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PORTFOLIO

Henry Stephens, [B.AS, BA] School of Architecture: VUW CED: UC Berkeley

special thanks to: Jansen Aui Evan Brenton-Rule Moni Eckey John Faichney Hannes Frykholm M. Paz Gutierrez Holly Keane Chris Lloyd Rikke Mathorne Rasmussen Nick Roberts Kyle Steinfeld Paul Stephens Liz Sullivan Simon Twose Rhys Williams

“Is this what I used to dread?” - Seneca

PROJECTS year 04 - 2012 Woolopolis year 03 - 2011 Earthquake Museum [construction] A Visual Abduction* PFA* Elastometric Module* Elastomer Wall* Cinemetrics* Sub-Terrarium City Pillows of Justice [construction] A Seasonal House year 02 - 2010 Changing Room Superlink Love Hotel Room of Sand Solar Decathlon House [construction] Junction year 01 - 2009 A Shelter from Safety Of Earth And Water A+D TRACE Sketchbook Photography * projects completed on exchange at University of California, Berkeley

Exterior perspective

WOOLOPOLIS FIRST PLACE

D3 HOUSING TOMORROW 2012 this project completed with: Hannes Frykholm

Modern rural environments represent a totally undescribed and highly volatile condition in which new, unique architectures and communities are only just beginning to develop. No longer a site marked by nostalgia and tradition, the unrelenting speed of global processes have left behind a weird territory of genetic experimentation, international migration and agricultural mechanisation in the global countryside - a halfway house between the old and the new.

Our project, Woolopolis, aims to consolidate the various functions and programs of New Zealand’s wool production into one dynamic community. Traditionally the programs associated with New Zealand’s wool economy - pasture, housing, shearing, production facilities and markets have been separated by both geography and context. This separation is no longer effective in a globalised world, so we turn to cohesion as a means of improving performance. Thus, Woolopolis

takes the form of a complex network of programs - processing facilties at ground level, housing units lofted above, with the market functioning as the communal centre of the complex and mediating between the two. The architecture functions as a machine in which sheep can be fed, shorn, the wool processed and sold, all the while housing a diverse community of farm and factory workers, shearing hands, agricultural scientists, designers and investors integral to the wool economy.

Housing units

Production facilities

Marketplace

NEW ZEALAND

ONLINE ORDERS

0h

WANGANUI-MANAWATU REGION

12h

TE APITI WINDFARM

24h

72h

96h

PRODUCTION STARTS

FINISHED WOOL PRODUCTS

MERINO KNITTING WOOL

FASHION DESIGN

FASHION GARMENT

PERENDALE

SHEEP FARMING

SHEARING

DRYING

SCOURING

TOPMAKING

SPINNING

DYEING

WEAVING

CARPETS

CARDING

INSULATION

ROMNEY

DRYSDALE

7. CATWALK + MARKET

6. FINAL PROCESSING

1. ENTRANCE/SHEEP RUN

2. TRANSITION TO SHEARING SHED

3. SHEARING SHED

5. SECONDARY PROCESSING

4. PRIMARY PROCESSING

7. CATWALK + MARKET

3. SHEARING SHED 1. ENTRANCE/SHEEP RUN

2. TRANSITION TO SHEARING SHED

Wool production + unrolled section drawing.

4. PRIMARY PROCESSING

5. SECONDARY PROCESSING

6. FINAL PROCESSING

Exterior perspective.

EARTHQUAKE MUSEUM SARC 321: CONSTRUCTION TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

construction details shown are to scale at A2 size

Earthquakes exist at two completely different scales. The immense scale of geological time, and the immediacy of human experience. The Wellington Earthquake Museum acts as an attempt to reconcile these differences in scale within the context of a modern exhibition space. From its position on the waterfront, the Earthquake Museum appears completely out of scale with its surroundings - characterised primarily by its huge, blank, sloping facades, strong material quality, and sheer physical mass. This overwhelm-

Aerial perspective. ing absence of any human scale in such a prominent position serves as a potent reminder of the latent potential for an earthquake to completely destroy Wellington city. As visitors move underneath the colossal mass of the museum and through to its interior, elements of human scale are gradually re-introduced through material quality, lines of sight, and constructional elements - visible indicators of human scale. The museum houses a variety of exhibition spaces, and education facilities, aiming to create a complex array of

spatial conditions through a restrained material palette and programatic specificity. Though this project begain in a design studio, it was used in a construction course to explore ideas of scale and how these might be reflected within construction details. I chose to detail the building’s skin, given that it offered the most potential to explore design ideas while still dealing with a host of practical issues.

Entrance to the museum.

SECONDARY VERTICAL SOLDIERS, STEEL U COLUMN

DIAGONAL BRACING STEEL TUBE

STEEL KNEE BRACING FOR LATERAL SUPPORT

ROUGH-SAWN 90X45X2500 TIMBER SHUTTERING, TONGUE AND GROOVE

VERTICAL TIMBER SUPPORT STUDS NAILED TO SHUDDERING, MINIMUM 50MM DEEP

DOUBLE C-FLANGE STEEL HORIZONTAL BRACE

ADJUSTABLE STEEL SCREWS

BASE

D18: EXPLODED ISOMETRIC - CONCRETE FORMWORK FOR MEMORIAL SPACES DIAGRAM

STEEL FEET FOR FORMWORK UNIT

SARC 321 CONSTRUCTION HENRY STEPHENS 301020623 TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

WELLINGTON EARTHQUAKE MUSUEUM

A12

ALUMINIUM PARAPET FLASHING TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE

12MM PLYWOOD ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN ROOF CAVITY BITUMINOUS TREATMENT VAPOUR BARRIER

TIMBER BLOCKING FOR ALUMINIUM FLASHING

POURED CONCRETE ROOF DIAPHRAGM

ALUMINIUM FLASHING FIXED TENSION UNIT AT TOP. ADJUST AT BOTTOM.

5MM STEEL TRAY DECKING 5MM PAINTED GIB PROTECTING METAL TRACK DECKING

200X200 SHS BEAM WELDED-ON WEB STIFFENERS RIGIDLY FIXING CURVED STEEL U-COLUMNS TO SHS BEAMS

D05: MEMBRANE WELL/ROOF DETAIL 1:10

PTFE TEFLON COATED GLASSFIBRE MESH MEMBRANE

CURVED UNIVERSAL COLUMN, 300PLUS BLUESCOPE STEEL

70MM POURED CONCRETE TOPPING

STEEL GRATE FIXED TO CONCRETE SLAB FOR CLEANING ACCESS

12MM REINFORCING IN TOPPING TCREATING DIAPHRAGM

METAL GRATE FIXED TO CONCRETE SLAB FOR CLEANING ACCESS PTFE TEFLON COATED GLASSFIBRE MESH MEMBRANE

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

12MM REINFORCING WELDED TO STEEL PLATE TYING CONCRETE TOPPING TO STEEL STRUCTURE

PLASTIC BEARING STRIP 200X200 SHS BEAM

D06: MEMBRANE WELL/MIDFLOOR DETAIL 1:10 PTFE TEFLON COATED GLASSFIBRE MESH MEMBRANE

12MM REINFORCING IN TOPPING TCREATING DIAPHRAGM 70MM POURED CONCRETE TOPPING

STEEL GRATE FIXED TO CONCRETE SLAB FOR CLEANING ACCESS

GREENLINE SHADE NZ 5MM FOLDED STEEL MEMBRANE FIXING

5-10MM COMPRESSIBLE SHEET

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

PLASTIC BEARING STRIP TRANSVERSE BEAM, 300PLUS BLUESCOPE STEEL 410UB53.7 SECTION, RIGIDLY CONNECTED TO STEEL HYBRID TRUSS SYSTEM

FOLDED GREENSTUF 20MM BLANKET INSULATION FIXED INSIDE TRANSVERSE BEAM OR RESTING ON HUNG CEILING

STEEL ROLLER

300MM DIAM PVC VENTILATION DUCT

TENSION FIXING FOR MEMBRANE

NZGRC 15MM DECORATIVE GRC PANELS FORMING HUNG CEILING FOR OUTDOOR/ATRIUM SPACE

ADJUSTABLE CONCEALED TENSION UNIT FOR MEMBRANE. NEAREST CEILING PANEL MUST BE REMOVED FOR ADJUSTMENT.

SERVICES TRAY

D07: MEMBRANE WELL/UNDERFLOOR DETAIL 1:10

SARC 321 CONSTRUCTION HENRY STEPHENS 301020623 TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

WELLINGTON EARTHQUAKE MUSUEUM

RECESSED STEEL TENSION TIES HANGING CEILING, ATTACHED TO DICORE SLAB

A08

Permanent gallery space.

Entering the body of the museum.

ACODRAIN KLASSIKDRAIN K100 NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE EXTENDS FALL INTO DRAIN

TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE

ROOF MEMBRANE CONTINUES UNDER FLASHING

12MM PLYWOOD

TIMBER BLOCKING AT PARAPET TO FIX ALUMINIUM FLASHING TO CONCRETE ROOF STRUCTURE

BITUMINOUS TREATMENT VAPOUR BARRIER CONCEALED ALUMINIUM FLASHING DIRECTING WATER DOWN RAINSCREEN CHANNEL

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN ROOF CAVITY STIFF CONCRETE MIX TO CREATE ROOF FALL TO DRAIN

FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL W/ ROUGHENED SURFACE TEXTURE TO CONCEAL RAINSCREEN JOINTS

POURED CONCRETE ROOF DIAPHRAGM

VERTICAL ALUMINIUM RUNNERS FIXED TO STEEL FRAME AND EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

5MM STEEL TRAY DECKING 5MM PAINTED GIB PROTECTING METAL TRACK DECKING

TEKTON BUILDING WRAP RUN 100MM UNDER FLASHING AT BOTTOM OF PANEL

200X200 SHS BEAM

300X300 SHS OF HYBRID TRUSS SYSTEM

RESENE WHITE INCUMENSCENT PAIINT

EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

D08: TRANSVERSE WALL/ROOF DETAIL 1:10

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN WALL CAVITY

GRCNZ 15MM INTERIOR DECORATIVE GRC PANEL W/ ROUGH AGGREGATE FINISH TIMBER BLOCKING TO FIX FLASHING

70MM POURED REINFORCED CONCRETE TOPPING

PE RAINSCREEN FLASHING CONCEALED BEHIND CAVITY DETAILIN FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL 25MM DIAM STEEL NELSON BOLT WELDED TO PLATE TYING SLAB TO PERIMITER OF STRUCTURE

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL

TEKTON BUILDING WRAP RUN 100MM UNDER FLASHING AT BOTTOM OF PANEL

200X200 SHS BEAM EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

D09: TRANSVERSE WALL/MIDFLOOR DETAIL 1:10

VERTICAL ALUMINIUM RUNNERS FOR INTERIOR PANEL FIXINGS ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN WALL CAVITY EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR INTERIOR PANELS

70MM POURED REINFORCED CONCRETE TOPPING PE RAINSCREEN FLASHING CONCEALED BEHIND CAVITY DETAILIN FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL CONCRETE COURED INTO CUT ICORE SLAB TO FIX CEILING TIES

25MM DIAM STEEL NELSON BOLT WELDED TO PLATE TYING SLAB TO PERIMITER OF STRUCTURE

STEEL TENSION TIES FIXED TO DICORE SLAB HANGING CEILING PANELS

10MM STEEL PLATE WELDED TO SHS AND NELSON BOLT

DICORE 250 9-STRAND PRECAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL 300MM DIAM PVC VENTILATION DUCT

VERTICAL ALUMINIUM RUNNERS FIXED TO STEEL FRAME AND EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

FOLDED GREENSTUF 20MM BLANKET INSULATION FIXED INSIDE TRANSVERSE BEAM OR RESTING ON HUNG CEILING

300X300 SHS OF HYBRID TRUSS SYSTEM

NZGRC 15MM DECORATIVE GRC PANELS FORMING HUNG CEILING FOR OUTDOOR/ATRIUM SPACE

EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

D10: TRANSVERSE WALL/UNDERFLOOR DETAIL 1:10

SARC 321 CONSTRUCTION HENRY STEPHENS 301020623 TUTOR: PHIL MARSH

WELLINGTON EARTHQUAKE MUSUEUM

A09

Lecture Theatre

Thinking Room

Atrium

Public Space/ Disaster Assembly Site

+16m

+12m

+8m

+4m +2m

0

-4m

Longditudinal section. ALUMINIUM DRIP FLASHING 200X200 SHS SKYLIGHT FRAME

STEEL GRATING FOR LIGHT DIFFUSION, GALVANISED, LAQUERED. AUTOMATED WINDOW CLEANING SYSTEM

TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE CONTINUES UNDER FLASHING

12MM PLYWOOD

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION CAVITY CREATED BY SKYLIGHT STEEL FRAMING

8MM TOUGHENED GLASS 11MM LAMINATED SAFETY GLASS FLOURESCENT TUBE

LIGHT FITTINGS. 6MM ACRYLIC GLASS PANE, TRANSLUSCENT, LIGHT DIFFUSING.

TORCH-ON NURAPLY GREENROOF MEMBRANE 12MM PLYWOOD

D11: LONGDITUDINAL SKYLIGHT/FRAME DETAIL 1:10

BITUMINOUS TREATMENT VAPOUR BARRIER

ASTM C-578 TYPE IV EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION IN CAVITY CREATED BY SKYLIGHT STEEL FRAMING

TIMBER BLOCKING

200X200 SHS OF SKYLIGHT FRAME SYSTEM 5MM PAINTED GIB COVERING METAL TRAY DECKING

D12: LONGDITUDINAL SKYLIGHT/ROOF DETAIL 1:10

GRCNZ 15MM INTERIOR DECORATIVE GRC PANEL W/ ROUGH AGGREGATE FINISH

OOTING DETAIL 1:10

QUAKE MUSUEUM

Temporary Exhibition

Permanent Exhibition

D15: RETAINING WALL - GROUNDPLANE DETAIL 1:10 TEKTON BUILDING WRAP RUN 100MM OVER FLASHINGG AT BOTTOM OF SCREEN

FIBRE C GRC RAINSCREEN PANEL W/ ROUGHENED SURFACE TEXTURE TO CONCEAL RAINSCREEN JOINTS EUROFOX CLIP-ON ALUMINIUM FITTINGS FOR GRC RAINCREENRAINSCREEN

20MM STEEL PLATE BOLTED TO COLUMN AND TOP OF RETAINING WALL

ALUMINIUM FLASHING

25MM DIAM BOLTS FIXING COLUMN TO RETAINING WALL

ACODRAIN KLASSIKDRAIN K100 WITH BRICKSLOT OPENING. MINIMUM 12MM CLEARANCE TO AVOID BLOCKAGE.

12MM DIAM REINFORCING THROUGH WALL AS REQUIRED BY ENGINEER

REINFORCING THROUGH SURFACE SLAB AS REQUIRED BY ENGINEER

SIKAPROOF SB DPM DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE TANKING UNDERSIDE OF SURFACE SLAB

CAST IN-SITU RETAINING WALL, SEE A12-13 FOR FORMWORK

50MM SAND BLINDING

150MM COMPACTED HARDFILL

BAG BOYS GREYWACKE GRANULAR FREEDRAINING DRAINAGE METAL

SIKAPROOF SB DPM DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE TANKING RETAINING WALL 12MM DIAM REINFORCING TYING SLAB TO WALL AS REQUIRED BY ENGINEER

BAG BOYS GREYWACKE GRANULAR FREEDRAINING DRAINAGE METAL

COMPACTED BACKFILL MINIMUM BOUNDARY 1:30 SLOPE TO SURFACE.

GEOTEXTILE FILTER FABRIC

GEOTEXTILE FILTER FABRIC BOUNDING DRAINPIPE

100MM DIAM PERFORATED PIPE WITH FALL TO STORMWATER OUTLET. BASE OF PIPE AT MAX 200MM DEPTH FROM INTERIOR FFL.

EARTH

50MM SAND BLINDING

150MM COMPACTED HARDFILL

D16: RETAINING WALL - FLOORSLAB DETAIL 1:10

A11

JJZ109

JJZ109 JJZ109

JJZ109 JJZ109 JJZ109

Diagram analysis of a clip from the film ‘Bullit’.

A VISUAL ABDUCTION SPRING 2011, CED: UC BERKELEY

ARCH 101: ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO TUTOR: KYLE STEINFELD This project completed with: Hannes Frykholm Amy Tong

Featured on www.socksstudio.com.

The first part of this studio examined inductive, abductive, and deductive methods of design through the creation of various analyical constructs. Beginning with an analysis of the relationship between architecture and cinema, the stuio then developed into three interlinked modules, each with a specfic purpose. Module A/Abductive: A film and film set, exploring a series of spatial constructs through the disembodied eye of the camera. Module I/Inductive: A set of analytical drawing constructs that could be applied to different contexts as a projective design tool. Module D/Deductive: A device to record site information. Broadly, this project examined the relationship between continuity and discontinuity in cinema and architecture.

0.00.44 .20

0.01

.32

180° 142°

0.00

74°

°

155

90°

240° 0°

329°

0.00.00

0.01.48

Intial dis

3° tance 10s=

Cinemetric analysis of a clip from the film ‘Bullit’.

BATTERY GUTHRIE

BATTERY RATHBONE

Analytical drawing construct applied to battery stations in the Marin Headlands

Drawing analysis of movement around Battery Spencer.

Film analysis describing continuity and discontinuity through movement of objects in space

Skalman: Drawing machine describing relationship in continuous environmental conditions (sun/wind) across discontinuous sites.

DIRECTION OF MACHINE

165 SEC: WALKING OFF PAPER

9 SEC: SPEEDING UP

START START

25S

60S 10S 170S

125S 150S

Date ddmmyy 270211 Position Latitude/Longitude

Time hh:mm 12:54p

Intensity

Conclusions

BAT. MILLER 37˚48’20.63”N/122˚28’36.67”W Slope º Wind m/s Sun Direction/North Weather conditions approx. N CLEAR SKY, SUN Length of reading ss 165 Change of weather

SUN

none

+clouds

+sun

DIRECTION OF MACHINE

85 SEC: SPEEDING UP

START

220 SEC: STOP

STOP

START

Date ddmmyy 270211 Position Latitude/Longitude

Time hh:mm 12:45p

Intensity

BAT. MILLER 37˚48’20.63”N/122˚28’36.67”W Slope º Wind m/s Sun Direction/North Weather conditions approx. N CLEAR SKY, SUN Length of reading ss 220 Change of weather

SUN

none

+clouds

Conclusions

SUN INTENSITY HAVE IMPACT ON ROTATION CF. MILLER 12:54p CF. RATHBONE 3:52p

+sun

PFA SPRING 2011, CED: UC BERKELEY

ARCH 101: ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO TUTOR: KYLE STEINFELD

The project takes the form of a film archive set across the entire Marin headlands. The archive is a buried retaining wall made up of hermetically sealed capsules, accessible at certain points within the landscape by large stone towers. These buried walls form a network of paths across the Marin headlands, linking in with existing hiking trails and accessway. The buried wall is created by a series of earth removal and burial machines, archival printers which organise the multiple wall systems based on the archival content. As the walls grow, access and projection towers are constructed along its length, acting as markers at the scale of the landscape, and as points of access to the archived content. As the walls form paths and then networks over time, the towers allow both walkers and technicians means of accessing the archival content. Each tower is outfitted with an interface that allows walkers to access content at a personal level, but the towers are also geared to providing for mass consumption. As the patterns of pilgrimage and event emerge over time, the towers become sites of ritual in the consumption buried films. The architecture becomes an event - a mediation between the direct, phenomenal experience of something, and the the replayable, rewatchable, anywhere, on-demand nature of watching film in the 21st century. This project was also part of a studio focused on the act of drawing as a means of guiding the process of architectural design. Instead of typical plans, sections and elevations, we were asked to construct dense, atmospheric, perspectival ‘money shots’ to convey our ideas. The project mediates between architecture’s relationship with vastly different timescales and forms of occupation, specifically in the overlap between extreme permanence, and extreme temporariness. This buried film-wall shows that a tension between the permanent and the ephemeral can play a role in understanding architecture’s relationship with extreme, geological timescales, and architecture’s relationship with the immediacy of the event. Section through buried film wall.

A

AA

Archival Printer: Plan, 1:20 B

Archival Printer: Section A - AA, 1:20

BB

A

Archival printer and film burial ceremony. Archival Printer: Section B - BB, 1:20

AA

15000

Section Through Tower, 1:50 Section through film tower.

1.

2. 3. 4. 6. 5.

7.

8. 9.

1. walking surface 2. doublle braced spring protection unit 3. interior climate control/airflow device 4. environmental stability module 5. fallout-proof outer shell 6. connective bracing unit 7. hermetically sealed storage unit 8. sealing door 9. nameplate

Film screening at a camp along the PFA trail.

6. 5. 4.

3. 2. 1. first placement 2. aggregation 3. bracing & structural support 4. hermetic control integration 5. burial 6. placement of walkable surface

Isometric: film container | Isometric: film wall.

1.

Ruined film tower in the landscape.

MATERIAL STUDIES: horizontal stretch

1

0mm

+20mm horizontal

0mm

+20mm

2

3

+40mm horizontal 

+40mm

1

PHOTOGRAPHS: horizontal stretch 0mm

+60mm horizontal 

2

+60mm

3

+20mm

+80mm horizontal 

1

+80mm

2

+40mm

+100mm horizontal 

3

+60mm

+100mm

1

2

+80mm

3

+120mm horizontal

+140mm horiztontal

+120mm

+140mm

1

2

+100mm

3

+140mm

+120mm

MATERIAL STUDIES: horizontal stretch w/ multiple aggregation 1

2

3

1

1

2

2

3

0mm

3

1

2

4

1

+20mm vertical

+10mm vertical

3

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1

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1

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2

+50mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+30mm vertical

3

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+60mm vertical

PHOTOGRAPHS: horizontal stretch w/ double aggregation

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4

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MATERIAL STUDIES: vertical stretch 0mm maxiumum tension deformation: vertical stretch

0mm

+10mm vertical

+20mm vertical

+30mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+50mm vertical

+60mm vertical

+10mm vertical

+20mm vertical

+30mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+50mm vertical

+60mm vertical

+10mm vertical

+20mm vertical

+30mm vertical

+40mm vertical

+50mm vertical

+60mm vertical

maxiumum tension deformation: vertical stretch

0mm

maxiumum tension deformation: vertical stretch

PHOTOGRAPHS: vertical stretch w/ double aggregation ARCH 129: THE NATURE OF ELASTOMERS  TUTOR: M. PAZ GUITERREZ HENRY STEPHENS #22569936 MODEL STUDIES 

Analysis drawings of material behaviour.

4

ARCH 129: ARCH THEARCH 129: NATURE THE 129: NATURE OF THE ELASTOMERS NATURE OF ELASTOMERS OF ELASTOMERS TUTOR: TUTOR: M. PAZTUTOR: GUITERREZ M. PAZM. GUITERREZ PAZ GUITERREZ HENRY STEPHENS HENRYHENRY STEPHENS #22569936 STEPHENS #22569936 #22569936 DIAGRAM: DIAGRAM: FIBROBLASTS DIAGRAM: FIBROBLASTS FIBROBLASTS AND THEAND WOUND THE AND WOUND HEALING THE WOUND HEALING PROCESS HEALING PROCESS PROCESS

nsion deformation: vertical stretch

[fig 6] - Human [fig 6]fibroblast - Human [fig 6] -cells fibroblast Human maintain fibroblast cellsthe maintain structural cells maintain the integrity structural the of structural integrity connective integrity of connective tissues of connective within tissues the human within tissues the body, within human by the synthebody, human bybody, syntheby synthe- [fig 7] - More [fig critically, 7] - More [fig 7] fibroblast critically, - More critically, cells fibroblast playfibroblast acells critical playrole cells a critical inplay wound arole critical healing. in wound role When inhealing. wound the healing. epidermal When the When epidermal layerthe is breached epidermal layer is and breached layer is breached and and sising the extracellular sising the sising extracellular matrix. the extracellular That matrix. is to say, That matrix. they is toThat create say,isthey to much say, create of they the much create structural ofmuch the framework structural of the structural framework that makes framework that up makes animal thattissue. up makes animal uptissue. animal tissue. tissue is removed tissue isor tissue removed dies,isfibroblast removed or dies, cells fibroblast or dies, flockfibroblast cells to theflock wound cells to the flock sitewound and to the grow site wound to and form site grow aand new, to grow form provisional atonew, formprovisional extracellular a new, provisional extracellular extracellular FibroblastsFibroblasts are found Fibroblasts beneath are found are the beneath found epidermal beneath the epidermal layerthe in humans, epidermal layer infunctioning humans, layer in humans, functioning as a grid functioning beneath as a gridthe as beneath askin gridthat beneath theholds skin the that extracelskin holds that extracelholds extracel-matrix (ECM) matrix by excreting (ECM) matrixby(ECM) collagen excreting by excreting and collagen fibronectin. collagen and fibronectin. In this and process, fibronectin. In thisfibroblasts process, In this process, fibroblasts deform fibroblasts relative deform to wound relative deform[site] to relative wound condito[site] wound condi[site] condilular tissuelular together. tissue lulartogether. tissue together. tions to create tionsnew to create tions tissue. tonew create tissue. new tissue.

[fig 8] - As [fig the8] wound - As [figthe heals, 8] -wound Asitthe is heals, made woundsmaller it heals, is made through it is smaller made the through smaller action through the of myofibroblasts, action theofaction myofibroblasts, which of myofibroblasts, establish whichaestablish grip which on establish the a grip onathe grip on the wound edges wound andedges wound contract and edges themselves contract and contract themselves using athemselves mechanism using a mechanism using similar a mechanism to that similar in smooth tosimilar that in muscle tosmooth that cells. in muscle smooth In thecells. muscle maturation In the cells. maturation In the maturation and remodeling and remodeling phase, and remodeling collagen phase,iscollagen remodeled phase, collagen is remodeled and realigned is remodeled andalong realigned and tension realigned along lines tension along and cells lines tension that andlines are cells no and that longer cells are needed no thatlonger are noneeded longer needed are removed areby removed apoptosis. are removed by apoptosis. by apoptosis.

This project This looks project to This examine looks project tothe looks examine waytoinexamine the which waya the in dynamic which way inatension which dynamic astructure dynamic tensioncomposed structure tension structure composed of deformable composed of deformable modules of deformable might: modulesmodules might: might: a) Functiona)as Function a response a) Function as a to response external as a response to conditions, external to external conditions, conditions, b) Generate b) structural Generate b) Generate complexity structuralstructural complexity throughcomplexity varying through forms through varying of module forms varying of aggregation, forms module of aggregation, module aggregation, c) Generate c) form Generate as c) aGenerate result form as of aform the result varying as of a result the material varying of the condition material varying of material condition each module. condition of each module. of each module. 1

2

1

2 3

ELASTOMETRIC MODULE

Human fibroblast cells maintain the structural integrity of connective tissues within the human body, by synthesising GE: n horizontal SPRING stretch w/ multiple aggregation COMPOSITE IMAGE: vertical stretch w/ multiple COMPOSITE aggregation IMAGE: vertical stretch w/ multiple aggregation 2011, CED: UC BERKELEY the extracellular matrix. That is to say, they create much of ARCH 269: NATURE AND ELASTOMERS the structural framework that makes up animal tissue. Fibroblasts are found beneath the epidermal layer in humans, TUTOR: M. PAZ GUITERREZ functioning as a grid beneath the skin that holds extracellular tissue together. This was a graudate research seminar project. Exhibited at California Academy of Sciences, ‘Design by Nature’, August - September 2011.

Using fibroblast cells as a precedent, this project looks to examine the way in which a dynamic tension structure composed of deformable modules might: a) Function as a response to external conditions, b) Generate structural complexity through varying forms of module aggregation, c) Generate form as a result of the varying material condition of each module.

ELASTOMER WALL SPRING 2011, CED: UC BERKELEY

ARCH 269: NATURE AND ELASTOMERS TUTOR: M. PAZ GUTIERREZ

This was a graduate research seminar project, completed as a group of 10.

Exhibited at California Academy of Sciences, ‘Design by Nature’, August - September 2011.

Can acoustic spaces be reconfigured through material behaviour alone? Using modular elastomer components, this project proposes an acoustically responsive wall system with a dynamic membrane to modify acoustic environments. Though made up of individual modules, the wall system aims to modify acoustic spaces by functioning as a continuous whole. Fixed to a structure with a double-curvature for stability and controlled by servo motors connected to a microphone, the membrane deforms from input by a fast fourier transform to reflect the dominant frequency waveforms within a space. This is only gestural as a visualisation tool though - the wall could be programmed to behave in any number of ways.

DIRTY  HARRY

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CINEMETRICS SPRING 2011, CED: UC BERKELEY

ARCH 101: ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIO TUTOR: KYLE STEINFELD

Completed over a weekend, cinemetrics was the first assignment for an advanced design studio completed on exchange at UC Berkeley. Two exercises were completed in the process of analysis the opening scene of Dirty Harry. Firstly, a story board investigating the temporal narrative of the film clip, and secondly, a spatial map analysing the scenes and displaying the spaces within the clip at the scale of an aperture, rather than the scale of a person.

MODULAR FARMING PLATFORM OPERATION

SUNLIGHT

REFLECTED SUNLIGHT

NUTRIFIED WATER IN

WASTE OUT

SUB-TERRARIUM CITY JULY 2011

VUW SOAD 24HR DESIGN COMPETITION This project was completed with: Amanda Crosby

Completed as part of a 24 hour competition, sub-terrarium city speculate how food distribution systems might function within Wellington in 500 years time. The proposal envisages a world where extreme climate change has forced humans underground, where colossal farm-pits with modular growing platforms provide the only means of sustenance, where farmer overlords rule with an iron fist, where light-fed vegertables are a delicacy and peasants can only afford to eat meat.

[Layer 1] rain/sun screen

[Layer 2] weatherproof

[Layer 3] structure

PATTERNED BRONZE SCREEN MODULE PIN JOINTFIXING SCREEN TO CONNECTION BOLT 20mm BOLT FIXING SCREEN TO CONCRETE MOMENT FRAME

WINDOW

IN-SITU REINFORCED CONCRETE MOMENT FRAME STRUCTURE PRECAST CONCRETE BEAM

PRECAST CONCRETE COLUMN

SECONDARY TIMBER STRUCTURE SUPPORTING FLOOR TO CEILING GLAZING FLOOR TO CEILING GLAZING

FLOOR TO CEILING GLAZING

VENTILATION AND AIR SUPPLY FIXED UNDER WINDOW FRAMES

10mm SHS HOUSING VENTILATION CONCRETE GUTTER

Supreme Court of New Zealand: Existing skin, exploded section.

PILLOWS OF JUSTICE TRIMESTER 2 2011

SARC 321: CONSTRUCTION

INSTRUCTOR: PHIL MARSH

Using the Supreme Court of New Zealand as a testbed, how can the performance of buildings be improved through the constructional elements of building screens? This project suggests that the implementation of a new screen for the court building offers the potential for greater performance. The current condition is a repeated detail around the perimeter of the court building, irrespective of any program or site orientation. Through an analysis of different building screens and skins, including the Sendai Mediatheque by Toyo Ito, and the Signal Box and Allianz Arena by Herzog and DeMeuron, the report suggests that the screen could be changed to become more effective performatively. A new screen detail comprising modular ETFE pillows fixed to a timber frame favours greater flexibility in terms of control of privacy, responsivness to program, light transmission and thermal comfort, and use of renewable materials. these ‘pillows of justice’ surrounding the courtroom will only serve to strengthen the actual pillars happening inside.

[Layer 1] rain/sun screen

[Layer 2] air cavity/ ventilation/ thermal performance

[Layer 3] glazing/weatherproof ALUMINIUM GLAZING FITTINGS FIXED TO STEEL SHEET ON FLOORPLATE JOINT FLASHED TO PREVENT WATER ENTRY INTO STEEL FITTINGS AT END OF FLOORPLATE

OUTER GLAZING, TOUGHENED, HEAT-TREATED W/ PRECAST HOLES FOR FITTINGS STEEL SUPPORT BRACKET FIXING GLASS SUPPORT RIB TO STEEL FLOORPLATE

SUSPENDED CEILING FIXED TO STEEL SHEET ON FLOORPLATE

STRUCTURAL GLASS SUPPORT RIB STEEL GLASS FITTINGS CONNECTED TO FLOORPLATES

INTERNAL GLAZING

STEEL TENTION TIES FIXED TO GLASS FITTINGS

RAISED FLOOR CONNECTED TO STEEL FLOORPLATE STEEL FLOORPLATES HONEYCOMB CONCRETE INSIDE STEEL FLOORPLATES CERAMIC FRITTING CONCEALS STEEL FLOORPLATES BEHIND OUTER GLAZING

Sendai Mediatheque: Existing skin, exploded section. [Layer 1] weatherproofing/ visibility/ thermal performance

[Layer 2] secondary structure

[Layer 3] maintenance/ services

LIGHTING UNIT SECONDARY STRUCTURE, 120/220MM SHS

PRECAST SPUN CONCRETE COLUMN RETRACTABLE MAINTENANCE WALKWAY

50MM PDE TUBE SECONDARY STRUCTURE, 50MM SHS FLASHING AT JOINT ALUM WEATHERSTRIP SEALING ETFE PILLOWS

1250/900MM REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR BEAMS

300MM/200MM STEEL RHS WITH TRAVELER 100MM DIA. AIR DUCT TO FACADE

CUSHION, 0.2MM ETFE SHEETING

MAINTENANCE LADDER

Allianz Arena: Existing skin, exploded section.

180X90X1600 TREATED GLULAM TIMBER FRAME

POLYOLEFIN SEAL ON ALUMINIUM WEATHERSTRIP OPTIONAL ETFE PANEL INSERT [REFER TO SPECS]

STEEL PIN JOINT FIXING TIMBER FRAME TO CONNETION BOLT 30MM DIA. STEEL BOLT FIXING SCREEN TO CONCRETE FLOOR

CUSHION, 0.2MM ETFE SHEETING

AIR SUPPLY 50MM DIA. PDE HOSE FIXED TO EXISTING COURT VENTILATION SUPPLY

STEEL TENSION BRACING FIXING WELDED TO 10MM FOLDED STEEL BACKING PLATE

180X90X8000 TREATED GLULAM TIMBER FRAME 10MM DIA. STEEL BOLT FIXING TIMBER FRAME TO STEEL BACKING PLATE.

ETFE PILLOW FIXINGS WELDED TO 10MM FOLDED STEEL BACKING PLATE

10MM FOLDED STEEL BACKING PLATE

180X90X1600 TREATED GLULAM TIMBER FRAME

AIR SUPPLY TO PILLOWS STEEL PIN JOINT FIXING TIMBER FRAME TO CONNETION BOLT 30MM DIA. STEEL BOLT FIXING SCREEN TO CONCRETE FLOOR

AIR SUPPLY 50MM DIA. PDE HOSE FIXED TO EXISTING COURT VENTILATION SUPPLY

5MM DRAINAGE GAP

New skin system: Proposed details.

PLATE EXTENDS TO CONNECT

5MM GAP BETWEEN MEMBERS FOR DRAINAGE 10MM STEEL BOLT FIXING GLULAM FRAME TO STEEL BACKING PLATE STEEL TENSION TIE BRACING

ALUMINIUM WEATHERSTRIP

AIR SUPPLY 50MM DIA. PDE HOSE FIXED TO EXISTING COURT VENTILATION SUPPLY

STEEL TENSION FIXINGS WELDED TO STEEL BACKING PLATE

180X90 TREATED GLULAM SCREEN FRAME

POLYOLEFIN SEAL ON ALUMINIUM WEATHERSTRIP

180X90X8000 TREATED GLULAM TIMBER FRAME

OPTIONAL ETFE PANEL INSERT [REFER TO SPECS] CUSHION, 0.2MM ETFE SHEETING

10MM DIA. STEEL BOLT FIXING TIMBER FRAME TO STEEL BACKING PLATE. STEEL TENSION BRACING FIXING WELDED TO 10MM FOLDED STEEL BACKING PLATE

ETFE PILLOW FIXINGS WELDED TO 10MM FOLDED STEEL BACKING PLATE

d inside a ost houses lope from weden. Innt times of w dialogue

2231

Section: Summer

STORE

READ

FIREPLACE

WASH

SUMMER WINTER

SLEEP

EAT

WORK

TRADITIONAL HOUSING

BREAKING UP THE ENVELOPE

HOUSING IN THE WILD

Section: Winter

Plan, with seasonal inhabitation cycles

Perspective: Summer SUMMER WINTER

Plan, with seasonal inhabitation cycles

Perspective: Winter

A SEASONAL HOUSE JULY 2011

SHELTER STUDENT ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COMPETITION 2011

This project was completed with: Hannes Frykholm

Houses today are defined by their separation from the wilderness. Tube-fed by an army of machines, most houses exist in complete separation from the environment that surrounds them. This proposal removes the envelope from the archetypal house, physically separates its functions, and spreads them around a forest in Hemavan, Sweden. Inhabitants of the house fall into seasonal rhythms by inhabiting different parts of the house during different times of the year, forcing them to engage and experience the wilderness as part of a daily routine.

Summer and Winter. Facing: Concept diagram | plan | Sections, summer and winter.

? Changing area Toilets

?

Showers Entry/Exit

CHANGING ROOM TRIMESTER 2 2010

ARCI 212: ARCHITECTURE DESIGN INTEGRATION

INSTRUCTOR: MATT FRASER

A refit of the Freyberg Pool changing rooms provides an interesting opportunity to investigate how transitions in form and materiality can enhance the sensory qualities of architecture. Traditionally, a changing room provides a point of transformation for the user, whether it is a shift in clothing, mindset, or environment. As the current changing rooms at Freyberg do not reflect this, the refit has been designed with these degrees of transition in mind, in program, form, materiality, and experience. The main features of the room are gradually shifting axes of transition, in both form and materiality, which follow logical pathways between the different elements of the program. Responding to the waterfront site, the mass of the room is projected out of the pool volume, where a skylight roof gradually breaks down into a wall opening. This break in form is clad in copper, which increases in patina and perforation over the course of the axis, reflective of the changing degree of exposure one experiences traveling across the space.

02

01 DN

DN

03

Materials have been chosen specifically to weather along these axes of transition. Timber, copper, and concrete all reflect varying degrees of exposure depending on their position in the space.

DN

plan with sections marked

section 01 - poolside entry

section 02 - axis

section 03 - transition from reception entrance

Ceiling

Weathering screen

Portal frame

Cloudform lighting system

Changing room

axis from showers | axis from changing area facing | exploded isometric: atmospheric and structural features

SUPERLINK TRIMESTER 2 2010

ARCI 212: ARCHITECTURE DESIGN INTEGRATION

INSTRUCTOR: MATT FRASER

Superlink is a light rail station, transport hub and flexible public space for a proposed light rail network running through Wellington city. Typically, subterranean buildings are defined by an abrupt transition from base to surface level. By creating a porous, flexible surface canopy, and by injecting a public space in between the platform and surface levels, the programmatic features and gradients of transition that define subterranean and uinfrastructural buildings are blurred and fragmented. Spaces within the station overlap and have been planned to provide a visual connection between the building’s different functions. Circulation routes between programs also overlap at points to force interaction between different user groups. The result is a dynamic, human and continually fluctuating public space and infrastructural development.

plan in context

section 01

section 02

section 03

public transport Public transport

commuter circulation Commuter circulation public Publiccirculation circulation

exploded isometric: function + circulation

02 - horizontal perforations allow for low-angle sun in the winter.

03 - placement of vertical perforations follow the sun’s path and allow for daylighting during hours of peak occupancy.

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interior perspective: public garden

physical model: exploded levels showing arrangement and relationships between spaces.

interior perspective: Hub overlap

on-site study: building footprints and volumes mapped with ephemeral parameters

LOVE HOTEL TRIMESTER 1 2010

ARCI 211: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INSTRUCTOR: SIMON TWOSE

Drawings from this project published in issue #10 of Arkhitekton Magazine.

The Love Hotel is an architecture realised through the very idiosyncratic process of drawing, in response to a very unique script of site phenomena that are experienced individually within Opera House Lane in Central Wellington. In terms of program, the Love Hotel is defined by a singular axis that follows the course of the site. As the user moves through the building, the site disappears from physical view, but is reintroduced through treatment of material, massing, surface and projection. The programmatic elements of the hotel, walkway, threshold, tower and dwelling, provide a figurative an d experiential gradient that marks removal from site. Treatment of surface and material reflects the drawn projection onto the site, while the machines physically project into the site. These machines record and compress the events happening within the building onto a single surface - a screen within the Opera House. Thus, the very act of inhabiting the building is transformed into a performance, a reflection of site qualities that transcend physical parameters. The Hotel takes place not as a cohesive whole, but as a series of projections, cast by intangible moments and events that are experienced within the site. The act of drawing is informed by these projections - projecting the building onto the site, through the site, and finally - deep into the site. In doing so, a position in favour of the discursive and subjective nature of symbolic architectural representation is established.

section 01: walkway machine

plan

section 05: journey

section 02: threshold machine

section 03: tower machine

section 04: dwelling machine

[1] projection onto site: Alley overhead

[2]

projection into site: Opera House screen

[3]

[4]

projection through site: megamachine

SOLAR DECATHLON HOUSE TRIMESTER 1 2010

SARC 223: CONSTRUCTION

INSTRUCTOR: SUNIL BAKSHI project completed with:

Bel Fraser, Ian Hopkins, Belinda Martin & Matt McFettridge.

The Solar Decathlon House is a synthesis of modular construction techniques and the kind of timber frame structure traditionally found within the residential architecture of New Zealand. As part of a group project, I was assigned to design, detail, and physically model a modular wall panel system that could be transported in a 20ft shipping container, assembled quickly and easily on site, all whilst acting in accordance with NZS3604 to ensure full weatherproofing and consistency with New Zealand building standards. The result is a compact, modular system that combines functionality with the bach typology outlined in the design intent.

physical detail: roof system

physical detail: wall module - floor module connection

physical details: wall module to roof, canopy and floor module connections facing | modular component system: solar decathlon house model

physical model: component wall unit assembly

overlay study: urban mass to projection map

ROOM OF SAND ARCI 211: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

Room of Sand was an experimental studio where we were asked to create a room that was bigger on the inside, than on the outside. The conceptual foundation of this project revolves around two closely linked ideas:

This project featured in the VUW School of

1.) It is possible to project oneself outside the physical constraints of a space, through the consumption of information.

TRIMESTER 1 2010

INSTRUCTOR: SIMON TWOSE

Architecture faculty publication for 2010.

2.) The way we perceive physical constraints and boundaries is dictated by the information that one is able to consume within a given space. The studio explored projections, models, and illustrations, before culminating in a series of abstract spatial drawings, and the development of an architectural position. The program consists of two rooms. The inside room consists of the structure and massing at either end. The outside room consists of the fog of information within the building’s centre. The transition between the spaces is gradual but the contrast is severe. Upon entering, the structure and concrete massing of the space gradually dissolves into an overwhelming blur. Through a series of membranes surrounding the outside room, layers of information are compressed and projected into the interior. As the building disintegrates, the viewer is left in an overwhelming sensory haze, and the physical constraints of the space disappear.

room of sand: projection membrane

room of sand: interior perspective

i: NYC

ii: Los Angeles

iii: London

A:

real information [raw data]

C:

structure: physical model [eventual dissipation]

D:

structure: drawn process [speculative investigation]

iv: flexible mould projection

v: solid mould projection

v: ephemeral data projection

B:

projected information

[physical model/data recordings]

E:

room of sand [cumulative architectural position]

N

1. max. building volume

PRIVATE CIRCULATION PUBLIC CIRCULATION

BEDROOMS

2. stagger for daylighting

GARDEN SPACE

COMMUNAL AREA THIRD FLOOR STAFF/ADMIN

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

SERVICES/ACCESS

PUBLIC SPACE

SECOND FLOOR

3. green space FIRST FLOOR

4. extrusion for circulation

exploded isometric: program

JUNCTION

Junction is an Elderly Care Centre and Art Gallery located within Oriental Bay, Wellington. The aim of the project was to normalise the process of ageing by allowing common, everyday practices to permeate the boundaries of what are usually hidden building typologies.

JULY 2010

ARCHITECTS FOR HEALTH: STUDENT DESIGN AWARD 2010

This project completed with: Nick Roberts

This is achieved through a program that encourages shared use of space, and purposely overlaps public and private circulation routes. While regular interaction with others is proven to be beneficial for the elderly, the Centre provides privacy and comfort for its patients. The building is arranged around a series of courtyards and is angled to make use of all-day sun and spectacular views of Wellington Harbour.

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A SHELTER FROM SAFETY TRIMESTER 1 2009

ARCH 102: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INSTRUCTOR: HOLLY KEANE

A Shelter from Safety is a temporary installation located on the Wellington waterfront. A response to climate change and envionmental damage, the shelter seeks to expose the false safety of the built environment, and reveal the violence and excess that comes with our everyday way of life.

OF EARTH AND WATER TRIMESTER 2 2009

ARCH 112: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INSTRUCTOR: HANNA O’DONOGUE

This proposal for a salt-water pool complex at Point Jerningham seeks to absorb and intensify existing site qualities rather than contain them. The complex consists of three separate pools for paddling, swimming and bathing, a cafĂŠ, changing room facilities, and a pool control area. The project began by investigating the spatial conditions that surround paddling, bathing and swimming at a series of different scales in the form of physical collages, before the development of an architectural position. Within the complex, the positions of the individual pools are informed by existing site conditions - weather, topography, and bathymetry. All three pools are linked by an axis that runs the length of the complex, acting as a means of circulation, and mapping transitions across the site. Across its length, the axis takes pool users from a very contained, hermetic paddling space to a swimming area that extends into open water, completely exposed to the elements.

Paddling Pool [enclosure]

Section 01: Transition across axis

Section 02: Site bathymetry

Plan

Bathing Pool [transition]

Swimming Pool [exposure]

Moment 01: Canopy

Moment 02: Pier

25 x Iterations of a cube [analogue]

25 x Iterations of a cube [digital]

A+D TRIMESTER 2 2009

ARCH 102: COMMUNICATIONS INSTRUCTOR: MONI ECKEY

A + D stands for Analogue + Digital. This studio investigated the design process itself, through an exploration of typified analogue and digital design methodologies, and their various potentials. By developing a cube over twenty five iterations, both digitally and by hand, the potentials and limitations of analogue and digital design processes are revealed.

Wireframe Model: 8x Analogue Interventions

Final Analogue Intervention

Final Digital Intervention

8x Digital Interventions

TRACE TRIMESTER 2 2009

ARCH 102: COMMUNICATIONS INSTRUCTOR: MONI ECKEY

Trace investigated a site in context, through abstract pathways and journeys, then representing them through analogue and digital modeling and drawing techniques. The analogue series of models depicted here represent the journey across Evans Bay from Point Jerningham - depicting the changing coastal landscape. The digital models represent the journey from Point Jerningham through to the Wellington CBD - showing a changing urban environment and increasing urban density.

Seated figure drawing.

Changing room: Experiential progression.

SKETCHBOOK/DRAWINGS VARIOUS PROJECTS 2009/2010

Petra, Jordan.

Love Hotel: On-site analysis drawing.

Room of Sand: Section through floating panopticon [perceived spatial mass].

Mammoth Mountain, Mammoth, California, USA, March 2008.

Tiger Park, Harbin, China, December 2009.

PHOTOGRAPHY TRAVELS 2007-2011

Sunrise, Borobodur, Java, Indonesia, November 2009.

Catedral Metropolitana de la Asunci贸n de Mar铆a, Mexico City, Mexico, June 2011.

skills: Hand drawing Painting [oil/acrylic/watercolour] Woodwork/woodshop use Metalwork [basic] Model making Laser cutter 3D printing CNC mill Casting, plastics, and elastics Digital Fabrication [basic] Photography Audio Production [basic] software: Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Adobe Flash SketchUp Revit Rhino 3D V-Ray for Rhino Grasshopper Revit CAD functions AutoCAD Maxwell 3D Studio Max Ecotect Logic Studio details henrystephens@gmail.com issuu.com/henrystephens thepapercity.tumblr.com


Henry Stephens | Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio