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CATSKILLCENTER WINTER 2017


MAURICE D. HINCHEY OCTOBER 27, 1938 – NOVEMBER 22, 2017

It is hard to believe that 2018 is here. Where does that time go? 2017 was a year of exciting accomplishments for the Catskill Center. This past year we: - Embarked on a redesign of the exhibits at the Catskill Interpretive Center

- Officially began the process of becoming an accredited land trust to help steward our preserves and conservation easements

- Finalized our new strategic plan, which will clarify our direction as we head towards our 50th anniversary in 2019

- Brought our members, friends and supporters together at our Summer Gathering and at our Fall Gala.

- Secured more than $7 million for the Catskill Park via our advocacy efforts - Reconstructed and rehabilitated the cottage at the Thorn Preserve, which will increase our ability to hold events and have a caretaker present at the Preserve - Invested in public access improvements at the Platte Clove Preserve (thanks to support from the New York State Conservation Partnership Program)

The honorable Maurice D. Hinchey, who represented upstate New York in Albany and Washington for nearly four decades, was laid to rest on the grounds of the Catskill Interpretive Center, a facility he fought for more than 30 years to create.

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As one of the leading progressive voices in Congress, Maurice Hinchey was a tireless defender of the environment and an unwavering champion of working people everywhere. He spent a lifetime fighting to ensure economic fairness and human rights worldwide.

- Greeted tens of thousands of visitors to the Catskill Park through the Catskill Interpretive Center, the Catskill Fire Tower Project and at our Preserves

- Held an amazing variety of events including: Taking Flight 2017, a Catskill Book Fair, the Catskill Cuisine series and the 2017 Membership Series which offered our members exclusive access to top-notch researchers and scientists from across the Catskills - Welcomed our new Catskill Interpretive Center Director and Communications Director to the team

When I think about how much we accomplished in 2017, I know it was only possible because we have assembled what has to be the finest team of staff and volunteers in the Catskills, if not anywhere. We’re supported by a dedicated Board of Directors and most importantly by our members and donors. Our work to conserve, protect and improve the Catskills and its communities is your work, and we are grateful for your generosity. Your donation powers our work across the region and the Catskill Center is only as strong as those who support us and share our vision that "Conservation Creates Opportunity" here in the Catskills. Our success is your success. I ask you to be part of the Catskill Center and to support our work.

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CONTENTS 3 A LETTER FROM JEFF 7 TIPS FOR HIKING IN WINTER 10 TAKING FLIGHT 2017 14 SCENIC BYWAY / AUDIO TOUR 16 MILE-A-MINUTE 23 MEMBERSHIP 24 CATSKILL PARK DAY 28 CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER 30 UTILITARIAN ART SHOW

BELLEAYRE WINDHAM PLATTEKILL HUNTER

DISCOUNTED SKI PASSES at the

CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER


IN THE CATSKILLS, WE LOVE GETTING OUTSIDE AS OFTEN AS WE CAN, BUT TO STAY WARM AND SAFE, WINTER ADVENTURES IN THE CATSKILLS REQUIRE CAREFUL PLANNING AND PREPARATION

layers, including a spare set of long underwear tops and bottoms – putting on fresh, dry clothes mid-hike may shock the system initially, but you will feel warmer quickly.

MAKE SURE YOUR EQUIPMENT WORKS -- discovering your water bottle is cracked when it is 10 below at lunchtime is worse than a bummer.

CONTRIBUTORS JEFF SENTERMAN Executive Director

MICHAEL DRILLINGER Land Trust Manager

SARAH MCGINNIS

Catskill Interpretive Center Director

DAN SNIDER

Field Projects Manager

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR WINTER HIKES

HEATHER PHELPS-LIPTON

Director of Communications

2017

WINTER SINCE 1969, THE CATSKILL CENTER HAS PROTECTED AND FOSTERED THE ENVIRONMENTAL, CULTURAL AND ECONOMIC WELL-BEING OF THE CATSKILL REGION

STAY DRY AND WATERPROOF WITH THE RIGHT CLOTHING Make sure you manage your core temperature while hiking to prevent sweating, which gets your clothes wet and limits their insulative value. Wear gaiters to help keep your legs dry, when trekking through overhanging trees, pop your hood over your head to prevent snow from getting in at the neck and getting you wet.

WINTER IS THE WRONG TIME TO THINK YOU NEED TO PACK LIGHTLY Carry many insulating

BE AWARE THAT SOLID FOOD ITEMS FREEZE Cut up those snickers bars ahead of time. Even cold cuts on a sandwich can freeze!

DRINK CONSTANTLY You will not feel as thirsty in cold weather and could become dehydrated without realizing it.

KNOW HOW TO REPAIR CROSSCOUNTRY SKI, SNOWSHOE AND CRAMPON/CREEPER BINDINGS You don’t want to be stuck miles from the trailhead with broken equipment that can’t be repaired.

DON’T USE THOSE SKI POLE WRIST LOOPS I f you go one way and your ski pole stays put, a downhill fall can wrench a shoulder.

IDEALLY KNOW YOUR WINTER HIKE AHEAD OF TIME Trail finding is tricky with deep snow, so knowing the route well is a good idea. It is often best to start your winter hiking on trails you already know well from the summer adventures.

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FAVOR HIKES WITH FEW STREAM CROSSINGS Crossings are dangerous as a water hazard and they also make you vulnerable to soaking everything you are wearing and carrying. Even just getting your snowshoes wet can result in the attachment of heavy globs of ice.

IF YOU’RE HIKING WITH A DOG, REGULARLY CHECK THEIR PAWS FOR ICING and make certain they are staying adequately hydrated and warm.

BE ESPECIALLY CAREFUL IF CONDITIONS ARE ICY Crampons

CABIN FEVER SATURDAY Calling snow angels of all ages! Come and cure what ails you with outdoor adventure experts, who will share fresh air how-tos of all sorts, from animal tracking to snow sculpture.

and creepers/cleats only work if you stay on your feet.

This event is especially well-suited for beginning adventurers and families looking for new ways to connect their kids to nature. Dress warmly!

If you are a beginner winter hiker,

WINTER OPEN HOUSE @ CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER

CONSIDER A GROUP HIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TRAIL CONDITIONS AND PREPARATION

Saturday, January 27 / 11am - 3 pm

Many areas have a number of outdoor clubs that leads hikes throughout the year that are open to new hikers without having to become a member.

With proper planning, the right skills and the right equipment, one of the best ways to FIGHT OFF WINTER’S CABIN FEVER is to get out of the cabin and get into the woods!

- Jeff Senterman

8 WINTER 2017

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TAKING FLIGHT 2017 BIRDING IN THE CATSKILLS 10 WINTER 2017

2017 was only year number two for Taking Flight, Birding in the Catskills, but it already feels like we’ve created a flock of followers.

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The 2017 Taking Flight conference was held at Frost Valley, a wonderful 2200-acre venue that is owned and operated by the YMCA. We had about a third more attendees this year than in 2016, and many familiar faces from 2016 came back for another year of Taking Flight.

Relationships were easy and I came to feel particularly close to our two keynote presenters. Richard Crossley, the author of the well-known Crossley ID book series, is a funny and very personable individual. We hung out by the campfire and talked not only of birds, but also of astronomy, wine and travel.

TAKING FLIGHT 2018 WARBLER WEEKEND THE CATSKILL MOUNTAINS HOST 27 DIFFERENT BREEDING WARBLERS AND AT LEAST 9 MORE SPECIES HAVE BEEN DOCUMENTED PASSING THROUGH. SCOTT WHITTLE AND TOM STEPHENSON, CO-WRITERS OF "THE WARBLER GUIDE WILL HEADLINE TAKING FLIGHT 2018.

TAKING FLIGHT 2018 / WARBLER WEEKEND AT THE EMERSON RESORT & SPA May 25 - May 27, 2018

It was very gratifying for me, personally, that people enjoyed what we did last year such that they saw value in returning. The weekend had all the pleasures of summer camp; complete with dining hall meals, outdoor activities and campfires.

Brian "Fox" Ellis, who channeled John J. Audubon for our weekend, was our other keynote presenter. In addition to his address in the persona of Audubon, Brian presented a workshop and led a bird walk. He and I had many exchanges about his life, work and career.

Attendees to the conference gave off an energy and joyful vibe that was infectious. Several times a bird was spotted outside the meeting room and everyone ran, binoculars and cameras in hand, to share the discovery. Peg DiBenedetto, Katie Palm, and I organized the Taking Flight weekends and our collaboration has been as natural as a day in spring.

Next year’s conference will be held at the Emerson Resort, a venue that differs greatly from the rustic setting and ambiance of the first year’s site, the Ashokan Center or this year’s, Frost Valley. It will be interesting to see the affect on the conference. 2018’s theme is Warblers, and we already have a stellar cast of presenters. It’s all very exciting.

For 2018, we are excited to welcome colleagues Heather Phelps-Lipton and Jonathan Mogelever to the Taking Flight team.

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—Michael Drillinger

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the Catskills Scenic Byway

The experience of driving the beautiful Catskill Scenic Byway just deepened with the addition of narration. From the Askokan Reservoir (the east-most end of the tour), to the charming town of Andes, a 56-mile stretch of Route 28 is now enriched with an hour and a half of stories of nature, adventures and history via the TravelStorys app. Get it from the Apple and Google app stores and at TravelStorys.com. Much of route 28 has spotty (at best) reception; be certain to download the tour before you start rolling. Look for "Catkill Scenic Byway". And have a wonderful time!

TRAVELSTORYS AUDIO TOUR 14 WINTER 2017

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On its stem, it has small recurved barbs that allow it to climb over any nearby plants. Unmanaged, this vine can shade out anything it climbs. It can be identified by its noticeably triangular leaves, bright blue berries, and round modified leaves called ocreae that grow around nodes on the stem. Mile-a-minute vine isn’t widespread in the Catskill region. Yet. This fact, and its highly invasive tendencies, are why it is so important for hikers, anglers, and other citizen scientists to report it when they see it. In neighboring areas, mile-a-minute is more widespread, but populations in the Catskills watershed are still low enough that together we can keep this plant from establishing a foothold.

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How do you track a plant that grows a mile a minute?

M

ile-a-minute vine (Persicaria perfoliata) is a particularly aggressive invasive plant, with Asian origins. Its name is very apt, as it can grow incredibly quickly - up to 6 inches a day in optimal conditions.

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M

any of the known milea-minute populations in the Catskill region have been reported by knowledgeable landowners. On August 5th, Catskill Center staff held an educational workshop on invasive species identification and management at the Phoenicia Library. During the Q&A, someone brought up a list of questions their friend, Jane Simmons, had given them – along with the assertion that their friend had been dealing with mile-a-minute at her house! Through follow-up conversations, Catskill Center staff confirmed what were unmistakable pictures of mile-aminute crowding its way into planted gardens and fields of milkweed. We spoke with Jane and secured permission to survey her property and treat any mile-a-minute vine we could find. This citizen scientist didn’t stop with reporting her own property though. Here is where she launches into true superstar status: she went above and

beyond, spreading the mile-a-minute word to her friends throughout the area. It

wasn’t

long

before

someone

"THAT SOUNDS LIKE SOMETHING I’VE BEEN PULLING IN MY GARDEN!" These landowners mentioned,

contacted us, and also agreed to a survey of their property. Staff at the Catskill Center’s invasive species program — The Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP) — found and pulled all of the mile-aminute on this property too. We have since reached out to surrounding landowners, seeking permission for surveys on the nearby properties as well. So far, we have found limited movement of mile-aminute from that site. We have controlled these infestations and are committed to continuing control until the plant is eradicated at these sites. But this superstar still wasn’t done!

Jane kept spreading the word, and an eagle-eyed friend of hers reported an errant vine only a few miles down the road, near a local highway. We again surveyed this property and found the single reported vine – just 10 inches long, behind a shed. CRISP staff pulled the plant and will return in 2018 to monitor the area. This goes to show the power of citizen scientists in reporting invasive species, particularly species that are currently uncommon in the region. Without this superstar citizen scientist, these infestations of milea-minute might have gone unnoticed or unreported for several more years, growing entrenched and spreading with each growing season. With landowner help, we have been able to locate these populations while they are small enough to be easily managed and start control early. The CRISP program also massmailed a mile-a-minute information card to homeowners in the town of Woodstock, with contact info on how to report the plant via iMapInvasives and to CRISP staff at the Catskill Center.

The response to the mailing has been overwhelming and encouraging! So many landowners have become keen citizen scientists, watching for invasive vines and eager to report any that they see in their neighborhood. Sometimes the reports end up being other invasive vines like Eurasian bittersweet, but those landowners still receive best management advice for whatever species they report. Our next steps for the management of mile-a-minute in the Catskills are to continue education through workshops, and to continue surveying and controlling it where CRISP staff find it. But citizen scientist superstars are just as vital to this effort as is CRISP staff! Without Jane in Woodstock and others like her, CRISP wouldn’t be able to track and control these newlyarrived species. Partnerships like these multiply the number of eyes watching for mile-a-minute and other invasive species and the earlier these newcomers are found, the easier they are to deal with. —Dan Snider

IF THIS LOOKS LIKE SOMETHING YOU’VE SEEN, PLEASE LET US KNOW AT

CATSKILLCENTER.ORG/MILEAMINUTE 20 WINTER 2017

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LOCALLY-OWNED ENTERPRISE PLAYS A HUGE ROLE IN PRESERVING THE PROSPERITY OF OUR REGION. THE CATSKILL CENTER AIMS TO CONNECT LOCAL BUSINESSES WITH THE LIKEMINDED INDIVIDUALS WHO MAKE UP OUR AUDIENCE.

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Become a Member

Your tax-deductible donation supports healthy ecosystems and vibrant communities throughout the Catskill region.

Member Benefits

Catskillcenter.org/membership Or complete this form and mail to:

Individual ($35) Family ($50) Senior/Student ($25)

CATSKILL CENTER P.O. BOX 504, ROUTE 28 ARKVILLE, NY 12406

EXCLUSIVE MEMBER PROGRAMMING An extraordinary educational program series reserved exclusively for Catskill Center members. The 2018 program schedule will be announced soon! FREE SUBSCRIPTION to the Catskill Center’s quarterly newsletter with news from the Catskill Center and across the Catskill Region. 10% DISCOUNT on purchases at the Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center and all Catskill Center facilities with presentation of member card. MEMBER ONLY INVITATIONS to the Annual Gathering, lectures and special events. ACCESS TO THE CATSKILL CENTER ARCHIVES at the Erpf Center in Arkville. Please contact the Catskill Center to schedule an appointment. MEMBER PACKAGE Members receive a membership package, including a member card and a Catskill Center cling sticker.

NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE

ZIP

PHONE EMAIL

MEMBERSHIP LEVELS $35 ­— Individual $50 ­— Family $25 ­— Senior/Student $100 — ­ Partnering member $250 — ­ Benefactor $500 — ­ Leadership Circle $1000 — ­ President’s Circle

AMOUNT CARD # EXPIRATION SECURITY #

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FEBRUARY 8, 2018

CALL TO ACTION

CATSKILL PARK DAY

Helmed by the Catskill Center, the Catskill Park Coalition and a batallion of supporters and volunteers will head to Albany and meet with as many New York State legislators as possible to discuss the urgent needs of the Catskill Park, Catskill Forest Preserve and our Catskill communities.

THE 2017 CATSKILL PARK DAY EVENT GENERATED A HISTORIC $7.2 MILLION COMMITMENT FOR THE CATSKILL PARK FROM THE STATE OF NEW YORK. The money benefitted infrastructure improvements within the "blue line" of the park, continued community Smart Growth Grants and provided funding for improvements to the Belleayre Ski Center. In years past, thanks to the support of Governor Cuomo and the State Legislature, the Catskill Park and region have seen strong growth in the marketing and promotion of the Catskills, which provided a boost to our tourism-based economy.

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Programs like the Governor’s Catskills Challenge and I Love New York promotions have dramatically raised regional awareness and buoyed the profile of the Catskills. We see the benefits of that promotion at locations like our Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center, where we are welcoming and introducing the Catskills to hundreds of new visitors every month.

WE’RE PITCHING A $14 MILLION CATSKILL PACKAGE IN 2018 The funding would build on past investments and regional collaborative success by committing necessary recources for: — Catskill Park stewardship, education, improvements and infrastructure maintenance — Operational support of the Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center — Increased budget and staffing for the NYSDEC’s Division of Lands and Forest — Support for the "Save the Hemlocks" initiative led by Cornell — A push for carbon neutral/green infrastructure in new projects across the Catskill Park

GET INVOLVED SPEND THE DAY WITH US IN ALBANY Help make the Catskills personal for all 63 state senators, 150 members of the Assembly and Governor Cuomo by shaking hands and sharing five minutes of what’s so special about the Catskills.

CALL THE GOVERNOR’S OFFICE at 518-474-8390. Thank him for the AdventureNY program, $7.2m in 2017 Catskill Park funding and his efforts to promote the region. Ask him to support the Catskill Park Coalition’s $14m Catskill package and let him know why the Catskills are important to you.

CALL YOUR LOCAL ASSEMBLYMEMBER www.nyassembly.gov/mem/search/

CALL YOUR STATE SENATOR www.nysenate.gov/registration/nojs/ form/start/find-my-senator Let them know that you support the Catskill Park Coalition’s Catskill Package and that you want them to support it. And that you vote!

SEND A NOTE TO GOVERNOR CUOMO

— Continued funding of the Belleayre Ski Center Unit Management Plan

Share your feelings about the Catskills and your interest in his continued support. And please don’t forget to thank him for all that he’s done for our region.

— New funding for Catskill Park Scenic Byways

WRITE A LETTER TO THE EDITOR OF YOUR LOCAL PAPER And please, let us know how it went!

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CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER

UPDATE

Fall was a whirlwind at the Maurice D. Hinchey Catskill Interpretive Center. On September 18, we broke ground on a new event pavilion, which will enable us to host community events and take our programming to a whole new level. It’s scheduled to be completed in spring 2018. At our Fall Gala in October, guests were treated to the first public peek of design firm Partner & Partners concept for the slated development of the Catskills Interpretive Center’s interior and exhibits.

There will be multimedia exhibits on Catskills nature, history, and culture; a floor-to-ceiling model of the watershed; and a moving painting which depicts the region’s land use history and restoration of wilderness. A listening booth will allow visitors to access the Catskill Regional Folklife and History Archives and hear noted local residents speak about their connection to the Catskills and what makes the region so special.

They are truly fantastic!

There will be a gallery space, which will feature a regularly-changing variety of interpretive exhibits, art shows, and special events.

Imagine the exterior of the Center you know and love, but as you walk inside you are immediately transported to a space reminiscent of a grand old Catskills hotel or mountain lodge.

The side door will be reinvented as an indoor trailhead, allowing visitors direct access to the wooded nature trails on the Catskill Interpretive Center’s beautiful 60-acre property.

At the center of the room, a cozy seating area with interactive maps offers the perfect space to gather and plan your next outdoor adventure.

And to the left of the entrance, an area will be devoted to the story of Maurice D. Hinchey’s life and legacy.

Nearby is a large desk, flanked with shelves stocked with local maps and area guides, where our friendly staff and volunteers welcome visitors. Digital displays around the desk offer current data — like weather and trail conditions, scenic views around the region, and events happening in the area on that day.

Visit http://future.cic.design/ to see the future of the Catskill Interpretive Center and to share your thoughts on the new exhibits. We greatly appreciate the support of our members and partners as we embark on this exciting new adventure - we couldn’t do it without you! - Sarah McGinnis

28 WINTER 2017

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IN THE ERPF GALLERY

UTILITARIAN ART SHOW FUNCTION OR FORM: UTILITARIAN ART / AN EXHIBIT

THROUGH JANUARY 6, 2018 2017 Exhibitors include: Jessica Baker – window coverings John Byer – woodwork Enid Cytryn – clothing Maureen DeKaser – floor coverings Rosalind Dickinson – pottery Tabitha Gilmore-Barnes – weaving Janie Greenwald – seat weaver Annie Hayes – hooked rugs Richard Kirgan – furniture Cheyenne Mallo – ceramics Joe Muehl – woodwork Franc Palaia – furniture Dan Palm – woodwork John Virga - woodwork

ERPF GALLERY 43355 ROUTE 28 ARKVILLE, NEW YORK Monday - Friday 9:30am - 4:30pm Saturday 10am - 2pm

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CATSKILLCENTER.ORG/BUSINESS

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STUDY NATURE, LOVE NATURE, STAY CLOSE TO NATURE. IT WILL NEVER FAIL YOU. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

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Winter 2017

The Catskill Center for Conservation & Development PO Box 504 43355 State Highway 28 Arkville, NY 12406

NON-PROFIT.ORG U.S.POSTAGE PAID CRST.NET 12550

Catskill Center / Winter Newsletter / 2017  
Catskill Center / Winter Newsletter / 2017  
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