experiences that can broaden the entire company’s insights, strategies and bottom line. “Today is testament to the new Board of Women in drinks and its renewed focus on reaching out and promoting the professional networking opportunities this forum offers to our industry.” The main attraction of the event was a panel discussion between four highly respected,

female leaders from the drinks industry. Facilitated by freelance journalist Angela Catterns, panellists included General Manager of Merchandising and Marketing for Woolworths Liquor Group, Rose Scott; founder of Lisa McGuigan Wines, Lisa McGuigan; Group Managing Director of CCA, Alison Watkins; and founder/Director of Mondo Search, Simone Allan. Sharing the stories of their own career paths, each woman elaborated on why they believe more women should take leadership within the industry. “51 per cent of our customers are females, so you ask yourself why wouldn’t you have an equal number of women behind the business as well,” Scott said. But Watkins added that the issue involves more than just addressing the number of women in workplaces. Talking about CCA, Watkins said: “When we really drill down and look at where the women within our business are, we find that they tend

to be concentrated in junior and functional roles like marketing and HR, and less in operational roles, such as running our factories or managing a sales team.” “So for us it’s really about making sure that we’re not only increasing the number at all levels, but also making sure that we’re helping our women develop skills and creating the opportunities for them to move into other areas across the company.” Lisa Mcguigan stressed the importance of workplaces providing professional support and training for women. She said: “I think we don’t focus enough on HR and creating a training department within that, particularly in the wine industry. While it doesn’t generate any revenue, it creates a really great team and confidence among employees. “When I was working in hospitality, I gained so much confidence from doing training courses and even just being selected to do a course.” Simone added from her experience in recruitment, the value of women to business. “I think that women have amazing intuition, which lends them well to roles that involve forecasting and planning. “I think that women also bring a great sense of connectedness to a business. “My advice to women that want to be in leadership roles would be to set goals, find a role that you’re passionate about and that plays to your strengths, and find mentors – people who will help you grow, ground and inspire you.” Contact the drinks association to find out what networking and professional development opportunities are available to you through Women in drinks. You can also stay updated and see photos from the event by liking the Women in drinks Facebook page.

Mondo Search is one of Australia’s leading Executive Search and Recruitment companies.

www.mondosearch.com.au 1300 737 917

The destination for best hidden talent - dedicated to the drinks, food and hospitality sectorsdrinks for over 18 years. trade|79 We care about your career journey!


PROMOTE

TRADE ACTIVITY THE BUSINESS BEHIND THE BRANDS

APPLY FOR THE HOSTPLUS HOSPITALITY SCHOLARSHIP L-R: Colin Campbell, Assistant Minister Senator Anne Ruston, Wolf Blass, John Angove and inaugural Life Member recipient, Phil Laffer

WINE INDUSTRY WELCOMES NEWEST LIFE MEMBERS John Angove, Colin Campbell and Wolf Blass have been welcomed as the newest Life Members of the Australian wine industry. The Life Members were inducted by the Winemakers’ Federation of Australia at a special awards presentation in Adelaide at the end of March. Each was recognised for their efforts and contribution to the country’s vineyards and wineries, helping to create a vibrant and modern industry and placing Australian wine on the global stage. Chairman of Angove Family Winemakers, John Angove AM, has long been recognised for his contributions to numerous industry and research organisations and for championing organic winemaking in Australia. Wolf Blass is well known for becoming Australia’s first freelance wine consultant and for his wine brand Wolf Blass Wines, which he set up in 1973. Wolf was previously awarded a Member of the Order of Australia in recognition of his role in helping to develop the nation’s wine industry and promoting excellence in winemaking, viticulture and research. Colin Campbell is a fourth generation winemaker at Campbells Wines in the Rutherglen wine region. Colin’s lifelong passion has been to see Rutherglen muscat recognised worldwide as a unique wine of Australia. He is recognised for establishing the Muscat of Rutherglen Network and its classification system, which is now used across the country. 80|drinks trade

Applications for the Hostplus Hospitality Scholarship supported by Melbourne Food and Wine (MFW) are open, offering one of the industry’s rising stars a careerchanging opportunity to work across the globe. The winner will be flown to three different countries to work in several internationally acclaimed hospitality businesses, followed by a one year mentorship facilitated by MFW and the organisation’s extensive global network. Online applications for the Hostplus Hospitality Scholarship close 5pm AEST on 22 April 2016. The Scholarship is open to Australian residents aged 22–35, currently working in hospitality with at least two years’ experience. Apply here: www.melbournefoodandwine.com.au/festival-info/scholarship

FUTURE INFLUENCERS OF THE DRINKS INDUSTRY MEET GLENN MCGRATH Future Influencers of the Drinks Industry met with Glenn McGrath at Archie Rose Bar in March, as part of an intimate networking event in Sydney. In association with Hardys Wines, over 50 members of the drinks industry were invited to mingle with the Australian cricket legend for an evening and learn about his partnership with the South Australian, family-owned wine brand. FIDI is an initiative run by publisher of drinks trade, Hip Media, set up over two years ago to provide more networking opportunities for those in drinks and hospitality. McGrath became the official Hardys cricket ambassador in the summer of 2014, and over the last two years has been responsible for representing and promoting the brand’s wines around the world through Cricket Australia. The partnership represents one of the largest and longest sponsorship agreements between an Australian wine brand and sporting star, and its success is measured today on the association many have of the two icons.

LEFT: Glenn McGrath with Archie Rose bar staff


TASMANIAN CIDER PRODUCERS GET READY FOR MID-WINTER FEST The Huon Valley Mid-Winter Fest is set to return for its third year this July, running between Friday 15–Sunday 17. Over the three days, festival goers and local cider producers will celebrate the history of Tasmania’s ‘apple valley’ by re-enacting pagan traditions used in the cider producing regions of south-west England. The festival will be located at The Apple Shed in the Huon Valley. Tickets can be purchased online at www.huonvalleymidwinterfest.com.au

APPLICATIONS OPEN TO THE WINE TASMANIA TRADE EXCURSION Trade are currently being invited to apply to this year’s Wine Tasmania visitation program, which will be held in June on Sunday 26 and Monday 27. The program is open to ten wine trade representatives and will provide selected participants with the opportunity to explore Tasmania’s local wineries. The two day immersive trip will also give participants the chance to visit a number of local food, cider and whisky producers. Applications must be submitted by 13 May and successful participants will be announced before Monday 23 May. Apply here: www.surveygizmo.com/ s3/2670422/2016-Wine-Trade-VisitationProgram

SIMON FORD TALKS SHOPPER MARKETING AT NETWORK BREAKFAST Simon Ford from Shopper Tracker spoke to over 200 people in March at the drinks association Network Breakfast. Hosted at the SCG, Simon focused on the importance of shopper marketing and brand decision-making to retailer and consumer satisfaction. “It’s solution retailing, not product retailing; that’s getting into the mind of the shopper, understanding their needs and becoming a destination for them,” said Simon. Simon suggests, “maximizing investment by understanding the categories and segments of the brand that will most likely give you the most bang for your buck and then going to a retailer that is most likely to align with that.” According to Simon, margin and retailer loyalty are also influenced by brand name. Simon also shared that premiumisation is occurring where people are less flexible in their choice of retailer - categories such as red wine, Champagne and cider. In order to move away from this commonality, Simon stated that there is a strong need to, “identify and segregate value from premium and build a portfolio around that.” The drinks association will host its next Network Breakfast on May 18 at the SCG, with Chief Economist of National Australia Bank (NAB), Ivan Colhoun. For more details, visit www.drinkscentral.com.au

drinks trade|81


CONNECT

EYE A QUICK LOOK INTO THE WEIRD AND WONDERFUL, AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN, ON LOCAL SHORES AND ACROSS THE GLOBE.

THE DONALD TRUMP WINE BRAND Believe it or not, among a conglomerate of brands including water and steaks owned by Republican frontrunner Donald Trump, there also exists a Trump wine brand. In fact, the political candidate recently took time out of his campaign to show off the wines at a press conference. The Trump Winery, located on a 1,300 acre estate in Charlottesville, Virginia is the largest in the state and produces sparkling, white, red and rosé wines.

GLENMORANGIE CREATES SUNGLASSES RANGE Glenmorangie has created a range of sunglasses, made from the staves of its whisky casks. The single malt whisky brand partnered with sunglass company Finlay & Co. to produce 1,843 pairs of the sunglasses, which Glenmorangie is claiming to be the first of their kind. The frames display the unique grain and natural finish of the staves and come numbered. Purchasers also have the option of getting their pair personally engraved. The glasses can be purchased online at finlayandco.com for 300 GBP.

MAN COMPLETES THREEYEAR PUB CRAWL A man in London has completed a mammoth, three-year pub crawl. The 28 year old set himself the task of visiting a pub at each of the stations on the London Underground and has been making his way through 270 pubs since March 2013. Sam Cullen documented his experience on his blog the Innside Track and now hopes to make a book about the journey. Cullen told a local newspaper, “It’s strange to have finished, because if you’ve been doing something for the best part of three years, it’s hard to think ‘it’s done now’. I’ve moved around a lot and changed jobs in that time, but this has been a constant. “I’d like to give myself at least a month off. but I don’t know what’s next."

82|drinks trade

FRANCE’S OLDEST WINE ESTATE FOR SALE France’s oldest wine estate in the Loire Valley has gone on sale. Château de Goulaine is said to occupy land that dates back to the 10th century AD. The castle’s vineyards and cellars are also said to date back to this period and have almost only ever been owned by the Goulaine family. The ‘Marquis de Goulaine’ wine label is made on site commercially and mostly produces muscadet from the Sevre-et-Maine and Vouvray appellations. The sale is expected to land somewhere between seven and ten million Euros.


Always reading on the go?

SPIRITS & LIQUEURS

Feature

IRELAND

The great whiskey nation of the 18th century has certainly not been without its problems. Yet today Irish whiskey is back in significant growth across the globe, so we pose the question – has the spirit of Ireland returned? And is it here to stay in Australia? By Hannah Sparks

U

national drink of Ireland. This knowledge eventually spread outside the walls of the church, and by the end of the 18th

without a license, and in 1820 the British Government took action. The Government raised taxes

‘as Gaeilige’. A revelation of their learnings from the East, where the technique of distilling perfumes was an age-old practice; back in Ireland, these monks had discovered how to create alcohol using the same methods with grain cereals. Although at this stage what these monks were creating was not yet technically whiskey, given that it was being taken straight off the still, what

century there were approximately 1,200 distilleries in the country. Irish whiskey had gained a favourable following both locally and internationally, with Ireland responsible for 90 per cent of global exports at one point. Growth continued for the industry in this period and the future of the industry looked prosperous, but the tides were changing, and it wouldn’t be long until the fortunes of Ireland would too.

and ordered officials to confiscate equipment and materials being used by unlicensed distillers, and by the mid-1800s their tactics had worked; only 88 licensed distilleries remained, while some prevailed, but this time in secrecy. To add more salt to the wound, many distilleries had also

they had discovered was how to create a palatable drink that would, in time (with oak), become the

The problem was, of the 1,200 distilleries operating in Ireland, the majority had always worked

begun to export much of their production to the West Indies

60

isce beatha or “water of life” is a term first coined by Irish monks some time around 700 A.D, defining distilled alcohol

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Drinks Trade - April May 2016  

Australia's highest circulating drinks industry publication for the on and off premise trade. Keep up to date with latest news at www.drinks...

Drinks Trade - April May 2016  

Australia's highest circulating drinks industry publication for the on and off premise trade. Keep up to date with latest news at www.drinks...

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