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CATSKILLCENTER SUMMER 2017


2017

SUMMER SINCE 1969, THE CATSKILL CENTER HAS BEEN THE MAJOR FORCE IN PROTECTING AND FOSTERING THE ENVIRONMENTAL, CULTURAL AND ECONOMIC WELL-BEING OF THE CATSKILL REGION


CONTENTS 4 A LETTER FROM JEFF 8 FORAGING WITH ROB HANDEL 12 5 QUESTIONS — ON HIKING SAFELY 14 BIOBLITZ AT THORN PRESERVE 20 REVERENCE / REMEMBRANCE 22 2017 MEMBER PROGRAM SERIES 24 SUMMER GATHERING REDUX 28 NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK 30 BUSINESS SUPPORTERS


Dark greens, blue skies, an o Summer in the Catskills is magnificent! It’s the time to hike, bike, bird, try canoeing, and catch fish. Stroll and shop along our main streets. Feast on fresh vegetables and fruit at a farmers market. Taste locally produced ciders and spirits. We have festivals, concerts, and more­­— summer is a serious pleasure-fest in the Catskills! Since 1969, the Catskill Center has helped make it all possible. Our mission is to protect and foster the environmental, cultural and economic well-being of the Catskill region. We protect our unique natural areas that make the Catskills so special, while seeking sustainable economic opportunities that will not negatively impact those same natural resources. Over the entirety of our 48 years, our belief that "conservation creates opportunity" has not wavered. Today that work includes leading the charge for the Catskill Park. In the 2017 New York State Budget, we helped secure more than $7 million in funding for the Park and its communities. We lead regional collaborative efforts like the Catskill Park Coalition and the Catskill Park Advisory Committee. We steward our region, fighting back against invasive plant and animal species here in the Catskills. We protect thousands of acres of land through conservation easements and our two publicaccess preserves. In a new partnership with New York City, we are

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n occasional thunderstorm...

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helping protect critical stream buffers. We lead conversations and working groups to tackle issues like overuse of our park lands, litter problems, transportation difficulties and more, all to become better stewards of our Catskills.

artist-in-residence

There we help visitors and residents alike appreciate and understand the unique environmental, cultural and historic resources of the Catskills, while helping them enjoy their time in the region.

This year we celebrate 20 years of the

Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center.

program

at our Platte Clove Preserve, and the Sculpture Park at the Catskill Interpretive Center enters another year with works from local artists and those inspired by the Catskills. Our classroom educational programming like Streamwatch reaches hundreds of students, and our workshops, lectures and presentations reach

Simply put, none of this would be possible without you! That’s the number one reason I am so excited to be launching our new member benefits program, which allows us to thank you for your support with unique and interesting member-only opportunities, including a world-class lecture series, discounts at the Erpf Center and Catskill Interpretive Center bookstores, this newsletter and more.

thousands across the region! If you are not already a member, At the first visitor center for the

please join us!

Catskill Park, we welcome thousands of visitors a year at the Maurice D.

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FORAGING WITH ROB HANDEL AT THE THORN PRESERVE 8 SUMMER 2017


On a warm Saturday evening in early July, Chef and forager Rob Handel from Heather Ridge Farm and The Bees Knees Café in Preston Hollow led a group around the Catskill Center’s Thorn Preserve in Woodstock. CATSKILLCENTER 9


They were on a quest for wild edibles. Rob found juniper berries, milkwort and dainty, tangy wood sorrel (Oxalis acetosella). As he gathered, he shared favored preparation possibilities. There were wild garlic, knotweed, mulberry and black walnut trees. In a very short amount of time, Rob had pointed out an astounding array of

Post wander, Rob poured cups of his homemade Nocino (black walnut liqueur)

and

dished

up

pickled

milkweed pods and chanterelles. Under a tree, he set up a station and blanched foraged plantain leaf, drizzled it with a dressing of sesame and soy, and sprinkled the dish with plantain seed.

plants that were not only edible, but

The wilted greens were similar to

quite tasty.

seaweed salad and delicious.

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Rob has been a man of the kitchen since his grandmother first set him to cracking eggs and peeling potatoes in her Catskills kitchen. He broadened his culinary horizons through research and travel. Currently, Rob is the chef at the Bees Knees CafĂŠ, where he serves up local meats and farm-raised poultry, and primarily works with local produce, cheeses, dairy and foraged ingredients.

Rob will lead two more afternoons of

ROB’S FORAGED MUSTARD "I use garlic mustard seeds and wild herbal beers that I brew myself. An equally nice mustard can be prepared using brown mustard seeds and commercially brewed beer, white wine, or cider."

foraging in 2017:

1/4 cup garlic mustard seeds (can substitute brown mustard)

September 7 at the Catskill

1/2 cup yellow mustard seeds

Interpretive Center

1 1/2 cup beer, wine, or cider

October 7 at the Platte Clove

1/4 cup vinegar (white wine, cider, distilled, or rice vinegar)

Preserve

1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon honey, sorghum syrup

Information about these programs and registration can be found at Catskillcenter.org/events

maple,

or

Combine mustard seeds and beer; let sit covered overnight. The next day, combine all ingredients and blend until desired texture is reached, adding water if necessary. Mustard seeds vary in flavor; adjust salt and sweetener to taste. Can be refrigerated for up to one month.

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5 questions WITH JEFF SENTERMAN What are your personal safety concerns when you hike?

Do you need sunscreen if you’re hiking in the woods?

For me, I think my biggest concern

realize, even in the shade of the woods.

​Yes, it’s easy to get more sun than you

is being prepared. None of us start a hike thinking that there is going to be a problem, but accidents happen and it’s being prepared that can make the difference between a bad situation and a terrible situation. Here in the Catskills, I’m most often worried about footing. Our trails are often quite rough and our rocks are very slippery, especially when they are wet. Without proper hiking shoes, it is very easy to slip or trip, and a fall can cause anything from a black and blue, a broken bone or at worst, death when that fall is in a dangerous place like Kaaterskill Falls. Whenever I hike with others, I make sure they have good hiking boots or shoes, and that they are aware of just how rough our trails can be and how slippery Catskill bluestone is!

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What about hiking with kids? Or what age would you say is a safe age to start hiking? It’s never too young to start hiking with kids. Before I could even walk, my parents had me in a backpack carrier out on trails across the Catskills. As I grew up, the mountains and the trails were natural to me and became something I appreciated. There are plenty of guides about getting kids started with hiking, and I think any effort we can make to connect our children to nature, to trails and to the outdoors is a positive development and

should

encouraged!

be

embraced

and


ON HIKING SAFELY

How do you deal with the tick / lyme disease issue? Lyme disease and ticks are now unfortunately a very real problem for those of us hiking and recreating in the Catskills. I treat my hiking clothing with permethrin, which is a tick repellant. When I wear long pants, I tuck my socks in to reduce places for ticks to get on my skin. I wear light-colored clothing when I can, to make ticks more obvious. When I finish hiking, I always do a check of my clothes and any skin that I can, and then when I get home, I do a full inspection (asking my significant other for help) to make sure that there are no ticks on my body. If you see a rash that looks like a bull’s-eye or have unexplained flu-like symptoms, go see your doctor and ask to be checked for Lyme Disease. Lyme isn’t something to ignore or to think won’t happen to you. Stay aware of the tick

Say you’re a gym rat, but a novice hiker, how long a hike would you recommend? With regular hiking, almost anyone can become a long distance hiker who can rack up the miles, but for those just starting, a 3-mile hike can often be a good starting point. It’s long enough to get beyond just a walk, but not so long that it feels like a forced march. From there, start working up to longer and longer distances as you find what works with your body and your feet!

problem, try to avoid them, and follow up with your doctor if necessary.

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scientists to conduct an intensive biodiversity field study at the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in Washington D.C. In the span of 24 hours, over 1000 species were identified; U.S. National Park Service naturalist Susan Rudy coined the event a "BioBlitz". Biodiversity is the variety of life in a particular habitat or ecosystem and is a powerful indicator of environmental quality. A loss in biodiversity (and the resulting simplification of the system) results in a lessening of the system’s resilience to pollution, an increase in the susceptibility to invasive species invasions and an increased vulnerability to extreme weather events and other stresses. Since the success of the first BioBlitz, people and places around the world have organized versions of the event and the public is invited to participate.

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BioBlitz at Thorn Preserve

In 1996, Sam Droege and Dan Roddy gathered fellow


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The Catskill Center, in conjunction with

Eastern-tailed blues, barn swallows,

the Woodstock Land Conservancy, has

and Halloween pennants. The pond,

led a BioBlitz at the Catskill Center’s

wetlands, and stream were full of

Thorn Preserve annually since 2015.

dragonflies, damselflies and crayfish.

This past July, citizen scientists of

One of the most exciting discoveries

all ages, were invited to participate.

of the 2017 BioBlitz was (through

Anyone interested in meeting experts

acoustical monitoring) the detection

and joining scientists in a hands-

of the Indiana bat. Indiana Bats have

on field study and data-gathering

declined by over 40,000 individuals

mission was welcome.

in New York State since 2007 and are

The variety of habitats at our beautiful 60-acre Thorn Preserve in Woodstock, New York support a great deal of biological diversity, and this year, the

endangered not only in New York State (due to White Nose Syndrome), but are also on the federal Endangered Species List.

fields of the Thorn Preserve were rich

At the Thorn Preserve, bats forage for

with movement and color. There were

insects along the stream corridor and

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over the fields and may roost on the

pond and along the mowed paths. The

Preserve under the loose bark of trees,

nests are made of silk strands spun

such as the shagbark hickory. In order

from the spinnerets of checkerspot

to best support their recovery, we will

larvae. Checkerspot caterpillars feed

continue to monitor bat populations

on plantain and beardtongue plants.

and how they are using the preserve and maintain the Preserve to best suit the bats’ needs.

Famously, monarch caterpillars only feed on the foliage of plants in the milkweed family and the toxins of

During the BioBlitz, we also observed

the plant are passed on to the insects

many connections between species.

to make them toxic to potential

Some

predators.

plants

require

certain

Common

milkweed

is

pollinators to be fertilized; some

abundant through the Thorn fields,

insects require certain host plants

and this summer, has supported

to complete their life cycle.

monarchs at numbers that had not

The

Baltimore Checkerspot is abundant at Thorn, and large concentrations of checkerspot "nests" were seen near the

been seen for several years. —John Thompson, CRISP Coordinator

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IN THE ERPF GALLERY

REVERENCE / REMEMBRA

WET PLATE TINTYPES AND DIGITAL PHOTOS BY KEVIN Q. GRAY July 22 - September 1, 2017 Kevin has twice been an artist-in-

juxtaposed with wet plate tintypes

residence at Platte Clove’s Red Cabin.

of Kevin’s mother’s most precious

In 2012, he focused on the surrounding landscape and captured color digital images. In 2015, Kevin meditated on his

objects. Meet the Artist Reception Friday, September 1 4-6 pm

memories of his mother, who had shared with him a strong reverence

The Erpf Gallery

for nature and was the first to take

Catskill Center

him to the Catskill mountains.

43355 Route 28,

This exhibit explores both bodies of work. Color C-prints of Platte Clove and the surrounding region are

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Arkvillle, New York Monday - Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm Saturday 10am - 2pm


RANCE

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Become A Member This extraordinary, four-part educational program series is reserved exclusively for Catskill Center members

CATS KI LLC E N TE R 2 0 17

EXCLUSIVE MEMBER PROGRAM SERIE S

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SATURDAY. JULY 22 7:00 PM THE HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL AND THE ICE AGE ROBERT AND JOHANNA TITUS THE CATSKILL CENTER ARKVILLE, NEW YORK

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12 7:00 PM GOLDEN EAGLES IN THE CATSKILLS PEG DIBENEDETTO THE EMERSON RESORT MT. TREMPER, NEW YORK

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 7:00 PM INTERNATIONAL ECO-TOURIST DESTINATIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON LOCAL ECONOMIES SUE CLARK AT THE CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER MT. TREMPER, NEW YORK

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28 HISTORIC CEMETERIES OF THE CATSKILLS AND THEIR GHOSTS JOHN THOMPSON FIELD EXCURSION


Your tax-deductible donation supports healthy ecosystems and vibrant communities throughout the Catskill region. Catskillcenter.org/membership Or complete this form and mail to:

Member Benefits Individual ($35) Family ($50) Senior/Student ($25) FREE SUBSCRIPTION to the Catskill Center’s quarterly newsletter with news from the Catskill Center and across the Catskill Region. 10% DISCOUNT on purchases at the Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center and all Catskill Center facilities with presentation of member card. MEMBER ONLY INVITATIONS to the Annual Gathering, lectures and special events. ACCESS TO THE CATSKILL CENTER ARCHIVES at the Erpf Center in Arkville. Please contact the Catskill Center to schedule an appointment. MEMBER PACKAGE Members receive a membership package in the mail, including a member card and Catskill Center cling sticker. Catskillcenter.org/membership Or complete this form and mail to:

CATSKILL CENTER P.O. BOX 504, ROUTE 28 ARKVILLE, NY 12406

NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE

ZIP

PHONE EMAIL

MEMBERSHIP LEVEL $35 ­— Individual $50 ­— Family $25 ­— Senior/Student $100 ­— Partnering member $250 ­— Benefactor $500 ­— Leadership Circle $1000 ­— President’s Circle

AMOUNT CARD # EXPIRATION SECURITY #

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2017 S

AT THE PE

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SUMMER GATHERING

PEEKAMOOSE RESTAURANT + TAP ROOM

Every summer, the Catskill Center hosts a celebration as an opportunity to spend time with our supporting community and to honor individuals whose work benefits the Catskill Park and the Catskill region. We call it our "Summer Gathering". This summer, our gathering filled the Peekamoose Restaurant and Tap Room to capacity. Jeff Senterman was honored to present Kathy Moser, Deputy Commissioner


of the New York State Department of

Moser has done on behalf of the

Environmental

Catskill Park.

Conservation,

with

the Alf Evers Award for Excellence for her outstanding work to advance outdoor recreation opportunities and communities in the Catskill Park.

The Catskill Center also had the pleasure to honor former Catskill Center Board President, H. Claude Shostal, with the Ginsberg Award

DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said,

for his many years of service to the

"The Department of Environmental

Catskill Center. Claude’s steadfast

Conservation values our partnership

leadership advanced the Catskill

with the Catskill Center to promote

Center on many fronts, benefiting

recreation, sustainable development,

the Catskill Park and communities

and natural resource conservation

across the Catskill region.

in the Catskill Park. I commend the Catskill Center for selecting Kathy Moser for the 2017 Alf Evers Award for Excellence in recognition of her leadership and the important work that she and her team at DEC are doing to fulfill Governor Cuomo’s commitment to promote and protect this valuable New York State treasure." The Catskill Center is truly grateful for all of the outstanding work Kathy

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The Center’s Volunteer Recognition Award was presented to Douglas Hamilton, of Grahamsville, for 18 years of truly exceptional volunteer service with the Catskill Fire Tower Project and throughout the Catskill Park. We hope you’ll join us next year! Become a member and receive a personal invite to the 2018 fête.


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NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK Sarah McGinnis is our new Director

Skyler Susnick is our summer CRISP

of the Catskill Interpretive Center.

2017 Hemlock Health Intern.

Sarah has a background in publicity

He’s focused on hemlock health

and marketing for socially-minded

monitoring and assessing the

small companies, non-profits,

abundance of hemlock pests,

and individuals in the arts and

including Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

entertainment industry. We’re very

and Elongate Hemlock Scale. Skyler is

happy to have her manning the ship

also monitoring old growth hemlock

in Mt. Tremper!

stands in the Catskills.

Nico Echevarria is our 2017 Catskill

Heather Phelps-Lipton joined the

Campground Invasive Species

Catskill Center at the end of May as

Steward.

our Director of Communications.

He’s conducting surveys of NYS

She lives on the edge of the Little

Department of Environmental

Delaware River and thinks living

Conservation campgrounds and

streamside, having a yard filled with

searching for Catskill Regional

beautiful old hemlocks and yet edged

Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP)

with knotweed, makes her life a

priority Early Detection invasive

virtual case study in the concerns of

species.

the Catskill Center.

He gained experience with aquatic invasives while working for the Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management in 2016. CATSKILLCENTER 29


WE THANK THE STARS FOR OUR

BUSINESS MEMBERS We are honored by and grateful for the support of these Catskill businesses.

If you would like to support our mission as a business member, please visit us at CatskillCenter.org/membership

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THE RICH MIND LIES IN THE SUN AND SLEEPS, AND IS NATURE. RALPH WALDO EMERSON

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Summer 2017

The Catskill Center for Conservation & Development PO Box 504 43355 State Highway 28 Arkville, NY 12406

NON-PROFIT.ORG U.S.POSTAGE PAID CRST.NET 12550

Catskill Center / Summer Newsletter / 2017  
Catskill Center / Summer Newsletter / 2017  
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