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HENRY MICHAEL STEPHENS GRADUATE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2009 - 2014 Kunstakadameits Arkitektskole, Afd. 2 School of Architecture: VUW CED: UC Berkeley


Henry Michael Stephens Nationality: New Zealand Age: 26. DOB: 01/10/1987, Singapore w: http://henrystephens.co.nz e: henrystephens@gmail.com p: +45 50 58 28 97

EDUCATION 2012-2014 2009-2011 2011 2006 - 2008

Kunstakademiets Arkitektskole, Afd. 2, Cand.Arch / MA Architecture Victoria University of Wellington BAS, Architecture University of California, Berkeley Study Exchange, Architecture Victoria University of Wellington BA, History & International Relations

WORK EXPERIENCE 09/11 - 08/12 09/11 - 06/12 09/11 - 02/12 03-06 2012

SELECTED COMPETITIONS 2013 2013 2013 2012 2012

House of Fairytales House of Fairytales Ideas Competion FIRST PLACE: The Lodge on the Lake Lodge on the Lake Ideas Competition Tykningen Åben projektkonkurrence Pavillon MAA 1:1 FIRST PLACE: Awaroa Lighthouse CavBrem Unbuilt Architecture Awards. FIRST PLACE: Woolopolis D3 Housing Tomorrow Competition 2012 SELECTED PUBLICATION / EXHIBITION

2014

2013 2013

2012

2010 - 2014

Simon Twose Architect Architecture Graduate Victoria University of Wellington Research Assistant New Zealand Institute of Architects Research Assistant StoryBox Designer SELECTED AWARDS

2013 2011 2005

EBCT Scholarship VUW Summer Research Scholarship NZQA Top scholar award. SOFTWARE PROFICIENCY Revit Architecture Rhino 3D + V-Ray 3D Studio Max AutoCAD Adobe Creative Suite Logic Pro

Awaroa Lighthouse to be published in BRACKET: [at extremes], 2014, New York. The Lodge on the Lake exhibited Canberra Gallery of Design. Stage House published in SOILED #4: Windowscrapers, 2013, Chicago Familial Clouds exhibited at Venice Architecture Biennale

LANGUAGES

other work featured in: MARK Magazine, CONCEPT Magazine, FUTURE Arquitecturas, ArchitectureNZ Magazine, Australian Design Review, Architect ArchDaily, Archinect, Bustler, DeZeen, Designboom and many more.

for a full list of publication and exhibition, please visit http://henrystephens.co.nz

English - Native Danish - Dansk Modul 3/ Prøve i Dansk 2 French - Basic

cover image - drawing from ‘love hotel’, second year project at VUW.


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new istanbul archipelago


00 ARCHITECTURE & VOLATILITY [2014] THESIS PROJECT in progress tutor: Niels Grønbæk

The project asks the question of how architecture, within the boundaries of its own disciplinary autonomy, might have a renewed agency in the kind of volatility that defines many contemporary urban environments. In order to explore many of the tensions that define architecture’s relationship with the contemporary megacity, the project presents a fictional scenario based on a real-world premise, in which a major earthquake is set to strike Istanbul at some point within the next 200 years. The project asks what sort of radical architectural possibilities and potentials might be unlocked if a major domestic policy reform in Turkey embraced anticipatory earthquake measures through the development of architectural and urban form. The project will operate within the constraints of a single site in the heart of Istanbul, begin by developing three thematic areas most affected by earthquakes, and continue to pursue design iteratively through a series of overarching ontological principles. The scenario presented and the subsequent urban strategies and institutional frameworks to be proposed hope to address many of the challenges that Istanbul faces in responding to an anticipated major earthquake, and to speculate on the subsequent shifts to many of the vulnerable institutions that currently govern the city. In this context architecture will attempt to give representation to the kind of tension and volatility that defines the developing megacity, re-framing architecture’s relationship with the city with a renewed agency fit for contemporary conditions.


early conceptual section through a compressed urban infrastructure: Istanbul as the idea of a city


A. water detention area and public space B. passage to guest house


01 THE LODGE ON THE LAKE [2013] FIRST PLACE: University of Canberra Design Ideas Competition published: MARK magazine, ArchitectureNZ, Concept online: ArchDaily, Archinect, Bustler, DeZeen, Architecture AU, ADR exhibited: Gallery of Australian design, Canberra. with: Jack Davies, Nick Roberts

Jury Citation: This design stood out as one that most successfully integrates the built forms with the subtle landscape of Attunga Point: it responsibly owns the landscape, it is beautifully sited and it celebrates the lake edge location. Casual, yet imposing, it reflects the informal nature of contemporary Australian lifestyles and architecture, while providing attractive larger spaces for public gatherings. Its materials - concrete, Australian timber and recycled metal - were chosen to weather and harmonise with the colours and textures of the bushland setting. Environmental considerations included extensive water detention. _______________________ A design for a new residence for the Prime Minister of Australia, the lodge is anchored by a split courtyard form, the frontal half sunk down into the earth forming a thickened, occupiable plinth on which the private volumes rest, while ancillary programs radiate out across the site. The building both enfolds the landscape and is subsumed by it, with retaining walls drawing visitors through the earth in a series of intermediary spaces. Internally, manipulation of the courtyard form allows a programmatic organisation attuned to both intimate spaces of repose and a monumental depth suitable for public assembly. Coupled with an awareness of the topography outside, these ever-changing patterns occurring internally, encourage inhabitants to find their way through the site – a gesture toward the nomadic Aboriginal mode of dwelling where built-form is occupied like land-form. From the composed house atop a plinth, to the slippages and interpolations that unravel down toward the lake, the lodge on the lake is a democratic marriage of terroir and architectural typology, introspective private dwelling, and public assembly.


N

boathouse + kitchen garden sleep out

private courtyard water detention area pool + recreation private entertaining outdoor entertaining + water detention surrounds

accessible green roof

water garden PM + service parking below

guest access to lake

raised PM courtyard

guest house below

PM + service shared access

water detention areas water detention area

ceremonial

entry

west elevation

tennis court

on-site parking below

A | establish courtyard form:

+ creates interior landscape + 8m module width maintains human scale within a large building and creates easy cross-ventilation.

vehicle access to dropoff

PM living

pedestrian access gate house

B | split courtyard form:

ALEXANDRINA DR

public function / gallery

+ organises key programmatic elements. + allows landscape to slip through building, creating opportunity for covered outdoor space. + digging in suggests an occupiable ‘depth’ within the landscape.

library + study volume private PM wing ceremonial entry

A | establish courtyard form:

+ creates interior landscape + 8m module width maintains human scale within a large building and creates easy cross-ventilation.

C | core loop of program established:

+ overlay of split forms creates monumental double height spaces for ceremonial entry and library. + raised private PM wing. + lodge begins to engage the landscape both horizontally, and vertically - allowing for slippages between.

PM living

PM + service access

C.

visitor vehicle exit visitor vehicle access foot access

SITE PLAN | 1:500

B | split courtyard form: A +| establish form: elements. organisescourtyard key programmatic

A | establish courtyard form:

+ creates interior landscape + 8m module width maintains human scale within a large building and creates easy cross-ventilation.

public function / gallery D | entry sequence + ancillary program:

+ creates interior landscape allows landscape to slip through building, + 8m module width maintains human scale space. creating opportunity for covered outdoor large building and creates ‘depth’ easy within + within digginga in suggests an occupiable cross-ventilation. the landscape.

+ carefully choreographed entry sequence through the ground plane for the PM, those arriving by car and on foot. + key circulation routes between indoor, outdoor, public and private spaces created. + ancillary program radiates across site.

library + study volume

PM living

private PM wing PM living

green rooves, walls and manicured landscape

ceremonial entry

water detention / garden locations.

B | split courtyard form:

C | core loop of program established: B +| split courtyard overlay of split form: forms creates monumental double

public function / gallery

+ organises key programmatic elements.

public function / gallery

+ creates landscape creatinginterior opportunity for covered outdoor space. ++ 8m module width maintains human scale within digging in suggests an occupiable ‘depth’ within a large building and creates easy the landscape. cross-ventilation.

PM + service access library + study volume private PM wing

E | water detention + program at edges of site:

+ organises key programmatic height spaces for ceremonialelements. entry and library. ++ allows landscape slip through building, raised private PMtowing. opportunity forthe covered outdoor + creating lodge begins to engage landscape bothspace. + digging in suggests an occupiable ‘depth’ horizontally, and vertically - allowing for within slippages the landscape. between.

A +| establish courtyard allows landscape to form: slip through building,

PM living

+ boathouse + kitchen garden along edge of wharf + additional sleep-out. + soft boundaries for security created through manipulation of topography and planting. + water detention areas established dedicated to purifying water, irrigation, and the prevention of flooding and erosion, depending on location.

visitor vehicle exit

library + study volume visitor vehicle access

private PM wing

ceremonial entry

ceremonial entry foot access

C | core loop of program established:

overlay of split form: forms creates monumental double B +| split courtyard

height spaces for ceremonialelements. entry and library. organises key programmatic raised private PMtowing. allows landscape slip through building, lodge begins to engage landscape bothspace. creating opportunity forthe covered outdoor horizontally, and vertically allowing for within slippages + digging in suggests an occupiable ‘depth’ between. the landscape.

PM + service access

overlay ofchoreographed split forms creates + carefully entrymonumental sequence double height spaces for ceremonial and those library. through the ground plane forentry the PM, + arriving raised private by carPM andwing. on foot. lodge begins to routes engagebetween the landscape + key circulation indoor,both horizontally, andand vertically allowing for slippages outdoor, public private-spaces created. between.program radiates across site. + ancillary PM + service access

visitor vehicle exit

library + study volume

C. site plan D. aerial view on Lake Burley Griffin E. west elevationI. public gallery space

C | core of program established: D entryloop sequence + ancillary program:

public function / gallery

+ ++ +

visitor vehicle access

private PM wing ceremonial entry foot access

green rooves, walls and manicured landscape

visitor vehicle exit visitor vehicle access foot access


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F. floorplans of lodge and auxiliary buildings G. section through prime minister’s residence H. entrance I. public gallery space J. stairs to lakeside K. boatshed and wharf


L. view of the logis from the boatshed


A. view across awaroa inlet B. view from behind on a misty day


02 AWAROA LIGHTHOUSE [2012] FIRST PLACE: CavBrem AAA Unbuilt Architecture Awards published: Bracket [at extremes], CLOG: Rendering. with: Nick Roberts, Jansen Aui

Jury Citation: Exciting and beautiful, taking the mythology of the lighthouse to create a luminous interior world and an engaging object in the landscape. _______________________ Located within the Awaroa inlet of New Zealand’s Abel Tasman National Park, the Awaroa Lighthouse operates at extremes by revealing tensions hidden within an image of stability. Situating architecture in the volatile mid-point between the otherworldly beauty of the New Zealand landscape, and an anxiety of destroying it latent within its national psyche, this work questions the extremity of human influence for the sake of preservation. Conceptually, the lighthouse is addressed as both an architectural typology, and for its imagistic quality. Romanticised as an image of stability on shaky ground, here the historical processes of the lighthouse as a navigational, directive, and organisational structure are re-imagined as a symbol of foresight in the event of an earthquake or related natural disaster. Shifting in form between muscular and fragile profiles, the presence of the lighthouse within the estuary embodies the tension and fragility hidden within an idealised New Zeland landscape. Manned by a single lighthouse keeper, the lighthouse records both immaterial data from a worldwide network, and material data from a network of telemetric rods at its base. In the event of a tsunami or other natural disaster, the lighthouse shifts to an ‘active’ state, creating huge, staggered sand walls between its outermost rods, protecting the fragile estuary behind it.


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C. site plan D. lighthouse by night E. view of lighthouse from south


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M. lighthouse diagrams N. workspace O. living area P. entry Q. longditudinal section


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R. deep internal voids S. lighthouse entrance T. work area U. living space


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A. Familial Clouds installed B. Closup photograph of drawing slides


03 FAMILIAL CLOUDS [2012] Exhibited: VENICE ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE 2012 New Zealand Contribution. completed for: Simon Twose Architect

Between March - August 2012 , Simon Twose and I designed, fabricated and installed this exhibition, which was the New Zealand contribution to the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale. Work on the table is by Andrew Barrie and a team of modelmakers from Auckland university. Text by Sarah Treadwell. _______________________ This exhibition, Familial Clouds is the work of two architects, Simon Twose and Andrew Barrie. Across the walls of the exhibition are two houses by Simon Twose, not organised as projects but rather as houses dispersed into clouds of process; productive lines, dead ends and frustrations, the usual stuff of family life. Now partial and oblique, 290 A1 drawings that composed the white house have been reduced to business card size (a million tiny objects that resist collection). Small mirrors, bracketed off the wall reflect and refract the drawings; the displacement of the images is matched by the rotating and twisting bodies that stare into the pre-positioned mirrors to find architecture. The mirrors offer a dislocated view that demonstrates the fleeting and difficult nature of the process of architectural practices and the transient nature of its products. The viewing body, shifted from the usual neutral mode of gallery contemplation, is momentarily comical and active. The conversation on the gallery wall then shifts from analogue practice to digital, in a project developed as an active response to the taut geological and aesthetic context of another New Zealand city, Wellington. In a miniature tectonic play, above the ominous meeting of Pacific and Australian plates, the concrete house’s massive elements are jolted together as if by large forces, as families are habitually shaken together and apart by influences beyond their control.


Familial Clouds exhibited at Venice Biennale 2012 C. Familial Clouds installed D - G. Closup photographs of the Installation

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Concrete House Models exhibited at Venice Biennale 2012 H. Structural Model I. Living Space Model J. Entrance Model

J.


A. the new Lotzes Have on a winter night B. complex interior geometry in the main gallery


04 HOUSE OF FAIRYTALES [2013] H.C. Andersen House of Fairytales Ideas Competition with: Hannes Frykholm, Mats Håkansson Behrbohm, Nick Roberts

One of the most beguiling aspects of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytales is their taking place in a world not unlike our own. They allow us to imagine the possibility of extraordinary happenings within our daily routine. That the narratives of Andersen’s work find their origin in Odense, becomes the point of departure for this proposal to create a new House of Fairytales – to celebrate the life, and to explore the most enduring themes present in Andersen’s writing. This proposal engages these ideas through the creation of a public attraction for the city of Odense, that finds its raison d’etre in celebrating the very personal, and often introspective, nature of human imagination. The House of Fairytales achieves this by challenging the conventions of contemporary museum architecture, which often relies on a singular and spectacular form to announce and separate itself from the city. Conversely, this is a House of Fairytales that is not one moment, but many. It is a public park, punctuated by moments of playful invitation that lead into an immersive interior loop. The scale of the new buildings on Lotzes Have follow the cadence of the existing street-scape, before slipping into an enveloping interior world. Themes running through Andersen’s oeuvre and the birthplace itself, are taken as design drivers that condition the experience, typified by a constant upending of spatial expectations, creating a malleable relationship between the museum’s inward contents and its outward context of Odense. Because notions of iconicity are never the burdened on any one view or moment, the House of Fairytales is able to act as an important link along the changing face of Odense’s public infrastructure, a surreal and educational departure into the world of Hans Christian Andersen, and a generous space of public gathering. The new House of Fairytales, celebrates a national icon through the reclamation of public space in the creation of a new type of museum – one that is at once deeply contextual, while still commanding its own undeniable presence.


C. the masterplan for the project - integrating a range of singular architectural typologies, an infrastructural link and a public space.


D. process diagrams

E. xploded isometric


01: Context Here the form of the museum integrates into the existing historic context of Odense.

02: Public The new Lotzes Have delivers a generous public space with clear visual links to the world of HC Andersen below.

03: Museum A subterranean museum avoids an exlicitly iconic gesture in favour of a more immersive interior experience.


The World Above The integration of Thomas B. Thriges Gade is marked by clear gateways at the site boundaries, drawing people not through the site, but to the site. To the west, a sculpted landscape for casual gathering, and to the east - Lotzes Have becomes re-imagined as a shallow, tilting ground plane pointing toward Andersen’s birthplace


The World Beheath A large underground foyer gathers visitors from the entry folly, cafe, and underground carpark, creating an auspicious scene for a sequence of spaces and galleries, though generous in scale, are designed so inhabitants are always afforded a very personal perceptual experience.


05 TOWARD A MINOR ARCHIPELAGO [2013] Year 01 work: Kunstakademiets Arkitektskole, Afd.2 tutor: Niels Grønbæk

Architecture’s relationship with the city is one that has been continually theorised over time, especially since the advent of modern cities at the beginning of the 19th century. Characterising this is Berlin - a city of both institutions and various attempts to undermine them. Over the past 100 years, a series of ideological proxy wars have seen external forces deploy and manifest their interests within the city as built form. Berlin is covered with the scars of competing ideologies; each one propelled by similarly utopian aspirations, each one building on the detritus of its ultimately failed predecessors. In many regards, Berlin’s current urban landscape is shaped by an archipelago of major architectures – each island exerting its own gravitational pull. Currently, Berlin is not propelled by the winds of intense political change, but rather by the commodified image that it projects of itself, a post-urban condition catalysed by a symbolic act of architectural destruction: the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989. Berlin today exists within the ruins of a major archipelago as much as it exists by it. This is an architecture project in episodes - an ecology of proposals designedto be considered both separately and simultaneously. Broadly, this project proposes a new critical architecture through which to understand architecture and the city through the development of new institutions for Berlin, described in the following pages.


Proposal 1: Eisfabrik Megaframe the Eisfabrik Megaframe exists as an attempt to is an attempt to synthesise the rigid nature of top-down major institutions, with bottom-up minorarchitectures. The megaframe consists of a massive structural grid which contains and consumes a variety of temporary programs within the site around the Eisfabrik. The frame is intended to represent the most reductive delineation of space. As minor architectures operate within the context of an existing built framework, the grid functions as as the most abstract representation of this framework. The grid provides both an invitation to build, and a functional means by which to host a complex mixture of decidedly minor architectures.


Proposal 2: Architecture as Ideology In attempting to maintain or even retain its autonomy, must architecture really be so resistant as to be almost military in nature? Are architects reduced to the deployment of overwhelming mass in order to retain their autonomy? Can architecture sidestep the sort of reactionary heaviness or spectacle that it is reduced to in order to operate within this context, whilst still maintaining the kind of disciplinary sincerity necessary to retain the intrinsic qualities of architecture? This ecology of formal experiments attempt to understand the architectural absolute at a variety of scales.


Proposal 3: Welfare Palace Collective Urban Strategy The archipelago of h么tels is an affirmation of the empty spaces - the voids that proliferate in Berlin. Based on the typology popularised in 17th Century Paris, the h么tel exists as an attempt to insert regular spaces into the fabric of the city. While these spaces exist asscars or holes in the urban landscape, they also exist as points of stability within the constant flux that surrounds them. Shifting in scale, density and location within the city, their only constant is the absence of the city - an absence that paradoxically defines Berlin.

N

towards a minor archipelago urban strategy

New Berlin Hotels The architecture of the h么tel archipelago exists to memorialise the void spaces through the most fragile and subtle of formal boundaries. These programless, architectureless spaces create a limit between the void and the city beyond, but also offer the potential for a confrontation with the city via the presence of an absolute architecture, at a minor scale.


The Institution The institution itself exists as a kilometer-long urban block placed in Gorlitzer Park. A combination of housing, collective spaces, architectural singularities, and minotorian subversions, the institution addresses the issue of how architecture can give representation to the collective subjectivity defined by a city like Berlin today.

Islands The institution is marked at first by the presence of a single large-scale formal gesture, a colossal rectilinear form fifty metres high and a kilometer long - architecture at its most absolute. However, the sublime uniformity of the exterior conceals a complex interior landscape that broadly corresponds with the existing features of Gorlitzer Park. The block is divided into five zones that broadly correlate to the absolute architectures found in Berlin - worship, atmosphere, agora, ruin, and void. The centre of these zones is marked by the placement of one large-scale architectural island, a moment of singularity and repoise within the surrounding milleu, venerating absolute architecture as an almost religious experience.


The Immeuble-Cite The absolute is reduced to the barest form at which it can exist, the minor is constantly attempting to subvert it. The institution thus constitutes a space that can confront the city whilst still absorbing its multiplicities and complexities. If Berlin is a field drawn together by the contractions of major architectures then the institution exists as a minortorian critique of that - the ruins of the immeuble-cite. The city is thus confronted with an architecture that reinforces the idea of the city - making explicit its abstract nature, whilst also resulting in a form which is the result of conscious, collective, conviction. The absolute of architecture reaches a limit, but in an articulated way.

the volkskirke Berlin

The Stranger(s) Thus elements of the architectural sublime become infected by the surreal, the banal, and the completely beserk. Ranging from subtle details within the major islands, a facade which exists simultaneously as a formal limit and a series of unsettling apertures, and spatial arrangements which fluctuate between the absolute and the informal, the architectural core exists in such a way to frame, host, and even celebrate the minor.


Interior Field Outside of the islands, the interior field of the institution can broadly be seen as a series of spaces which facilitate living, learning, and working. Though the institution is defined by a relentless interiority and repitition, it does not represent a complete totality - its framework allows for moments of informality and subversion. The minor cannot exist without the major, and so it seems - the major cannot exist in splendid isolation.

Dialectics The project gives representation to the dialectic between epistemology and ontology, ecology and ideology, minor and major, the banal and the sublime, the surreal and the austere, collapsed onto the singular frame of architecture.


A.

C.

B.


06 TYKNINGEN [2013] Åben projektkonkurrence Pavillon MAA 1:1 completed with: Hannes Frykholm, Mats Håkansson Behrbohm

As a low-lying country with shallow topography and predominantly open landscapes, the presence of wind in Denmark’s natural environment has contributed to its present condition as much as centuries of agricultural development and terraforming. Thicket deals with the sensory experience of Denmark’s natural environment the way it used to be, transplanted to a contemporary urban setting. Located at the very heart of Kongens Have, Tykningen acts as an abstract simulation of a small grove of trees, reverberating the sounds and atmosphere of a lost Danish forest. Taking the form of an elegant timber pavilion floating lightly above the grass of Kongens Have, Thicket is defined by its almost intangible core – the space created by and within a flexible grid of 1,332 timber rods hanging from the pavilion’s canopy. The rods move and shift to produce a series of different soundscapes - partly dependent on wind activity within the park, and partly dependent on visitors as they interact with the space. Rather than being a lone object defined by its distance from viewers, Tykningen invites users to pass through its core and engage in the full sensory experience generated by a unique combination of natural environment, visual spectacle, and subtle materiality. Thicket does not have any specific entrance or direction, instead existing as a diaphanous membrane for visitors, sound, and light. Tykningen resists the idea of the contemporary pavilion as an architectural typology defined by unnecessary formal gymnastics, and the kind of stability associated with timber as a building material, in favour of a more subtle tectonic realised through a new approach to materiality. Tykningen is both fluid and unstable, responsive to its users and site conditions, a constantly shifting cloud on the otherwise still green of Kongens Have.


exploded isometric of pavilion

previous page (clockwise):

across:

A. pavilion in Kongens Have B. pavilion threshold C. joint details

E. interior view F. distribution of rods in the pavilion G. section through pavilion


E.

F.

G.

x2

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1/16

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06a STAGE HOUSE [2013] Commissioned for and published in SOLIED #4: Windowscrapers completed with: Hannes Frykholm

Privacy no longer exists in the traditional sense. It is no longer possible for one to engage with society and maintain a private sphere simultaneously. We exist not in physical space, but in the liminal space between relentless waves of twitter posts, facebook updates and faux-filtered instagram snaps – our lives collectively laid out as a singular highlight reel depicting endless excess, excitement and stimulation. When our identities become more based on a virtual presence and less on being seen in the physical world, the former objects and spaces used as identity and status markers lose their meaning as real objects. We filter candle light on our instagram, without necessarily burning a candle. We frame a specific corner of our living room with our camera - posting a photograph of a well-lit, beautiful space, when the rest of the room is a mess or just empty. We post images of creme brulee on our trip to Paris last summer, not the cheap block of cheese bought from a budget suburban grocery store. One could argue that this constant framing of life turns the entire existence into a staged act, where our physical surroundings are reduced to scenography - a series of images generating simulacra. In a sense this reality is no longer real, but a kind of hyperreality, a Disneyland of everyday life where the reference is more important than the actual experience. To speak with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard, it is as if the hyper-reality needs the “old imaginary like a sympathetic nervous system made up of childhood signals and faked phantasms” (Baudrillard, 13). A critique like Baudrillard’s inevitably also asks for loopholes and ways to a more real reality, an almost utopian negation of the simulacra in order to revive true desires and energies. We are not interested in this, but rather the consequences and possibilities with the given order of simulacra, and what part architecture plays in this process. Another suitable metaphor for the situation might be found in Jorge Louis Borges’ short story “On Exactitude in Science” (Borges, 325), where the imperial cartographers draw a map with scale and resolution so great that it eventually covers the entire terrain. The map is larger than life. In a similar way our internet-identities are already far greater than our physical selves. The reduction of the entire physical world to the abbreviation “IRL” (In Real Life) is a display of how the priorities between the different worlds have changed dramatically the last decade. The life in the physical world is no longer necessarily more “real” or true than the digital universe. Architecture has been slow to respond to this shift in social dynamics. Therefore, we propose the Stage House as a model for re-institutionalising privacy within the context of a typical domestic home. The Stage House acts to reclaim privacy. Not through the isolation of its most personal domestic activity, but rather through the open display of ostensibly ‘private’ moments. Consisting of a blank facade with a single aperture, the Stage House exists as a complex mechanical system of rotating stage sets - in constant transition to frame and project selected moments within the lives of its inhabitants outwards. The single window functions not as a lens into the home, but rather as a kind of smokescreen that actively protects its inhabitants. In a context where the most typically private moments are rendered public almost immediately, the Stage House airs its ‘private’ moments freely - all the while protecting its inner workings from prying eyes. The privacy seem to have been inverted, what was once a closed off part of everyday-life is now displayed in high-resolution. In a similar way, the former public spectacles seem to have lost their importance as generators of identity, social recognition and control. REFERENCES Baudrillard, Jean, Simulation and Simulacra (Ann Arbour, 1994) Borges, Jorge Louis, Collected Fiction (New York, 1998)


07 TOXIC ASSET HORROR CABINET [2012] New York CityVision Competition with: Hannes Frykholm, Nick Roberts

The Toxic Asset Horror Cabinet speculates on a future for New York, driven by the city’s historical tendency to re-script it’s idea of entertainment – a condition where authenticity becomes a tool to be manipulated for commercial gain. During the late 20th Century, previously ‘anti-social’ forms of entertainment such as the strip-clubs and brothels that occupied 42nd St and Times Square were replaced by sanitised, carefully designed experiences that are now familiar parts of the New York’s identity. New York has long capitalised on a self-awareness of its own image, a state where authenticity becomes reproducible as entertainment, an ultimately mediated urban experience, or ‘vicarious encounter’ with the real New York. This observation of New York’s past behaviour has resulted in a proposal for a new form of disaster-tourism: one based on the recent and still-lived history of 2008’s Global Financial Crisis. This proposal differs from conventional disaster tourism in that the disaster is both unnatural and largely intangible – our future New York specifically engages the absence of any physical trace left in the very location the disaster purportedly stemmed from. This proposal addresses the physical manifestation of toxic assets – if the physical effects of the global financial crisis were dispersed far from Wall St, this project reintroduces the physical form that these assets were derived from: foreclosed homes from across America. As Phillip Johnson’s AT&T tower would come to symbolise corporate America infiltrating the domestic (Jacobs, 2012) – here the domestic literally re-enters the corporate – this time as entertainment. Our proposal takes the form of foreclosed homes planted strategically along popular tourist routes (FIG 2). The home becomes the monument, and then the museum – a mobile tourism infrastructure to commemorate an immaterial crisis. Operated by previously out-of-work bankers, these homes are flown in and marked, not by the weight of the grid, but instead by the lightness of balloons – reclaiming the vertical space of Manhattan for the many unknown victims of the disaster, and in turn establishing a presence equal to that of its iconic skyscrapers. As the effects of the global financial crisis continues to be a lived and painful reality for so many, this project re-introduces the notion that despite the immaterial mediums through which America’s financial institutions operate, their physical manifestations are equally real. The Toxic Asset Horror Cabinet removes this physical distance between cause and effect, and the ideal image of New York is forced to contend with its true self, masked in the form of entertainment – just as it has always done.


B. Manhattan Plan C. Manhattan Section D. Staten Island Perspective E. High Line Perspective F. Taxonomy of Foreclosed Homes

B. plan of Manhattan C. manhattan section D. staten island ferry view E. high line view F. taxonomy of foreclosed homes

B. 0

C.

100m

500m


E.

D.

Past Present

F.

Detroit, MI

Fort Lauderdale, FL

Merced, CA

El Centro, CA

Las Vegas, NV

$35,652.00 $6,451.82

$392,845.50 $196,467.00

$225,966.50 $112,983.15

$390,845.00 $132,457.50

$310,410.00 $140,648.00

El Centro, CA

Las Vegas, NV

Pittsburg, PA

Dayton, OH

Cleveland, OH

$390,845.00 $132,457.50

$310,410.00 $140,648.00

$275,608.00 $110,519.00

$127.428.00 $105,035.00

$150,845.60 $105,790.25


SOLAR PANELS PRODUCES POWER FOR PRODUCTION FACILITES

ROOFING MADE OF OUT REUSED LOCAL MATERIALS

A SYSTEM OF DRAIN PIPES COLLECTS RAIN WATER FOR AGRICULTURE

MARKET COMBINED FASHION CATWALKS AND TRADE CENTER, THE MARKET CONNECTS WITH THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

WOOLOPOLIS IS NEW ZEALAND’S TRADITIONAL RURAL VERNACULAR AT HYPERSPEED - ARCHETYPAL BUILDING FORMS, RUGGED LOCAL MATERIALS, CONSTRUCTED BY LOCAL CONTRACTORS AND FUTURE DWELLERS STAIRS FOR CIRCULATION

[P - 01] SHEARING SHED SHEEP ARE SHORN AND WOOL FORWARDED TO MAIN PROCESSING STATION.

[P - 02] PROCESSING SHED RAW WOOL PROCESSED TO DIFFERENT GRADES: GARMENT, INSULATION, CARPET OR MISC.

[P - 03] INSULATION MANUFACTURING PROCESSED WOOL TURNED TO WOOL-BASED INSULATION PRODUCTS, READY FOR MARKET.

A. woolopolis B. program and typology diagram

[P - 04] CARPET FACTORY PROCESSED WOOL WOVEN INTO CARPETS, VARYING GRADES. COLOUR FACILITIES AVAILABLE.

[H - 325] HOUSING UNIT HOUSING UNITS IN THE COMPLEX ADJUSTED FOR OPTIMAL AND SUSTAINABLE LIVING CONDITIONS.


08 WOOLOPOLIS [2012] FIRST PLACE: D3 HOUSING TOMORROW published: CONCEPT Magazine, Future Arquitecturas online: ArchDaily, Archinect, Bustler exhibited: Giles Hall Gallery, MSU with: Hannes Frykholm

Modern rural environments represent a totally undescribed and highly volatile condition in which new, unique architectures and communities are only just beginning to develop. No longer a site marked by nostalgia and tradition, the unrelenting speed of global processes have left behind a weird territory of genetic experimentation, international migration and agricultural mechanisation in the global countryside a halfway house between the old and the new. Our project, Woolopolis, aims to consolidate the various functions and programs of New Zealand’s wool production into one dynamic community. Traditionally the programs associated with New Zealand’s wool economy - pasture, housing, shearing, production facilities and markets have been separated by both geography and context. This separation is no longer effective in a globalised world, so we turn to cohesion as a means of improving performance. Thus, Woolopolis takes the form of a complex network of programs - processing facilties at ground level, housing units lofted above, with the market functioning as the communal centre of the complex and mediating between the two. The architecture functions as a machine in which sheep can be fed, shorn, the wool processed and sold, all the while housing a diverse community of farm and factory workers, shearing hands, agricultural scientists, designers and investors integral to the wool economy.


C.

D.

E.

C. housing D. production areas E. marketplace F. dwelling G. production diagram


F.

NEW ZEALAND

ONLINE ORDERS

0h

WANGANUI-MANAWATU REGION

12h

TE APITI WINDFARM

24h

72h

96h

PRODUCTION STARTS

FINISHED WOOL PRODUCTS

MERINO KNITTING WOOL

FASHION DESIGN

FASHION GARMENT

PERENDALE

SHEEP FARMING

SHEARING

DRYING

SCOURING

TOPMAKING

SPINNING

DYEING

WEAVING

CARPETS

CARDING

INSULATION

ROMNEY

DRYSDALE

7. CATWALK + MARKET

6. FINAL PROCESSING

1. ENTRANCE/SHEEP RUN

2. TRANSITION TO SHEARING SHED

3. SHEARING SHED

5. SECONDARY PROCESSING

4. PRIMARY PROCESSING

7. CATWALK + MARKET

3. SHEARING SHED 1. ENTRANCE/SHEEP RUN

G.

2. TRANSITION TO SHEARING SHED

4. PRIMARY PROCESSING

5. SECONDARY PROCESSING

6. FINAL PROCESSING


A. view from queens wharf B. earthquake museum from above


09 EARTHQUAKE MUSEUM [2011] Year 03, VUW SARC 321: Construction Tutor: Phil Marsh

Earthquakes exist at two completely different scales. The immense scale of geological time, and the immediacy of human experience. The Wellington Earthquake Museum acts as an attempt to reconcile these differences in scale within the context of a modern exhibition space. From its position on the waterfront, the Earthquake Museum appears completely out of scale with its surroundings - characterised primarily by its huge, blank, sloping facades, strong material quality, and sheer physical mass. This overwhelming absence of any human scale in such a prominent position serves as a potent reminder of the latent potential for an earthquake to completely destroy Wellington city. As visitors move underneath the colossal mass of the museum and through to its interior, elements of human scale are gradually re-introduced through material quality, lines of sight, and constructional elements - visible indicators of human scale. The museum houses a variety of exhibition spaces, and education facilities, aiming to create a complex array of spatial conditions through a restrained material palette and programatic specificity. Though this project begain in a design studio, it was used in a construction course to explore ideas of scale and how these might be reflected within construction details. I chose to detail the building’s skin, given that it offered the most potential to explore design ideas while still dealing with a host of practical issues.


Entrance to the museum.

SECONDARY VERTICAL SOLDIERS, STEEL U COLUMN

DIAGONAL BRACING STEEL TUBE

STEEL KNEE BRACING FOR LATERAL SUPPORT

ROUGH-SAWN 90X45X2500 TIMBER SHUTTERING, TONGUE AND GROOVE

VERTICAL TIMBER SUPPORT STUDS NAILED TO SHUDDERING, MINIMUM 50MM DEEP

DOUBLE C-FLANGE STEEL HORIZONTAL BRACE

ADJUSTABLE STEEL SCREWS

BASE

D18: EXPLODED ISOMETRIC - CONCRETE FORMWORK FOR MEMORIAL SPACES DIAGRAM

STEEL FEET FOR FORMWORK UNIT

SARC 321 CONSTRUCTION HENRY STEPHENS 301020623 TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

WELLINGTON EARTHQUAKE MUSUEUM

A12


ALUMINIUM PARAPET FLASHING TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE

12MM PLYWOOD ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN ROOF CAVITY BITUMINOUS TREATMENT VAPOUR BARRIER

TIMBER BLOCKING FOR ALUMINIUM FLASHING

POURED CONCRETE ROOF DIAPHRAGM

ALUMINIUM FLASHING FIXED TENSION UNIT AT TOP. ADJUST AT BOTTOM.

5MM STEEL TRAY DECKING 5MM PAINTED GIB PROTECTING METAL TRACK DECKING

200X200 SHS BEAM WELDED-ON WEB STIFFENERS RIGIDLY FIXING CURVED STEEL U-COLUMNS TO SHS BEAMS

D05: MEMBRANE WELL/ROOF DETAIL 1:10

PTFE TEFLON COATED GLASSFIBRE MESH MEMBRANE

CURVED UNIVERSAL COLUMN, 300PLUS BLUESCOPE STEEL

70MM POURED CONCRETE TOPPING

STEEL GRATE FIXED TO CONCRETE SLAB FOR CLEANING ACCESS

12MM REINFORCING IN TOPPING TCREATING DIAPHRAGM

METAL GRATE FIXED TO CONCRETE SLAB FOR CLEANING ACCESS PTFE TEFLON COATED GLASSFIBRE MESH MEMBRANE

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

12MM REINFORCING WELDED TO STEEL PLATE TYING CONCRETE TOPPING TO STEEL STRUCTURE

PLASTIC BEARING STRIP 200X200 SHS BEAM

D06: MEMBRANE WELL/MIDFLOOR DETAIL 1:10 PTFE TEFLON COATED GLASSFIBRE MESH MEMBRANE

12MM REINFORCING IN TOPPING TCREATING DIAPHRAGM 70MM POURED CONCRETE TOPPING

STEEL GRATE FIXED TO CONCRETE SLAB FOR CLEANING ACCESS

GREENLINE SHADE NZ 5MM FOLDED STEEL MEMBRANE FIXING

5-10MM COMPRESSIBLE SHEET

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

PLASTIC BEARING STRIP TRANSVERSE BEAM, 300PLUS BLUESCOPE STEEL 410UB53.7 SECTION, RIGIDLY CONNECTED TO STEEL HYBRID TRUSS SYSTEM

FOLDED GREENSTUF 20MM BLANKET INSULATION FIXED INSIDE TRANSVERSE BEAM OR RESTING ON HUNG CEILING

STEEL ROLLER

300MM DIAM PVC VENTILATION DUCT

TENSION FIXING FOR MEMBRANE

NZGRC 15MM DECORATIVE GRC PANELS FORMING HUNG CEILING FOR OUTDOOR/ATRIUM SPACE

ADJUSTABLE CONCEALED TENSION UNIT FOR MEMBRANE. NEAREST CEILING PANEL MUST BE REMOVED FOR ADJUSTMENT.

SERVICES TRAY

D07: MEMBRANE WELL/UNDERFLOOR DETAIL 1:10

SARC 321 CONSTRUCTION HENRY STEPHENS 301020623 TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

WELLINGTON EARTHQUAKE MUSUEUM

RECESSED STEEL TENSION TIES HANGING CEILING, ATTACHED TO DICORE SLAB

A08


Permanent gallery space.

Entering the body of the museum.


ACODRAIN KLASSIKDRAIN K100 NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE EXTENDS FALL INTO DRAIN

TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE

ROOF MEMBRANE CONTINUES UNDER FLASHING

12MM PLYWOOD

TIMBER BLOCKING AT PARAPET TO FIX ALUMINIUM FLASHING TO CONCRETE ROOF STRUCTURE

BITUMINOUS TREATMENT VAPOUR BARRIER CONCEALED ALUMINIUM FLASHING DIRECTING WATER DOWN RAINSCREEN CHANNEL

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN ROOF CAVITY STIFF CONCRETE MIX TO CREATE ROOF FALL TO DRAIN

FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL W/ ROUGHENED SURFACE TEXTURE TO CONCEAL RAINSCREEN JOINTS

POURED CONCRETE ROOF DIAPHRAGM

VERTICAL ALUMINIUM RUNNERS FIXED TO STEEL FRAME AND EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

5MM STEEL TRAY DECKING 5MM PAINTED GIB PROTECTING METAL TRACK DECKING

TEKTON BUILDING WRAP RUN 100MM UNDER FLASHING AT BOTTOM OF PANEL

200X200 SHS BEAM

300X300 SHS OF HYBRID TRUSS SYSTEM

RESENE WHITE INCUMENSCENT PAIINT

EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

D08: TRANSVERSE WALL/ROOF DETAIL 1:10

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN WALL CAVITY

GRCNZ 15MM INTERIOR DECORATIVE GRC PANEL W/ ROUGH AGGREGATE FINISH TIMBER BLOCKING TO FIX FLASHING

70MM POURED REINFORCED CONCRETE TOPPING

PE RAINSCREEN FLASHING CONCEALED BEHIND CAVITY DETAILIN FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL 25MM DIAM STEEL NELSON BOLT WELDED TO PLATE TYING SLAB TO PERIMITER OF STRUCTURE

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

TEKTON BUILDING WRAP RUN 100MM UNDER FLASHING AT BOTTOM OF PANEL

200X200 SHS BEAM EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

D09: TRANSVERSE WALL/MIDFLOOR DETAIL 1:10

VERTICAL ALUMINIUM RUNNERS FOR INTERIOR PANEL FIXINGS ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN WALL CAVITY EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR INTERIOR PANELS

70MM POURED REINFORCED CONCRETE TOPPING PE RAINSCREEN FLASHING CONCEALED BEHIND CAVITY DETAILIN FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL CONCRETE COURED INTO CUT ICORE SLAB TO FIX CEILING TIES

25MM DIAM STEEL NELSON BOLT WELDED TO PLATE TYING SLAB TO PERIMITER OF STRUCTURE

STEEL TENSION TIES FIXED TO DICORE SLAB HANGING CEILING PANELS

10MM STEEL PLATE WELDED TO SHS AND NELSON BOLT

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL 300MM DIAM PVC VENTILATION DUCT

VERTICAL ALUMINIUM RUNNERS FIXED TO STEEL FRAME AND EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

FOLDED GREENSTUF 20MM BLANKET INSULATION FIXED INSIDE TRANSVERSE BEAM OR RESTING ON HUNG CEILING

300X300 SHS OF HYBRID TRUSS SYSTEM

NZGRC 15MM DECORATIVE GRC PANELS FORMING HUNG CEILING FOR OUTDOOR/ATRIUM SPACE

EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

D10: TRANSVERSE WALL/UNDERFLOOR DETAIL 1:10

SARC 321 CONSTRUCTION HENRY STEPHENS 301020623 TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

WELLINGTON EARTHQUAKE MUSUEUM

A09


Lecture Theatre

Thinking Room

Atrium

Public Space/ Disaster Assembly Site

+16m

+12m

+8m

+4m +2m

0

-4m

Longditudinal section. ALUMINIUM DRIP FLASHING 200X200 SHS SKYLIGHT FRAME

STEEL GRATING FOR LIGHT DIFFUSION, GALVANISED, LAQUERED. AUTOMATED WINDOW CLEANING SYSTEM

TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE CONTINUES UNDER FLASHING

12MM PLYWOOD

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION CAVITY CREATED BY SKYLIGHT STEEL FRAMING

8MM TOUGHENED GLASS 11MM LAMINATED SAFETY GLASS FLOURESCENT TUBE

LIGHT FITTINGS. 6MM ACRYLIC GLASS PANE, TRANSLUSCENT, LIGHT DIFFUSING.

TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE 12MM PLYWOOD

D11: LONGDITUDINAL SKYLIGHT/FRAME DETAIL 1:10

BITUMINOUS TREATMENT VAPOUR BARRIER

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN CAVITY CREATED BY SKYLIGHT STEEL FRAMING

TIMBER BLOCKING

200X200 SHS OF SKYLIGHT FRAME SYSTEM 5MM PAINTED GIB COVERING METAL TRAY DECKING

D12: LONGDITUDINAL SKYLIGHT/ROOF DETAIL 1:10

GRCNZ 15MM INTERIOR DECORATIVE GRC PANEL W/ ROUGH AGGREGATE FINISH


OOTING DETAIL 1:10

QUAKE MUSUEUM

Temporary Exhibition

Permanent Exhibition

D15: RETAINING WALL - GROUNDPLANE DETAIL 1:10 TEKTON BUILDING WRAP RUN 100MM OVER FLASHINGG AT BOTTOM OF SCREEN

FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL W/ ROUGHENED SURFACE TEXTURE TO CONCEAL RAINSCREEN JOINTS EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

20MM STEEL PLATE BOLTED TO COLUMN AND TOP OF RETAINING WALL

ALUMINIUM FLASHING

25MM DIAM BOLTS FIXING COLUMN TO RETAINING WALL

ACODRAIN KLASSIKDRAIN K100 WITH BRICKSLOT OPENING. MINIMUM 12MM CLEARANCE TO AVOID BLOCKAGE.

12MM DIAM REINFORCING THROUGH WALL AS REQUIRED BY ENGINEER

REINFORCING THROUGH SURFACE SLAB AS REQUIRED BY ENGINEER

SIKAPROOF SB DPM DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE TANKING UNDERSIDE OF SURFACE SLAB

CAST IN-SITU RETAINING WALL, SEE A12-13 FOR FORMWORK

50MM SAND BLINDING

150MM COMPACTED HARDFILL

BAG BOYS GREYWACKE GRANULAR FREEDRAINING DRAINAGE METAL

SIKAPROOF SB DPM DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE TANKING RETAINING WALL 12MM DIAM REINFORCING TYING SLAB TO WALL AS REQUIRED BY ENGINEER

BAG BOYS GREYWACKE GRANULAR FREEDRAINING DRAINAGE METAL

COMPACTED BACKFILL MINIMUM BOUNDARY 1:30 SLOPE TO SURFACE.

GEOTEXTILE FILTER FABRIC

GEOTEXTILE FILTER FABRIC BOUNDING DRAINPIPE

100MM DIAM PERFORATED PIPE WITH FALL TO STORMWATER OUTLET. BASE OF PIPE AT MAX 200MM DEPTH FROM INTERIOR FFL.

EARTH

50MM SAND BLINDING

150MM COMPACTED HARDFILL

D16: RETAINING WALL - FLOORSLAB DETAIL 1:10

A11


A. 3° tance 10s=

Intial dis

0.00.00

0.01.48

329°

240° 90°

155

°

74°

180° 142°

0.00

.32

0.01

.20

0.00.44


10a A VISUAL ABDUCTION [2011] Spring 2011, CED: UC Berkeley published: Socks Studio tutor: Kyle Steinfeld with: Hannes Frykholm, Amy Tong

The first part of this studio examined inductive, abductive, and deductive methods of design through the creation of various analyical constructs. Beginning with an analysis of the relationship between architecture and cinema, the stuio then developed into three interlinked modules, each with a specfic purpose. Module A/Abductive: A film and film set, exploring a series of spatial constructs through the disembodied eye of the camera. This Module resulted in the production of a film represending a procession through space, using a rotating film set and a series of overlapping anamorphic projections as a form-finding tool. Module I/Inductive: A set of analytical drawing constructs that could be applied to different contexts as a projective design tool. Beginning with an analysis of the film Bullitt, the drawings developed a projective language that could then be applied to develop a new understanding of a physical site. Module D/Deductive: A device to record site information. This Module resulted in the development of Skalman, a drawing machine that able to produce readings of site through a recording of solar intensity and wind direction. Broadly, this project examined the relationship between continuity and discontinuity in cinema and architecture.


BATTERY GUTHRIE

BATTERY RATHBONE

B.


C.

A. Cinemetric analysis of a clip from the film ‘Bullit’. B. Analytical drawing construct applied to battery stations in the Marin Headlands C. Drawing analysis of movement around Battery Spencer.


D. diagram of film rig and anamorphic projection E. film analysis describing continuity and discontinuity through movement of objects in space


Skalman: Drawing machine describing relationship in continuous environmental conditions (sun/wind) across discontinuous sites.


DIRECTION OF MACHINE

165 SEC: WALKING OFF PAPER

9 SEC: SPEEDING UP

START START

25S

60S 10S 170S

125S 150S

Date ddmmyy 270211 Position Latitude/Longitude

Time hh:mm 12:54p

Intensity

Conclusions

BAT. MILLER 37˚48’20.63”N/122˚28’36.67”W Slope º Wind m/s Sun Direction/North Weather conditions approx. N CLEAR SKY, SUN Length of reading ss 165 Change of weather

SUN

none

+clouds

+sun

DIRECTION OF MACHINE

85 SEC: SPEEDING UP

START

220 SEC: STOP

STOP

START

Date ddmmyy 270211 Position Latitude/Longitude

Time hh:mm 12:45p

Intensity

BAT. MILLER 37˚48’20.63”N/122˚28’36.67”W Slope º Wind m/s Sun Direction/North Weather conditions approx. N CLEAR SKY, SUN Length of reading ss 220 Change of weather

SUN

none

+clouds

Conclusions

SUN INTENSITY HAVE IMPACT ON ROTATION CF. MILLER 12:54p CF. RATHBONE 3:52p

+sun


MATERIAL STUDIES: horizontal stretch

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0mm

+20mm horizontal

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+20mm

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+40mm

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PHOTOGRAPHS: horizontal stretch 0mm

+60mm horizontal 

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+60mm

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+80mm horizontal 

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+80mm

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+40mm

+100mm horizontal 

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+60mm

+100mm

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+80mm

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+120mm horizontal

+140mm horiztontal

+120mm

+140mm

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+100mm

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+140mm

+120mm

MATERIAL STUDIES: horizontal stretch w/ multiple aggregation 1

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+10mm vertical

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+50mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+30mm vertical

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+60mm vertical

PHOTOGRAPHS: horizontal stretch w/ double aggregation

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MATERIAL STUDIES: vertical stretch 0mm maxiumum tension deformation: vertical stretch

0mm

+10mm vertical

+20mm vertical

+30mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+50mm vertical

+60mm vertical

+10mm vertical

+20mm vertical

+30mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+50mm vertical

+60mm vertical

+10mm vertical

+20mm vertical

+30mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+50mm vertical

+60mm vertical

maxiumum tension deformation: vertical stretch

0mm

maxiumum tension deformation: vertical stretch

PHOTOGRAPHS: vertical stretch w/ double aggregation ARCH 129: THE NATURE OF ELASTOMERS  TUTOR: M. PAZ GUITERREZ HENRY STEPHENS #22569936 MODEL STUDIES 

Analysis drawings of material behaviour.

4


10b NATURE AND ELASTOMERS [2011] Spring 2011, CED: UC Berkeley Exhibited at California Academy of Sciences, ‘Design by Nature’, Aug- Sept 2011. tutor: Paz Guiterrez

PART 1: MODULE Human fibroblast cells maintain the structural integrity of connective tissues within the human body, by synthesising the extracellular matrix. That is to say, they create much of the structural framework that makes up animal tissue. Fibroblasts are found beneath the epidermal layer in humans, functioning as a grid beneath the skin that holds extracellular tissue together. Using fibroblast cells as a precedent, this project looks to examine the way in which a dynamic tension structure composed of deformable modules might: a) Function as a response to external conditions, b) Generate structural complexity through varying forms of module aggregation, c) Generate form as a result of the varying material condition of each module. PART 2: ELASTOMER WALL Can acoustic spaces be reconfigured through material behaviour alone? Using modular elastomer components, this project proposes an acoustically responsive wall system with a dynamic membrane to modify acoustic environments. Though made up of individual modules, the wall system aims to modify acoustic spaces by functioning as a continuous whole. Fixed to a structure with a double-curvature for stability and controlled by servo motors connected to a microphone, the membrane deforms from input by a fast fourier transform to reflect the dominant frequency waveforms within a space. This is only gestural as a visualisation tool though - the wall could be programmed to behave in any number of ways.


C.

D.

B.

E.


F. H.

B. Wall Prototype 1 C. Wall Prototype 2 D-E. Casting tests and 3D Print F-G. Assembly Details H. Final Prototype

G.


a special thanks to my friends, teachers, and collaborators: Jansen Aui Phil Ayres Evan Brenton-Rule Jack Davies Hannes Frykholm Niels Grønbæk Mats Håkansson Behrbohm Dan Kelly Nick Roberts Kyle Steinfeld Paul Stephens Liz Sullivan Simon Twose Jae Warrander

Henry Stephens | Graduate Architecture Portfolio  

Academic, Professional and Personal work completed at: Kunstakademiets Arkitektskole Afd. 2 Simon Twose Architect School of Architecture:...

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