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Mountlake Terrace High School 21801 44th Avenue West Mountlake Terrace | WA | 98043 @MTHSHawkeye | @MTHSports www.TheHawkeye.org V28.03 | 8 November 2012

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» JAZZ IT UP The Jazz Symposium brought together some of the top local middle and high school jazz bands »P11

» A FAMILY RUN BUSINESS Sophomore Ratanachat Saelee earns good grades and then helps with her family’s business after school »P4

» CROSS COUNTRY SHINES The harriers had a successful season and sent two individuals to the state meet in Pasco »P12

President Obama secures re-election

Nation and student body choose Obama over Romney

Quick numbers

Story by Will Khadivi Illustration by Kyra Dahlman

303

Hawkeye staff

After a long and tiring election season, the victor was officially announced by the major television networks at around 8:15 p.m. PST on election night. President Obama cruised to reelection, beating former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney and winning all but two of the states that he carried in 2008. “I believe we can seize this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggests. We’re not as cynical as the pundits believe,” President Obama said in his victory speech in Chicago Tuesday night. “We are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions, and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. We are and forever will be the United States of America.” “I was supporting President Obama,” senior Sukhaman Kaur said. “I think he will follow through in the plans he has for the country.” For MTHS students, however, many weren’t sure who they were supporting in the lower profile state races. “I wasn’t really following the race for governor,” freshman Liya Ewing said. In the gubernatorial race, Democrat Jay Inslee was leading Republican Rob McKenna yesterday by about 30,000 votes. U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell easily won reelection with 59 percent of the vote over her Republican challenger. On election night, Referendum 74, which would legalize samesex marriage, looked likely to pass. Washington was officially named the first state to legalize recreational use of marijuana with Initiative 502. Initiative 1240, which would allow up to 40 publicly funded charter schools in Washington, was barely passing and Initiative 1185, which would require a two-thirds vote of the legislature to pass a tax increase, was passing handily. “I was a little surprised by the marijuana law,” Ewing said. “I wouldn’t think that people would want to legalize marijuana because it’s illegal in federal law.” The majority of the mock election results at MTHS follow the actual results on Nov. 6. The only measure whose result differed from the mock election result was the charter school initiative, which as of Wednesday evening, was barely passing.

Mock election favors Obama

Students cast votes for senator, governor, and three other key ballot measures on election day By Alyssa Vallester Hawkeye staff

Some 851 students and teachers registered to vote in the mock elections, which are held every four years for the presidential elections. Humanities teacher Chris Ellinger and his students manned the mock election voting booths in front of the theater on Nov. 6. “Mock elections are an opportunity for students who can’t legally vote to participate in a simulated election similar to the one the U.S. is involved in,” Ellinger said. Even though Ellinger helped and managed the mock election, it was all student directed – the students created the registration forms, went out and manned the stations during lunch, created the post-

ers and the videos. “We tried to mimic the challenges of running an election. The kids have done a great job. They’re excited. They get frustrated, Chris Ellinger they get mad. People Humanities teacher don’t want them to have interest in it. Reality is, not everybody cares,” Ellinger said. The Snohomish County election office also provided six privacy voting booths, an official ballot box and “I voted” stickers to give to those who voted Tuesday. “Mock elections are an opportunity for students who can’t legally vote to participate in a simulated election.”

For complete mock election results, check out page 2 and www.TheHawkeye.org

Obama’s current electoral vote count (Florida’s count is incomplete)

51.19

Obama’s total percentage of the popular vote

8:15

The time when most major television networks declared Obama the winner

31 million

Tweets sent on election night, making it the most tweeted event in U.S. political history

Statistics gathered from the Associated Press and Twitter (www.ap.org and www.twitter.com)

U.S. President

Barack Obama

23%

Mitt Romney

23%

77%

77%

President Barack Obama received 77 percent of the vote in the MTHS mock election, while Governor Mitt Romney received 23 percent of the vote.


71%

2 | News | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012

Mock election results 2012U.S. Senator

ESD receives Hazel Miller Foundation grant By Daniil Oliferovskiy

29%

Maria Cantwell (D)

MTHS favored Maria Cantwell, the incumbent, to win. Cantwell coasted 71% to reelection by defeating Republican candidate Michael Baumgartner.

Copy Editor

Michael Baumgartner (R)

29%

71%

29%

Washington Governor Jay Inslee (D)

Rob McKenna (R)

37%

63%

29%

MTHS supported former Congressman Jay Inslee. On election night, the 71% race was too close to call. As of 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Inslee led McKenna, 51.11 percent to 48.89 percent.

Initiative 1240 Yes

MTHS narrowly opposed Initiative 1240, which would allow the creation of up to 40 charter 71% schools. As of 5 p.m. on Wednesday, the measure was passing with 51.26 percent approval.

The Edmonds School District has received many generous donations and ample amounts of funding and was granted $68,150 from the Hazel Miller Foundation that will fund three different district programs. Edmonds-Woodway, Lynnwood, Meadowdale, and Mountlake Terrace high schools have received financing to afford certified staff members, who are responsible for tutoring students in need; the library is now open for an extra hour each day; an activities bus now runs five times a week; and an academic coach will be provided to help struggling students. Principal Greg Schwab said, “We talk all the time about ways to support students who struggle in school and the one barrier that keeps coming up is resources. We now have a pool of resources that can be used to work with these students who need more time and attention to help them be more successful.” As well as extra tutoring, the district will select 15 to

20 freshmen with the biggest achievement gap and aid them throughout their high school career and ensure that they perform well academically. The Hazel Miller Foundation is a non-profit organization that supports programs to aid welfare within South Snohomish County and the Edmonds School District. The foundation focuses on improving education, youth services, poverty alleviation, the environment, and culture and art. Junior Jayme Nguyen seemed keen on the new program and the additional transportation and she said, “I know that a lot of students need more help than they’re getting, and sometimes they don’t stay after school because they have no way of getting home.” In a time of financial struggles, MTHS is fortunate to receive money in an ever declining state of educational support. Assistant Principal Peter Schurke stated, “I would like to see the results so great that people decide to give more money to do more things.” The district would need to reapply the following year for the funding to continue.

No

47%

53%

29%

Initiative 520

Yes

47%

No

53%

MTHS mascot Herky performs at a recent football game but the costume is now missing after being stolen.

MTHS narrowly supported Initiative 520, which would71% legalize the use of marijuana in Washington. The measure also passed on election night. 29%

Referendum 74 Yes No MTHS overwhelming supported referendum 74, which would make same sex marriage legal in Washington. The measure also passed on election night.

24%

76%

Herky, the missing mascot

By AnhViet Nguyen

anyone was going to be in the suit and I could tackle them,” Bame said. In a scenario reminiscent of an assembly script, At the game, Bame cheered without the costume MTHS mascot Herky is missing. The beloved hawk along with the cheerleaders. Despite the heavy rain costume, donned regularly by senior Bailey Bame, that night, he continued to keep a positive attitude and was stolen prior to the football game delighted the fans in attendance. “I went to the game against Shorewood H.S. “I heard from one of my friends at just to see if anyone “The last time I saw Herky was at Lynnwood that they heard about it but was going to be in the [Edmonds School District 5K she didn’t know who took it though. the suit and I could Fun Run] going on at the mall. I put We’re just going to have to wait to get a tackle them.” him in my car and now he’s disapnew one because no one is going to tell peared,” Bame said. me,” Bame said. Bailey Bame senior Bame took over the role of Herky Bame and Athletics Director Kim last year and has performed at varStewart have discussed plans to purious athletic events and pep assemblies. He was chase a new Herky costume to replace the missing one. shocked and disappointed to lose the costume. However, it will take some time until the new Herky “I was freaking out. I went to the game just to see if is unveiled. News Co-Editor

Schurke wins a national award By Erick Yanzon

and four letters of support. Schurke also won the Washington State Assistant Principal Peter Schurke received Air Force Association Teacher of the Year a $1,000 grant was named the third place in 2011. finalist for the 2012 National Aerospace In his second year at Terrace, the developTeacher of the Year awarded by the Air ment of the STEM Magnet High School is Force Association. one of his first administrative duties that The program’s purpose is to recognize opened in the beginning of the current teachers at the national level for their school year. accomplishments and There are currently 85 achievements in preparstudents in the STEM “I am so happy to be ing students about Science, program in MTHS. here and to be working Technology, Engineering He is also advising the with such a great and Mathematics (STEM) new rocketry club that team.” so they can contribute to he wanted to replicate Peter Schurke tomorrow’s technologies. in Terrace when he used Assistant principal The criteria to be a canto be in Ingraham High didate is a cover sheet that School. includes educational history and professionSpeaking to MLTNews.com, Schurke said, al development, a professional biography, a “I am so happy to be here and to be working prepared message if he or she won the award with such a great team.” Online & Social Media Manager

Erika Fisher | Hawkeye


8 November 2012 | Hawkeye | 3 » Stand up and Be Heard Have a reaction to this issue’s Editorial section? Email us at editorial@thehawkeye.org

Editorial

Healthy school food is destined to fail Why kids opt for unhealthy choices

E

ven though more opportunities to eat healthier have been introduced into the ways Terrace students get their food, these healthy options have been set up to fail. The incredible amount of uncompetitive pricing going on at MTHS has made bringing a meal from home the only option that is both healthy and affordable. Terrace students have many Nick Fiorillo the425 Editor choices for their lunchtime dining – The Hawk Shop, Hawk Café, numerous vending machines and plain old school hot-lunch give students a variety of foods. However, students who buy at school have to pick between two types of food: nutritional or affordable. The food choice students have rarely includes both of the categories. The extremely and expensive healthy options get beat because they can’t compete with the cheaper junk foods offered. The Hawk Café has more healthy options this year. There are several hearty nutritious salads offered, such as Chicken Caesar and Asian Chicken. However, priced at $3.25 a salad without any drink, choosing the nutritional option is one that many people of the student body just can’t afford. Instead, they turn to cheaper items such as a pretzel with cheese, or a cup of noodles, snacks which have little nutritional value at all. These unfair prices send a message to the students from MTHS – the importance of healthy eating is insignificant. However, the need for healthier eating has never been so great. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that 12.5 million children between the ages of 2 and 19 are obese. This epidemic has tripled since 1980, according to the CDC. Championed by First Lady Michelle Obama, the childhood obesity campaign is one that has been given a great deal of attention recently. With childhood obesity such a serious and widespread problem in America, one would think the district would make a greater effort to make eating healthier, easier. However, this is clearly not the case. The problem is not simply making healthy eating available. These options need to

How obesity has impacted America

· $147 billion is spent every year to provide healthcare to obese people

be priced fairly so that students able to afford to eat healthy. Times are tough for MTHS students and families. Many don’t have enough money to spend on expensive options. What is truly sad is that paying for healthy eating is seen as “splurging.” These expensive items are always the healthy alternatives to the candy, soda, chips and cookies that help fatten America. The arrival of these new virtual snack shacks also brought more healthy options. Similarly, these products were priced so much higher than the other junk that they, too, have been set up for failure. How are they able to compete with a $1.50 Pepsi or Dr. Pepper? The answer is they can’t. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, about 98 percent of high schools have vending machines. The standard school lunch is actually one of the best ways to get healthy food at school. They offer a salad buffet, and the fruit and vegetable bar. Even though many students claim to resent that rule that you must take from the fruit and veggie bar, these rules are helping, like it or not, students. The main problem with school lunch is the variety is low, and students may be turned away by the same-old sameold. However, they are making a larger contribution to healthy eating than the other school eateries. The availability of healthy foods, however, has not been truly solved. Take the student run Hawk Shop for example. Sure, they serve up some delicious grub. Nevertheless, if one wanted to eat a healthy meal at the Hawk Shop, they would surely have a harder time doing so. The “entrees” that the Hawk Shop serves are low in nutritional value and high in carbohydrates, calories and fat. The advancements in healthy eating have been very beneficial. Every new salad and fruit added to the menu is a small victory for a better future. If politicians and administrators really want to get kids to eat healthy, they cannot simply put greens on the menu. They must make sure these healthy options are priced fairly and competitively so that students can make a true and fair choice for their lunch.

Kyra Dahlman | Hawkeye

Staff Editor-in-Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michelle Schomer Photo/Graphics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kyra Dahlman Business Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joy Gardner The425 Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Fiorillo Online & Social Media Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erick Yanzon Arts & Entertainment Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . Shannon Beaumont Feature Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nazia Khan Health Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Driscoll Editorial Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conner Worman News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AnhViet Nguyen & Will Khadivi Opinion Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Denait Medhane Sports Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . Austin McDermott & Nathan Koplitz Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charles Divers & Daniil Oliferovskiy Photo Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Serafina Urrutia Distribution Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maria Balcita Symposia Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abigail Solomon

» Rising from the fire to serve The Red Onion’s back from the ashes and in a new location »P5

Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elbethel Abebe, Jaira Arcilla, Beza Ayele, Jensen Beaumont, Brieanna Benvenuti, Raven Blackburn, Robin Choi, Stephen Cuplin, Addison Daniels, Dominic DeMiero, Chloe DeVries, Spencer Froelick, Sereena Gee, Jayla Gomez, Mike Guevarra, Amanda Holthusen, Alexis Hunt, Thanh Huynh, Manvir Kaller, Parminder Kaur, Arshia Kiani, Peter Kidane, Eve Largent, Huyen Le, Luke Luttrell, Harrison Mains, Anthony Markert, Paxtyn Merten, Maria Quinones, Jannon Roque, Gurminder Singh, Josiah Sum, Lisa Totten, Brian Tran, Alyssa Vallester, Paige Watson Illustrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erika Fisher, Max Lkhagvasuren Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vincent F. DeMiero FANs Coordinators . . . . . . . . . . . . Cathy Fiorillo and Sandy Merten Gigante Amichevole Barbuto Emeritus . . . . . Jim “Animal” Pecotte Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pacific Publishing Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MTHS ASB, JEA/WJEA, NSPA, Student Press Law Center NOTES: Names in bold indicate voting members of the Editorial Board All e-mails are [SectionName]@thehawkeye.org

| Mountlake Terrace High school | 21801 44th Avenue West | Mountlake Terrace | WA | 98043 | Voice: 425.431.7770 | Fax: 425.431.7773 | Editor@thehawkeye.org |

· Two-thirds of all Americans are overweight · Approximately 63 million of all doctor visits every year in the United States are obesity related · Obesity surpassed smoking as the most expensive American health problem · 12 million Americans are 100 pounds overweight Source: CNBC.com

Hawkeye Staff Editorial

Lunchtime recipe needs more stirring

T

he “Mix It Up” event was held on Oct. 30 during both lunches. The theme was “lifesavers.” Members gave out lifesavers candy to everyone and students were supposed to give them to someone who had “saved their life” in some way. Students also received a piece of paper and were asked to write the person’s name that influences them the most. The tables in the front half of the HUB were also formed into a diamond shape, having the center as the area for the activities and games. The back of the HUB stayed the same and wasn’t really “mixed up.” The speaker could have also been more open to everyone and in general, and not focused on specific people and friends participating in the games. Saying “If you’re a cheerleader, you should cheer people up” and similar statements seemed to confirm stereotypes instead of breaking them down. Also, “Mix it Up” would benefit from actively recruiting members who actually want to make a change. Next time “Mix it Up” shouldn’t just mix some of MTHS’s students.

The staff editorials represents the views of the Editorial Board

Policies Mission Statement The Hawkeye’s mission viewpoints on relevant topics. The Hawkeye will is to provide the MTHS community with print as many letters as space allows. Letters quality, thought-provoking student produced must include the author’s name, signature and publications. In policy and in practice, the class or position relative to the letter. Typed or Hawkeye is a designated open forum publication. legible, hand written letters are acceptable, but In these efforts, the Hawkeye has established should not exceed 200 words. The Hawkeye will several open public forums for the exchange edit all letters for accuracy, spelling and grammar. of information, opinions and artistic expression We reserve the right to refuse to print any letter. dedicated to those in the MTHS community. Editorial Cartoons Submissions represent Since 1960, we have faithfully served our the view of the artist. Editorial cartoons audience and community as an open, public accompanying editorials represent the view of forum where student editors make all decisions. the author. Artwork should be submitted to staff Editorials The editorial section of the Hawkeye members in room 130. Cartoons are selected serves as a forum for well-written, thoughtful, based on their appropriateness and clarity. longer forms of expression. Signed editorials Advertising The Hawkeye will not accept any represent the opinions of the author. Unsigned advertising that the Editorial Board deems to editorials represent the opinion of the Hawkeye be: factually inaccurate; designed to mislead, Editorial Board. Views printed herein are meant deceive or defraud; containing malicious, to be opinionated and do not necessarily vindictive or unsubstantiated attacks; offering represent the opinions of the Hawkeye staff, goods and/or services illegal for teens to student body, faculty, administration or school possess, buy or use; libelous; obscene; creating board. The Hawkeye will print submitted guest imminent danger or disruption to school. editorials as space allows and requests that all The Hawkeye reserves the right to refuse contributors include their name, signature and any advertising, solicited or unsolicited. position relative to the editorial. The Hawkeye Advertisements do not necessarily reflect the will edit all submissions for accuracy, spelling and views or endorsements of the Hawkeye staff, grammar. We reserve the right to refuse to print student body, faculty, administration or school any submission. board. Letters to the Editor Readers are encouraged to voice their opinions in the Opinion section, Revised 11/2012 a public forum for the expression of varying


4 | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012 » NewS In the Community? Hear of news in our community? Let us know at the425@thehawkeye.org

the425

» Beyond the Curtain Senior Jocelyn Leggett works from behind the scenes to deliver shows that blow the audience away »P6-7

Making a brighter future for both her and her family Ratanachat Saelee won’t stop untill the customers are served and the homework is completed cold], but those two days it would be hot for here,” she said.

Story by Nick Fiorillo Photos by Nick Fiorillo and Alyssa Vallester Hawkeye staff

For most, the last bell of the day means it’s time for fun, to go home and to do homework. However, for sophomore Ratanachat Saelee the end of school means going to work to keep her family business alive. Saelee and her family own and operate one of Mountlake Terrace’s hidden gems, Amorn Thai Cuisine. Named for her father, Amorn, the store is run by Ratanachat Saelee, her mother, father, grandmother, and brother. Together, the five work day and night to support themselves in a country they are still fairly new to. Like most of us, Saelee starts her day at around 5:30 a.m. She studies in her classes every day, just like the rest of us. When she arrives at her house, she has about an hour until her responsibilities begin. She and her middle school aged brother, Nikan, work together doing all the non-cooking work for the restaurant. “I work the outside…the cash register, taking people to seats, taking orders, serving food and cleaning tables,” Saelee said. Usually her duties last until eight or nine p.m. Between taking orders from customers wanting an authentic Thai meal, or simply clearing tables of the customers who enjoyed the mouth-watering food, Saelee attempts to complete as much homework as possible. If you walk in to Amorn Thai, it’s hard to initially see, but a space in the front has been converted to a space for her and her brother to accomplish their school work. “Sometimes, it’s kind of stressing… it’s a lot of work,” Saelee said. Although very difficult, Saelee said she loves working with her family every day. Saelee loves interacting with the customers and the excitement of doing what she loves. “It’s pretty fun,” she said. “Every day is different, each customer is different …each experience is unique.” She likes developing relationships with the customers who become the regulars. “Sometimes our customers come so often, they become friends instead of just customers,” she said. For many people, especially teens, one couldn’t imagine spending so much time with your family without someone killing someone else. Saelee said, “We do some-

Travels to Thailand

The Saelee family, originally from Thailand, own and operate Amorn Thai in Mountlake Terrace. (From left to right) Amorn, Ratanachat’s father, Ning, her mother, Ratanachat’s grandmother, Nikan, her brother, and Ratanachat.

none. “When I came here, I pretty much knew nothing [about English],” Saelee said. Her father, Amorn, had lived in America several years previous to moving back to Thailand and starting a family. Saelee didn’t know a lick of English and On top of all her responsibilities at had no experience in a land so different than her home. She said work, Saelee is in several that communication is advanced classes. “Every day is different, still sometimes an issue Saelee takes AP each customer is in school. “It is hard for European History, different...each [teachers] to understand Honors Pre-Calculus and experience is unique.” me when I talk someenrolled is STEM engiRatanachat Saelee times,” Saelee said. neering program. Finding Sophomore Saelee first lived in time to do school work on Seattle and attended school in the Seattle top of running her family’s business is very School District. In sixth grade, she transstressful for Saelee. She said it’s hard, but it was even harder in Thailand. ferred to Evergreen Elementary, now closed, in the Edmonds School District. Her family purchased the building that would soon become one of Mountlake Terrace’s best The Saelee family, including Ratanachat, local eateries. They live just two houses are originally from Thailand. Ratanachat down from their restaurant, making it easy Saelee arrived in America in time to enroll for mom to call her up to work. for fourth grade. She was just eight years She was old enough before she came to old when her family left their lives behind America to still hold on to memories of her in Thailand for a new beginning in America birthplace. Saelee said one of the biggest One of the biggest struggles with leaving differences between the U.S. and Thailand her home and coming to a foreign country is the climate. “In Thailand, it’s super-hot was not being able to communicate with all the time. There’s no cold at all,” Saelee others. Her English skills were next to said. “Maybe once or twice a year [it gets times get mad at each other,” but still enjoy working side by side each other, making some of the finest Thai cuisine in the area.

Excelling Academically

Coming to America

For the past several years, the Saelee family has long parts of their summers in their birthplace of Thailand. When they came to the U.S., they left behind many family members. “My mom has 10 siblings including her,” Saelee said. Saelee’s other grandmother, who is 90 years old, also still lives in Thailand and is one of the reasons that they like to go back regularly. She likes different things about both her homes (the U.S. and Thailand). “Sometimes, when I am in Thailand, I miss [the United States] and sometimes when I am here [in the United States], I miss Thailand.” One of the things she misses about Thailand is all her family that still remains there. “I miss all my cousins,” she said. When in Thailand, she misses the milder weather of the Pacific-Northwest and its serenity compared to Thailand. “Thailand is so noisy. You sit in your house and you can hear all the cars running,” Saelee said. “It’s more peaceful here.”

A Bright Future Ahead With high academics, Saelee said she probably will not continue the family business after she graduates from MTHS. She wants to go to college and her family wants her to do more. “The first choice would be UW,” Saelee said. Right now, Saelee said she wants to either to go into engineering or become a doctor. The Saelee family is the American Dream personified. They came to America with a dream and a staff of five. Now, their business is up, running, and just one meal eaten here can make a returning customer for life. Saelee is one of the hardest working students at MTHS. What makes it even more impressive is you will never hear her complaining. She leads with a smile and has a work ethic admired by all who know her. While her job and school can pile up, Ratanachat Saeele is willing to do the work to help her family’s dream succeed.


8 November 2012 | Hawkeye | the425 | 5

Fans say final goodbye to Terrace’s Farmers Market By Daniil Oliferovskiy Copy Editor

Fans of locally grown fruits and vegetables were saddened at the news of the closure of the Mountlake Terrace Farmers Market. The Mountlake Terrace Business Association (MLTBA) announced in late October that the farmers market would not return in spring of 2013. Mountlake Terrace healthy-envy locals have consistently found garden-fresh produce and local groceries ripe from the stem at the MLT Farmers Market. MLTBA and the city of Mountlake Terrace joined forces to put on the show, and since its opening in 2009, the market has featured vendors from throughout Mountlake Terrace and other local farmers in the region. Consequently, the closure of the Farmers Market limits the availability and variety of exclusive foods. MLTBA President Ayesha Sheik suggested that they simply did not have enough customers to support the cost of running the market. When asked about the closure of the market, Sheik said, “We decided to discontinue it. There were a number of reasons. It was slowing down [as well as] a lot of [other] reasons for it to not be held next year.” When biology teacher Adam Welman learned that the market wouldn’t be back for another year, he shouted, “That’s terrible!” Welman said, “I value local produce and I do my best to buy stuff that’s grown closer to us and not in Australia or California.” City Councilman Doug McCardle said he was disappointed that the market would not be back for 2013. “It’s always sad to see local businesses and organizations close due to bankruptcy or whatever reason,” he said.

Abigail Solomon | Hawkeye

When customers attended the Mountlake Terrace Farmers Market in spring 2012, they didn’t know it would be the last year they could find locally grown products in Mountlake Terrace. The market has potential to come back but will definitely not be back for 2013.

McCardle also said he wants to try to bring the fresh food bazaar back to MLT. “I’m sad that it appears to be closing down and I would like to, you know, talk to the people in charge of it and see what could be done to possibly keep it open to the citizens of Mountlake Terrace once again.” There is, however, a silver lining to the closure of the farmers market. Money saved from the elimination of market funding will be put towards other efforts. When asked about the extra funds now that the market is closed, Sheik said, “We’re going to continue to put it back into the community. As you know, we do backpacks for the elementary schools and we’re going to do events like that where we either give back to the schools or different organizations that may need help.”

Fire won’t stop the Red Onion A second location is opening after fire forced the local burger joint and restaurant to close in October By Sereena Gee

Even with the fire, Red Onion hasn’t been one to cancel plans to help the community. After a kitchen fire on Oct. 1 forced Red Onion’s annual Trunk R Treat folRed Onion Burgers to close, owner Seaun lowed through on Oct. 31. The MTHS Richards announced that there would be Football Boosters also accepted candy a new location for the popular local res- donations for the event. taurant. The Red Onion also hosted a Crab Feed The announcement was made via Night on Nov. 4, a fundraiser for the MLT Facebook on Oct. 6. Richards said the new senior center. location will be in the “strip mall adjacent Richards said that when he first found to Albertsons on the corner out about the fire it was of 212th and 44th, located like “a big punch in the “[When I found in Mountlake Terrace.” gut.” out about the fire] Richards said he hopes to Though the damage did it was like a big open the new location on not affect all of the Red punch in the gut.” Dec. 1, although, he said it is Onion building, very sigSeaun Richards really “up to the insurance nificant damage occurred Red Onion Owner companies.” in the kitchen and rear of The new location is the former site of the the restaurant. Currently the Red Onion is restaurant Wok-In Teriyaki, which went remodeling the second location and addout of business. ing in new tables and chairs. Many customers will find the new locaEven though the second location seemed tion more conveniently located. It has eas- like solely a response to the fire that closed ier access to Interstate 5 and is closer to down the first location, Richards said that Lynnwood. this idea had been in the works. It’s possible that eating at the Red Onion “We were going to have two locations in the future may follow with a trip to the anyway,” he said. dry cleaners, getting that new hairstyle, The community support for Red Onion renting or a movie or taking your pet to following the fire has been tremendous. the vet. The restaurant’s Facebook page has served Red Onion has been as both an announcement board for the a major sponsor of management, but also for fans to express Owner Sean many community their sadness and to offer help to owners Richards says the events. Many school Seaun and LaRae Richards. second organizations, such as The Mountlake Terrace community is location MTHS music boost- looking forward to the reopening of one of will be ers and sports boost- its favorite eateries and offering a taste of open in ers, have held fund- Terrace to nearby cities. December raisers at the local As the Red Onion posted on Facebook, eatery. “We will be back.” Hawkeye staff

History teacher Laurette Culbert advocated local markets and their organic products. “I like the fact that with organic produce it’s much kinder to the land and the environment,” she said. Sadly, neighborhood vendors like Ayala Farms, Snohomish Bakery, Whidbey Island Ice Cream, and others are forced to sell their products somewhere other than our backyard. Although the market will be non-existent in 2013, there is still hope of revival and restoration of the market for 2014. Sheik insisted “[The farmers market] needs a lot more community support.” If community leaders and citizens feel strongly about bringing back the farmers market, they need to voice their support.

Put UW on

YoUR

Waiting List Hot Facts

T o do: ransfer

• Get a t Edmonds degree from ollege Community C to the UW • Transfer on a ion savings it u t d n e p S • ralia trip to Aust

Community college transfer students graduate at a higher rate than students who start at a four-year university. 19,000 students who transferred to a public or private four-year college or university together saved more than $100 million by starting at a community college in Washington. Source: Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges 2009-10

Connect With Us

Get started today! www.edcc.edu/future

Find all our social connections at http://edmondscc.ning.com.


6 | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012 »four more years with obama Find out what MTHS students think the re-elected president will do for his second term »P8

8 November 2012 | Hawkeye | Feature | 7

Feature

» Have any ideas for Feature? Email the Feature editor at feature@thehawkeye.org

Jocelyn Leggett

BEHIND THE CURTAIN WITH

S

Story by Nazia Khan Photos by Serafina Urrutia hours that the cast and crew spend together, they become such a big Hawkeye staff

ome people may have a difficult time deciding what they are going to do after they graduate from high school, while others may figure it out in college. For those who know their journey after high school know exactly how they want to achieve that goal in life. On the other hand, there are those who may find their passion just by pure luck. Sometimes, the future can even be determined in the most unlikely of places such as being put into a class that wasn’t originally a first option. Jocelyn Leggett is one of the few people that a little class overflow was affected greatly by. For the people that know Leggett, they know she is a hard worker and very dedicated to what she puts her mind to. Leggett was put into Jeannie Brzovic’s drama class her freshman year because her French class was full. Some may not be too happy by a schedule change that dramatic, so to speak. Luckily for Leggett she fell in love with the class. The award-winning MTHS drama department has many dedicated people who work behind the scenes to make sure a show goes right; Leggett is one of those many people. She stands out for several reasons. Not only has she been an outstanding stage manager since her junior year, she keeps everybody cool, calm and under control during the hectic times in rehearsal and show nights. Normally high schoolers have a full plate with just having six high school classes and an extracurricular activity. Leggett, who is also a Running Start student, has to juggle memorizing lines for an upcoming play, working as a stage hand or working on plans to make the show best that it can be still has time to keep a healthy sleeping schedule. Most people would probably think that it is too much work at one time, but not for Leggett. “It’s as simple as having an organized calendar and a phone to communicate with all the people in charge. You just plan and plan everything monthly and weekly and then by the hours; just work down. Seems hard but it’s not. It’s a piece of cake,” Leggett said. Not only does Leggett work intensely hard for the MTHS drama department – five shows and counting since her sophomore year – she has worked as a stage manager for the musical “13” and was a part of the crew for “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” at the Edmonds Heights Theater. She has also worked backstage for “My Fair Lady” at the Lyric Light Opera. When asked why she loves drama, Leggett said, “First and foremost, I love the theater. I love telling stories. That’s my biggest enjoyment in life; telling stories and I also love working with the people. The people are the biggest reasons why I’m in it.” While stage managing, Leggett spends more than 100 hours per show working with the cast and crew, getting everything ready and making sure everyone knows where to be, what to be and when it needs to be done. Sometimes they can be in the school building for more than 12 hours a day to prepare for an upcoming show. In all the

family, “You have to love them.” The people are what Leggett said she would miss the most after she graduates. Leggett’s “drama momma” Jeannie Brzovic, is one of the people she will miss most after she graduates on June 13. Mariah Bittinger, senior, said about Leggett, “I think she is a great one [stage manager], she is really professional and always wants to get the job done right the first time, and she and Amber [Hamman, assistant stage manager] work really well together on getting everything done and making sure everyone’s where they’re supposed to be and if you’re not here you are supposed to be, she’ll come after you.” Finding something that somebody loves0 can be found in something as simple as moving a set piece on and off the stage. A set piece in “Almost Maine” was the reason she fell in love with drama. Leggett’s favorite part of being in drama is “having that person in the audience come up to you and say that was a very good job, thank you. It’s nice to know somebody appreciates you.” As of Oct. 28, Leggett became the production stage manager for a professional show held at the 5th Avenue Theater called “The Music Man Project” which starts on Mar. 22 and 23. Earlier this year at Roosevelt High School, auditions were held for performing arts colleges and universities. She got callbacks from six of the schools she had performed for, including the New York Conservatory for the Dramatic Arts. Although on Oct. 31, she found out that she had gotten accepted to the design and technology department of the Northern Colorado School of Theater. If she decides to attend this college, she would still focus on stage management. “She seems really determined and she knows how to handle everything, and she has the motivation to get things done,” said Bittinger about Leggett. The drama department this year has a lot in store for keeping the community entertained. The troup is putting on two comedies, including a very popular play by Neil Simon called “Fools.” Not to mention, Leggett is one of the six leads for their very next show, a sorrow filled tragedy called “A Piece of My Heart” set during the era of the Vietnam War. For the people who would like to join drama, it’s as easy as going to the club meeting or going to an audition for an upcoming show. If you have a free period, are in need of an art credit, or just want to get involved in drama, there are beginning and advanced drama classes, as well as classes for theater tech, for those who would rather work back stage. Leggett added, “I like theater because it’s not just a place to escape to when you want to leave real life. Theater is evolving these days; not just as an entertainment form, but it’s actually becoming a source of media. There are more people going into the theater and coming out actually learning something that they didn’t know before. It’s beautiful. I want to be apart of that after high school.”

I think she is a great one [stage manager], she is really professional and always wants to get the job done right the first time, and she and Amber [Hammon, assistant stage manager] work really well together on getting everything done and making sure everyone’s where they’re supposed to be and if your not here your supposed to be, she’ll come after you. ~ Mariah Bittinger Senior

Senior Jocelyn Leggett applies makeup in the Green Room back stage in the MTHS Theater (top). Drama teacher Jeannie Brzovic and Leggett discuss staging and tech needs for the upcoming production of “A Piece of My Heart” that tells the story of several nurses in the Vietnam War (center). Leggett rehearses her role as one of the nurses in “A Piece of My Heart” that will run from Nov. 15 to 17 in the Theater (right).


6 | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012 »four more years with obama Find out what MTHS students think the re-elected president will do for his second term »P8

8 November 2012 | Hawkeye | Feature | 7

Feature

» Have any ideas for Feature? Email the Feature editor at feature@thehawkeye.org

Jocelyn Leggett

BEHIND THE CURTAIN WITH

S

Story by Nazia Khan Photos by Serafina Urrutia hours that the cast and crew spend together, they become such a big Hawkeye staff

ome people may have a difficult time deciding what they are going to do after they graduate from high school, while others may figure it out in college. For those who know their journey after high school know exactly how they want to achieve that goal in life. On the other hand, there are those who may find their passion just by pure luck. Sometimes, the future can even be determined in the most unlikely of places such as being put into a class that wasn’t originally a first option. Jocelyn Leggett is one of the few people that a little class overflow was affected greatly by. For the people that know Leggett, they know she is a hard worker and very dedicated to what she puts her mind to. Leggett was put into Jeannie Brzovic’s drama class her freshman year because her French class was full. Some may not be too happy by a schedule change that dramatic, so to speak. Luckily for Leggett she fell in love with the class. The award-winning MTHS drama department has many dedicated people who work behind the scenes to make sure a show goes right; Leggett is one of those many people. She stands out for several reasons. Not only has she been an outstanding stage manager since her junior year, she keeps everybody cool, calm and under control during the hectic times in rehearsal and show nights. Normally high schoolers have a full plate with just having six high school classes and an extracurricular activity. Leggett, who is also a Running Start student, has to juggle memorizing lines for an upcoming play, working as a stage hand or working on plans to make the show best that it can be still has time to keep a healthy sleeping schedule. Most people would probably think that it is too much work at one time, but not for Leggett. “It’s as simple as having an organized calendar and a phone to communicate with all the people in charge. You just plan and plan everything monthly and weekly and then by the hours; just work down. Seems hard but it’s not. It’s a piece of cake,” Leggett said. Not only does Leggett work intensely hard for the MTHS drama department – five shows and counting since her sophomore year – she has worked as a stage manager for the musical “13” and was a part of the crew for “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” at the Edmonds Heights Theater. She has also worked backstage for “My Fair Lady” at the Lyric Light Opera. When asked why she loves drama, Leggett said, “First and foremost, I love the theater. I love telling stories. That’s my biggest enjoyment in life; telling stories and I also love working with the people. The people are the biggest reasons why I’m in it.” While stage managing, Leggett spends more than 100 hours per show working with the cast and crew, getting everything ready and making sure everyone knows where to be, what to be and when it needs to be done. Sometimes they can be in the school building for more than 12 hours a day to prepare for an upcoming show. In all the

family, “You have to love them.” The people are what Leggett said she would miss the most after she graduates. Leggett’s “drama momma” Jeannie Brzovic, is one of the people she will miss most after she graduates on June 13. Mariah Bittinger, senior, said about Leggett, “I think she is a great one [stage manager], she is really professional and always wants to get the job done right the first time, and she and Amber [Hamman, assistant stage manager] work really well together on getting everything done and making sure everyone’s where they’re supposed to be and if you’re not here you are supposed to be, she’ll come after you.” Finding something that somebody loves0 can be found in something as simple as moving a set piece on and off the stage. A set piece in “Almost Maine” was the reason she fell in love with drama. Leggett’s favorite part of being in drama is “having that person in the audience come up to you and say that was a very good job, thank you. It’s nice to know somebody appreciates you.” As of Oct. 28, Leggett became the production stage manager for a professional show held at the 5th Avenue Theater called “The Music Man Project” which starts on Mar. 22 and 23. Earlier this year at Roosevelt High School, auditions were held for performing arts colleges and universities. She got callbacks from six of the schools she had performed for, including the New York Conservatory for the Dramatic Arts. Although on Oct. 31, she found out that she had gotten accepted to the design and technology department of the Northern Colorado School of Theater. If she decides to attend this college, she would still focus on stage management. “She seems really determined and she knows how to handle everything, and she has the motivation to get things done,” said Bittinger about Leggett. The drama department this year has a lot in store for keeping the community entertained. The troup is putting on two comedies, including a very popular play by Neil Simon called “Fools.” Not to mention, Leggett is one of the six leads for their very next show, a sorrow filled tragedy called “A Piece of My Heart” set during the era of the Vietnam War. For the people who would like to join drama, it’s as easy as going to the club meeting or going to an audition for an upcoming show. If you have a free period, are in need of an art credit, or just want to get involved in drama, there are beginning and advanced drama classes, as well as classes for theater tech, for those who would rather work back stage. Leggett added, “I like theater because it’s not just a place to escape to when you want to leave real life. Theater is evolving these days; not just as an entertainment form, but it’s actually becoming a source of media. There are more people going into the theater and coming out actually learning something that they didn’t know before. It’s beautiful. I want to be apart of that after high school.”

I think she is a great one [stage manager], she is really professional and always wants to get the job done right the first time, and she and Amber [Hammon, assistant stage manager] work really well together on getting everything done and making sure everyone’s where they’re supposed to be and if your not here your supposed to be, she’ll come after you. ~ Mariah Bittinger Senior

Senior Jocelyn Leggett applies makeup in the Green Room back stage in the MTHS Theater (top). Drama teacher Jeannie Brzovic and Leggett discuss staging and tech needs for the upcoming production of “A Piece of My Heart” that tells the story of several nurses in the Vietnam War (center). Leggett rehearses her role as one of the nurses in “A Piece of My Heart” that will run from Nov. 15 to 17 in the Theater (right).


8 | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012 » WHAT do you think? Love an article? Hate an article? Just have an opinion? E-mail us at opinion@thehawkeye.org

Opinion

» eat well this thanksgiving Check out the health section for some healthy tips » p9

A word from your ASB officers

The Principal’s corner

What’s coming up

Opportunities abound

T

his month, Terrace has many things The choices that have been discussed are planned and some things have already the Columbia Tower Club, The Seattle Art occurred. To start, the first quarter ended Museum and the Seattle Sculpture Park. Nov. 2 and teachA couple weeks ago the junior ASB disers are finishing cussed the places with the entire junior up all of their class after an emergency fire drill and had grades. everyone vote for one. The top two that the The school’s class chose were the Columbia Tower and annual Macho the Seattle Sculpture Park. Conflict started Volleyball tourwhen there were pricing problems, so all of nament took the locations are still in discussion. They Lilianne Nguyen ASB Public Relations Officer place Nov. 6 in are still contemplating about all of the locaour main gym. tions and will decide on a final location For those who don’t know what Macho soon. Volleyball is, it is an aggressive loud comAs December is coming up, winter sports petition for boys to are beginning. Many people are show off their volleyvery excited for basketball sea“This month, ball skills in a double son this year as said on Twitter Terrace has got elimination tournaand Facebook because of all the many things ment. The team can excitement the Rowdy Rooters planned and some have up to eight players put into the crowd and how things have already and two coaches. The good we are. occurred.” top two teams move By the way, it is already an onto districts, which were last night in the official club. Rowdy Rooter meetings are Terraceum. Monday mornings and Stew is the adviser. The top two teams from every school in More details on that soon. the Edmonds School District compete to Also girl’s basketball and wrestling are see who the top team in the district is. starting as well. If you are interested, tryDo you know what was to be announced outs are next week! Nov. 6? The Presidential Election! Something else that is coming up is our All last week, you could see some of annual canned food drive put on by our Chris Ellinger’s block class asking people if Interhigh. You are able to bring in cans or they’ve registered to take part in the Mock non perishable items between Nov. 13 and Election. 29. If you did, voting was Tuesday in front of This year’s competition will be between the theater. The mock election’s results are hallways so collect as many cans as you can that Barack Obama wins, charter schools to help out our Terrace community! failed, same-sex marriage passed, legalizing marijuana passed, and Jay Inslee won. In the real election, Obama wins in a NOTE: The Hawkeye provides the ASB close race, and all the laws got passed. officers space each issue in the Opinion As you may know, the junior class ASB section as part of our mission as a has been in discussion of a prom location. designated open public forum.

A

s we wrap up the Fall Sports seafrom high school in four years and go on son, I want to congratulate all of to the next adventures that await us all our student-athletes who competed and outside of the walls of MTHS. represented our But, while you are here, I think it is school so well really important to make your time during the first memorable. athletic season of We have so many things to do here and the year. so many ways that you can get involved. Football had an We have more than 40 student clubs incredible run, with a variety of interests — Hip Hop, making it to the Ecology, Technology, Rocketry, GSA, Greg Schwab MTHS Principal playoffs for just Anime — I could go on with others, but the second time in our school’s 52-year the point is we have something that will history. That’s quite an amazing accomprobably be of interest to you. plishment. In addition to clubs, there are the athCross Country runletic programs we offer ners Jack Pearce and each season. Then there “Get involved. Ella Schroth competare the opportunities to Find something that ed at the State Meet in be involved in performinterests you and get Pasco. ing arts. Plays are open into it.” Swimmer Riley to students who want to Morgan qualified for audition. We have talent the State Meet this coming weekend. shows and Terrace Idol. Women’s Tennis, Women’s Soccer and Interested in learning to play an instruVolleyball all had very competitive seament? We have a guitar class that is open sons this year as well. to any student who wants to take it. In addition to all of our student-athGet involved. letes, we also have had great performancFind something that interests you and es by our student musicians and actor get into it. with a recent jazz concert and Improv You have the power to make your four Night. years here something that you will look There are many great performances back on with great memories, but you coming up in the next few weeks and I have to take that first step and get conencourage you to support your fellow stu- nected. dents by going to see a play or concert. With all of this going on, it got me to thinking about how important it is to your school experience to get involved. So many times, students go through their four years of high school and never NOTE: The Hawkeye provides the school take the time to find that thing they are administration space each issue in the passionate about. True, the reason we are Opinion section as part of our mission as a all here is to get an education, graduate designated open public forum.

HawkTalk Obama Edition Sebastian Baker

Ethan McGregor

Freshman

“I hope he ends this war and brings the troops home.”

Lilia Suschik Sophomore

“I want Obama to fix the economy.”

Junior

Q: “What do you hope President Obama accomplishes during his next term?”

“I want to see Obama improve the economy.”

Erin Keating Senior

“I’d like him to improve the job market.”


8 November 2012 | Hawkeye | 9 » HAVE ANY Ideas? E-mail the Health Editor at health@thehawkeye.org

Health

» Jazz tradition continues The jazz bands kicked off the year at the annual Jazz Symposium »P11

Have a healthy holiday Switch up classical Thanksgiving dishes

Max Lkhagvasuren | Hawkeye

By Maria Balcita and Olivia Driscoll

30 miles

Distance a person would have to run to burn off the calories of the average thanksgiving dinner

675

Millions of pounds of turkey Americans consume on Thanksgiving Day

229

Average grams of fat in a Thanksgiving dinner

4

Grams of fat saved when taking skin off the turkey before eating it

Hawkeye staff

Thanksgiving dinner can be made in a healthy, flavorful way. It’s the time to indulge on delicious meals and spend time with family. This thanksgiving season, moderation is key. Thanksgiving dinner can be an enjoyable meal without all the fat, sugar and calories, but it can be overwhelming to try and eat healthy during the holiday season. It can be made much easier with these simple tips and tricks. One easy thing to do, is to skip the thighs; one turkey thigh has as many calories as a prime rib. Instead, go for white meat, without eating the skin. Limit the stuffing and gravy that go along with it to only a couple tablespoons. There are 20 grams of carbs, 450 mg of sodium, 200 calories- and 1 gram of fat in 3/4 cups of stuffing. Gravy is often over used, in one half cup serving there is 16 grams of fat, 206 calories, and 8 grams of protein. Stuffing can be made in a more nutritious way using less bread, and more vegetables like onion and celery as well as more fruit, like apples. Sweet potatoes are one of the healthier Thanksgiving dishes, they are rich in fiber, high in vitamins C and A, and low in calories. Try adding a dash of cinnamon or nutmeg for a burst of flavor instead of loading them with brown sugar or marshmallows. Cinnamon stabilizes the blood sugar levels in the body, which slows the entry of sugar and carbohydrates into the blood stream. Another calorie saving swap that can be made, is trading out green bean casserole for fresh green beans. A half cup serving can have up to 290 calories, 11 grams of fat, and 228 mg of sodium. If you decide to eat all the dishes served, make sure to have small portions. Take the time to enjoy dinner and eat slowly. Don’t linger at the dinner table after finish-

ing the meal; this will make eating more food tempting. Also, avoid arriving to dinner on an empty stomach. Eating snacks throughout the day will help decrease the likeliness of over eating during dinner. Desserts are often loaded with carbs, fat and sugar, there are many alternatives that avoid all these unnecessary calories. Gingered cranberry-pear cobbler and pomegranate-poached pears are two options that are just as tasty, an they have less calories and sugar. Take advantage of the fresh fruits that are in season during fall that can be incorporated into deserts that have natural sugars instead of artificial flavoring. If traditional desserts are the only options available, the best choice to make would be a two inch slice of apple or pumpkin pie, not pecan pie. Skipping whip cream can save another 50 calories. Another thing that can add up quickly on Thanksgiving are drinks. One serving of apple cider has about 100 calories, so limit this to one, eight ounce serving. This Thanksgiving, make sure to take the time to prepare healthy and nutritious meals that everyone can enjoy. The holiday season doesn’t have to be full of fat, sugar, and calories; it can be celebrated in a healthful way. Thanksgiving dinner is still eaten after the meal is over, leftovers can be remade into healthy, tasty dishes. Turkey sandwiches are commonly made for black Friday lunch. Instead of just piling turkey and gravy onto white bread try white meat, on whole wheat bread, topped lettuce and a little cranberry sauce. A few other healthy dishes that can be created are turkey soup, stuffing dumplings turkey and sweet potato hash, pumpkin biscottis, and turkey chili. Eating healthy can continue successfully through out the whole year.

9

Grams of fat served when whole milk is used instead of heavy cream in mashed potatoes – this also saves 168 calories

3,000 - 4,500

Amount of calories in the average Thanksgiving dinner

74

Calories saved when eating homemade cranberry sauce rather than canned sauce

105

Grams of sugar in the average Thanksgiving dinner – just 20 grams a day are recommended Numbers and statistics from Ace Fitness and Rodale News


10 | Health | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012

The truth about “Obamacare” How the law affects everyone positively and negatively By Will Khadivi News Co-Editor

One of the most notable and decisive accomplishments of President Barack Obama’s first term was healthcare reform, officially known as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act it is known to many as “Obamacare”. The actual law, passed by Congress, signed by the President, and upheld by the Supreme Court is very complex and will be fully implemented by 2014. The Hawkeye has created this guide to Obamacare’s major parts along with some pros and cons. New regulations will require all insurance companies to cover anyone regardless of a pre-existing condition. Previously, insurance companies could deny care to someone with a so-called “pre-existing condition” such as cancer. Arguably the most controversial part of the new law is the “individual mandate” which will require all

Pros

Americans not covered by a health plan, Medicaid, Medicare or another government health plan, to purchase insurance from a private insurance company or face a penalty from the Internal Revenue Service. However this penalty may be waived in cases of “financial hardship.” Over the summer, the Supreme Court took up the constitutionality of the law. In a 5-4 decision, all major parts were upheld including the individual mandate. Low income individuals and families whose combined income is 400 percent of poverty can be eligible for incentives to buy private insurance from the federal government on a sliding scale. The federal healthcare program for the poor, Medicaid, will also be expanded for those whose incomes equal up to 133

percent of poverty. So-called “healthcare exchanges” will be set up as a marketplace in each state to purchase insurance for individuals or companies. The purpose is to increase competition and reduce the cost of healthcare coverage.

Cons

• The number of bankruptcies caused by health care related issues with decrease significantly • Patients with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied by an insurance company • People are able to stay on their parents’ insurance until they are 26 years old • 32 million Americans were without healthcare, but now most people will have access to coverage

• Millions may still remain without coverage • Some view this act as violating states’ rights – some states have sued to be exempt from the law • Taxes will increase • Increased amount of coverage may result in higher insurance prices

Kyra Dahlman| Hawkeye

What’s really in your food? By Olivia Driscoll Health editor

Genetically modified foods have many benefits, but there are also many known and unknown risks. Genetic modification changes the gene, which causes characteristics of the organism to change. When plants are genetically modified, a foreign gene is inserted into the plant’s own genes. The commercial sale of genetically modified foods began in 1994 when the FDA approved the Flvr Svr delayed ripening tomato. According to Human Genome Project Information, in 2006, 252 million acres of transgenic crops were planted in 22 countries. Most of these crops were herbicide and insect resistant corn, cotton, soybeans, canola, and alfalfa. According to the Huffington Post, 70 percent of corn and 90 percent of soy is genetically modified. Crops are being field-tested that could be weather resistant. Other genetically modified food sources that are being tested are quickly maturing fish and mad cow disease resistance cows. Some advantages of genetically modified foods are pest resistance, herbicide tolerance, cold tolerance, disease resistance, quicker mature time, enhanced taste, and added nutrients. One concern about genetically modified foods is that they are considered an intellectual property. Intellectual properties are creations of the mind that have exclusive rights protected by the law. Common things that have intellectual property rights are copyrights, trademarks, patents, and industrial design rights.

This could lead to corporate control when a company is able to own crops. Plant breeders also have rights that give them exclusive control over the seeds, cutting, divisions, tissue culture and the harvested material including cut flowers, fruit and foliage, that are for a set number of years. Petition I-522, “The People’s Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act,” is an initiative to the Washington state legislature that, if passed, would establish a mandatory labeling of foods processed through genetic engineering. This petition still needs enough signatures collected to be able to appear on the next ballot. Since genetically modified food isn’t labeled, it is impossible for people to know how much they are consuming. This initiative would make it so they can be aware, and make the choice to consume it or not. However, foods that are labeled organic are not genetically modified. Many people don’t really know how much food is genetically modified. The California Department of Health and Agriculture reports that almost 80 percent of processed foods contain some ingredient that was genetically modified. Another possibility that could happen is an unintentional gene transfer and crossbreeding, since pollination can’t be controlled. An issue regarding genetically modified foods is a reduction in biodiversity, which inadvertently leads to increased allergies. There haven’t been many studies on the effects of genetically modified foods on human health because most effects are long term and are still being researched.


8 November 2012 | Hawkeye | 11 » Hawks soar in playoffs Men’s tennis, women’s swim, football, and cross country make it to postseason »P12

A&E

Jazz bands prepare for the year by hosting the annual Symposium

Story by Jannon Roque Graphics by Kyra Dahlman

the tenor sax, and one by Taylor Griffin, senior, The Mountlake Terrace High School on the piano. Jazz Bands performed at the annual “Fables of Faubus” Jazz Symposium, held at MTHS on had two solos by Saturday, Oct. 20. DelGiudice and Perry. Jazz Symposium is an annual event “I thought it was cool that MTHS hosts where schools from playing with the proaround Washington come together and fessionals because they play for clinicians and are assisted by could help lead the band professionals. and take charge,” said “The Jazz Symposium is an event we Ryan Leppich, sophomore. put on which includes a bunch of other Jazz Ensemble 2 perschools and some of the area. It’s just formed a different set, includa fun get together,” said by three year ing “Shiny Stockings” arranged Jazz Band member Lauren Krienke, by Greg Yazininski, “The Red sophomore. Door” arranged by Scott Ragsdale “It’s not a competitive thing, it’s more and “Line Drive” by Carl Strommen. for clinicians to come and talk about Thor Peterson, junior, performed a how they played,” said complicated solo for “I thought it was Kandin Neri, senior. “Shiny Stockings” cool playing with the This year, Jazz on his trumpet. professionals because Ensembles 1 and 2 “The Red Door” they could help lead performed three piecincluded an impresthe band and take es each, both directed sive Tenor Sax solo charge.” by Darin Faul. from Krienke. Ryan Leppich Jazz Ensemble 1 Peterson and Sophomore performed “Harlem Krienke each had a Airshaft” by Duke solo in “Line Drive,” Ellington, “Sweet Georgia Brown” the concluding song. arranged by Sammy Nestico, and The Jazz Symposium consisted of “Fables of Faubus” by Charles Mingus. many schools this year, among them “Harlem Airshaft” included two solos Alderwood Middle School, Eckstein by a junior trumpeter Alicia Smith and Middle School, Edmonds-Woodway junior clarinetist Levon Kalustyan. High School, Lynnwood High School, “Sweet Georgia Brown” included and Roosevelt High School. three solos, one by guest performer This year, the Terrace Jazz Bands Todd DelGiudice on the alto sax, one didn’t perform to be critiqued, rather by guest performance Rich Perry on they played with the headline group,

Hawkeye staff

HEY XIX

along with a few guests from New York. Nov. 10, 2012 the Jazz bands will be hosting the big event, “Swing Dance,” which will be free to all veterans in uniform, and $5 to all others. In upcoming weeks, the Jazz Band will be performing with Jeff Hamilton, the drummer of the jazz band and co-director of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra. Toward the end of the year, the band hopes to return to New York to perform in Essential Ellington.

It’s JAM SESSION

the 19th annual kick-off to the winter sports season

5:45 to 9 | Tues | november 20 | in the terraceum $5 w/3+ cans of food | $7 general admission featuring:

Men’s & women’s basketball scrimmages contests | Prizes | DJ tilt | cheer | hiphop brought to you by the hawkeye | SMP | Sorelli Pizza | Fitness 19 | las espuelas | A-Team

» What’s hAPPENING? Know of any arts events that are going on in the community? Email them to ae@thehawkeye.org


12 | Hawkeye | 8 November 2012 » Follow us on twitter Go on Twitter and follow us @MTHSports for game results, updates and sports news!

Hawks rewrite history

Sports

» SEND US YOUR SPORTS STORY Have a sports idea? Let us know at sports@thehawkeye.org

By Austin McDermott Sports Co-Editor

As the fall sports season came to a close, the Hawks found four of their six sports teams in postseason play. With women’s swim, football, men’s tennis, and cross country all in the playoffs, this marks one of the better seasons in school history. Football made the postseason for only the second time in school history and was unlucky enough to face fourth ranked Kennedy Catholic last Saturday. After trailing 21-9 at halftime, the Hawks outscored the Lancers 26-14 in the second half, but still All WesCo 3A Football came up short with a 1st Team final score of 35-29. Mason Stone DB Following the game, an Devante Downs RB & LB emotional Coach Tony Jevin Pahinui OL & DL Umayam said, “When 2nd Team it’s all said and done, Quintin Barnard WR we had a heck of a footBeau Kennedy QB ball team. They didn’t Jordan Brown DL quit and battled the top Brett Potter LB teams, literally the top Honorable Mention teams in the state. It’s Jazz Borromeo DL a testament to the fight Shawn Evensen WR that these guys have.” Chance Ragsdale RB Also having one of their best years in school history was cross country. After men’s cross country easily clinched the WesCo 3A championship, the Hawks finished in fourth place at districts. Jack Pearce, junior, and Ella Schroth, freshman, both qualified for state. Pearce finished 38th overall out of 144 runners with a time of 16:28.6. Schroth finished with a time of 20:03.1, for 51st out of 139. Nine competitors represented women’s swim at Marysville-Pilchuck in districts. Six seniors, Julie Felber,

Austin McDermott | Hawkeye

As Jevin Pahinui (72) looks on, the Hawks line up for their final play of the year Saturday night against Kennedy Catholic.

Sonja Head, Jessica Jamtaas, Mckenzie LeSueur, Sarah Lundquist and Riley Morgan, as well as two juniors, Sarah Willhoite and Megan Bruce, and one sophomore, Daria Jamtaas. Bruce, LeSueur, Morgan and Willhoite competed in the 200 meter freestyle relay, and finished with the fourth best overall time in districts. Morgan finished in third in the 50 meter freestyle along with a fourth place finish in the 100 meter butterfly events and will compete in the state championship for both events on Nov. 9 for the second straight year. The Hawks’ men’s tennis team was represented by two

sophomores, Collin Rhodes and Brandon Park, one junior, Bryce Pingul, and three seniors, AnhViet Nguyen, Tin Ho, and Kandin Neri in the WesCo 3A South Division Tournament. In doubles, Neri and Ho fell to the Shorecrest Scots’ Chris Sato and Nick North. Meanwhile, Nguyen and Pingul came up just short against the Glacier Peak Grizzlies’ Max Everett and Devin Remlinger. Both singles competitors Rhodes and Park fell in the first round as well. With winter just around the corner and one of the best fall seasons in recent school history, the Hawks hope to keep their hot streak alive and send more athletes into the postseason.

Cross Country runs to 3A State Championships in Pasco By Erick Yanzon

Online & Social Media Manager

A race through the open-air course covered with grass, hills, gravel and woodland all over the terrain. Some 5,000 meters with a wide range of temperatures and weather conditions stood in the way of the Cross Country team who overcame rigorous conditions. The team had a successful 2012 season with the following wins throughout the year.  The clear skies had just a hint of cold air on Saturday afternoon. Junior Jack Pearce placed 38th with a time of 16:36.8 during the WIAA State Cross Country Championship meet on Nov. 3 at Sun Willows Golf Course in Pasco. Meanwhile, freshman Ella Schroth had a 20:03.1 time

The women’s team placed finishing 51st for the wom“[We’re] looking seventh out of the 11 teams.  en’s 3A category.  pretty strong... The men’s cross country The two athletes qualified they’re all going team also took the title as the after the 3A District 1 meet to be stepping 2012 Wesco Champions durat Lakewood High School up next year and ing the Wesco 3A Conference which took place on Oct. 27. going to have a meet on Oct. 18 at Cedarcrest Pearce breathtakingly took good team.” Golf Course. 3rd place on the men’s field, Yohans Tewolde They came home finishing as Schroth finished 13th for Cross Country Senior first with an impressive score women’s. of 70 followed by Glacier Peak at 74. Pearce The men’s varsity team was a hair length finished 2nd with a time of 16:06.5, folaway from qualifying for state to place lowed by senior Yohans Tewolde at 9th fourth with a combined total of 114 points, and juniors Wyatt Allemann at 14th, Peter 16 points behind Shorewood’s 98 for third place. The other two out of the top three Kidane at 17th and 28th for Nathan Sparks. The women’s Cross Country team placed teams that qualified for state were Oak Harbor placing first with 67 points beat- sixth with a combined score of 156. Schroth ing Glacier Peak by 10 points, who placed was the team’s top runner placing 17th, followed by sophomore McKenna Hunt at second.

18th, sophomore Maddie Dellinger at 27th, freshman Marie Auch-Schwel at 32nd, and sophomore Jacinta Garcia at 52nd.  The team also won the Edmonds School District meet on Oct. 11 at Lynndale Park. Five out of the top 10 in the men’s field were Pearce placing 2nd, followed by Tewolde at 3rd, Sparks at 6th, junior Chris Baumgartner at 8th, and Kidane at 9th place. On the women’s field, Hunt finished 3rd with Schroth trailing behind for 7th, and Schwel at 10th.  The only graduating athletes are Tewolde and Steven Szilvassy.  Tewolde said, “With only Stevey and I graduating, [we’re] looking strong. Peter, Wyatt, Chris, Henry, Nathan, [are] all going to be stepping up next year and going to have a good team.”


Volume 28.3