Hawkeye 11-2022

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IT’S TIME TO REALIZE THAT STUDENTS ARE MUCH MORE THAN THEIR GPA

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SCOTUS DECISION WILL IMPACT THE LIVES OF THOUSANDS OF INDIGENOUS AMERICANS

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MOUNTLAKE TERRACE HIGH SCHOOL | 21801 44TH AVE. W MOUNTLAKE TERRACE WA 98043

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NOVEMBER 2022 | VOLUME 38 | ISSUE 3

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NO MATTER ITS TITLE, YOU CAN’T “GO WRONG” SEEING THE FALL DRAMA PRODUCTION

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Women’s soccer sails to state’s sweet 16 13


2 | NOVEMBER 2022

Hawkeye

11/2022 Vol. 38, Issue 3

IN THIS ISSUE…

04

Terrace Events Calendar

05

News Update

06

OP/ED: Holiday yea or nay?

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Policy affirms student expression

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OP/ED: Striving for perfection

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The foundation of ICWA is at risk

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Swing like your life depends on it

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Doomed from the start

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Touchdown! Goal! Ace! Point!

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Stay current with school and community events in October and November. Our staff picks for what you need to know in the world, nation and state. Staff member Lucas Barquin calls into question the ethics of Thanksgiving based on its origins. The Edmonds School District updates its policy regarding student expression and student publications, setting a national standard.

Is there no limit to the amount of damage you would allow your mental health to take for a good job stamp from your teacher? TEMPO Co-Editor Arabella Devera shares the detrimental effects she experienced seeking academic validation. The Indian Child Welfare Act is being reevaluated by the Supreme Court after questions of it being discriminatory were brought up in the case of Brackeen v. Haaland. Terrace students enjoyed a dazzling night of swingin’ the night away early this month with performances by the jazz bands and singers to compliment the dance. Got any plans on Nov. 17-19? Cancel them! Because that’s when Terrace’s drama program presents its fall play, “The One Act Play That Goes Wrong.” The title is self-explanatory. This fall sports season was definitely a year to write home about. Whether they were on the field or in the pool, these athletes wowed us all.

Winter sports schedule

Put down that pumpkin spice latte and pick up a steaming mug of hot cocoa on your way to these winter sports games.

Daily dose of thought

Do you have what it takes? Solve this logic puzzle to find out.

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ON THE COVER

Junior midfielder Daniela Cortezzo drives the ball upfield for the Hawks in early season action. The women’s soccer team made it to the second round of the state tournament before being ousted by Lakeside, 3-0. PHOTO BY SERAS BRYNER

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Playing the day away

Junior Nahom Ezra plays saxophone at a concert band performance. Terrace bands also performed as accompaniment for the swing dance. PHOTO BY EMMALEE HARMON


Hawkeye

Letter from the Editor

OP/ED

NOVEMBER 2022 | 3

THANKFUL? NAH. LET’S TALK DISLIKE

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ey there Hawks, ‘tis November. The month for being thankful, and for being a colonist. Everyone had those assignments in elementary school relating to Thanksgiving somehow, from doing those weird hand turkeys to making pilgrim hats. Most of all, we were told to acknowledge the things we were thankful for. So, of course, what would be more fitting in this column than talking about the things Maggie O’Hara and Cecilia Negash we dislike? We surveyed a CO-EDITORS-IN-CHIEF group of high school students (our leadership staff) on what their dislikes are. Some of these dislikes are very reasonable, others can be considered a bit irrational. For example, our sports editor shared his strong dislike for the letter “C” (that one was particularly hurtful). To start off, slow walkers. There are a lot of slow walkers out there. We think they should be charged with loitering, because they move so slowly that they practically aren’t moving at all. Do slow walkers even know that they’re slow walkers? One of us (not to name any names) is a very anxious walker. Now, there’s nothing wrong with walking slowly per se. If you like to meander from place to place, not a single thought of urgency to get to your destination or a looming fear of being late in your head, by all means, you do you. However, if you are in a crowded place where most of the people there have somewhere they need to be, like passing periods between classes, then you should reconsider your life choices. People who chew with their mouths open. That’s vile. Imagine sitting near someone who is chewing with their mouth wide open, maybe even talking while doing so, little bits of food flying out of their mouth with each word. If even a microscopic amount of food splatters on you, everyone in that room needs to be evacuated. Or when a serving of food is being shared amongst multiple people, and someone licks their fingers and grabs more of the food with their moist fingertips? That’s just sinister. The smell of broccoli. We actually like eating broccoli, it’s a very solid vegetable, maybe even our favorite. But cooking it emits such a pungent smell that it burns nostril hairs. Sometime last week, in the halls of Terrace, it smelled like unwashed booty. The source of the smell was unknown, until a little birdie mentioned what the chef class was up to that week. I guess they were cooking something involving broccoli (if that’s not true then our apologies for the incrimination). Either way, the smell that was lingering in the halls only solidified our stance on this. But the scrumptious outcome of the cooking process almost makes up for the smell. Beaches and sand. Specifically Washington beaches. They’re painful because of the seashells, barnacles, and dead fish carcasses that you constantly step on, and very slimy because of all the seaweed that washes up on the shore from the depths of the even slimier water. And it’s always cold so the sand isn’t even soft, just freezing and rocky. If you wear shoes, then

you always end up with sand in your shoes, and if you don’t wear shoes then you will still end up with sand in your shoes because you have to eventually put your shoes back on. The idea of beaches is lovely. We love the water, swimming can be fun and they do look beautiful. Like, if it were required, we would still go to a beach. Zoë Teran. It’s her birthday today as we’re writing this. Zoë is our archnemesis, as well as one of our staff members. If you too know Zoë Teran, our deepest condolences. Normal oranges. Not like tangerines or mandarin oranges, those small ones are fantastic. No, we mean just regularsized oranges. The peel is always too thick. You’re left sitting there digging your fingers into this rind that feels as though it’s inches thick. And for what? To taste a piece of fruit that is less flavorful and more filled with seeds? It’s like walking a hundred miles to get punched in the stomach. And when you finally manage to get the peel off, you’re left peeling the pith (the white, stringy, spongy substance that’s right below the peel that always gets stuck to your fingers and under your nails). The orange is also less practical to carry around. If you were to put it in your lunch box, it would take up a lot more room than a single tangerine or mandarin orange. That room could be used for superior fruits, like two tangerines or mandarin oranges. While we’re on the topic of fruits, red delicious apples are gross. Yes, we know that sentence sounds really contradictory, but that’s only because “delicious” is the official name, and a pretentious one considering they don’t live up to it at all. Red delicious apples are the really dark red ones. It’s hard to describe how they taste, but let’s just say they taste like unhappiness. When someone holds the door open for you when you are nowhere near the door. This sounds really ungrateful, but we’re only bringing it up because of the stress. The person holding the door open for you has to stand there and wait until you’re at the door, which inevitably compels you to start speeding up, maybe even reaching a light jog. Or when you’re far away from the crosswalk and a car slows down for you way before you’re even crossing. Sometimes we’ll even purposefully slow down or pretend to turn down a different street just to avoid the awkwardness of crossing in front of a car. But if they slow down, and you also slow down, then you end up having to speed up, and then whoever is behind the wheel will probably be able to tell that you were purposefully slowing down just to avoid crossing in front of them. It’s a horrible, awkward standoff. Those are all the dislikes we can think of right now, maybe we’ll rehash this topic in the next issue (if we’re feeling especially bitter). But on a more positive note, we believe it’s just as important to acknowledge the things you’re thankful for. We are very thankful for our incredible staff in Hawkeye, and for the community here at Terrace. So when Thanksgiving day rolls around, don’t forget to think of what you’re grateful for, and make sure to stuff your face with some homemade apple pie, as long as it wasn’t baked with red delicious apples. Until next time, Hawks! H

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The HAWKEYE

The Hawkeye’s mission is to provide the MTHS community with quality, thought-provoking student produced publications. Since September 1960, we have faithfully served our audience and community as a designated open public forum where student editors make all decisions. In policy and in practice, the Hawkeye will always be a designated open forum publication.

Co-Editors-in-Chief

Cecilia Negash & Maggie O’Hara

Editorial

News Editor: Terina Papatu Sports Editor: Jakob Nacanaynay Op/Ed Editor: Kaitlyn Miller Lifestyle Editor: Mika Raring Fashion Editor: Denise Munoz Tempo Co-Editors: Hunter Michaelson & Arabella Devera

Business

General Manager: Phuong Lam Travel & Event Coordinators: Rachel Davis & Rodney Budden Distribution Manager: open Outreach Manager: open

Visual

Graphics Editor: Rodney Budden Photo Editors: Seras Bryner & Emmalee Harmon Design Editor: Rachel Davis

Online/Digital

Online Manager: Kaylee Miyamoto A/V Editor: Terina Papatu & Cecilia Negash

Contributing Staff

Virginia Alsept-Beaty, Lucas Barquin, Casey Carpenter, Halle Connell, Ciara Constantino, Charli Gilchrist, J Gurney, Dewey Jones, Evan Kerani, Adrian Knowlton, Kimberly Nguyen, Mya Phin, Soren Ramerman, Efrata Soloman, Bryce Soumphonphakdy, Adrian Subaykan, Zoë Teran, Adrian Treadwell, Sophia Vander Veer, Sicily Weitz Name in bold indicates staff member of the month as selected by the Editorial Board.

Support

Adviser: Vincent F. DeMiero, CTE, CJE Co-Adviser: Christina Lewis Teacher Candidate: Erin Tarampi Journalist-in-Residence: Samantha Pak FANs Coordinator: Carrie Lee Printer: Pacific Publishing Member of: MTHS ASB, JEA/WJEA, NSPA, SPLC, ESD CTE, FAPFA

Policies

Editorial Policy The editorial section of the Hawkeye, including editorial cartoons, serves as a forum for well-written, thoughtful, longer forms of expression. Signed editorials represent the opinions of the author. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of the Hawkeye Editorial Board. Views printed herein are meant to be opinionated and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the Hawkeye staff, student body, faculty, administration or school board. The Hawkeye will print submitted guest editorials as space allows and requests that all contributors include their name, signature and position relative to the editorial. The Hawkeye will edit all submissions for accuracy, spelling and grammar. We reserve the right to refuse to print any submission. Letters to the Editor Policy Readers are encouraged to voice their opinions in the Opinion section, a public forum for the expression of varying viewpoints on relevant topics. The Hawkeye will print as many letters as space allows. Letters must include the author’s name, signature and class or position relative to the letter. E-mailed, typed or legible, hand written letters are acceptable, but should not exceed 200 words. The Hawkeye will edit all letters for accuracy, spelling and grammar. We reserve the right to refuse to print any letter. Advertising Policy The Hawkeye will not accept any advertising that the Editorial Board deems to be: factually inaccurate; designed to mislead, deceive or defraud; containing malicious, vindictive or unsubstantiated attacks; offering goods and/or services illegal for teens to possess, buy or use; libelous; obscene; or creating imminent danger or disruption to school. The Hawkeye reserves the right to refuse any advertising, solicited or unsolicited. Advertisements do not necessarily reflect the views or endorsements of the Hawkeye staff, student body, faculty, administration or school board. Complete policies are available at www.thehawkeye.org/about-2/mission-policies/

© 2022 HAWKEYE | ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED

2022


IN THE KNOW

4 | NOVEMBER 2022

COMING UP: NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

Hawkeye

By Rachel Davis and Maggie O’Hara HAWKEYE STAFF

DATE

EVENT

Oct. 29 - Nov. 22 HOSA First Aid Kit Fundraiser November Food Drive Friday, Nov. 18 Spike the Drive District Event

TIME/PLACE MTHS MTHS 7 p.m., Terraceum

Nov. 17 - Nov. 19 “The One Act Play That Goes Wrong”

7:30 p.m., Theater

Tuesday, Nov. 22 Freshmen/Connect Pre-Jam Pizza Slam

5 p.m., HUB

Tuesday, Nov. 22 JAM SESSION XXVII

5:30 p.m., Terraceum

RODNEY BUDDEN | HAWKEYE

SPOTLIGHT

Nov. Food Drive For the entire month of November, 1-30 Terrace is hosting a food drive. Anyone can donate at any time, so take the chance to give back.

Nov. 23 - Nov. 25 Thanksgiving Break

Off Campus

Thursday, Dec. 1 Opioid Crisis Community Presentation 6 p.m., HUB Saturday, Dec. 10 Santa Breakfast

8 a.m.-Noon, HUB

Nov. “The One Act Play That Wrong” 17-19 Goes The drama department is putting

on their fall play. Tickets are $8 for general and $6 for students with ASB, children and senior citizens.

Nov. Jam Session XXVII The Hawks are back! Join in the fun 22 as we kick off of the winter sports season.

Sunday, Dec. 11 Holiday Bazaar Tuesday, Dec. 13 Orchestra Concert Thursday, Dec. 15 Afternoon Assembly

10:00 a.m., HUB

Nov. Thanksgiving Break Spend some time away from school 23-25 to enjoy some good TLC with your friends and family.

7 p.m., Theater 12:50 p.m., GYM

Friday, Dec. 16 EARLY RELEASE

10:20 a.m., MTHS

Dec. 19 - Jan. 2 Winter Break

All Days

Sunday, Dec. 25 Christmas Day

All Day

Monday, Jan. 1 NO SCHOOL

All Day

Dec. Holiday Bazaar The clubs at MTHS gather together 11 to sell some gifts to the community. EDITORS’ NOTE: The information in this calendar is taken in part from the calendar published on the MTHS webpage. Information may change. For further information on an event, contact the organizing party. For corrections, contact editor@thehawkeye.org or visit us in Room 130.

Land Acknowledgement

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he Hawkeye acknowledges that our campus sits on the traditional homelands of the Suquamish, Stillaguamish and Coast Salish peoples. The lands of these tribes were taken by colonizers using the Treaty of Point Elliott, which to this day has never been fully honored. We also recognize the 29 tribes throughout Washington state. As a local news organization, we commit to remembering the genocide of Indigenous peoples in the United States and ask that our readers take a moment to reflect on the history and land on which they stand. H


Hawkeye

IN THE KNOW

Ingraham H.S. shooting tragedy By Terina Papatu NEWS EDITOR

On the morning of Nov. 8, the Seattle Police Department received reports of a shooting that took place within 100 feet of the entrance to Ingraham High School. Nearly 10 minutes after the first call, paramedics and police arrived at the scene and began CPR on the victim. The 17-year-old was later pronounced dead by Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell. The shooting was believed to be a targeted attack, according to both students and Seattle Public Schools (SPS) Superintendent Brent Jones. The shooting occurred during the passing time between Ingraham’s first and second periods. A 14-year-old boy was arrested an hour after the shooting was reported for first-degree murder on the King County Metro, while the school went into lockdown until 12:30 p.m. Along with the 14-year-old, a 15-year-old was also suspected of assisting the alleged shooter and illegally possessing a gun. The two teenagers remain in custody, but have not been formally charged. Following this incident, Ingraham families were relieved that no one else got hurt, but are also upset and grieving. Two Ingraham seniors planned a city-wide walkout against gun violence on Nov. 14, with the goal of providing an opportunity for students to grieve together and demand the district be less nonchalant about the shooting. They’re also advocating for better security for the school, some suggestions being adding metal detectors or bag checks. Harrell proposed a budget of $4.3 million to the district for prevention of gun violence and gang interventions. While this isn’t the first time Seattle has experienced gun violence, some students are outraged with how long it took administrators to alert parents about the lockdown as well as the reasoning. SPS plans to introduce more safety resource officers and a child wellbeing council that includes nurses, pediatricians and psychologists to the schools. H

Biden’s response to Ukraine war

By Halle Connell HAWKEYE STAFF

After Russian President Vladimir Putin’s attack on Ukraine starting in 2014 and the recent increase in attacks from Russia, other countries have tried to assist Ukraine. Over the course of the war, many different countries have tried to step in to help Ukraine by sending weapons, ammunition and huge amounts of financial support. The United States has stepped in to help fund Ukraine, investing over $18 billion to their government. Many are concerned about what steps Russia will take to win, and many administrations have stated how in the wake of this war not calming down, The western world has had a limited response and is trying to turn it into a broader war. As of the writing of this, multiple world leaders have stated to be very careful on the subject of nuclear weapons and the possibility of usage by Russia. During a fundraiser event in New York on Oct. 25, President Joe Biden made a statement worried about Putin’s potential use of nuclear weapons, sparking panic and suspicion surrounding Russia’s claim. “The risk of nuclear Armageddon is at the highest level since 1962,” Biden said. As the high risk of nuclear warfare in 1962 was a result of the Cold War, the LUCAS BARQUIN | HAWKEYE possibility of the risk being at a similar level now raised concerns. In response, Putin denied ever saying that Russia would use nuclear weapons. “We have never intentionally said anything proactively about possible use of nuclear weapons by Russia, we have only hinted in response to those statements that the western leaders have made,” he said. White House secretary Karine Jean-Pierre has responded to news reporters about Joe Biden’s alarming comment. “Russia’s talk of using nuclear weapons is irresponsible and there’s no way to use them without unintended consequences. It cannot happen. If the Cuban missile crisis has taught us anything, it is the value of reducing nuclear risk and not brandishing it,” Jean-Pierre said. Biden’s national security team has made multiple comments in the past warning people of Putin’s ability and threat to use nuclear weapons on Ukraine, but nothing they’ve said in the past has come close to the severity of Biden’s recent comment. H

NOVEMBER 2022 | 5

• the update •

A lot happens in a month. From fashion to finance, we are constantly bombarded by headlines from around the world. Here are the Hawkeye’s picks for what you need to know. stories by nicoVirginia francoisAlsept-Beaty, Terina Papatu Stories by Rachel Davis, Halle Connell, graphics nico francois Graphics by Rodney by Budden and Lucas Barquin

Halloween leads to Itaewon stampede

International

United Kingdom’s new prime minister

International

As October ended, Halloween, and of course Halloween parties, quickly rolled around. In Itaewon, a fairly narrow street in Seoul, South Korea, these parties ended in disaster. During a party held on Oct. 29, huge crowds of people pushed through the thin street. Beginning in the afternoon, people kept arriving, expecting the large crowds but not realizing that the night would end with about 100,000 people in the small space. The first calls to authorities began at around 10 p.m. and with no crowd management, the panic in the crowd slowly became unbearable. The crowd only fully deflated at 5 a.m. on Oct. 30, leaving 153 dead, including two U.S. nationals, and 82 injured. H

As of Oct. 25, 2022, Rishi Sunak is now the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and the leader of the Conservative Party. He was elected after Liz Truss resigned after just 45 days in office. Sunak is the United Kingdom’s first prime minister of color, being born to Indian Punjabi parents, and is the youngest prime minister to be elected. Sunak is also the wealthiest prime minister, boasting a net worth of over $830 million. Sunak’s first major hurdle to overcome is dealing with the United Kingdom’s economic crisis, with rising inflation and the RussoUkrainian war proving to be massive issues. H

Washington’s midterm results

State

Every two years, voters elect or reelect the members of the Senate, House of Representatives and state representatives. This year, nearly 60 percent of eligible voters participated in the Nov. 8 elections. Results included Senator Patty Murray, representing the Democratic party, winning and continuing to hold her position. Along with that, 10 House members secured their spots: Susan DelBene, Rick Larsen, Dan Newhouse, Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Derek Kilmer, Kim Schrier, Pramila Jayapal, Marilyn Strickland, Adam Smith and Marie Gluesenkamp Perez. Washington’s Secretary of State, Steve Hobbs won again, who was the first Asian-American Secretary of State. H

Efforts to restore Washington’s grizzly bears

State

The National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have begun a new program to begin the restoration of grizzly bears in Washington state’s North Cascades. The North Cascades is one of six ecosystems designed to protect grizzly bears, but it has been 30 years since they were officially established. However, the effort is viewed cautiously by a portion of the population who are concerned that with the reintroduction of grizzly bears, farmland and animals may be at risk. There will be public video conferences for the next three weeks to discuss the issue and allow the public to express their concerns until Dec. 14. H

Community Transit’s new zip shuttles

Local

Community Transit introduced a new form of transportation, zip shuttles, on Oct. 20. The shuttles are part of a pilot project to provide more accessible and efficient transportation to citizens of Lynnwood, and will soon expand to other areas such as Arlington and Lake Stevens. While the zip shuttles are similar in system to other pick-up services like Uber and Lyft, the main difference is cost. Shuttles cost $2.50 regardless of pick up and drop off location, while Uber and Lyft have a minimum cost of about $3.50. H


6 | NOVEMBER 2022

OP/ED

Hawkeye

Greater understanding needed for student accommodations

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ith any problem, there always seems to be at least one solution. When it comes to student accommodations in school however, it seems like no one knows exactly how to tackle it. Often students are left with not enough accommodations, or having to Lucas Barquin HAWKEYE STAFF explain to teachers the details of what their accommodations are. In my experience, most staff members have been understanding and respectful when handling my accommodations, but that’s not always the case. I have had to repeatedly tell teachers what my accommodation plan is, and why I cannot take off my headphones, in front of all my classmates. I’m not saying this is everyone’s experience, but since the start of the 2022-2023 school year I have heard many upsetting stories from other students with accommodations dealing with similar things, from getting yelled at by teachers to having to publicly tell the class about a medical condition, and just flat out not being allowed to use resources they need. It’s understandable to ask questions, or to talk to students privately about these issues, but it comes to a point that in a school setting many students with these accommodations,

including myself, do not feel safe or comfortable in some classrooms. When these issues apply to so many different students’ situations in school, it can be hard to overlook all the negativity that surrounds it. While I have had bad interactions with staff, there have also been incredibly kind and caring interactions. The difference between these is the level of education on the topic. At least from my experience, staff who do not understand accommodations and why you have them are the most likely to have a problem with it and bring it up during class. It feels hopeless coming into school every day expecting to be safe and learning, only to be anxious all day, waiting for your teacher to ask you to stop doing what your accommodations allow, like wearing headphones, texting in class, walking out, etc. Accommodations are a necessity for some students to be able to attend school, and for students that need them to be afraid of actually using them is beyond discouraging. My accommodations are incredibly minor, but they are important and allow me to go to school every day, and even then I have had to talk to several of my teachers about my use of them. I personally need them to stay on task and to not be overwhelmed in a school environment, and it can add a lot of unneeded stress to explain that to staff. Especially now in the age we’re in, I’m sure every student has heard at least one of their

teachers say, “I have a no technology policy in my classroom.” While I agree that phone usage in classrooms is a problem, many students have accommodations that involve technology. On the first day of school, walking into a new building and environment, the first rule in almost all of my classes was that we were not allowed to wear headphones. I got asked to take mine off multiple times. While knowing why this rule is in place, I was too afraid to tell my teachers about my accommodations, especially in a public space, and this resulted in me feeling unwelcome in a lot of my classes. I ended up writing notes to most of my teachers explaining my situation, and thankfully, most of them have respected this I am incredibly thankful for all of the staff that have been patient and understanding with these accommodations, but not all of them are. It can be incredibly stressful to play a guessing game with your teachers, trying to figure out which classes are and aren’t okay to use your accommodations in. It’s added stress onto an environment that’s already stressful. A few staff members have said that my and others’ accommodations are distracting, but it comes to a point where it’s more distracting in class for a teacher to stop their lesson just to ask a student to take their headphones off. I personally believe that these issues would

CHARLI GLICHRIST | HAWKEYE

be pretty easy to avoid if we actively worked towards them. Instead of publicly asking students about their accommodations, teachers could email them, or even give out papers to every student asking if there are any accommodations they should know about. That way, students can feel welcome and wouldn’t be singled out in front of their class. It’s really frustrating from the point of view of students that need them when teachers don’t respect accommodations. I hope that one day, students will feel safe using their accommodations in school without fear and having to go through so many extra hurdles. H

IT’S TIME TO RECONSIDER THANKSGIVING’S SHADOWY PAST A

mericans are spending more and more on Thanksgiving each year. In 2021, nearly $1 billion was spent on Thanksgiving turkeys alone. It seems that everything nowadays is commercialized, and Thanksgiving is no exception. The question is, should we continue celebrating and profiting off of a holiday that has such a tragic history? I myself only learned the true origins of this holiday a few years ago. My family usually never celebrates, but I do know that the holiday is really important to a lot of other families as a time to get Lucas Barquin HAWKEYE STAFF together and be grateful for each other. But this is also an incredibly mournful time for many others as well. Thanksgiving is a time to visit family, friends and other loved ones, and to appreciate all that you have. This can be an incredibly self-reflective time for many, or just a chance to see your family, but for many Indigenous families, Thanksgiving is a time of mourning and protest. In the past, Thanksgiving was thought of as a time to commemorate the first pilgrims, their voyage here and the first dinner they had with the Wampanoag Indians. Now with the knowledge we have about Thanksgiving and the reality of the destruction that happened to Indigenous populations and their culture when European settlers arrived, it feels out of place to celebrate it. Imagine mourning your ancestors and the genocide that took place, just for most of the U.S. to celebrate this day and what happened. Is Thanksgiving something that we really want to celebrate? I personally wish we could celebrate the message of Thanksgiving, RODNEY BUDDEN | HAWKEYE

coming together and being grateful for all that we have, as a different holiday. Recognize and mourn the Indigenous lives lost to the European settlers and get together another day to celebrate. The truth is that the United States makes so much money off of it and it’s so deeply ingrained in our culture that no matter what, people will continue to celebrate it. Maybe this year, instead of celebrating European settlers, remember the Indigenous lives lost that made it possible for us to live here. Celebrate the original owners of this land. While it’d be unrealistic for it to happen all at once, it’d be nice to see a future where Thanksgiving is about the Indigenous peoples that continue to face injustices to this day, rather than the ones who colonized them. H


NEWS

Hawkeye

Policy protects student expression By Terina Papatu NEWS EDITOR

The Edmonds School District (ESD) unanimously adopted a significantly updated freedom of expression policy on Nov. 8 – a policy that sets a high standard for other public school districts across the state. According to several student press rights experts, the ESD policy is the first in the state to overtly disallow prior review of student media by school officials. Although student media at MTHS have operated without prior review since the school opened in 1960, that wasn’t the case at the district’s other high schools. “…there shall be no administrative prior review of school-sponsored student media unless school officials have a demonstrable concern that the student media contains prohibited speech as defined by 28A.600.027(2),” the policy states. Assistant Superintendent Greg Schwab (who is a former MTHS principal) oversaw the revision and updating of policies falling under section 3000, which address guidelines for much of student life. Specifically, policy 3220 addresses freedom of expression and student media. While the previous policy that was adopted in 1993 was essentially fine, it needed to be updated in part of because of the state’s New Voices law that was signed by Gov. Jay Inslee in 2018. The New Voices law clarified

the roles and responsibilities for public school student journalists and school officials, as well as protected media advisers. In the revision process, Schwab met with HSM student publication leaders in early October where he shared an initial policy draft. Schwab gave student leaders time to review it and provide feedback, then worked with student leaders, publication advisers and legal experts to craft a revision that was presented to the Board in late October for a first reading. The entire policy follows Tinker v. Des Moines, a case from 1969 which

defined First Amendment rights for U.S. public school students. The new policy essentially negates the 1988 Hazelwood decision that some interpreted to allow administrative censorship. This change not only affects students, but parents and staff, as it clarifies that the responsibility of the content published is now on the students in charge of the publications rather than the school district. As of now, the ESD is the first in the state and the country with a policy that completely denies prior review, even though it is not illegal under the New Voices Law. H

NOVEMBER 2022 | 7 STAFF EDITORIAL

New policy sets a precedent, now its up to students to make your voices heard

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s journalists, we have the right and responsibility to speak on current events affecting us both locally and in a wider context, reporting the full truth and amplifying voices that often get overlooked. As student journalists, that right and responsibility extends to topics and issues affecting us as individuals, other students, our school and our community. And as students, we have a unique perspective on those topics and issues that deserve to be recognized and heard. The same goes for every single student at Terrace. We are fortunate to live in a place where freedom of expression and student voices are encouraged and uplifted the majority of the time. Still, it’s essential not to take our voices for granted, and to recognize how often censorship occurs in journalism and the dangers of it. With the rise of laws like Florida’s Don’t Say Gay bill being put in place in other parts of the country, student-run publications, from yearbooks and newspapers to websites and social media accounts, are censored and not allowed to express or defend students’ identities. Where’s the freedom of speech in that? Even here in Washington and the Edmonds School District, where the newly adopted Policy 3220 sets a high standard for protecting student expression, many students still have it drilled into their brains that their thoughts, feelings and opinions aren’t worth listening to. It reaches a point that many don’t speak out about issues they notice, and believe they could never create change. We say your voice does matter. In a high school, who knows the experiences of students better than the students themselves? Our experiences matter. Your experiences matter. While we may be the ones with a publishing company on speed dial, words printed on a page mean nothing without a student body to represent. H Staff editorials represent the views of the Hawkeye leadership staff. Please share your views with us by writing a letter to the editor.

RODNEY BUDDEN | HAWKEYE

EDMONDS SCHOOL DISTRICT POLICY 3220: STUDENT FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION EDITOR’S NOTE: At its regular meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 8, the Edmonds School District Board of Directors unanimously passed the following revision of Policy 3220.

Policy 3220 The free expression of student opinion is an important part of education in a democratic society. The District encourages students’ verbal and written expression of opinion on school premises so long as it does not substantially disrupt the operation of the school or otherwise violate this policy. Students are expressly prohibited from the use of vulgar and/or offensive terms in classroom or assembly settings. Student Publications Student publications produced as part of the school’s curriculum or with the support of the Associated Student Body fund are intended to serve both as vehicles for instruction and student communication. Although substantively financed and operated by the District, student editors of school-sponsored media are responsible for determining the news, opinion, feature, and advertising content of the media, consistent with chapter 28A.600 RCW. Material appearing in such publications may reflect various areas of student interest, including

topics about which there may be controversy and dissent. When engaging with a controversial issue, student publications should strive to provide in-depth treatment and represent a variety of viewpoints. However, as has been the practice and policy for decades in the Edmonds School District, there shall be no administrative prior review of schoolsponsored student media unless school officials have a demonstrable concern that the student media contains prohibited speech as defined by 28A.600.027(2). Such materials may not: • Be libelous or slanderous; • Be an unwarranted invasion of privacy; • Be obscene or profane, such that it would violate federal or state laws, rules or regulations or incites others to violate federal or state laws, rules or regulations, including the standards established by the federal communications act

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or applicable federal communication commission rules or regulations; Incite students so as to create a clear and present danger of the material and substantial disruption of the school; Violate district policy or procedure related to harassment, intimidation, bullying, or related to the prohibition on discrimination pursuant to RCW 28A.642.010. Violate federal or state laws, rules, regulations, or incite the violation of such laws; or Advertise tobacco products, liquor, illicit drugs, or drug paraphernalia.

RODNEY BUDDEN | HAWKEYE

The superintendent will develop guidelines, assuring that students are able to exercise freedom of expression so long as it does not present a material and substantial disruption of the orderly operation of the school, implementing the standards above, and establish-

ing procedures for the prompt review of any materials that appear not to comply with the standards. Distribution of Materials Student and district staff may distribute student publications or other materials on school premises in accordance with procedures developed by the superintendent or designee and are a valuable means of expression under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Such procedures may impose limits on the time, place, and manner of distribution including prior authorization for the posting of such material on school property. Non-school sponsored media is subject to the same First Amendment rights as school sponsored media. However, students responsible for the distribution of material that leads to a substantial disruption of school activity or otherwise interferes with school operations will be subject to corrective action, including suspension or expulsion, consistent with student discipline policies. Those who are not a student, or a district employee may not distribute materials on school grounds. H


PERSPECTIVE

8 | NOVEMBER 2022

Hawkeye

THE PRESSURE O AND THE DISASTRO Story by Arabella Devera Photo by Emmalee Harmon Graphics by Rodney Budden and Charli Gilchrist HAWKEYE STAFF

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f you are currently a student or have ever been one, then you are familiar with that feeling of success and accomplishment when you’ve aced a test or did well on an assignment, as you rightfully should after working so hard. But after that momentary victory, you start to feel anxious. Sure, you just got a good grade, but now you have to worry about getting the next good grade, and another after that. The pressure is even worse if you just got a great grade. You wonder, “will I be able to measure up again?” Because everyone knows that if you fail, you’ll disappoint everyone, and most of all frustrate Arabella Devera TEMPO CO-EDITOR yourself because you feel you could’ve done better. You always could’ve done better. Or at least, that’s what you think. At least, that’s what I thought. In the past, I never had a word for this craving to be a smart individual—to be recognized as a smart individual. Then I learned about something that couldn’t have described it more perfectly. Academic validation. It’s really an unhealthy addiction, dare I say life-threatening one, that the competitive nature of school creates for so many students. With academic validation, you equate your self-worth with your academic success. Although wanting to do well in school may not seem harmful on the surface, when it gets to an extreme level it becomes dangerous for a multitude of reasons.

Exhibit A: it’s timeconsuming and draining Academic validation can and will make you work. A lot. This isn’t inherently a bad thing, but it becomes a problem when you start to overdo it. If you want to get praised, then you’ll go above and beyond with your work, maybe doing extra things that aren’t necessary to get a good grade in the first place just for the sake of feeding the desire to excel. Don’t get me wrong, if you’re passionate about an assignment and truly want to elevate your work to the next level, by all means go for it. But if you are motivated by the fact that you’ll gain some recognition, maybe it’s time to reevaluate your choices and whether or not it’s healthy. Looking back, I regret the times I’d spend hours into the night, even early morning, working on some English assignments, yearning for the compliments I could get from my teacher. If we read a short story, I’d analyze every nook and cranny of that story, inputting every single interpretation I could come up with and even what Google had. Yes, I would look things up on Google and do extra research on my assignments unasked. It was exhausting. I spent more than

enough time squinting my eyes, looking over the same passages over and over again trying to get into the nitty-gritty details. I often depended on caffeine to get me through the school day, but also through unhealthy all-nighters. It took so much out of me, I felt like a zombie. It got to the point where my English teacher said that while they appreciated my work, I could tone it down a notch. They wanted to make sure I also got some rest and took care of myself. So even my English teacher noticed I was being a little overkill with my work. Looking back, I agree. While I was proud of myself, that feeling was short-lived and paled in comparison to my feelings of exhaustion and fatigue. I’d spend all my time either sleeping or working in my dark, desolate room, aging like fine wine. But unlike wine, this process wasn’t good for me. My time could’ve been used more wisely. Not to mention how it negatively impacted my social life, which brings me to…

Exhibit B: it harms your relationships Given that academic validation can drive you to do nothing but study and work for days on end, it’s easy to forget to make time for other people. You may have to cancel plans with friends and family, or reject them entirely. I remember a time when my friends invited me to go ice skating around wintertime, and I said no due to schoolwork. I was frustrated because I didn’t know what I wanted. Of course I want to spend time with my friends, but at the same time, I would’ve felt guilty knowing that I could use the time to study. So I studied. In hindsight though, I made myself too busy with school because I thought I didn’t have a choice. Another aspect contributing to this was that I didn’t rely on anyone. You see, academic validation can lead you into thinking that you have to accomplish everything on your own. If you don’t, your mind tells you you’re essentially cheating and took a shortcut because you weren’t smart enough to figure things out yourself. This made my process of studying and doing work a lot longer, thus making me busier for longer periods of time. But this was so harmful to me, to the people who cared about me, and to the people who wanted to spend time with me.

Exhibit C: it leads to self-comparison One of the driving forces of academic validation is getting that recognition from your teachers and peers. This is especially relevant in selfcomparing, as students will not only look at the rubrics but also will look at their classmates. It’s not bad to look at your peers as examples, but can be unhealthy when it gets to the point of insecurity. It almost feels like a contest to see who can do better, slowly eating you up inside as you wish you could be as good as so-and-so. If someone could impress the teacher, then they would also have those “being smarter bragging rights.” It can make you feel small and lesser for not doing as well, and it’s a mentality that is unfortunately inherent in the school system. I know I feel bad when I see my peers efficiently working in class, probably


Hawkeye

PERSPECTIVE

OF PERFECTION OUS CONSEQUENCES on some masterpiece, whereas I’m staring at a blank document, barely getting my thoughts collected. I still picture and experience nervously glancing around the classroom, hearing people type away with ease. It’s haunting. There was no one in particular I would compare myself to, but I kept an eye on the people who I deemed the smartest and who I knew excelled in the classroom as if I was competing against them. How could I be like them? How much time do they spend working on an assignment? What’s their study schedule like? I tried to evaluate them and figure them out as if they were some type of perfect student formula to follow. It took a long time to realize that everyone has different work ethics, and that’s okay. I tend to work at a slower pace and can focus more when I’m alone, but for the longest time, I believed that I was just not hardworking enough. Like apples and oranges though, we’re all different. Now, all of these aspects of academic validation come together to this underlying danger—depression. While school is not always the cause of one’s depression, it can still contribute to it. Those feelings of inadequacy push you to the limit until you finally hit burnout. For some, the build-up could take days, months or even years. Sometimes, it’s not a linear journey and will be filled with ups and

downs. For me, I entered freshman year with this toxic mentality and crashed in the middle of my sophomore year. In between those years, I was diagnosed with severe depression and signs of being suicidal. I tried to cope by striving for even more academic validation, but that did the opposite of helping. Eventually, after trying so hard, I just wanted to give up. With a lot of self-reflection and getting proper help though, I’ve come to terms with my limits and what I really want in life, understanding that how I do in school isn’t a determining factor of how I am as a whole person. Because of how the education system is structured today, there is more emphasis on students’ success instead of their growth. It pushes students to become labor robot machines and perform consistently at high, specific standards. If you don’t produce those specific results, academic validation makes you feel like you simply didn’t work hard enough, ultimately making you feel like you have no value. Okay, so what? Fight it. Fight the urge to be the perfect student. Fight the urge, please. Do the work to satisfy yourself, not for anyone else. And remember that there is so much more to a person than their grades. School is only a fraction of our lives, and it should never become more involved than that fraction. H

NOVEMBER 2022 | 9


10 | NOVEMBER 2022

NEWS

Hawkeye

SCOTUS RULING COULD IMPACT NATIVE AMERICAN SOVEREIGNTY By Halle Connell HAWKEYE STAFF

The ICWA (Indian Child Welfare Act) has been in place for more than 43 years. It was enacted in 1978 to protect Native American children from being unlawfully removed from their homes and placed with non-Native families. The ICWA prioritizes placement of Native children in the welfare system first with relatives, and then with other Native families before anyone else to preserve their family connections and culture. The practice of stripping Native Americans, especially younger children, of their culture and separating them from their tribes has been around since the 19th century and continued for over a century. Offreservation residential schools for Native children began in 1879 in the U.S. as a means to strip and rid Native American children of their culture in order to assimilate them into EuroWestern life. From the establishment of the first residential school to the shutdown of all of them in 1996, an estimated 1,900 unmarked graves have been found, most of them of children. From then on, until the ICWA was implemented, there were over 150,000 cases of Native American children being unlawfully taken and placed in non-Native homes, and being restricted from connecting back to their tribe and previous home. These cases, as in many instances, had no evidence or reports of abuse and neglect in the child’s previous household. For over four decades, the ICWA has been in place to protect Native children amidst reports that they were being taken out of their homes at a higher rate than any other racial group while making up a significantly smaller percentage of the population. Congress put the ICWA in place to allow tribal governments to oversee cases with Native children, and to protect them from being taken from their homes without evidence of needing to do so. But in 2018, several states filed a lawsuit against the ICWA claiming it “violated the constitution” in what is now known as the case of Brackeen v. Haaland. “The case was appealed by the

existence. As was the case before the ICWA was put in place, this separation would cut cultural ties from the only people that can carry it on: the children. “Overturning that act, that law, allowing people to take those Indigenous children out of their homes, strip them of their culture, rid them of their language and force them to only speak English, and cut their hair, that’s dehumanizing. Right?” Finn Drake-Sargent said. “In a way, it’s like a genocide of that culture.” Native American people on social media as well as other activists are trying to spread the word of the potential overturning of the ICWA. However, these posts have not gotten as much attention and publicity as other news as of late despite being circulated since February after the Supreme Court announced the hearing. The majority of experts believe that the Supreme Court will overturn the ICWA, just like they overturned Roe v. Wade. The ruling will not be decided until June 30, 2023. Many Native American families and children around the U.S. are RODNEY BUDDEN | HAWKEYE scared to see how this ruling will turn out. federal government and four interbanc is a full-court reevaluation of sion. “The range of accusations the vening tribal nations to the Fifth the case, and in November 2019 In February 2022, the Supreme plaintiffs have shared alleging Circuit Court of Appeals. In Jan. the Fifth Circuit Court replaced Court announced that they would ICWA’s lack of constitutionality all 2019, 325 tribal nations, 57 Native the decision of the three-judge accept all four petitions and would fail under legal scrutiny,” Cherokee organizations, 21 states, 31 child panel. As a response, 486 federally be reviewing them in November Nation Principal Chief Chuck welfare organizations, Indian and recognized tribes filed an “amicus” 2022 under the case name Hoskin Jr. said in a statement preconstitutional law scholars, and during court proceedings. In April “Brackeen v. Haaland.” sented on Oct. 17. “So for the court seven members of Congress Many are worried not to overturn ICWA in this case joined the United States only for the children of would be a devastating blow not “Overturning that act, that law, allowing and four intervenor tribes the tribes, but for the just to the welfare of our children, people to take those indigenous children out of their homes, strip them of their in filing briefs to urge the tribes themselves being but to congressional authority, culture, rid them of their language and Fifth Circuit to uphold at risk of getting wiped legal precedent and to the basic force them to only speak English, and cut the Indian Child Welfare away by the government foundations of federal Indian law.” their hair, that’s dehumanizing. Right? In a Act,” the Native American just as they were a cenThough many plaintiffs claim way, it’s like a genocide of that culture.” Rights Fund stated in 2019. tury ago. that the ICWA is unconstitutional, Finn Drake-Sargent In August of 2019, a “I think that [ICWA] others believe it does not violate FRESHMAN three-judge panel from should probably stay in the constitution. This law has been the Fifth Circuit Court place,” Dean Thompson in the hands of a huge debate since reversed the decision. The court of 2021, the court released a 325said. “It’s not very moral, and it’s almost a decade ago. The public recognized the uniqueness and page document explaining their dehumanizing if they just took has been divided on whether the importance of ICWA, affirming decision to reverse the court’s rulaway their rights like that.” law is constitutional or not, as well the constitutionality of the law. ing, explaining how the concept If this law is overturned by as whether it’s needed. Late in November of the same of “Indian child” did not operate the Supreme Court, states will “It’s not fair for the children to year, the court decided to reevaluon race and how parts of ICWA once again be allowed to separate be taken away from their family ate the case in an “en banc.” When were unconstitutional. Throughout Native children from their homes and from their culture,” Austine national and important laws are this court case, four petitions were and place them into non-Native Nichole said. H looked at by the Fifth Court, an en signed by both sides of the decihouseholds, threatening tribes’ very


Hawkeye

LIFESTYLE

NOVEMBER 2022 | 11

An evening swing to end the night Many soloists played, one of which being senior Ryan Acheson on alto saxophone, featured in the song “Sultry Sunset” by Duke Ellington. “Some of the tunes we RODNEY BUDDEN | HAWKEYE played for about a month By Miles Young and Sofia Nowak Terkelsen beforehand, while others we learned just that HAWKEYE STAFFW week,” Acheson said. On Nov. 4, MTHS hosted a swing dance, Acheson has been playing jazz music ever a night filled with fun dance, delicious dessince 8th grade and has loved it since. serts and wonderful jazz music. Performing “The thing that really drew me to jazz was were Jazz Ensemble 1 and 2 along with the freedom you get while playing it. There’s vocalists, soloists and even two dance just so much room for personal expression, instructors there to teach everyone how to and you can really make it yours,” he said. swing dance. This freedom in jazz and the freedom in The event officially started at 6 p.m., when swing dancing blended together beautifully the two dance instructors began their lesto create a spectacle of art and creativity. sons. They walked everyone through the Accompanying the bands were a few basic steps of Lindy Hop, a style of dance vocalists, each who auditioned for the posioriginating in the 1930s and ‘40s. It’s full tion. Senior Abigail Setalla performed of constant motion and interpretive moves, not only a vocal solo, but also a wonderful making it quite a fun, lively dance style. trumpet feature in the song “Portrait of Lindy Hop evolved from different dances, Louis Armstrong,” also by Duke Ellington. including jazz, tap, breakaway and 1920s Sophomore Mya Phin sang for the song “It’s Charleston, using elements from African Only A Paper Moon” by Harold Arlan, and American dances and European partnered had a duet with senior Riley Frank in “Fly dance. The two instructors teach this and Me To The Moon,” originally written by other dances at the Century Ballroom in Bart Howard. Frank also sang with Jazz 1 downtown Seattle, which is open just about on the song “When You Wish Upon a Star” every day and hosts an array of dances, like from Disney’s Pinocchio. East and West Coast swing, waltz and salsa “I love singing jazz,” Frank said. “I put a lot dancing. of emotion into my singing, so I was really By 7 p.m., the live music began. Jazz 1 hoping to get the part, because the commustarted things off, going through an array nity is really great and because of the liberty of lovely jazz songs. They featured songs that comes with jazz. It’s just a lot more by Duke Ellington, old classic artists from freeing and less structured, and feels more the ‘40s and a few newer, well-known songs. comfortable.”

Even with the soothing jazz and comfort in doing something she’s passionate about, Frank was still nervous at the prospect of performing in front of so many. “I was super excited, but I was also a little nervous, just because I don’t sing in front of people that often. But once I got up and started singing, it instantly went away,” she said. The event let people show others their skills and do the things they love. Hearing from the band and vocalists, it seems clear that jazz is something that each of them see as an opportunity to be open and creative, which perfectly accompanied the dance style being performed that night. According to vocalists, band members and people attending, the swing dance was a huge success. The vocalists and band members were surprised by the amount of people that showed up. Most of the attendees said they would absolutely attend a swing dance again, and some asked if

there would be another event soon. Many didn’t know how to swing dance prior, so having the dance instructors really encouraged more people to come and learn something new. With all of these factors combined, it was an enjoyable evening for all. Although the last football game of the year took place on the same day, there were still many people who attended the dance. One specific guest, Mylin Nguyen, chose the swing dance over the game because she wanted to listen to music and relax after a long week at school. The music was the main attraction of the night for many attendees, wanting to hear their fellow students sing and perform. “They were phenomenal,” Nguyen said. CHARLI GILCHRIST | HAWKEYE The swing dance was wonderfully carried out, and people are eagerly awaiting another. Hopefully next year, or even in the months to come, students will get another chance to show off their musical and dancing skills in a fun, risk-free event. H

Hawks greatest hits Story By Ciara Constantino and Mya Phin Graphics By Rodney Budden HAWKEYE STAFF

From R&B to jazz, pop and rock, music unites people and creates communities. You could hear a familiar tune on the radio and immediately start singing along to it. Music tastes vary from person to person. Some like genres most people have never heard of, but being open-minded can introduce you to genres and artists you wouldn’t have known you liked otherwise. “My favorite genre is Brazilian jazz, and my favorite music style is slow and calming,” freshman Sebastian Bailon said. “My favorite music genre is R&B,” sophomore Fiorella Diaz said. This month has seen quite a development in the music scene with Taylor Swift’s newest album, “Midnights.” According to “Billboard Hot 100,” Taylor Swift’s songs occupied their top 10 spots for the past two weeks in the U.S. and the U.K., breaking

records for the first time in 64 years. She also holds the record as the first artist in history to have five debut albums, selling over 1 million. As of right now, the no. 1 song on “Billboard Hot 100” is “Anti-Hero” by Taylor Swift. “I really like her new album, and my favorite song from there is ‘Anti-Hero.’ I’m not surprised that she’s one of the top artists right now, and the majority of people enjoy her music, especially her older songs,” junior Dani Cortezzo said. While Taylor Swift dominates “Billboard Hot 100,” former bands and artists broke records there as well. Notably, in 1964, The Beatles held the top five spots. From 1982-1984, Michael Jackson had seven top 10 hits from “Thriller.” Elvis Presley, also known as the king of rock and roll, had 18 songs that made it to No. 1. However, Drake was the most recent record-breaker, occupying the top nine spots on Sept. 18, 2021, with songs from his album, “Certified Lover Boy.” Taylor Swift’s album breezed through and broke all these records in a short period of time. Aside from Taylor Swift, several other artists and songs have made it big in the past couple of years, such as rising

Filipino R&B/soul artist Grentperez, who released his debut album “Conversations With the Moon’’ in September 2021. People most often recognize him from his famous single, “Cherry Wine.” Icelandic singer Laufey released her newest album, “Everything I Know About Love,” on Oct. 14, 2022, bringing a modern twist to jazz. Her unique approach makes her stand out in today’s music scene. “Shirt” by SZA, which was played at the end of her “Good Days” music video in 2020, aroused excitement when it was released on Oct. 28, 2022. Another uprising artist is “Jvke” (pronounced “Jake”), who released “This is what __ feels like” on Sept. 23, 2022. “Golden Hour,” which is song no. 3 on his album, blew up on TikTok and gave goosebumps to people who heard it for the first time. There are many uprising and popular artists, but everybody’s music taste is different. Music continues to unite usfrom making friendships, to relationships and more. H


LIFESTYLE

12 | NOVEMBER 2022

Hawkeye

Fall play: A satirical take on producing theatre By Efrata Solomon HAWKEYE STAFF

Clear your calendars and cancel all your plans! Despite being barely two months into the school year, the MTHS drama department has already been hard at work for the first production of the 2022-2023 school year, and the showtimes for the play are just around the corner. This year, the fall production, called “The One Act Play That Goes Wrong,” is a selfaware comedy about the production of a play itself, premiering on Thursday, Nov. 17 through Saturday, Nov. 19. The initial performance originally ran in London at the Old Red Lion Theatre in 2012, written by Henry Lewis, Jonathan Sawyer and Henry Shields of Mischief Theatre Company. “It’s a play about a play, which is a murder mystery about who murdered a wealthy socialite in the middle of the night,” senior Jack Williams said, who plays the director Chris. Chris also plays the esteemed local inspector in the murder mystery. At first, the play sounds pretty standard. However, the production is about to run anything but smoothly, as implied by the title. Senior Maryana Ward, who plays the company’s stage manager Annie, illustrates some of the chaos that ensues during this production. Ward describes a scene in the play where the lead actress in the murder mystery, played by sophomore Seble Daniel, gets knocked unconscious. Annie is forced to replace her and actually warms up to her new role in

the play, until she gets knocked out as well and has to be lifted through a window to be removed from the stage. Both the lead actress and Annie eventually regain consciousness, and Annie’s newfound passion for acting leads to a fight between the two on stage. “My favorite scene has to be when [Annie and Sandra] get into a catfight on stage,” sophomore and stage technician Amitha Thomas said. With these glowing descriptions, how could this play not pique your interest? As of writing this article, the play is almost done and ready to premiere. “We’re making really good progress and it’s a really good play. We’ve already blocked (choreographed) everything,” Thomas said. “We’re on the verge of doing costumes, and we’re just a few days away from tech work,” Williams said. “I was worried earlier about the play’s progress, but I feel better now.” Ward has made a lot of personal progress as an actress throughout this play. “In the show, I have to be very dramatic and over the top, and it’s really brought me out of my comfort zone. It taught me not to care what other people think,” Ward said. Williams, Ward and Thomas all drew different interpretations of the show’s main theme, something hard to pinpoint due to the play being a satire. “There aren’t really any grand moral themes,” Williams said. “we’re mainly there to make people laugh.” “Don’t be hard on yourself when you make

mistakes, laugh at them, and work with what you have,” Ward said. “Even if you mess up, there’s always a bright side,” Thomas said. Drama teacher Jeannie Brzovic just wants to entertain the audience and hopes they have a few good laughs. She also encourages anyone interested in future theater projects to audition for the winter play. “Auditions for our second winter play will open soon [after the performance of this play]. It’s another comedy called ‘Rumors.’ Anyone can and should audition for it,” Brzovic said. “Rumors” is a play by Neil Simon that premiered in 1988, focusing on contrived and ridiculous situations about a chaotic dinner party. For any students who want to watch the fall play, all tickets are sold at the door. Brzovic recommends arriving 20-30 minutes before the production starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $8 for general admission and $6 for children 13 or under, senior citizens, or those with ASB cards. “We’ve had a lot of fun doing the play because it’s such an unusual comedy,” Brzovic said. “I think it’s gonna be a good show. I hope for a good crowd and that it goes well,” Williams said. Will someone actually break a leg in this disastrous play? You’ll never know unless you decide to see the play on Nov. 17, 18 or 19, so make sure you buy a ticket to watch it! H

CLUB FEATURES Stories by Kaylee Miyamoto Graphics by Rodney Budden HAWKEYE STAFF

TSA

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he Technology Student Association is a variety STEM club. From state to national level competition, students can perform in many different projects from fashion design to speech to dragsters. Anyone of any grade or experience can join as long as they are a STEM CTE student. Meetings are weekly in room 128 on Thursdays from 2:003:00 p.m. H

FRC

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he FIRST Robotics Competition is an international robotics competition where high schools have 6 weeks to build a robot. MTHS FRC teaches students how to come together as a team, compete and build a robot with STEM skills. Team 1778 is open to everyone and no experience is necessary. The club meets Tuesdays and Thursdays in the MTHS workshop and room 131 6:00 - 7:30 pm. H

FRC WANTS YOU! By FRC Representatives

Are you looking for something to do as we are out of quarantine? Well, FIRST Robotics Competition is looking for new members. FIRST Robotics Competition, I’m sure that immediately makes you think of building robots and coding, and you would be right. You learn how to get shop certified so you can use chop saws and drill screws, you learn computer-aided design, how to code and program, and you can learn to weld. But there is so much more to FRC than just building robots. As fun as robotics can be, it might not be your strong suit, but don’t worry, FRC requires fundraisers and sponsoring to be successful, which can’t be done without people working to make it happen. You can do publications, marketing, treasury, website building or graphic design—whatever interests you. Something that is so great about FRC

is that whether you do the actual building of the robot or work on business, you can learn skills that will help you in the future. Between building robots and the various competitions, you learn crucial life skills like how to work well with a team, how to use effective means of communications, how to be professional and how to manage your time. Chill Out 1778 won the Rookie of the Year Award 2006 when we first started, and that was just the start. We have been regional finalists five times, won safety awards six times, we even went to worlds in both 2017 and 2018. This may not seem that impressive, but there are about 3,800 FRC teams worldwide and only 450 teams total make it to worlds. That’s 11%. Pretty impressive, right? FRC isn’t for everyone and that’s okay, but if you are interested, come check it out. We would love to have you. H


Hawkeye

SPORTS

FALL SPORTS WEREN’T KICKED AROUND THIS SEAS N

NOVEMBER 2022 | 13

Senior Sierra Sonko sends the ball across the field in a game against Stanwood. SERAS BRYNER | HAWKEYE

By Efrata Solomon HAWKEYE STAFF

WOMENS’ SOCCER

This year has been a historic one for the women’s soccer team. With a record of 12 wins, four losses and four ties, this is the first time in 31 years that the varsity team has gone to the 3A state tournament, marked by their win over Oak Harbor H.S., 1-0. They also ranked first at the 2A/3A WesCo standings out of 16 other teams. As of writing this, the season has just ended, concluding a remarkable season with a loss to Lakeside H.S. 3-0 on Nov. 11 in the second round of the state tournament. The winning goal against Oak Harbor might’ve been a fluke, but the achievements of the varsity soccer team absolutely weren’t. “This has been an amazing season, and we’ve worked really hard to get to state. We were undefeated for seven to eight games [at the start of the year] and we’ve achieved all the goals we set before the season,” junior forward Natalie Cardin said. She scored the goal against Oak Harbor and led the team this year on goals and assists, nineteen and seven respectively, followed by sophomore midfielder Ava Hunt. “We’ve had a really good season for attacking and defending. We haven’t let in more than one goal per game and attackers scored about 1-2 goals per game. We’re putting it all on the field [this year],” senior goalkeeper Sierra Sonko said. For Sonko, her goal of seeing her team make it to playoffs not only was fulfilled but surpassed this year, representing a radical change from the team record her freshman year. “During my freshman year, we had 10 straight losses and not a single win. I scored one goal as a goalkeeper and that was basically my flex for the season. From that, I just thought of high school sports as just something to do for fun, but since we’ve been getting better I’ve started to take it more seriously,” Sonko said. However, such an impressive season didn’t

come without adversity. Cardin had a deep tear in her quad to deal with the entire season and had to sit out for a few games. “It really took a toll on me,” she said. “It felt horrible to not be on the field and be able to support my team.” Sonko also reflected on her dislocated knee before playoffs last year (4-4-3) and how it affected the season. “We had good games last year but [my injury] set back our defense and we played a lot of good offensive teams. It was the hardest moment for me where I wanted to play but couldn’t, and it also lowered our team’s mood and messed up our mindset,” Sonko said. A standout on the team this year has been sophomore midfielder and defender Claire August, also known as “Claire-bear.” “Claire is so cool, she’s really a positive role model for our soccer team. She fights like a rabid dog over the ball during games and fights for our team with everything she’s got,” Sonko said. “She’s humble so she would never say that herself,” Cardin added. “But she doesn’t get enough credit on our team. Another standout on the team this year was junior midfielder Daniela Cortezzo. “Dani has improved the most out of anyone on the team. She was already a great player before, but now she’s our most versatile player. She’s powerful, fast, and helps with defense,” Cardin said. As the season ends, losses will be felt among the team with the departure of the seniors. Sonko herself will be leaving the team to play D1 soccer at Sacramento College. “I’ve been happy to share this season with my girls,” Sonko said. “Everyone on the team is amazing and [deserves] flowers, butterflies and kisses. I’m really sad to be separated from such lovely people.” “We’re gonna miss our seniors, but we have such a good team and core right now. We have a big reputation to uphold next year,” Cardin said. H

WOMENS’ VOLLEYBALL

Meadowdale. Our coach told us to get our On the volleyball team, the varsity team energy up because we need it now (and they set an overall record of 6-12, just losing out won 2-1!) Volleyball relies a lot on energy and to Ferndale High School in a three-set win, momentum, so if you don’t have it you’re not where the Golden Eagles moved on to the 3A going to win,” Rahla said. District 1 Tournament. The JV team has a Another example of the team overcomrecord of 7-10, ending the season by a loss to ing the odds can be seen at their game with Cascade High School. Arlington. However, the C-Team for volleyball has “My favorite moment of the season has to be been a true standout among fall sports in when we beat Arlington because [they were] general, going undefeated 15-0 overall and a very tough and scrappy team. A lot of them 13-0 at conference games. They finished off were like trees and the tallest of us was only their triumphant season with a win against 5’7”, but our commitment to volleyball helped Cascade High School. us out,” Rahla said. “We have a very tightSome standout memknit community here. bers of the team were Everyone knows each sophomore outside hitother,” freshman outside ter and libero (back-row hitter Georgia Rahla said. defensive specialist) The C-team is mostly Sophia Argueta. made up of freshmen, “Sophia would play with three sophomores back-middle and everyand two juniors, maktime it looked like the ing it even all the more ball was going to drop impressive that a team she would always dive with relatively little to get it, and I was like experience in high school ‘how?’” Rahla said. sports could pull off such Another standout was a record. freshman outside hitter Something that helped Josie Davis. the team perform to “This is Josie’s first year its fullest extent was playing, but I was really Sharalee Matthewsimpressed by her. She Malloy, the head coach of has the power, she can the volleyball team, and hit and serve hard, and her advice to players. she’s really consistent “If we mess up, our Junior Shady Meyer spikes the ball in a with her serves,” Rahla varsity volleyball game in the Terraceum. coach would say ‘fix it, said. SERAS BRYNER | HAWKEYE don’t beat yourself up,’ The 2023-2024 seaand I would say to myself, ‘this is my responson of volleyball looks great for not only the sibility and I will fix it,’” Rahla said. C-team, but varsity and JV as well, with Although the C-team’s record might give hopes of bringing in more wins and records you the impression that they’re infallible, next year. don’t get it twisted. The volleyball team has “I’m just excited to play again. Volleyball is had their fair share of struggles throughout a huge part of my life and I’m excited to see the season. anyone again and get to know this wonderful “A struggle we’ve had to face is when we’ve sport [better]. I also want to get to know new gotten behind in points at the game against kids next year,” Rahla said. H


SPORTS

14 | NOVEMBER 2022

Hawkeye

RUNNING ALL THE WAY TO STATE AND BACK

By Efrata Solomon HAWKEYE STAFF

Throughout the season, both cross-country teams placed second out of four teams at the Sehome High School invite on Sept. 9. On Sept. 20, the men’s team came in second and the women’s team came in fourth at the WesCo League meet at Mountlake Terrace. Both teams would make it to third place at the Kamiak High School Meet on Oct. 5 and at the ESD Championship on Oct. 13. At the the WesCo League Championships, both the women’s and men’s team would come in sixth out of 19 teams, with some ESD top finishers being senior Mark Tiersma (21st) and sophomores Arielle Analau and Erin Woodman (15th and 23rd, respectively) in the 5k race. “This was a really good season to have as my final season,” senior Liliana Lopez-Santiago, varsity captain, said. “Cross-country felt like a family and we’re known as a tight knit community. I didn’t get to achieve some of my goals for senior year, but I was still happy to be there.” “This was my last season so I went full out on it,” senior Sadie Sadler, varsity captain, said. “Even though I got injured, I always cheered on my teammates. I’ve raced with my senior friends for the past six years and having it come to an end was sad for me.” One of the biggest accomplishments of the season was getting over ten PR’s this whole season and sending two boys to state, seniors Carter Middleton and Mark Tiersma. Respectively, they’ve gotten 92nd and 141st at the Washington 3A State Championships. However, this road (or track) to state hasn’t come without its hardships. “[Mark Tiersma and I] would end up doing great at the beginning of the season and set huge PR’s,” Middleton said. “I would then proceed to tear my hamstring and was out for a few weeks, then after that I got sick for another week and went from having a great shot at the top 25 in state to questioning whether or not I would make it to state. I persevered through it and Mark and I would both run great at District 1

Senior Mark Tiersma was one of two athletes to represent the Hawks at the state meet. PHOTO PROVIDED BY QUANRRY MACH Champs to qualify for state.” The team as a whole has also encountered a lot of hardships through the smoky weather, injuries, sickness with COVID19 and other illnesses, lack of dedication, and imbalanced skill among the team. “It was really hard to find a balance of what workouts to do when some runners are more advanced than other people, especially with our coach not having an assistant, so it was hard to keep track of times because she wanted to give the same amount of attention to everyone,” Lopez-Santiago said. On a more positive note, during their trip Tiersma and Middleton made their long trip to state fun by enjoying their time with each other and making fun little vlogs. You can find some of these vlogs on the Instagram account @mths. runs, an unofficial humorous account dedicated to the 20222023 cross country season, run by junior Quanrry Mach. “This was Quanrry’s first year in cross-country, and one special thing he brought to the team was a camera. He captured a bunch of moments of people hanging out, and it felt really nice for us to have memories we could look back on,” Lopez-Santiago said. Some standout teammates were Lopez-Santiago and senior Nina Dodgen.

“They’ve stuck with me for my whole cross-country career, and were always caring, compassionate, supportive and fun to be around. I wouldn’t want to be with anyone else,” Sadler said. A big underdog athlete on the team was freshman Logan Toulouse, who ran an amazing time of 17:53.8 minutes for a 5K. “He really shined through at the end of this season. I think he has a lot more potential and I can’t [wait to] see where he takes his talents,” Middleton said. The upcoming track and field season in the spring brings a lot of excitement amongst the team. “I’m excited for this track season to shatter the times I’ve put hundreds of miles into. I’m ready to show off my talents,” Middleton said. “I’m trying to go to state in 3-4 events next year including the 2 mile and 1600, 800, and 400 meter races.” “I have a second chance with track. It’s another season to be part of a team, but with different people, and to soak in the last moments before graduation,” Lopez-Santiago said. Next year looks to be a bright one for the cross country season. There’s a lot of confidence that the women’s and men’s team will go to state, especially for the women’s team. “Our freshmen and sophomore girls PR’d and outran most of the girls on the team,” Sadler said. Both Sadler and Lopez-Santiago are looking forward to seeing what will happen with the cross-country team in the 2023-2024 season without them running alongside them. “I have a lot of confidence we’ll go to state next year. We have a good group of girls and boys that will stay consistent with running through the year, and I’m excited for them to stay close without seniors and for new freshmen to come in,” Lopez-Santiago said. “I would like to see [the men’s and women’s team] go to state next year, but still have fun and create memories. I want to come back and visit, say hi, and run with my team after going to college,” Sadler said. H

HAWKS 2022-2023 WINTER SPORTS CALENDARS (EXCLUDING POST-SEASON) DATE

WRESTLING

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

TIME

DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

OPPONENT

MEN’S BASKETBALL DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

11/22/22

TBA

JAM SESSION XXVII

11/22/22

5:45 p.m.

JAM SESSION XXVII

11/22/22

7:15 p.m.

JAM SESSION XXVII

12/1/22

5:30 p.m.

@ Snohomish

11/30/22

7:15 p.m.

@ Sehome

12/2/22

7:15 p.m.

Mark Morris

12/3/22

7:00 a.m.

Invitational Meet @ Edmonds-Woodway

12/5/22

7:15 p.m.

King’s

12/3/22

5:00 p.m.

@ Lynden

12/8/22

7:00 p.m.

Archbishop Murphy, Cascade & Jackson

12/7/22

7:15 p.m.

@ Marysville-Pilchuck

12/6/22

7:15 p.m.

Marysville-Pilchuck

12/9/22

7:15 p.m.

Marysville-Getchell

12/9/22

7:15 p.m.

@ Marysville-Getchell

12/12/22

7:15 p.m.

@ Stanwood

12/10/22

2:30 p.m.

King’s @ Highline C.C.

12/15/22

7:15 p.m.

Archbishop Murphy

12/13/22

7:15 p.m.

Stanwood

12/16/22

7:00 p.m.

@ Bear Creek

12/15/22

7:15 p.m.

@ Archbishop Murphy

12/19/22

7:15 p.m.

@ Arlington

12/20/22

7:15 p.m.

Arlington

12/21/22

7:15 p.m.

Kamiak

12/27/22

7:30 p.m.

Holiday Tourney - TBA

12/28/22

6:30 p.m.

@ Ingraham

12/28/22

7:30 p.m.

Holiday Tourney - Rogers

1/3/23

7:15 p.m.

Cedarcrest

1/4/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Cedarcrest

1/5/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Snohomish

1/6/23

7:15 p.m.

Snohomish

1/11/23

7:15 p.m.

Meadowdale

1/10/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Meadowdale

1/13/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Monroe

1/13/23

7:15 p.m.

Monroe

1/18/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Everett

1/17/23

7:15 p.m.

Everett

1/20/23

7:15 p.m.

Shorewood

1/20/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Shorewood

1/25/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Edmonds-Woodway

1/24/23

7:15 p.m.

Edmonds-Woodway

1/28/23

7:15 p.m.

Lynnwood

1/27/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Lynnwood

1/31/23

7:15 p.m.

Shorecrest

1/31/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Shorecrest

2/2/23

7:15 p.m.

@ Cascade

2/3/23

7:15 p.m.

Cascade

12/10/22

8:00 a.m.

Invitational Meet @Sedro-Woolley (M)

12/10/22

7:00 a.m.

Invitational Meet @ Orting (W)

12/15/22

7:00 p.m.

@ Shorewood

MEN’S SWIMMING DATE

TIME

OPPONENT

12/6/22

3:30 p.m.

Mariner @ Kamiak

12/13/22

2:45 p.m.

Meadowdale & Shorewood @ Lynnwood Pool

12/15/22

2:30 p.m.

Jackson @ West Coast Aquatics

2:45 p.m.

Shorecrest @ Lynnwood Pool

12/17/22

9:30 a.m.

Invitational Meet @ Lynnwood

1/5/23

1/5/23

7:00 p.m.

Cedarcrest

1/17/23

2:45 p.m.

1/10/23

7:00 p.m.

Meadowdale

Edmonds-Woodway @ Lynnwood Pool

1/12/23

7:00 p.m.

@ Shorecrest

1/19/23

2:45 p.m.

Lynnwood @ Lynnwood Pool

1/20/23

7:00 p.m.

@ Archbishop Murphy

1/26/23

2:45 p.m.

1/24/23

7:00 p.m.

@ Lynnwood

Kamiak @ Lynnwood Pool

1/26/23

7:00 p.m.

Edmonds-Woodway

1/28/23

3:30 p.m.

District Meet @ Lynnwood Pool

Graphics by Rodney Budden GRAPHICS EDITOR

EDITOR’S NOTE: Home games for men’s and women’s

basketball, as well as wrestling are in the Terraceum. These schedules were accurate as of the Hawkeye’s press date. However, sports schedules can change for a variety of reasons, including inclement weather. For updates as well as JV and C-team schedules visit the official Hawks Athletics website at MTHSAthletics.com


Hawkeye

November’s Logic Puzzle

ACTIVITY

NOVEMBER 2022 | 15

YOU’RE IN CHARGE OF THE UNDERWATER HOCKEY TOURNEY Created by Jakob Nacanaynay SPORTS EDITOR & PUZZLE MASTER

The Scenario

There was a single elimination underwater hockey tournament featuring eight teams: • Aardvarks • Bats • Crabs • Dolphins • Eels • Ferrets • Geese • Hippos The tournament was set up with the following rules: • For the first round, the first seed was

paired with the last seed, the second seed with the second to last, and so on • The first and fourth seeds could have played each other in the semi finals • The fifth seed bats played the ferrets in the semi finals • The geese made it to the semi finals in an upset • The first seed made it to semi finals • The third seed dolphins won the tournament • The dolphins beat the aardvarks • The eels lost in an upset • The crabs were eighth seed NOTE: An upset is defined as a team with a lower seed beating a team with a higher seed.

Your Task

Determine what seed was each team?

Your Deadline • 12/5/22

Swag for the Winner

Write your name and your answer on this page and bring it to Room 130. We’ll randomly select one correct entry and the winner will receive some HSM swag and a shout-out in the next issue! H

JAM SESSION WORD SEARCH

WORD LIST

ALUMNI BASKETBALL CHEERLEADERS CONTESTS DIVING FOOD DRIVE GIVE A WAYS HAWK BROADCASTING HAWKEYE HAWKS HERKEY JAM SESSION

PRE JAM PIZZA SLAM PRIZES REBOUND ROWDY ROOTERS SWIMMING TEMPO TERRACE TERRACEUM THREE POINTER TRADITION WINTER SPORTS WRESTLING

HAWKEYE COMICS!

BY LUCAS BARQUIN | HAWKEYE


16 | NOVEMBER 2022

Hawkeye

MEN’S & WOMEN’S BASKETBALL SCRIMMAGES ANNUAL MEN’S ALUMNI GAME 3-POINT SHOOT-OUT DUNK EXHIBITION WRESTING TEAM INTRO CHEERLEADERS · HERKEY THE HAWK PRIZES · CONTESTS · DJ · GIVE-A-WAYS T-SHIRTS · AND MORE! ALSO: PRE-JAM PIZZA SLAM FOR 9TH GRADERS & CONNECT 5PM IN THE HUB

5 $ 3 $

GENERAL ADMISSION

W/CANNED FOOD DONATION

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