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Mountlake Terrace High School 21801 44th Avenue West Mountlake Terrace | WA | 98043 @MTHSHawkeye | @MTHSports www.TheHawkeye.org V28.09 | 12 June 2013

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An open public forum faithfully serving our audience since 1960

From the top right, counterclockwise: Attendees of a March 16 memorial service for 2007 MTHS graduate Dianna Hanson pay tribute to her through a candlelight vigil held outside of the HUB. Jazz 1 preforms at their Swing Dance fund-raiser held in the HUB on Nov. 10. Varsity basketball players Blake Fernandez and Yohans Tewolde embrace after their team’s fourth place finish in the WIAA 3A state tournament held at the Tacoma Dome on March 2.

A school year full of triumph and tragedy

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f the 2012-13 school year had to be summarized in one word, it would most likely be: eventful. It seems like at every point this year there was something going on. From homecoming to the men’s basketball team going to state to the tragic death of a former student or the December assault and robbery of a student that drew national headlines. This school year will go down as one of the most eventful in MTHS history. Please read more of our special report – Looking Back: The Year in Review, page 2

Long-time art teacher retires By Alyssa Vallester Hawkeye staff

On June 18, art teacher Tim Cashman will retire. This is a surprise to many students as Cashman has been with the Edmonds School District for 27 years, including 12 years at MTHS. “I’m 66 and my stocks person says I have enough money to live until I’m 90 fairly comfortably,” Cashman said. “I taught pottery, design art, senior project, art history, photography, U.S. History, smoke and fire sculpture, drawing, and studio art [at MTHS].” Cashman is the art club

adviser and was the academic adviser for the men’s basketball team. He also did score keeping for basketball games. He has also worked with The Hawkeye for years. “I will miss all the people that make up this school; from sports staff to admin, teachers and students,” Cashman said. Cashman is proud to leave two lasting legacies at MTHS: this year’s renovation of the murals in the art hallway and the creation of a memorial art plaza for outdoor use to staff, students, and community with benches and art. In addition, Cashman

was instrumental in creating the glass art at the Mountlake Terrace Transit Center in 2008. Subsequent to his retirement, Cashman plans to travel. “I would eventually like to visit every continent,” Cashman said. “I’ve already been to Japan and Scotland. There are lots of places to see.” “Whenever former students come to visit, I always tell them that they just gave me a million dollar raise. It’s great to see and hear what they are doing. They have no idea how important that is to teachers,” Cashman said.

Williams resigned after investigation over sexual comments

By Will Khadivi News Editor

According to an article in the May 19 edition of The Herald, former student behavior coordinator Anthony Williams resigned over the fallout over an investigation about i nappropriate comments he allegedly made to students and Anthony Williams former behavior coordinator staff members. The article stated that several teachers, students, and other staff members complained about comments from Williams. According to The Herald, an investigation by Edmonds School District officials revealed that Williams had omitted working at neighboring Northshore School District when applying for his job at Edmonds in 2009. The article stated that Williams resigned his position as an aide and coach at Northshore in 2008 under

similar circumstances. An investigation revealed that he had inappropriate conversations with students including asking a student on a date and calling other students “hot.” According to the report, he also asked some students if they were virgins. Williams denied any wrongdoing to school officials but admitted to some of what he was accused of, according to The Herald. Williams resigned on Jan. 28 after being placed on leave from the Edmonds School District in December. According to Principal Greg Schwab, Williams’ termination had been recommended to the school board. Before the school board meeting on his termination, Williams had decided to resign. In February, The Hawkeye published an article about questions that were raised after Williams’ resignation. At the time, many students and staff members were frustrated by the lack of information about Williams. “It is really frustrating in situations like these to not be able to say things, but that is absolutely the way it has to go,” Schwab said referring to legal due process and privacy issues.


Looking Back:

2 | News | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013

The Year in Review Stories and photos by Hawkeye staff

September & October The 2012-2013 school year started out with various changes. The roof was renovated and new skylights welcomed the students in front of the school. The old 217th Street driveway that passes around the school was renamed Hawk Way, and was celebrated by the school and community. The month of October started with Homecoming week. This year’s theme was superheroes, with seniors Tye Esparza and Taylor Arbuckle elected as Homecoming King and Queen. Even though MTHS lost in our homecoming game against the Meadowdale Mavericks, the school still felt proud and showed sportsmanship. The next night, students grooved to the music with the annual homecoming dance, entitled “A Night in the Sky.”

November The story that dominated the month of November was the Nov. 6 national election along with various state and local races. President Barack Obama was reelected to a second term, defeating Republican challenger Mitt Romney by winning 332 electoral votes to Romney’s 206. Obama also carried a majority of the nationwide popular vote. The state of Washington made history by becoming the first state, along with Colorado, to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. Voters also made Washington the seventh state to legalize same-sex marriage. Washington was the first state to legalize same-sex marriage by a public vote along with Maine and Maryland. Washington voters also narrowly approved a measure to allow up to 40 publicly-funded charter schools.

Members of this year’s Homecoming Court (left to right), seniors AnhViet Nguyen, Grace Gil, Tye Esparza, Taylor Arbuckle, juniors Greg Bowman and Brittany Kinsella at the Oct. 5 Homecoming Game against the Meadowdale Mavericks at Edmonds Stadium.

December The MTHS community was rocked to its core by the Dec. 4 assault and robbery of junior Jose Bernabe in a school restroom. That day, senior Darian Sharpe was arrested in connection to the incident. He was charged with one count of robbery in the first degree and one count of assault in the second degree. Sharpe was emergency expelled that day by school officials. After the incident, MTHS received a large amount of coverage from Seattle-area media stations who speculated reasons for the assault and robbery. Bernabe returned to MTHS in January. It was later uncovered that a second student had played a part in the incident. In January, then-junior Jordan Brown was charged with one count of robbery in the first degree. It was later uncovered that Bernabe was robbed of just the $9 that was in his wallet.

A student signs one of the two posters made for junior Jose Bernabe. Bernabe was assaulted and robbed in a school restroom on Dec. 4.

January & February The annual Terrace Idol competition, held on Jan. 17 was a huge success with junior Katy Bodnar winning the judge’s choice award. Bodnar and senior Lucas Pope then tied for first place for the crowd’s choice award. Pope was the surprising victor because the levels of his talents were unknown to many of the student body and his peers. In a guest column in the Feb. 12 edition of The Hawkeye, Pope said that: “I never have described myself as a singer, although I did grow up amongst them.” Among the 20 contestants this year, most were from MTHS, though students from Lynnwood, Edmonds-Woodway, and Shorecrest High School also competed. Continued on page 6...

Junior Katy Bodnar and senior Lucas Pope are presented with trophies on Jan. 17 after winning the annual Terrace Idol singing competition.


12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | 3 » Thoughts? Ideas? What did you think of this issue’s Editorial section? Email us at editorial@thehawkeye.org

Editorial

It’s a wrap!

Hawkeye Staff Editorial

End of year schedule needs serious rethinking

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here are only a few days of school left and it seems like everything is just crammed up at the end. The underclassmen finals this semester are on a Friday and a Monday, which is right after graduation that many students attend. Allotting half of a day to review for the first final and a weekend for the other is not a fair amount of time. Maybe the School Board should not have made the last full day of the school year on a Monday and they shouldn’t have assumed that there would be snow days this year. We would much rather have another day of school and have the finals on a Monday and a Tuesday, for example. Also, having a pointless half-day the day after finals are over is just a waste of time. A lot of teachers don’t even take attendance, and most students just don’t care and don’t show up. Putting the end-of-course exams, yearbook day, and moving up assembly in the very last couple of weeks before the school year ends gives us even less time for class. Teachers are then forced to adjust their lesson plans to fit and cram all due dates at once. Some of these events also could have occurred earlier in the year. Maybe the School Board should think about that next year before it is too late.

» Nostalgic Seniors Find out what the graduating seniors will miss most about Terrace »P5

’12-’13 was a school year to remember A letter from the outgoing editor

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y name is Michelle Schomer and I have served as the editor-in-chief of the Mountlake Terrace High School newspaper The Hawkeye from 20112013. The Hawkeye has been a part of my life ever since my freshman year when I joined as a writer and I have never regretted one minute spent with these Michelle Schomer amazing people. In my Editor-in-Chief 2011-2013 time being the editor, The Hawkeye has faced burglary and incredibly exhausting nights, sometimes even staying in the newsroom until 1 a.m. in order for each issue to come out on time. The Hawkeye has helped countless students find their place in high school and achieve goals they never imagined, from winning individual awards for their work to getting jobs and going to college. The Hawkeye wouldn’t be the way it is without Vince DeMiero, the greatest mentor and adviser I could have ever grown to know. He is the most selfless, endearing teacher I have ever met, and I

am so glad to have had the opportunity to work alongside him these past four years. Each issue being published never would have been possible without the hard work and determination from the Hawkeye staff whom I have grown to call my family. Although my time here as the editor of The Hawkeye is over, I have no doubt that this publication’s photographers and reporters will be able to inform our community on the latest news. Without our audience, The Hawkeye never would have been able to be known as an awardwinning student run organization or even win our very first online Pacemaker, so many thanks to all who have supported the work published by this unbelievably talented staff. I encourage any student who has an interest in learning how to write different types of articles, learn how to advertise, fund-raise, photograph, to carry themselves in a professional manner, meet new people, and be able to work alongside fellow classmates to accomplish something great each and every issue, then there’s no questioning it: You should join The Hawkeye family.

We have much for which to be thankful

A solid product from the Tempo

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he quality of this year’s yearbook far surpassed that of last year. We applaud the Tempo staff and yearbook adviser Beth Gilbraith on a job well done. This year’s book had a good theme, interesting cover, and many of the memories of the 2012-2013 school year. The yearbook had a common message: “Together.” This message represented the kind of year it has been at Terrace. MTHS has dealt with many challenging incidents. Several incidents, such as the bathroom assault, led to some hard times for MTHS. However, these events, along with many positives for the school, led to an increase in school pride. In these hard times, students and staff came together to celebrate all the good here. The yearbook helps reflect this spirit during the year. The Tempo included practically everyone. All clubs, groups and sports were included in the memory of this school year. We know our journalism colleagues at the yearbook have put in hard work this year. It truly shows.

Thank you all so much from The Hawkeye The Hawkeye would like to extend a big thanks to many in our community who have made this year so special. You are the reason we stay late to get the next issue out on time. And though we don’t have time to thank each and every one of you, we’d be remiss if we didn’t specifically thank: • Kim Stewart ~ for continued support of The Hawkeye’s endeavors • Nadine Coombs ~ for all of her assistance in getting us to our conventions and so much more • Tim Cashman ~ for years of putting up with The Hawkeye in our shared quarters in 130 • Angelo Comeaux ~ for his support and vision to get the Hawks Live Sports Network going • Steve Willits ~ for countless hours volunteering as the voice of HLSN • Sandra Merten ~ for helping in coordinating fund-raisers and supporting us in countless ways • Cathy Fiorillo ~ for helping coordinate events and supporting us in countless ways • Vince DeMiero ~ for being the best adviser any journalism team could have • Debbie DeMiero ~ for chaperoning the Hawkeye’s trips to San Antonio and San Francisco • Frank DeMiero ~ for creating an amazing retreat for The Hawkeye • Ethel McNeal ~ for helping coordinate travel arrangements for national conventions • Evelyn McLaughlin ~ for her family’s continued support of student journalism • ASB ~ for the continued support of independent student journalism • Terrace Administrators ~ for supporting an uncensored student media program • Custodial Staff ~ for taking such great care of us in the news room • ESD CTE Staff ~ for unbelievable technical and professional support • Pacific Publishing ~ for printing all the copies of The Hawkeye • Krispy Kream ~ for helping us fund-raise money to help us go to San Francisco • Seaun and LaRae Richards and The Red Onion staff ~ for allowing the Hawkeye staff to work the Red Onion and raise funds • YOU! ~ because without you, our readers, there’s no us.

The staff editorial represents the views of the Editorial Board

Staff Editor-in-Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Fiorillo Business Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joy Gardner Online & Social Media Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erick Yanzon Photo/Graphics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erika Fisher the425 Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paxtyn Merten Arts & Entertainment Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Beaumont Feature Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniil Oliferovskiy Health Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Driscoll Op/Ed Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conner Worman & Denait Medhane News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Will Khadivi Sports Editors . . . . . . . . . . . Austin McDermott & Anthony Markert Lead Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Vallester Photo Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serafina Urrutia Distribution Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maria Balcita Advertising Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robin Choi Multimedia Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jaira Arcilla Web Developer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arshia Kiani Departing Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . AnhViet Nguyen, Michelle Schomer, Kyra Dahlman, Nazia Khan, Max Lkhagvasuren, Charles Divers, Spencer Froelick, Sereena Gee, Dorian Pennington, Mikea Hawkins-Tanner, Elbethel Kelemu, Marie Auch-Schwelk

Policies

Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beza Ayele, Jensen Beaumont, Brieanna Benvenuti, Stephen Cuplin, Dominic DeMiero, Chloe DeVries, Mike Guevarra, Danielle Hirano, Amanda Holthusen, Alexis Hunt, Manvir Kaller, Shelbe Kane, Parminder Kaur, Peter Kidane, Amanda Krofchek, Eve Largent, Huyen Le, Luke Luttrell, Harrison Mains, Maria Quinones, Jannon Roque, Ella Schroth, Gurminder Singh, Josiah Sum, Luke Thurber, Brian Tran, Roxana Valea Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vincent F. DeMiero FANs Coordinators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cathy Fiorillo & Sandra Merten Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pacific Publishing Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MTHS ASB, JEA/WJEA, NSPA, Student Press Law Center NOTES: Voting members of the Editorial Board will be established at the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year. All emails are [SectionName]@thehawkeye.org

| Mountlake Terrace High school | 21801 44th Avenue West | Mountlake Terrace | WA | 98043 | Voice: 425.431.7770 | Fax: 425.431.7773 | Editor@thehawkeye.org |

Mission Statement The Hawkeye’s mission viewpoints on relevant topics. The Hawkeye will is to provide the MTHS community with print as many letters as space allows. Letters quality, thought-provoking student produced must include the author’s name, signature and publications. In policy and in practice, the class or position relative to the letter. Typed or Hawkeye is a designated open forum publication. legible, hand written letters are acceptable, but In these efforts, the Hawkeye has established should not exceed 200 words. The Hawkeye will several open public forums for the exchange edit all letters for accuracy, spelling and grammar. of information, opinions and artistic expression We reserve the right to refuse to print any letter. dedicated to those in the MTHS community. Editorial Cartoons Submissions represent Since 1960, we have faithfully served our the view of the artist. Editorial cartoons audience and community as an open, public accompanying editorials represent the view of forum where student editors make all decisions. the author. Artwork should be submitted to staff Editorials The editorial section of the Hawkeye members in room 130. Cartoons are selected serves as a forum for well-written, thoughtful, based on their appropriateness and clarity. longer forms of expression. Signed editorials Advertising The Hawkeye will not accept any represent the opinions of the author. Unsigned advertising that the Editorial Board deems to editorials represent the opinion of the Hawkeye be: factually inaccurate; designed to mislead, Editorial Board. Views printed herein are meant deceive or defraud; containing malicious, to be opinionated and do not necessarily vindictive or unsubstantiated attacks; offering represent the opinions of the Hawkeye staff, goods and/or services illegal for teens to student body, faculty, administration or school possess, buy or use; libelous; obscene; creating board. The Hawkeye will print submitted guest imminent danger or disruption to school. editorials as space allows and requests that all The Hawkeye reserves the right to refuse contributors include their name, signature and any advertising, solicited or unsolicited. position relative to the editorial. The Hawkeye Advertisements do not necessarily reflect the will edit all submissions for accuracy, spelling and views or endorsements of the Hawkeye staff, grammar. We reserve the right to refuse to print student body, faculty, administration or school any submission. board. Letters to the Editor Readers are encouraged to voice their opinions in the Opinion section, Revised 6/2013 a public forum for the expression of varying


4 | Editorial | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013

Thank you, Terrace, and goodbye

An outgoing Hawkeye staff member voices his opinion about his experience as a Hawk I

t was a day much like today—a day exactly nine months ago, blanketed with a picturesque blue sky that failed to betray the sad ugly truth that summer had finally been vanquished— that I stood rather uncertainly before Spencer Froelick Hawkeye staff Mountlake Terrace High, wondering what would await me inside. Upon entrance, I was greeted rather rapidly with the overwhelming idea that “This school is exactly like I imagined high school in the 6th grade.” This idea, engorged with a plethora of John Hughes movies and mid 2000’s Teen Nick, had long been dismissed as mere fiction. I can say—with my hand placed firmly upon my heart—that I had boatloads more fun at Mountlake Terrace than I ever did at Shorewood. But I digress, for who cares about the beginning of the year? It’s the end of the year, you know—for those who don’t keep updated—and the school is in this sort of hormonal limbo of frustrated sun-starved youths frothing at the mouth to get outside and run around like hooligans and ruffians all summer. Less than two weeks

remain and my mind is racing like 64 circling the campus like falcons, are pretty Southern Comfort-soaked alcoholics at the nice, too. I never really got used to the Kentucky Derby making a beeline for the constant Orwellian state of affairs at the bar and my God do I have school, characterized by “I’m glad I moved a lot to say about Terrace. administrators and police and decided to As a stranger, an outsidofficers hanging from the attend Mountlake er, a new kid, I am proud ceiling, wings folded and Terrace. I came to say I can present my eyes ablaze with watchdog here solely for findings with objectivity intensity, at every turn. the experience and a certain honesty that I’ve been told I came to of being the new lends itself only to a perTerrace during a bad year kid, because it son stuck rather suddenly and I believe it… bathroom always seemed an into a new—and quite surbeatings, arrests, drugs, viointeresting position real—environment. lence, MTHS Confessions… to find oneself in.” It is my duty to inform it’s overwhelming, really. you—as a writer, shameI appreciated the wide less cynic, and presumed selection of AP classes as journalist—that Mountlake Terrace High well, for I think I learned more in AP School operates on a sad, broken eduChemistry than I’ve ever learned about cational system. However, so does every anything ever in my life. But to be honest, other school in the country—most of you I spent a good 50 to 60 percent—and that’s should know this. So worry not, dear a conservative figure—doodling and readreaders, and always remember that if the ing intently, fiercely and passionately bored nation does it, you can do it too. out of my still-developing skull. But can I truly call MTHS a bad school? The students are a nice bunch—intrinsiI mean… I’ve attended better. However, I cally friendly, even—and I made more like to look on the bright side these days. friends than I originally envisioned. But The school itself is nice—a sort of I’ve never seen so many people so blindly crooked yet neat, folded mass of bricks obsessed with their electronics—so much, and steel and ultra-modern (for the ’90s) in fact, that I’m willing to offer my seristructure that presents itself throughout ous recommendation and endorsement to the area of the incredibly spacious buildMTHS as the very first cyborg-integrated ing. But the Dodge Chargers, emblazoned high school when the revolution goes with various unfriendly judicial emblems, down and yes, Schwab & Co, I will contact

you with due dispatch to work out the financial and legal details of said endorsement. I guess what I’m trying to say is… I’m glad I moved and decided to attend Mountlake Terrace. I came here solely for the experience of being the new kid, because it always seemed an interesting position find oneself in. It was everything I imagined and more— surreal, challenging, easy, confusing, infuriating, uncomfortable, and often comical. Yet as a junior, I’m even happier to be leaving, for the Edmonds School District in general leaves a lot to be desired. For those of you with another year, or God forbid—two or three years—of high school hovering smugly above your head, I offer only mild empathy. Consolation and blind optimism have no place behind the locked, barred, and heavily guarded doors of Mountlake Terrace, for raw reality and the paradoxical lack thereof rule with an iron fist. But take note, dear readers, of the unique situation at hand. High school is practice for college and college is practice for the real world. So pay your dues now, try new things, make mistakes, learn what you can while you can. The window of opportunity is closing, but the halcyon days are on their way. The future, as Tom Petty once said, is wide open.

Erika Fisher | Hawkeye


12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | 5 » WHAT do you think? Love an article? Hate an article? Something been on your mind? Email us at opinion@thehawkeye.org

» we’ve accomplished so much It certainly was an eventful year. See it wrapped up in brief »p6

Opinion

A word from your ASB officers

The Principal’s corner

Senior class legacy is secure

So many are owed thanks

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look back and it’s amazing to see how they had probably one of the coolest hallmuch Terrace has grown as a whole. We ways ever. I don’t think I’ll ever forget how have grown closer and more comfortable they spelled out seniors with the super hero with each other. symbols. remember feelMaybe this is why we look up to them ing annoyed so much, because we know they do such by freshman great things. I know personally for a fact or scared of that the class of 2013 will be an inspiring seniors, but now generation. They have accomplished so I realize we all much these past few years in high school, have differences and they will accomplish so much more Taron Castleton and we all know in the years to come. Especially the senior ASB Public Relations Officer we are equals, projects, I watched four senior projects we are just different ages. All four classes this year that I found outstanding. Each have wonderful people that I know and senior had put in so much time and effort; appreciate. Its opportunities you couldn’t deny how much like this article in the hawk they had done. The project I “It’s amazing eye that I appreciate so much liked the most was a perfect to see how because it’s how I express my scale model of the school. This much Terrace feelings to those who inspire senior had made a scale model has grown as a and influence me the most. I exactly one five-hundredth of whole.” can’t believe that in a few days the school’s size. He told us I won’t see one fourth of those how he planned to be a profespeople any more. Life goes on and our sional architect and how accurate his model senior class is on that road to bigger and really was, he had calculated almost the better things. June 13 is the big day. entire school’s dimensions and he had even It’s always interesting to see all the found the elevation change throughout the senior gifts and appreciation before they school. leave – like the senior kisses put on by our It’s times like these that I’m glad I’ve had very own freshman class. This is just one this opportunity to meet some of the senior example of how Terrace has unified. When class. Our seniors have set the bar high; it’s you think about high school it seems like scary to think that in just one more year freshmen and seniors are on opposite sides that I will be a senior and that I will have of the food chain, but at Terrace that’s not to meet those same expectations. I know the case. I watched as several freshmen that with the example they have set it will came and worked, cutting out the senior be possible. I want to thank all the seniors kisses cards (which look super good by the who have helped me this past year because way) for hours. It really makes you stop and this is probably the last Hawkeye newsparecognize how much we all look up to our per they will read, and they deserve to be seniors. It reminds me of the homecoming recognized. theme this year, “super heroes.” It seems so NOTE: Hawkeye provides ASB space each long ago now, but it was one of the biggest issue in the Opinion section as part of our events we did all year. The seniors went off; mission as a designated open public forum.

HawkTalk

Final thoughts of the flying Hawks

Tyler Friedemann senior

“Yes, because it shows how much you’ve grown as a person and how much you’ve changed.”

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ell, here we are again. June is make sure our school runs smoothly here. Graduation is just ahead each day and supports our students and and our seniors will be leaving us for staff in so many ways. college, work Third, I want to thank our athletic and the rest coaches and club advisors. The perforof their lives. mances by our athletic teams during all For the rest three of our sport seasons would not be of us, it’s possible if we did not have caring and another sum- committed coaches who work tirelessly mer vacation to prepare their athletes to be successfilled with ful on the field, court, pool, or course. Greg Schwab adventures. Congratulations to our programs and Principal Before we athletes who represented our school so say our farewells, I wanted to take some well! The many clubs and groups that we time to say thank you to the people who have in our school are possible because make our school such a of the dedication of staff great place. members who stepped up “Thank you to First, thank you to our and took on these roles. the people who teachers. Our teachers care Fourth, thank you to our make our school very much about student performing arts teachers such a great success and work hard each and students. We have truly place.” day of the school year to outstanding programs that help make sure that students are learncompete at the national level and turn ing. We are fortunate to be in a school out some incredible student performwhere teachers work so hard and care so ers in vocal music, instrumental music, much! and drama. These students and staff are Second, thank you to our classified another reminder of the outstanding employees. These are the folks who work school that we are. behind the scenes to make sure our Finally, thank you to our ASB. You school runs smoothly. Our kitchen staff have done an excellent job this year in makes sure that breakfast and lunch are providing leadership to our school. Your prepared each day. Our custodial staff leadership much appreciated. makes sure our building is clean and Congratulations to our seniors as they well-cared for. Jerry Myers makes sure graduate. You have done a remarkable our campus is safe and that students job here during your four years. We are where they are supposed to be. Sue wish you all the best. To everyone else, VanSenus helps make sure that our 9th have a great summer and we’ll see you graders are being successful in their in the fall! classes. Our Educational Assistants work to help support students in the classNOTE: Hawkeye provides the school room and assist our teachers in deliveradministration space each issue in the ing a good education to all our students. Opinion section as part of our mission as And finally our office secretaries who a designated open public forum.

Q: Are memories of your time at MTHS worth keeping?

Tanya Hurtado

Tim Cashman

“Yes, because they are the things that you go through and help you grow up.”

“Yes, because they sum up my whole time here.”

senior

art teacher

Amanda Granberg senior

“Yes, because I had a good time at Terrace and a good experience.”

Jesse Zerom senior

“Yes, because I see it as a really loving environment.”

Email us: Opinion@TheHawkeye.org | Tweet us: @MTHSHawkeye | Message us: www.facebook.com/TheHawkeye | Write us: visit us in room 130


6 | Hawkeye | 13 June 2012 » Meet the seniors Get to know the seniors better as they graduate and fly off »P8

» Have any ideas for Feature? Email the Feature Editor at feature@thehawkeye.org

Feature

A Year’s Worth of Memories

Senior Marquis Armstead drives up the court versus Seattle Prep in the Hawks third state game on March 2 at the Tacoma Dome. Terrace beat the Panthers 54-43.

…continued from page 2

March Terrace highlighted March with the men’s basketball team visiting the Tacoma Dome and finishing fourth in state. The Hawks lost their first game against the Lincoln Abes, a familiar opponent, but went on to win the following two games against the University Titans and Seattle Prep Panthers. Coach Nalin Sood said, “There are a lot of coaches who will walk out of here feeling like the luckiest coach in the game of basketball and that’s how I feel right now.” The Hawks finished with an overall 22-5 record and the best finish at state as a 3A school.

April One can easily say that April was an artsy kind of month. After years of fading colors and damaged walls, the art murals have outgrown their lifespan, and Art Club began redecorating the art hallway. Art teacher Tim Cashman oversaw the recreation. He divided people into teams and assigned them to different sections of the wall. The process is a long and strenuous one that began by brainstorming ideas and approving them, priming the walls, sketching preliminary ideas, painting the wall, and finally adding a sealent to protect the color. In total, students spent more than 50 hours on each mural.

May May was dominated by headlines of Terrace track achievments. The men’s team had an outstanding season and went undefeated. Several standouts included Duane Dahl, Joshua Kim, Tye Esparza, Beau Kennedy, Quinell Mason, Jack Pearce and Gifton Okoronkwo and others. The women enjoyed standouts in McKenna Hunt, Katherine Walter, and Chinne Okoronkwo. Terrace also sent several competitors to state. Kennedy finished fourth in the javelin, Hunt hurdled to fourth place, and siblings Gifton and Chinne both received first place finishes in the triple jump. In addition, Chinne, who is a freshman, finished second in the pole vault.

Katie Tran, sophomore, carefully paints over her preliminary sketches. Tran paints a mural with a tiger and lion dressed in a tuxedo and dress. Art teacher Tim Cashman divided students and assigned them to sectons of the walls and students spent dozens of hours on each mural.

Sophomore Ryan LaCasse stands ready to grab the baton from junior Devonte Downs at the Edmonds District Meet. MTHS men’s track team finished the regular season with an overall record of 9-0 and placed 14th in state.

June June has crept upon Mountlake Terrace and brings joy and meloncholy. The seniors are now full fledged and prepare for flight to college or employment. Some look to the future with eagerness while others look back upon their four years with sorrow. On the other hand, juniors and underclassmen enthusiastically wait for last day of school with summer zeal for sunbathing, vacations, and outdoor fun. It’s not all fun and games, though, as AP students are assigned summer homework and plan for next year’s rigorous courses. Speaking of planning, students should order their student planners and prepare for the first day of school on Sept. 4.

Kellie Watson and senior Kelsey Watson award Micheal Lotz the Mike Watson Memorial Scholarship “For Love of the Game.” The scholarship was in memory of Mike’s passion for sports and his sad passing in 2012. In his name, Lotz recieved $500.


The Hawks’

?

next flight The next destinations for this years’ graduates Western Washington University Taylor Marie Arbuckle Shiffite Kiya Awel Mason Oliver Bergstrom Grace Yaeun Gil Matthew Aaron Kamradt Bryce Tyler Kolbo

Michael Dean Lotz Tess Catharine O’Reilly Nathaniel Lewis Otis Lucas Edward Pope Erin Elizabeth Russell Tony Anh Vo

Everett Community College Tyler James Friedemann Mikea Reshe Hawkins-Tanner Blake Johnathan Hertrich

Samantha Marie Nathe Latrae Deon Sarden Taylor Cassandra Smith

Samantha Jo Netz Nghi Nhan Elijah Woods Parker Jamie Rae Reiser Lina Lyn Rickels Etienne Marcel Sotelo Yohans Amelesom Tewolde Alec Zen Wong

Raymond Chase Lindquist Christian J. Mabbott

Sera Batirau Motokana

Cascadia Community College Caylee Jordan Brott Connor Lucas Clausen Daniel Edward Gardner Ashlee Lorraine Hoyt Samantha Ryoko Mafune Alyssa Jean McCune

Tessa Kyrene Palmer Siera Faith Prout Rebecca Lynn Prudnick Kylee Miranda Spear Janna Truong Torin C. Webster

Daniel Min Kue An Nick Awasthi Phong Nghinh Bach Bailey Joseph Bame Casandra Barojas Tapia Zoe Lorette Bellecy Brandi Nicole Black Ivy Rene Boyer Chanelle Sun Calhoun Chloe Nicole Calhoun Andrew Jason Dahl Tasha Kaelen Diaz Sofia Drogomiretskiy Lavinia Ruth Enache Shawn Edwin Evensen Julie Marie Felber Robyn Teresa Firoved Cody Ray Nelson Flynn Katelyn Jenann Frazier Blake Anthony Gilfert Anne-Marie Gabriella Gonzalez Andrew Lloyd Gordon Christopher Guardiano Christopher Joseph Guerrero Briana Rae Hall

Full-time Employment

U.S. Armed Forces Army Grace Seung-Hee Back Louis Sothea Cordell Mouton

Coast Guard Desireé Davette Massey

Army National Guard Jonathan Wynner VanPelt Gochayna

Flying Farther Away - Out of State College

Whitworth University

Spokane Community College

Sonja Camille Head

Brennan Michael Tibbetts

University of Washington Emily Louise Banschbach Shanice My Tran Duong Blake Fernandez Tin Trung Ho Jerusalem Grace Kifelew Joshua Kim Elliot Gene Kingsley Erika JoAnn McAuliffe

Edmonds Community College Amber Leigh Hamman Elle Kerrigan Hess Jeffrey Andrew Houfek Jessica Marie Hundtoft Forrest Robert Hussey Jessica Nicole Jamtaas Nazia Adila Khan JungMin Kim Maria D. Laureano Medina Chan Woo Lee Isaac Timothy Leese Odkhuu Lkhagvasuren Ana-Laura Luna-Ortiz Julian France Magat Sandra Adele Marshall Nathan Alan McElwain Alexander Donald Meyer Shaylene Tiera Ferro Miller Alejandra Montes Trung Tri Nguyen Adam Michael Oberstadt Ryan Austin Ogilvie Natasha Olheiser Sophia Pastushok Jessica Nicole Philio

Vincent Matthew Max (Community College) Holli Ann Meyers (Other) Jennifer Guadalupe Richarte (Gary Manuel Aveda Institute) Antonio Stefan Romei (Undecided) Ashley Susan Rucker (Culinary School) Clayton Oliver Wallace Seward (Community College) Holly Ann Tiersma (Undecided) Camren Tyler Webb (Apprenticeship in Motorsport Photography) Regina Rae Work (Pima Medical Institute) Bryan John Wyss (VOICE Program)

Bellevue College

Jetsper Salazar Cubos

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Arcelia de Jesus Bibian Ascencio (Community College) Iobana Bibiana Bibian Ascencio (Community College) Charles William Divers (Community College) Rebecca Nicole Frazier (Community College) Alexa Nichole Gifford (Northwest Hair Academy) Aaron M. Golesch (IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program) Michael W. Green (Missionary) Darian Marie Guihan (Community College) Tayler Justin Howell (Sno-Isle Tech Center) Benjapon Hummel-Schluger (Undecided) Jordan Nicole Kenniston (Other) Franklin James Koenig (Undecided) Kassidy Jayne Dakota Long (Cosmetology School) Anthony Mijares Madayag (Other) Lorenzo Lusvardi-Guazzoni (Italian Exchange Student) Dalton Jay Mason (Other)

Josue Jehudiel Alcala Jacob Cooper Cawsey Forrest Richard Clement Matthew D. Folmsbee Tia Lindsey Garrett Michael W. Green Tayler Justin Howell Maxey Lee Jernigan Jr. Erminio Montes Jr. Michael David Reynolds Kayla Marie Steuart Isabel Talavera-Guillen Ryan Vogel Andrew Thomas Walsh

University of Washington Bothell lana Cari Erkan Bradford Harold Halter Thanh Kim Huynh Chandler Elizabeth Kalthoff Sukhaman Kaur Jason Paul Kozodoy Elliott Gyri Lee Sarah Christine Locke

Other/Undecided

Judith Silva Robinson Alyssa Lee Rogers Logan Rynn Sather Tabetha Ann Sheppard Oleg A. Shevchuk Raj Singh Kyle Takahashi Sjolin Jasmine Alexandria Stires Steven J. Szilvassy Trinh Ta Kaylyn Mae Tolliver Evan Lane Tostberg Thu Van Anthony Vladaj Alice Elaine Wahlman Kelsey Nicole Watson Tyler Jon Webster David Michael Young Yosef Seare Zerom

Anna Joy McClenny Abigail Anne McDermott Armen Nalbandyan Mashael Sajid Sunyoung Song Laura Michelle Taylor Brett Jeffery Tomsett Jordan Rikio Yoshida

Eastern Washington University

Shoreline Community College Marquis Latrell Armstead Trung Tuan Banh Hayley Alexandra Benvenuti Jose Calderon Antonio Michael Camarena Kyra Lee Dahlman Jazmin Cecilia Espana Jon Paul Figueroa McKayla Morgan Floe Rodrigo Garcia-Ruiz Zayla Nachelle Ghebremedhin Sarah Christine Gillen Amanda Erin Granberg Meagan Elizabeth Greenhaw Connor Lee Hazel Stephanie Hersman Colan Jeffrey Lamb

Jocelyn Deanna Leggett Troy Carl Lyrberg Antonia Maria Martinez Cameron Ray Miles Nancy Nhi Nguyen Dorian R. Pennington-Obispo Jonathan Michael Poellinger Sarah Rose Pung Emigdio Fabian Rios Jade Roque Andrew Dongbin Shin Tri Tran Linh Trinh Christina Marie Wimmer Audrey Dale Wofford Amanda Mae Woodyard

Seattle Pacific University

Kevin Michael Harrington

Elbethel Abebe Kelemu

Quintin Dale Barnard Duane Steven Dahl Tye Anthony Esparza Beau James Kennedy Madeline Marie Younglove

Central Washington University Taylor Edward Griffin Kandin Vincenzo Neri

Washington State University Trevor Dean Christensen Seth Merrill Christianson Rachel Linn Fesler Aleksander Gebreyesus Erica Nichole Guenther Audrey Viola Halenbeck Casey Joann Hynes Christina Elaine Martin Peyton Nash Morrison Madisyn Jean Pauline Roberts Amanda Michele Schnee Michelle Lynn Schomer

Seattle University Aidan Michael Murray Nevan Holt Wichers

Art Institute of Seattle Wynton Andrew Morin

Seattle Central Community College Avery Albert Fowble

Arizona John Edward Moore (Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University) Haley Renee Shoemaker (Northern Arizona University) California Taylor Armani Johnson (California Lutheran University) AnhViet Nguyen (Stanford University) Kyle Jon Scherrer (University of Southern California)

NOTE: The Hawkeye worked with the MTHS Counselling Department and individual students in assembling this list of seniors and their intended plans for the near future. However, not all seniors were able or willing to share their information. This list is up to date at the time the Hawkeye went to press.

Canada - British Columbia Desmond Saisitthidej (University of British Columbia) Idaho Marissa Mae Gilbraith (University of Idaho) Mason James Stone (University of Idaho)

Iowa Riley Marie Morgan (University of Northern Iowa)

North Carolina Hannah Roberta Fickle (Methodist University)

Massachusetts Alyson Taladoc Davis (Framingham State College) Reign Henry King (Berklee College of Music) Serena Hope Hohenstein (Emerson College) Karendeep Kaller (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences)

Oregon Erin Rae Keating (Oregon State University) Amanda Nicolette O’Hara (Oregon State University) Sarah Blyth Lundquist (Western Oregon University) Gifton Iheke Okoronkwo (Oregon Institute of Technology) Sara Margaret Smart (Oregon State University)

Minnesota Anfernee Freeman Calloway-Ferreri (Hamline University)

Utah Alex Jon Hansen (Brigham Young University, Provo)

New Jersey René Julaine Bos (Seton Hall University)

Washington, DC Grace Egger (George Washington University)


8 | Senior Feature | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013

12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | Senior Feature | 9

Individuality Eight seniors who show us it’s our differences

Louis Mouton D

espite his many appearances on HBN, not many people know Louis Mouton as a fighting artists, a reputation he received with his involvement in art at MTHS and martial arts. Mouton is a Cambodian African American that came to MTHS halfway into his junior year. He lives with his mother, step dad, and little brother, and he has found that he enjoys the school and feels welcomed. During his time here, Mouton has become the Art

that bring us together Stories and photos by Olivia Driscoll, Erick Yanzon, Daniil Oliferovskiy, Paxtyn Merten, Gurminder SIngh, Luke Thurber and Jannon Roque

For videos for each of the featured seniors, go to www.thehawkeye.org. Or scan this QR code with your smart device.

Hawkeye staff

Club president and revived the club by recreating the art murals. As the president of Art Club, Mouton has collaborated with art teacher Tim Cashman to reinvent the art hallway. Together, the two divided up students into nearly 20 teams and allowed them to demonstrate their abilities by putting their ideas and images on the walls. Louis recently became active in art and, “[the art murals] have really been my first painting project and this has been my first project of this size.” Considering that the art hallway is Mouton’s first painting job, it’s remarkable how well the art murals are turning out. Unlike renowned artist like Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, Mouton is unfamiliar with painting. Instead, he enjoys the simplicity of art. “I mainly just draw with pencil on paper, [and] I carry a sketch book around,” Mouton said. Contrary to his recent interest in art, Mouton has been active in martial arts much longer. It is something he has done since he was seven years old and because his step dad is a kung-fu instructor. When thinking about whether he likes martial arts or painting more, Mouton was undecided. “It’s really split down the middle between art or martial arts. Martial arts is something I’ve been doing since I was seven, [but] I’ve been into art in the past

couple of years [and] it’s really my passion.” Likewise, Mouton is forced to split up his time between both talents. Mouton attends martial arts lessons several times a week and, “I try to draw a couple hours a day before I go to bed.” With graduation also coming up, many seniors may be worried about how they will fit their hobbies into the busy bustle of preparing for college or finding employment, but not Mouton. He plans to carry on his talents and passions past high school. “I intend to go into the Army after I graduate and I’ll use the money I get from the military to pay for art school.” It’s clear that Mouton’s martial arts skill will come in handy in the Army, but some may wonder why he decided to join the military of all options. Mouton answers, “I feel like it’s something that I’ve wanted to do.” His desire to serve in the military may be rooted in his family’s history in serving in the Armed Forces. He’s had family members from both sides serve in the Army, the Navy, and the Navy Seals, and Mouton plans to carry on that legacy. It’s not every day that you see an artist serve in the military and pulling fighting moves. Even da Vinci didn’t serve as a soldier.

Taylor Johnson

T

aylor Johnson may be the ultimate “Belieber” (Justin Beiber fan), in fact she is the ultimate fan girl. On his birthday she baked Beiber a cake and gave it out to other students. However, it wouldn’t be surprising if one day she was also famous. The past couple years Johnson has been involved in several drama productions. Last year she was in the musical “All Shook Up” where she was in the chorus. This year she has been in the spring production of “Musical Comedy Murders of the 1940s” in which she played Marjorie Baverstock. She was also in the musical showcase “Don’t Stop the Beat,” which she performed and worked behind the scenes in. After she graduates, she will attend California Lutheran University in “a land far, far away” called Thousand Oaks, Calif. Johnson said she would like to be an actress even though it may seem unrealistic. Her advice for others with her same aspiration is, “If you want to be an actor I’d say don’t give up on that, but have a back up plan.” Johnson’s

BryaN Wyss

W

e all know him as the guy in the wheelchair, but there’s more about senior Bryan Wyss that you may not know. He is one of Terrace’s most inspirational students. Living in a wheelchair is not easy, and even sometimes it takes him a while to do things, Wyss positively said, “It’s really easy to maneuver. People here are really nice. They respect you if you are in a wheelchair.” He served as the men’s basketball manager for three years from his freshman to junior year. He was the one in charge of keeping stats, and managing the clock and practices. This year, he joined the track and field team and qualified for the 3A men’s state championships. He finished third in the 3A men’s wheelchair javelin throw with a toss of 16 ft. 8 in. He enjoyed going to a lot of different schools and meeting different people besides his team. “Track was really fun,” Wyss said, “I got to build a lot of friendships. It was a great experience.” Wyss is going to the VOICE program (Vocational Opportunities In Community Experiences) for three years until he’s 21. This program provides comprehensive instruction and vocational experiences to prepare students for adult life. Students in this program also receive assistance in career exploration, job search, job applications, and interviewing skills. After this program, he will attend Edmonds Community College. For his culminating project, he job shadowed a librarian at Mountlake Terrace Elementary School. Besides school and sports, his hobbies include going on the computer, watching movies, playing games, and he also enjoys reading sometimes. His favorite experiences in school are some-

thing that most students don’t usually appreciate. Wyss likes going to school everyday, meeting new friends, and learning different things. As an advice for the upcoming freshmen, Wyss said, “Just do your work, stay busy, [and] have a great time because it will be over before you know it.” “I’m going to miss talking to my friends, going to different classes, and mostly the assemblies. They are so fun,” Wyss commented. Wyss is sure one to be missed by the whole student body by his optimism and kind presence.

Sera Motokana

E

veryone knows Sera Motokana as one of the funniest and positive seniors in the school, but little do they know that she’s also one of the nicest and thoughtful students. She is involved in various clubs and activities in MTHS. She has been part of FCCLA for two years and a representative this year. She is also the promotional officer of Eco Club, vice president of Honor Society, and she is also involved in Teens Against Tobacco Use (TATU). Motokana is going to Lake Washington Institute of Technology next fall, and was accepted in the nursing program. She is attending college for four years to receive her certification to be a registered nurse, and plan to start working at nursing homes. For her culminating project, she shadowed a nurse at an adult family home,

where she helped taking care of the residents, and learned skills that pertain to her future goals as a nurse. She thought that exploring the nursing field has helped her really understand what it takes to become one. “Doing it as a senior project opened up my eyes to realizing that this is something I want to do in the future,” Motokana said. Her parents are one of her inspirations to becoming a nurse because they are both in the nursing field. “I saw how much they love their jobs and I really like to help people, so I decided to go with the nursing field to help others and to make them feel better,” she continued. She took the Health Care Professions intra-district class in Edmonds-Woodway High School her junior year, where she

other dream job is being a teacher; she said it would be cool to get to work with kids. One of the biggest parts of Johnson’s life is church. At her church she works with little kids and takes care of the babies. This could also help her with her hopes of being a teacher. There are several things Johnson has done to help her with her goals and become who she is. She says that being in plays and musicals have helped her come out of her box, try new things and meet new people. Something that she has also been involved with here at MTHS is Mix It up. Mix It Up has helped her talked to people she never would have and make several friends. Another thing Johnson has been doing to prepare for her future is modeling. She is involved with Seattle Talent Agency and also takes a few acting classes there. “I hate school,” Johnson said jokingly, but for many people hating school isn’t a joke. Getting involved in activities is a way to make high school a little more enjoyable. Whether Johnson ends up being on the big screen or teaching the next generation, she will do it with determination and put care and effort into it.

Gifton Okoronkwo

I took the Washington State Nursing Assistant Certification examination, and became a certified CNA. As the youngest of the family, one of the hardest challenges that she has encountered was when her older brother moved back to Fiji five years ago. “We were really close and it was sad because I don’t get to see him anymore,” she said. “We talk in the phone, but it’s not the same.” She is also a Link Leader this year, so as an advice to the upcoming freshmen, she said, “Just focus on school because that is your life for the next four years, and I know some freshmen that struggle with school so try to get good grades, do good in school and make new friends.” She encouraged all students to, “Expand your horizons in life and in school,” she added. Motokana’s jokes and laugh are sure to be missed as she goes on pursuing her dreams in college.

n his senior year, Gifton Okoronkwo won the state title for triple jump. It was his first year on track. It turned out that he had a knack for his newly found sport. He started trying out and messing with track only last summer. He was convinced to become a triple jumper by two other triple jumpers – his sister Chinne Okoronkwo, who also won state in triple jump, and his friend Tye Esparza, who won 8th in triple jump. “The number one thing that helped me was the support at home with my family, the great sibling support with my sister, I had great support from all my coaches, and from other contestants from other teams and from our team,” Okoronkwo said. With this he made it to state which he thought was a lot of fun. He liked the new experience of state. Okoronkwo said it was a lot better than the national competition because state had more of a family aspect because he knew most of the people there. He also has he teammates that want him to do his best and he wants them to do their best too. At nationals he was just trying it out to see if he liked it and did not really know anyone there. This year he had one advantage not many athletes have: his sister to help him out. He says that his sister is extremely beneficial because she is a real veteran and can give him tips plus watch his marks. He also finds it helpful because he can take his game home and talk to his sister about what he can do to become a better jumper and new techniques

he can try. This year track has not just made him a better jumper but he also thinks it has made him a better person. “It has improved my focus and my work ethic a lot I know I have to work real hard to get where I am and where I want to be.” With his new found track talent, many wondered if track is something he plans to do in the future “I do plan on doing track when I leave Mountlake Terrace,” he said. He also wants to pursue other interests in engineering too. Okoronkwo is involved in many other clubs and sports besides track. These extracurricular activities include DECA, in which he was the treasurer for, Mix-It-Up club, robotics, which he was in all four of his years at MTHS. Okoronkwo also played basketball in his freshman year, JV soccer during his freshman year and varsity soccer during his sophomore and junior years. Okoronkwo also shined in the classroom. He took AP classed, such as AP calculus and physics. He did all of this while maintaining a near 3.0 GPA. Okoronkwo could not have asked for a better senior year. He said he has no regrets at Mountlake Terrace and is excited to leave. He is looking forward to a wonderful track filled future. “I think all great things must come to an end and I’m ready for the future.”


8 | Senior Feature | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013

12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | Senior Feature | 9

Individuality Eight seniors who show us it’s our differences

Louis Mouton D

espite his many appearances on HBN, not many people know Louis Mouton as a fighting artists, a reputation he received with his involvement in art at MTHS and martial arts. Mouton is a Cambodian African American that came to MTHS halfway into his junior year. He lives with his mother, step dad, and little brother, and he has found that he enjoys the school and feels welcomed. During his time here, Mouton has become the Art

that bring us together Stories and photos by Olivia Driscoll, Erick Yanzon, Daniil Oliferovskiy, Paxtyn Merten, Gurminder SIngh, Luke Thurber and Jannon Roque

For videos for each of the featured seniors, go to www.thehawkeye.org. Or scan this QR code with your smart device.

Hawkeye staff

Club president and revived the club by recreating the art murals. As the president of Art Club, Mouton has collaborated with art teacher Tim Cashman to reinvent the art hallway. Together, the two divided up students into nearly 20 teams and allowed them to demonstrate their abilities by putting their ideas and images on the walls. Louis recently became active in art and, “[the art murals] have really been my first painting project and this has been my first project of this size.” Considering that the art hallway is Mouton’s first painting job, it’s remarkable how well the art murals are turning out. Unlike renowned artist like Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, Mouton is unfamiliar with painting. Instead, he enjoys the simplicity of art. “I mainly just draw with pencil on paper, [and] I carry a sketch book around,” Mouton said. Contrary to his recent interest in art, Mouton has been active in martial arts much longer. It is something he has done since he was seven years old and because his step dad is a kung-fu instructor. When thinking about whether he likes martial arts or painting more, Mouton was undecided. “It’s really split down the middle between art or martial arts. Martial arts is something I’ve been doing since I was seven, [but] I’ve been into art in the past

couple of years [and] it’s really my passion.” Likewise, Mouton is forced to split up his time between both talents. Mouton attends martial arts lessons several times a week and, “I try to draw a couple hours a day before I go to bed.” With graduation also coming up, many seniors may be worried about how they will fit their hobbies into the busy bustle of preparing for college or finding employment, but not Mouton. He plans to carry on his talents and passions past high school. “I intend to go into the Army after I graduate and I’ll use the money I get from the military to pay for art school.” It’s clear that Mouton’s martial arts skill will come in handy in the Army, but some may wonder why he decided to join the military of all options. Mouton answers, “I feel like it’s something that I’ve wanted to do.” His desire to serve in the military may be rooted in his family’s history in serving in the Armed Forces. He’s had family members from both sides serve in the Army, the Navy, and the Navy Seals, and Mouton plans to carry on that legacy. It’s not every day that you see an artist serve in the military and pulling fighting moves. Even da Vinci didn’t serve as a soldier.

Taylor Johnson

T

aylor Johnson may be the ultimate “Belieber” (Justin Beiber fan), in fact she is the ultimate fan girl. On his birthday she baked Beiber a cake and gave it out to other students. However, it wouldn’t be surprising if one day she was also famous. The past couple years Johnson has been involved in several drama productions. Last year she was in the musical “All Shook Up” where she was in the chorus. This year she has been in the spring production of “Musical Comedy Murders of the 1940s” in which she played Marjorie Baverstock. She was also in the musical showcase “Don’t Stop the Beat,” which she performed and worked behind the scenes in. After she graduates, she will attend California Lutheran University in “a land far, far away” called Thousand Oaks, Calif. Johnson said she would like to be an actress even though it may seem unrealistic. Her advice for others with her same aspiration is, “If you want to be an actor I’d say don’t give up on that, but have a back up plan.” Johnson’s

BryaN Wyss

W

e all know him as the guy in the wheelchair, but there’s more about senior Bryan Wyss that you may not know. He is one of Terrace’s most inspirational students. Living in a wheelchair is not easy, and even sometimes it takes him a while to do things, Wyss positively said, “It’s really easy to maneuver. People here are really nice. They respect you if you are in a wheelchair.” He served as the men’s basketball manager for three years from his freshman to junior year. He was the one in charge of keeping stats, and managing the clock and practices. This year, he joined the track and field team and qualified for the 3A men’s state championships. He finished third in the 3A men’s wheelchair javelin throw with a toss of 16 ft. 8 in. He enjoyed going to a lot of different schools and meeting different people besides his team. “Track was really fun,” Wyss said, “I got to build a lot of friendships. It was a great experience.” Wyss is going to the VOICE program (Vocational Opportunities In Community Experiences) for three years until he’s 21. This program provides comprehensive instruction and vocational experiences to prepare students for adult life. Students in this program also receive assistance in career exploration, job search, job applications, and interviewing skills. After this program, he will attend Edmonds Community College. For his culminating project, he job shadowed a librarian at Mountlake Terrace Elementary School. Besides school and sports, his hobbies include going on the computer, watching movies, playing games, and he also enjoys reading sometimes. His favorite experiences in school are some-

thing that most students don’t usually appreciate. Wyss likes going to school everyday, meeting new friends, and learning different things. As an advice for the upcoming freshmen, Wyss said, “Just do your work, stay busy, [and] have a great time because it will be over before you know it.” “I’m going to miss talking to my friends, going to different classes, and mostly the assemblies. They are so fun,” Wyss commented. Wyss is sure one to be missed by the whole student body by his optimism and kind presence.

Sera Motokana

E

veryone knows Sera Motokana as one of the funniest and positive seniors in the school, but little do they know that she’s also one of the nicest and thoughtful students. She is involved in various clubs and activities in MTHS. She has been part of FCCLA for two years and a representative this year. She is also the promotional officer of Eco Club, vice president of Honor Society, and she is also involved in Teens Against Tobacco Use (TATU). Motokana is going to Lake Washington Institute of Technology next fall, and was accepted in the nursing program. She is attending college for four years to receive her certification to be a registered nurse, and plan to start working at nursing homes. For her culminating project, she shadowed a nurse at an adult family home,

where she helped taking care of the residents, and learned skills that pertain to her future goals as a nurse. She thought that exploring the nursing field has helped her really understand what it takes to become one. “Doing it as a senior project opened up my eyes to realizing that this is something I want to do in the future,” Motokana said. Her parents are one of her inspirations to becoming a nurse because they are both in the nursing field. “I saw how much they love their jobs and I really like to help people, so I decided to go with the nursing field to help others and to make them feel better,” she continued. She took the Health Care Professions intra-district class in Edmonds-Woodway High School her junior year, where she

other dream job is being a teacher; she said it would be cool to get to work with kids. One of the biggest parts of Johnson’s life is church. At her church she works with little kids and takes care of the babies. This could also help her with her hopes of being a teacher. There are several things Johnson has done to help her with her goals and become who she is. She says that being in plays and musicals have helped her come out of her box, try new things and meet new people. Something that she has also been involved with here at MTHS is Mix It up. Mix It Up has helped her talked to people she never would have and make several friends. Another thing Johnson has been doing to prepare for her future is modeling. She is involved with Seattle Talent Agency and also takes a few acting classes there. “I hate school,” Johnson said jokingly, but for many people hating school isn’t a joke. Getting involved in activities is a way to make high school a little more enjoyable. Whether Johnson ends up being on the big screen or teaching the next generation, she will do it with determination and put care and effort into it.

Gifton Okoronkwo

I took the Washington State Nursing Assistant Certification examination, and became a certified CNA. As the youngest of the family, one of the hardest challenges that she has encountered was when her older brother moved back to Fiji five years ago. “We were really close and it was sad because I don’t get to see him anymore,” she said. “We talk in the phone, but it’s not the same.” She is also a Link Leader this year, so as an advice to the upcoming freshmen, she said, “Just focus on school because that is your life for the next four years, and I know some freshmen that struggle with school so try to get good grades, do good in school and make new friends.” She encouraged all students to, “Expand your horizons in life and in school,” she added. Motokana’s jokes and laugh are sure to be missed as she goes on pursuing her dreams in college.

n his senior year, Gifton Okoronkwo won the state title for triple jump. It was his first year on track. It turned out that he had a knack for his newly found sport. He started trying out and messing with track only last summer. He was convinced to become a triple jumper by two other triple jumpers – his sister Chinne Okoronkwo, who also won state in triple jump, and his friend Tye Esparza, who won 8th in triple jump. “The number one thing that helped me was the support at home with my family, the great sibling support with my sister, I had great support from all my coaches, and from other contestants from other teams and from our team,” Okoronkwo said. With this he made it to state which he thought was a lot of fun. He liked the new experience of state. Okoronkwo said it was a lot better than the national competition because state had more of a family aspect because he knew most of the people there. He also has he teammates that want him to do his best and he wants them to do their best too. At nationals he was just trying it out to see if he liked it and did not really know anyone there. This year he had one advantage not many athletes have: his sister to help him out. He says that his sister is extremely beneficial because she is a real veteran and can give him tips plus watch his marks. He also finds it helpful because he can take his game home and talk to his sister about what he can do to become a better jumper and new techniques

he can try. This year track has not just made him a better jumper but he also thinks it has made him a better person. “It has improved my focus and my work ethic a lot I know I have to work real hard to get where I am and where I want to be.” With his new found track talent, many wondered if track is something he plans to do in the future “I do plan on doing track when I leave Mountlake Terrace,” he said. He also wants to pursue other interests in engineering too. Okoronkwo is involved in many other clubs and sports besides track. These extracurricular activities include DECA, in which he was the treasurer for, Mix-It-Up club, robotics, which he was in all four of his years at MTHS. Okoronkwo also played basketball in his freshman year, JV soccer during his freshman year and varsity soccer during his sophomore and junior years. Okoronkwo also shined in the classroom. He took AP classed, such as AP calculus and physics. He did all of this while maintaining a near 3.0 GPA. Okoronkwo could not have asked for a better senior year. He said he has no regrets at Mountlake Terrace and is excited to leave. He is looking forward to a wonderful track filled future. “I think all great things must come to an end and I’m ready for the future.”


The Hawks’

?

next flight The next destinations for this years’ graduates Western Washington University Taylor Marie Arbuckle Shiffite Kiya Awel Mason Oliver Bergstrom Grace Yaeun Gil Matthew Aaron Kamradt Bryce Tyler Kolbo

Michael Dean Lotz Tess Catharine O’Reilly Nathaniel Lewis Otis Lucas Edward Pope Erin Elizabeth Russell Tony Anh Vo

Everett Community College Tyler James Friedemann Mikea Reshe Hawkins-Tanner Blake Johnathan Hertrich

Samantha Marie Nathe Latrae Deon Sarden Taylor Cassandra Smith

Samantha Jo Netz Nghi Nhan Elijah Woods Parker Jamie Rae Reiser Lina Lyn Rickels Etienne Marcel Sotelo Yohans Amelesom Tewolde Alec Zen Wong

Raymond Chase Lindquist Christian J. Mabbott

Sera Batirau Motokana

Cascadia Community College Caylee Jordan Brott Connor Lucas Clausen Daniel Edward Gardner Ashlee Lorraine Hoyt Samantha Ryoko Mafune Alyssa Jean McCune

Tessa Kyrene Palmer Siera Faith Prout Rebecca Lynn Prudnick Kylee Miranda Spear Janna Truong Torin C. Webster

Daniel Min Kue An Nick Awasthi Phong Nghinh Bach Bailey Joseph Bame Casandra Barojas Tapia Zoe Lorette Bellecy Brandi Nicole Black Ivy Rene Boyer Chanelle Sun Calhoun Chloe Nicole Calhoun Andrew Jason Dahl Tasha Kaelen Diaz Sofia Drogomiretskiy Lavinia Ruth Enache Shawn Edwin Evensen Julie Marie Felber Robyn Teresa Firoved Cody Ray Nelson Flynn Katelyn Jenann Frazier Blake Anthony Gilfert Anne-Marie Gabriella Gonzalez Andrew Lloyd Gordon Christopher Guardiano Christopher Joseph Guerrero Briana Rae Hall

Full-time Employment

U.S. Armed Forces Army Grace Seung-Hee Back Louis Sothea Cordell Mouton

Coast Guard Desireé Davette Massey

Army National Guard Jonathan Wynner VanPelt Gochayna

Flying Farther Away - Out of State College

Whitworth University

Spokane Community College

Sonja Camille Head

Brennan Michael Tibbetts

University of Washington Emily Louise Banschbach Shanice My Tran Duong Blake Fernandez Tin Trung Ho Jerusalem Grace Kifelew Joshua Kim Elliot Gene Kingsley Erika JoAnn McAuliffe

Edmonds Community College Amber Leigh Hamman Elle Kerrigan Hess Jeffrey Andrew Houfek Jessica Marie Hundtoft Forrest Robert Hussey Jessica Nicole Jamtaas Nazia Adila Khan JungMin Kim Maria D. Laureano Medina Chan Woo Lee Isaac Timothy Leese Odkhuu Lkhagvasuren Ana-Laura Luna-Ortiz Julian France Magat Sandra Adele Marshall Nathan Alan McElwain Alexander Donald Meyer Shaylene Tiera Ferro Miller Alejandra Montes Trung Tri Nguyen Adam Michael Oberstadt Ryan Austin Ogilvie Natasha Olheiser Sophia Pastushok Jessica Nicole Philio

Vincent Matthew Max (Community College) Holli Ann Meyers (Other) Jennifer Guadalupe Richarte (Gary Manuel Aveda Institute) Antonio Stefan Romei (Undecided) Ashley Susan Rucker (Culinary School) Clayton Oliver Wallace Seward (Community College) Holly Ann Tiersma (Undecided) Camren Tyler Webb (Apprenticeship in Motorsport Photography) Regina Rae Work (Pima Medical Institute) Bryan John Wyss (VOICE Program)

Bellevue College

Jetsper Salazar Cubos

Lake Washington Institute of Technology

Arcelia de Jesus Bibian Ascencio (Community College) Iobana Bibiana Bibian Ascencio (Community College) Charles William Divers (Community College) Rebecca Nicole Frazier (Community College) Alexa Nichole Gifford (Northwest Hair Academy) Aaron M. Golesch (IBEW Electrician Apprenticeship Program) Michael W. Green (Missionary) Darian Marie Guihan (Community College) Tayler Justin Howell (Sno-Isle Tech Center) Benjapon Hummel-Schluger (Undecided) Jordan Nicole Kenniston (Other) Franklin James Koenig (Undecided) Kassidy Jayne Dakota Long (Cosmetology School) Anthony Mijares Madayag (Other) Lorenzo Lusvardi-Guazzoni (Italian Exchange Student) Dalton Jay Mason (Other)

Josue Jehudiel Alcala Jacob Cooper Cawsey Forrest Richard Clement Matthew D. Folmsbee Tia Lindsey Garrett Michael W. Green Tayler Justin Howell Maxey Lee Jernigan Jr. Erminio Montes Jr. Michael David Reynolds Kayla Marie Steuart Isabel Talavera-Guillen Ryan Vogel Andrew Thomas Walsh

University of Washington Bothell lana Cari Erkan Bradford Harold Halter Thanh Kim Huynh Chandler Elizabeth Kalthoff Sukhaman Kaur Jason Paul Kozodoy Elliott Gyri Lee Sarah Christine Locke

Other/Undecided

Judith Silva Robinson Alyssa Lee Rogers Logan Rynn Sather Tabetha Ann Sheppard Oleg A. Shevchuk Raj Singh Kyle Takahashi Sjolin Jasmine Alexandria Stires Steven J. Szilvassy Trinh Ta Kaylyn Mae Tolliver Evan Lane Tostberg Thu Van Anthony Vladaj Alice Elaine Wahlman Kelsey Nicole Watson Tyler Jon Webster David Michael Young Yosef Seare Zerom

Anna Joy McClenny Abigail Anne McDermott Armen Nalbandyan Mashael Sajid Sunyoung Song Laura Michelle Taylor Brett Jeffery Tomsett Jordan Rikio Yoshida

Eastern Washington University

Shoreline Community College Marquis Latrell Armstead Trung Tuan Banh Hayley Alexandra Benvenuti Jose Calderon Antonio Michael Camarena Kyra Lee Dahlman Jazmin Cecilia Espana Jon Paul Figueroa McKayla Morgan Floe Rodrigo Garcia-Ruiz Zayla Nachelle Ghebremedhin Sarah Christine Gillen Amanda Erin Granberg Meagan Elizabeth Greenhaw Connor Lee Hazel Stephanie Hersman Colan Jeffrey Lamb

Jocelyn Deanna Leggett Troy Carl Lyrberg Antonia Maria Martinez Cameron Ray Miles Nancy Nhi Nguyen Dorian R. Pennington-Obispo Jonathan Michael Poellinger Sarah Rose Pung Emigdio Fabian Rios Jade Roque Andrew Dongbin Shin Tri Tran Linh Trinh Christina Marie Wimmer Audrey Dale Wofford Amanda Mae Woodyard

Seattle Pacific University

Kevin Michael Harrington

Elbethel Abebe Kelemu

Quintin Dale Barnard Duane Steven Dahl Tye Anthony Esparza Beau James Kennedy Madeline Marie Younglove

Central Washington University Taylor Edward Griffin Kandin Vincenzo Neri

Washington State University Trevor Dean Christensen Seth Merrill Christianson Rachel Linn Fesler Aleksander Gebreyesus Erica Nichole Guenther Audrey Viola Halenbeck Casey Joann Hynes Christina Elaine Martin Peyton Nash Morrison Madisyn Jean Pauline Roberts Amanda Michele Schnee Michelle Lynn Schomer

Seattle University Aidan Michael Murray Nevan Holt Wichers

Art Institute of Seattle Wynton Andrew Morin

Seattle Central Community College Avery Albert Fowble

Arizona John Edward Moore (Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University) Haley Renee Shoemaker (Northern Arizona University) California Taylor Armani Johnson (California Lutheran University) AnhViet Nguyen (Stanford University) Kyle Jon Scherrer (University of Southern California)

NOTE: The Hawkeye worked with the MTHS Counselling Department and individual students in assembling this list of seniors and their intended plans for the near future. However, not all seniors were able or willing to share their information. This list is up to date at the time the Hawkeye went to press.

Canada - British Columbia Desmond Saisitthidej (University of British Columbia) Idaho Marissa Mae Gilbraith (University of Idaho) Mason James Stone (University of Idaho)

Iowa Riley Marie Morgan (University of Northern Iowa)

North Carolina Hannah Roberta Fickle (Methodist University)

Massachusetts Alyson Taladoc Davis (Framingham State College) Reign Henry King (Berklee College of Music) Serena Hope Hohenstein (Emerson College) Karendeep Kaller (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences)

Oregon Erin Rae Keating (Oregon State University) Amanda Nicolette O’Hara (Oregon State University) Sarah Blyth Lundquist (Western Oregon University) Gifton Iheke Okoronkwo (Oregon Institute of Technology) Sara Margaret Smart (Oregon State University)

Minnesota Anfernee Freeman Calloway-Ferreri (Hamline University)

Utah Alex Jon Hansen (Brigham Young University, Provo)

New Jersey René Julaine Bos (Seton Hall University)

Washington, DC Grace Egger (George Washington University)


12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | Senior Feature | 11

Serena Hohenstein W

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Davidson

ould you rather write for a TV show or be in one? In Serena Hohenstein’s case, both! Ever since she was in her first play in fourth grade, Hohenstein knew she had potential. What she didn’t know was that her potential and hard work would gain her the lead in a school musical her junior year, as well as the opportunity to be in the ensemble for a professional performance of “The Wizard of Oz.” Hohenstein’s dynamic stage presence, harmonious voice and uplifting personality have helped her obtain not only parts in plays, but also friends along the way. “I love acting because when I’m on stage I get to be somebody who I’m not. I get to have their experiences, which I may not have had before. Also, it’s just kind of freeing,” Hohenstein revealed. At MTHS, Hohenstein has had a part in multiple productions. These include “Larry and the Werewolf,” “Almost, Maine” and “Back to the ’80s.” During her junior year, she was the main character, Natalie, in the school musical “All Shook Up.” Natalie was her favorite role of those she has had at the high school because it was the first time she had ever been the lead in a play. Hohenstein also acts outside of school, mostly through the Seattle Children’s Theatre. She was in two summer season shows, “Avenue Q” and “The Reformed Vampire Support Group.” These were directed by adults but acted out by kids. Her most recent and overall favorite play was this past fall and winter. She was in the ensemble for

Seattle Children’s Theatre’s professional production, “The Wizard of Oz,” which she loved because of the people, the atmosphere and the costume. Soon, Hohenstein will be on her way to Emerson College in Boston. There, she will be majoring in yet another one of her passions, writing for film and TV. Even though acting isn’t her major, Hohenstein won’t stop doing what she loves. “I decided on Emerson because of the community there. I met some faculty who are currently working professionals but they also teach there. Also, I love the aspect that I can get involved in so many other things besides my major,” explained Hohenstein. After college, Hohenstein’s goal is to move to Los Angeles and get a job writing for a TV show. She hasn’t quite decided how she is going to continue acting at that point, but hopes to continue with her passion. While Hohenstein’s future is full of exciting new opportunities, the end of her high school career is proving to be very bittersweet. “I have had an amazing four years in high school. I have met incredible friends and incredible teachers and just had amazing experiences. Endings are always hard for me, so [ending] something that’s been so regular for four years is really crazy and emotional. But I’m also really excited for this next step,” Hohenstein voiced. Whether it is on stage or behind the scenes, Hohenstein’s next step will take her deeper into the world of drama and entertainment.

Nevan Wichers

N

evan Wichers, one of this year’s valedictorians, is a student who has dedicated his four years of high school to robotics. “I joined at the beginning of my freshman year just because before that I was interested in the engineering program and field. I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do but I knew it had something to do with robots,” Wichers said. After joining robotics, Wichers realized that programming is what he was going to do. Wichers now programs robots to move, shoot hoops, and to follow objects. “One thing I had fun doing was vision targeting, which is means you get the robot to try to see something with a camera and processing that image to try to find its target,” Wichers said. Robotics is a club where students meet everyday. In the beginning of the year they stayed until 6:00 p.m. and worked on small robots. Then as the year progresses, they start to build bigger robots as tall as a standard picnic table and wide as one too. In the middle of the year the robotic students stay at school and work on these robots. The robotics kids usually stay until 8:00 p.m. “It’s called build season and it’s six weeks in the middle of

the school year,” Wichers said. Wichers really enjoyed being in robotics because he got to know more about robots and programing he got more interested. “My favorite part is programming part because I like to do that and it’s really cool to get the robot to do what you want. So I have a lot of fun with that and working with other members of the group because it is good to first get a sense of teamwork,” Wichers said. One person that Wichers has met in robotics and who he really enjoyed working with was technology teacher Dan Lafferty. Lafferty encouraged Wichers to do Robotics. “Lafferty influenced me to stay in robotics because he was the one who taught me a lot of the things I know about robots and programing,” Wichers said. He wants everyone to know that robotics is really fun and it will help in the future. “I want everyone to know about robotics because one, it is a lot of fun, second,

Erin Keating

Y

ou may have seen her face on HBN, anchoring the local news. You may have also seen her at band concerts throughout the past four years. For those of you who don’t know this hard-working and very involved student, her name is Erin Keating. Keating moved to Mountlake Terrace her freshman year of high school from Canyon Park Junior High School. Not knowing very many people and leaving friends behind, Erin found her first few months of high school being the “new girl.” “When I first came here I was extremely shy and quiet. I never really had to make friends before so I didn’t really know how… But one day I finally worked up enough courage to ask John Moore if I could sit with him at lunch. I was extremely nervous and scared. Little did I know that John would convince me to do ASB which subsequently boosted my confidence.” She has been on ASB since her sophomore year, serving as class representative sophomore year and treasurer junior year. She has also been an avid member on HBN since her

because it will be really helpful to everyone because robots are everywhere and all around us,” Wichers said. He plans to do programing in the future. “I plan to go to Seattle University after that I want to do something that has to do with programing.”

junior year. This year, Keating was part of the ASB “Big Six,” serving as the secretary. Coupled with part of Big 6, Keating was also executive producer on HBN. She represented HBN at the national student journalism convention in San Antonio this past fall. She was also in Chamber Winds band where she played clarinet. She also reached the academic achievement of being on Honors Society with a 3.5 GPA which she kept throughout her high school years. Keating is attending Oregon State University where she wants to major in New Media Communications. “I was looking at classes and I was looking at HBN and I really liked being on TV, as clichéd as that sounds. But once I got in, I learned more of the behind-the-scenes type things and the ropes of it, and I really enjoyed that too along with anchoring. So, I guess just overall being on TV.” For the summer, Keating aims to work her part-time job at Cold Stone Creamery, and hang out with her friends before she leaves for college.


12 | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013 » New In the Community? Is something new happening in our community? Let us know at the425@thehawkeye.org

the425

» The mysteries of health Kimberly Nelson takes time to answer some rather unconventional health questions »P13

Coming soon to MLT: Hot dog eatery

Owners of Red Onion Burgers set plans for a new hot dog restaurant opening in July

“We want the two restaurants to be related as far as complementary cousins, but we also want them to have two separate identities.” Seaun Richards Owner, Red onion burgers

Erika Fisher | Hawkeye

Put UW on

YoUR

Waiting List Hot Facts

T o do: ransfer

• Get a t Edmonds degree from ollege Community C to the UW • Transfer on a ion savings • Spend tuit ralia trip to Aust

The food supply Compiled by Gurminder Singh Hawkeye staff

If you hadn’t owned a business, what might you have done?

“It’s hard to say, I was doing this when I was in high school. When I was your age I thought I was going to be a fashion designer. Then I realized I was making more money here. I also though I was going to be a dancer when I was younger.”

Community college transfer students graduate at a higher rate than students who start at a four-year university. 19,000 students who transferred to a public or private four-year college or university together saved more than $100 million by starting at a community college in Washington. Source: Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges 2009-10

Connect With Us

Faces of the425:

Chris Ahn

Kim Nygard

Owner, Double DD Meats

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO OPEN A BUSINESS? “I didn’t have a choice when I came to the United States. Because [my] English is poor, money is not a lot. Owning a grocery store is easier.”

Owner, 56th Street Market

What is your most proud moment while running your business? “There’s not just one. When I hear a customer say things like ‘this is the coolest store I’ve ever been in’ or ‘I’m a kid in a candy store’ it really makes me proud.”

Kwon Lee

Owner, Handy Mart

Find all our social connections at http://edmondscc.ning.com.

Get started today! www.edcc.edu/future

Erika Fisher | Hawkeye


12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | 13 » have any suggestions? Contact the Health editor at Health@thehawkeye.org

is this normal?!

Kimberly Nelson FASCE teacher

ITN?! columnist Kimberly Nelson is back! She will answer all health-related questions you may be afraid to ask, or she may just address some questions that she feels really need to be answered. Credentials? Oh, yeah, she’s got ‘em. Not only is she a health educator, she has a master’s degree in Theology and Counseling.

Dear Ms. Nelson: I hear that crying is good for your brain, but why is it so hard for guys to cry? Signed, Mr. Dry Eyes Dear Mr. Dry Eyes: What an excellent question and such an easy answer. Since boys have smaller brains than girls something has to go; hence the lack of reasonable emotions that boys exhibit. JK! HAHAHA!!! I’m not a guy hater-really. In most cultures, boys are taught from the beginning to be tough and not cry. Only babies and

Health

girls cry, BE A MAN! Right away boys learn to control any emotion that might lead to crying, because who wants to be ridiculed and punched by your dad, uncles or brothers? And on the playground, when you do a face plant under the monkey bars and woodchips are embedded into your cheeks, boy you better not cry. When you are playing baseball and a line drive slams into your special place (you know where THAT is) you better walk it off. Don’t try to blame the dirt in your eyes. In reality, crying releases hormones into your bloodstream that make you feel calm and satiated. They’re the same hormones that are secreted when you enjoy a belly laugh, eat a very enjoyable meal, or when you are a grown up and have sex. Worried about crying in front of others? Support a guy friend who cries about something painful, try crying by yourself, eventually, you will develop a healthy relationship with the crying process. It’s ok to cry about sad and painful stuff, it’s a natural process that is built into our bodies. Girls respect boys who aren’t afraid to show emotions other than anger. Erika Fisher | Hawkeye

Dear Ms. Nelson: How do I know when my boyfriend is being clingy or obsessive? When does it cross the line into an unhealthy relationship? Signed, Ms. Needs Space

Erika Fisher | Hawkeye

Dear Ms. Needs Space: People are so complex; we each have different needs, challenges and histories which make relationships even more complicated. Clingy can be cute…if it’s about being happy to be together. But clingy can be a red flag…a sign of trouble. Try to find out why your boyfriend is clingy, what’s his motivation? What happens before he becomes clingy? What gets him into the clingy mode? Notice the type of attention that he exhibits when he’s clingy. Does he require that you ALWAYS hold hands when walking, that he watches your calls and texts, or monitor who you talk to, cause those are red flags. Signs of trouble to come, signs of control issues. Controlling behavior is used when someone is in need of power, it is not about love. It is about regulating someone else usually because the controller has a need to manage the world around them. Boyfriends aren’t the only ones who get clingy…girlfriends can be obsessive too. Keep in mind that sometimes boyfriends and girlfriends show their clingy behavior differently.

Dear Ms. Nelson: I’m trying to get into shape for summer. How many calories does my body really need? I always hear different things. Signed, Striving for a Beach Bod Dear Striving for a Beach Bod: Yea for you! Getting in shape will help you to feel good about yourself. Counting calories is based on your metabolism, the balance between what you take in and what you work out. There are great resources on line that can help you calculate what and how much you should eat as well as how much and

» musical comedy Kills ‘em Last drama production of the year a success »P14

the type of workout that is best for you. Consider checking on WebMD or http://www. myfitnesspal.com/ for inforErika Fisher | H mation and support. Remember that feeling good is better than setting a goal according to what others think.

awkeye

Summer safety tips Try and stick to a schedule. Teens need eight to nine hours of sleep every night.

Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from UV rays.

Make sure to apply sunscreen before going outdoors, even when tanning. It’s important to use an SPF to protect yourself from sunburns and skin cancer.

Stay hydrated. Your body needs a lot water, especially during hot summer months. Erika Fisher | Hawkeye

Erika Fisher | Hawkeye

Take advantage of the sunny weather and try an outdoor activity like swimming, jogging or soccer. According to the Centers for Disease Control, teens need at least 60 minutes of exersize, three days a week.

When swimming or doing other water activities make sure to use the buddy system and wear a life jacket when necessary.


14 | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013 » What’s hAPPENING? Know of any arts events that are going on in the community? Email them to ae@thehawkeye.org

A&E

» A year of champions Many MTHS teams made it to district play-offs or state »P16

The final production sends the year out with a bang

Calvin Martin (11), Allie Maurer (10), Myles Stillwaugh (11), Danielle Hirano (10), and Vincet Max (12) attempt to puzzle together the pieces of who the killer could be in “The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940.”

Taylor Johnson, Franklin Koenig, and Vincent Max finish their high school experiences of theater productions with a musical murder mystery By Sereena Gee and Ella Schroth Photos by Serafina Urrutia Hawkeye staff

The last production of the year, John Bishop’s “The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940,” gathered many students and their families to the MTHS Theater every night from May 30 through June 1 at 7 p.m. Everything from the fancy set of a mansion in  Chappaqua, New York,  with secret passages, to the dressy costumes reflected the title-given time period of the 1940s. To begin the show, a German foreign exchange student, sophomore Marie AuchSchwelk, portrayed a German maid by the name of Helsa Wenzel, and was stabbed repeatedly before being thrown into a closet by a masked figure. Afterwards, Wenzel reappeared, and helped to cook and attend the needs of the rest of the cast, sophomores Allie Maurer as Elsa Von Grossenkueten and Danielle Hirano as Nikki Crandall; juniors Myles Stillwaugh as Michael Kelly, Evan Roberts as Patrick O’Reilly, Calvin Martin as Roger Hopewell, and Monika Young as Bernice Roth; and seniors Vincent Max as Ken De La Maize, Franklin Koenig as Eddie McCuen, and Taylor Johnson as Majorie Baverstock. The cast gathered at Von Grossenkueten’s house, to put together a production of “White House Merry-Go-Round.” They quickly discovered that their creative team was also the same one for the show “Manhattan Holiday,” during which some of the chorus girls were mysteriously murdered.

At Von Grossenkueten’s house, Baverstock and O’Reilly were murdered shortly after Wenzel was.   “My favorite scene was my death scene because I was most comfortable with a German accent for one, and well, I just like the idea of dying, and pretending to get killed,” third murder victim, Roberts, said. Crandall revealed her identity as part of the United States Naval Intelligence, and then discovered that De La Maize was the murderer by decoding a chorus girl victim’s diary. De La Maize tried to kill Crandall, but was knocked out by McCuen. As a twist, Wenzel stepped out of her identity and turned out to be We n z e l ’s t w i n brother as well as a homicidal maniac, and then proceeded to kill the sur-

vivors, but was The one who got a majority of the injuknocked out ries was Young, who acted as a character by McCuen that “missed all of the main events and got b e f o r e drunk.” She explained,  “I have bruises all he could over my knees from falling so much, and I e l i m i n a t e think that I have a stage burn on my elbow.”  them all. Besides injury, there was a minor techniThe show cal difficulty during Saturday’s show, as the ended with sword meant to kill Johnson’s character Wenzel and De La wasn’t moving from Max’s hanger. Maize being taken “I walked by [Johnson] and she told me to away, and a song cover, so I just kept talking,  but the lights performance on the came back on while she was very obviously piano by Hopewell and alive,” said Young. Roth. However, Stillwaugh saved the scene by As successful as the play telling Johnson backstage to scream, and was, there were some aspects dropped something to make the sound of a that didn’t body falling. go very “I’m proud of Myles, and “I liked how we smoot h ly, that we had a really good had quick parts in for every cover up,” said Young. it and it was kind of time a charThe audience laughed energetic and it was acter died until there were tears in a lot of fun to do.” or fainted, their eyes and their hearts Monika Young they hit the were pounding loudJunior hard stage ly with  each scream and and occathreat. sionally injured themselves. “I liked how we had quick parts in it and it “In my early scene with was kind of energetic and it was a lot of fun Majorie, there’s a point to do,” said Young. where she hits me and I fall Plays and musicals to look forward to on the ground and it was at next year include “The Miracle Worker,” a really awkward angle so I “Sympathy Jones the Musical,” and wasn’t exactly sure how to do “Rumors,” all to be directed by Brz. it. So I just kind of fell to my Brz is an awesome director, she does a knees and I have a bruise on my whole bunch for the show,” Roberts conknee now and a couple on my cludes. elbow,” said Roberts.  


12 June 2013 | Hawkeye | 15 » CHECK US OUT ONLINE Find exclusive content and stories on the web at www.thehawkeye.org

» We’re on twitter Go online to Twitter.com and follow @MTHSports for game results and updates

Sports

Softball comes alive late in season, finishes 7th in state By Jack Pearce Hawkeye staff

The Terrace softball team had yet another tremendous season as it continued its tradition of little noticed excellence. The team snagged the last spot from the Wesco South conference for the District 1 playoffs with an 11-9 record, extending its streak of playoff appearances to a staggering 16th consecutive season. No other Terrace team, including the men’s basketball team, has a mark even close to that. The record didn’t accurately reflect the competitiveness of the team; they ended up losing five games by just two runs or less. Co-captain and the Everett Herald’s “all-area” junior, Maddy Kristjanson spoke about the regular season saying, “We were just missing that one crucial hit or out in those games.” Being the last team in meant that the Hawks had to face the top team from the North: Marysville-Pilchuck. The Hawks were not intimidated, but determined. “Everyone anticipated us to be two and done,” said the other co-captain, Rene Bos, senior. “We wanted to prove them wrong.” And the Hawks did just that. The team dismantled Pilchuck 6-4 and then defeated Shorecrest 4-0 to qualify for the state softball tournament. “It was amazing.” exclaimed Bos regarding qualifying for state. “Our hitting just came alive,” said Kristjanson. “As a team we hit nine home runs in [the state tournament].” The softball team went on to get seventh in the 3A state tournament, falling to the Bainbridge Spartans and even-

Luke Thurber | Hawkeye

Hannah Baisch prepares for her at-bat against Meadowdale during the 3A District 1 championship. The Mavericks narrowly defeated the Hawks 6-5 to clinch the District title.

tual second place Prairie and beating Bonney Lake and Enumclaw. Both Bos and Kristjanson described the team as “energetic, loving and determined.”

“We had great team chemistry,” said Kristjanson. All these factors added up to make a historic team that none of them will forget.

Track tops out at state By Austin McDermott Sports Co-Editor

Luke Thurber | Hawkeye

Gifton Okoronkwo begins his run for the triple jump at the Edmonds District Meet in May.

12 state competitors. Nine top ten finishes. Two state champions. One team. This year’s track team not only lived up to the precedent created by last year’s success, but likely surpassed it as well. At the WIAA 3A Track championships, the Hawks continued their season long triumphant tendencies. Chinne Okoronkwo, freshman, and her brother Gifton Okoronkwo, senior, continued their season-long dominance in the triple jump, with both siblings claiming the state championship in the event. Gifton made a stellar jump of 46’ 7.25”, a whole foot further than the second place competitor. Chinne also easily won with a jump of 40’. Chinne also finished second in pole vault and sixth in long jump, despite a hamstring injury. Gifton, Quinnell Mason, Joshua Kim, and Duane Dahl, all seniors, also competed in the 4x100 relay, finishing second in the state with a time of 42.85 seconds. Dahl also competed in the 300 meter hurdles, finishing ninth and a time of 40.48 seconds. Beau Kennedy, senior, made his second straight trip for the javelin, and just like last season, he finished eighth with a solid throw of 173’9”. Mckenna Hunt, sophomore, built on her surprise state appearance from last season; this year she came in fifth for the 100 meter hurdles with a time of 15.3 seconds, and fourth in the 300 meter hurdles coming in at 45.48 seconds, an expected improvement compared to last year’s seventh place finish in the 300 meter hurdles. Before heading to the state championships, the men’s Hawks track team easily defeated the competition, completing the

Gifton and regular season Chinne with an undeOkoronkwo, feated record McKenna and winning Hunt, Quinnell the 3A Wesco Mason, Duane track champiDahl, Joshua onship with a Kim, and Beau team score of Kennedy all 131.5 points, finished in more than 20 the top 10 at points ahead the 3A State Championships of second place Shorecrest. The women’s track team had a much different season, winning only 2 matches, but averaging 74.3 points per meet. Behind Hunt, Okoronkwo, and Hailee Malins, a freshman, being the only female underclassmen to qualify in state this season. Despite Malins failing to place in the top ten at state this season for shot put (she placed 12th), she is still just a freshman with a personal record of 36’ 0.75”. Other competitors at the state meet were Yohans Tewolde who came in 16th in the 800 meters and 14th in the 4x400 Relay along with Mason, Kim, and Dahl. Bryan Wyss participated in the wheelchair Javelin event, coming in third, and Tye Esparza, came in eighth place in the Triple Jump behind teammate and champion Okoronkwo. Also competing at the state competition was junior Jack Pearce who came in 13th in the 3200 meters. Looking back at this year’s track season, it’s easy to see the team has a bright future; the women’s team in particular. Behind three young studs who already have state experience, the team is poised to dominate the sport for several years to come.


16 | Sports | Hawkeye | 12 June 2013

A year of Hawks, a year of champions Terrace sent teams and individuals to state competitions every season Synopses by Austin McDermott Sports Co-Editor

FOOTBALL 2nd playoff berth in school history

Right: The Hawks line up against the Lynnwood Royals on September 14. The Hawks demolished the Royals with a 42-0 victory. On their way to a 5-5 season and just the second playoff appearance in school history, the Hawks averaged over 29 points per game while allowing just 15 points per game. They also outrushed opponents by a total of 1647 yards to just 577 yards, crushing Lynnwood, Shorewood and Marysville-Getchell by over 30 points each and shutting out Shorecrest 28-0, spoiling the Scot’s Homecoming game.

Serafina Urrutia | Hawkeye

hoops

4th in state 2nd straight trip to the Dome

Left: Marquis Armstead lines up for a free throw against the University Titans. The Hawks defeated the Titans 59-56 on their way to a fourth place state finish and a 23-4 overall record. Armstead finished the game with 12 points. The Hawks ended their season on a high note, defeating perennial state favorite Seattle Prep 54-43 and shutting down Panthers star and “Seattle Times Player of the Year” DJ Fenner, holding him to just nine points, a season low for the Nevada Wolfpack commit. It was the second straight trip to the Tacoma Dome for the Hawks who did not place last season. Serafina Urrutia | Hawkeye

baseball Perennial playoff contenders

Right: Junior pitcher Dominic DeMiero finishes his delivery against the Meadowdale Mavericks on April 17. DeMiero pitched a complete game, giving up just two runs and scattering 10 hits through seven innings as the Hawks won the second game of a three-game sweep of the Mavs. After starting the season 4-8 the team went on a tear, winning eight straight games on their way to another playoff appearance despite losing 11 seniors last season. In what was supposed to be a rebuilding year, the Hawks turned it into a playoff season and were just a few clutch hits away from making it to the state tournament, losing to Ferndale 2-0 and Stanwood 9-7 in the District playoffs.

Track:

Duane Dahl Tye Esparza McKenna Hunt Beau Kennedy Joshua Kim Hailee Malins Quinnell Mason Jack Pearce Chinne Okoronkwo

high flying hawks

Daniil Oliferovsky | Hawkeye

Gifton Okoronkwo Yohans Tewolde Bryann Wyss

Cross Country:

Women’s Tennis:

Sydney Springberg

Nicki Bouche Tina Liu

Women’s Swim: Riley Morgan

Ella Schroth

Wrestling:

Women’s Golf: Sydella Yonker


Volume 28.9